Home‎ > ‎

Superhero Summarizing

Superhero Summarizing

Reading to Learn Lesson Plan

By Lauren Romano

Rationale: Comprehension is the ultimate goal in reading instruction because people have to comprehend information that they read in order to recall it. There are various strategies that can be used to gain meaning and knowledge from text. A very helpful strategy is summarization. Fluent readers use summarization to understand text. Children need to be taught how to eliminate the trivial information and how to pick out what is important. In this lesson, students will learn the five steps of summarization which will allow them to summarize what they are reading.

Materials:

·       Copies of the article: “Crows in the City” by Hideyo Kubota for each student. (found at http://www.highlightskids.com/audio-story/crows-city)

·       Poster with summarization rules on it

1.    Delete unimportant information

2.    Delete repeated information

3.    Substitute easy words for list items

4.    Select a topic

5.    Invent a topic sentence if there is not one already

·       Poster with the paragraph on it from “Animals: Penguins” (found at http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/emperor-penguin/)

·       “As the young penguins grow, adults leave them in groups called chicks in creches while they leave to fish. There is a reason for the timing of emperor penguins’ hatching. By December, when the Antarctic weather has warmed somewhat, the ice the penguins occupy begins to break up, bringing open waters closer to the nesting sites.”

·       Dry erase board and maker

·       Paper for each student

·       Pencil for each student

·       Highlighter for each student

·       Black marker for each student

·       Summarization checklist for each student

Did the student…

yes

no

Get rid of unimportant information

 

 

Get rid of repeated information

 

 

Super-ordinate items and events

 

 

Select a topic

 

 

Write a topic statement that covers everything that is important from the passage of the text

 

 

 

Procedures:

Introduce the lesson explaining that we are going to learn a new comprehension strategy. Say: “Today, we are going to learn a new comprehension strategy that is called summarization. It will help us understand the text we are reading better. Does anyone know what the word summarization means? Good Job! That is correct. Summarization means to take the main or the most important ideas out of a passage and put it into a sentence or a few sentences. When you summarize a passage, you understand and comprehend what you have read better.”

Review the fluency strategies with all of the students. Say: “Boys and Girls what do we do when we have trouble reading a sentence?” “Good Job! You are right we use crosschecking. We can crosscheck what we have read to make sure that the sentence still makes sense. When I read the sentence, (write this sentence on the board: The little boy ate his food) as the little boy at his food, then I could use my crosschecking skills to determine that the sentence does not make sense. I would reread my sentence correctly as the little boy ate his food.

Display the poster board with the summarization rules written on it. Say: “We can use the summarization rules written on the poster to help us comprehend and understand what we are reading.” Read the rules aloud to the students. Display the poster with the paragraph from “Animals: Penguins” written on it. Say: “I want you to read the paragraph on this poster from the article ‘Animals: Penguins’ silently to yourselves. I will give you about five minutes to read the paragraph and then I will model how to use summarization rules written on the poster board.”

Say: “Let’s look at the paragraph from ‘Animals: Penguins’ written on the board. I am going to read it to you.” “As the young penguins grow, adults leave them in groups called chicks in creches while they leave to fish. There is a reason for the timing of emperor penguins’ hatching. By December, when the Antarctic weather has warmed somewhat, the ice the penguins occupy begins to break up, bringing open waters closer to the nesting sites.” “The first rule states that we need to delete unimportant information. I am going to cross out with my black marker ‘young’ and ‘December’ as well as ‘somewhat’. I need to remember that the penguins grow and hatch when the weather warms and that the water comes close to the nesting sites. The second rule is to delete the repeated information. There is no repeated information in this passage so we can now go onto rule number three. Rule number three which substitutes easy words for list items. I am going to highlight, ‘adults leave them in groups called chicks in creches’ and ‘the ice the penguins occupy begins to break up’. The last step is to compile a topic sentence. My topic statement is, ‘The adults leave the chicks in groups while the Antarctic weather warms and open waters come closer to nesting sites.’ This is how you apply summarization rules that are displayed on the board.”

Pass out the article “Crows in the City” to each student. Say: “I have given you each a copy of ‘Crows in the City’. I want each of you to read it silently and then apply the summarization rules to summarize the passage.” Provide an article talk, “This article is about how birds make their nests. They use things in their nests that you would never think of! This article tells how two friends discovered all of the different things that birds use in their nests.” “Let’s read the article to find out more interesting facts about what birds use in their nests. Remember to use your markers to cross out the unimportant information and your highlighter to highlight the important information you want to summarize. After you have done this combine the important information into one topic sentence. After everyone has completed their summarizations, we will share them with the rest of the class.”

Assessment:

For assessment use the checklist in the materials section to evaluate each of their summarizations. Each child will be evaluated on their availability to delete the trivial and repeated information, find the important information, and create one topic and summarizing sentence. I will also ask questions pertaining to the text to the class to make sure that they comprehended and understood what they had read.

Comprehension questions:

1.    Where do the children in the article live?

2.    What are some items that crows use in their nests?

3.    When do the crows start collecting materials for their nests?

4.    What to the crows sometimes eat out of?

5.    Where do the crows build their nests?

References:

Article: http://www.highlightskids.com/audio-story/crows-city

Article: http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/emperor-penguin/

 

Comments