Entering the Conversation

This unit asks you to consider what it means to be American, as well as giving you the opportunity to consider multiple perspectives about the immigrant experience throughout the history of this nation.  At the end of the unit, you will be able to define your beliefs about America in a metacognitive sense, discover rhetorical devices and why they are used in the written and spoken word, and further develop your analytical and writing skills.  We will spend our time in this unit examining many shorter pieces while we practice with the art of rhetoric, but our longer text for this unit will be Spiegleman's Maus I.  At first glance a novel about the Holocaust and its harrowing effects, this graphic novel "bleeds" the ethos of the American through the vibrant retelling of Spiegelman's father's story.  We will also spend time working with authors like Alexie, Anzaldúa, and Tan, among others.  This is my favorite unit to teach in American Literature, and by the end of the unit, you'll understand why.

 

Comparing Perspectives I

Playground in Tenement Alley, Boston (Hine, 1909)

"The New Colossus" (Lazarus)

    About the Colossus of Rhodes

"I Hear America Singing" (Whitman)

"Let America Be America Again" (Hughes)

    About anaphora (literary device)

 

Comparing Perspectives II

"In Response to Executive Order 9066" (Okita)

"Immigrants" (Mora)

 

"The Joys of Reading and Writing:  Superman and Me" (Alexie)

"How to Tame a Wild Tongue" (Anzaldúa)

"Mother Tongue" (Tan)

"The Fourth of July" (Lorde)

"Two Kinds" (Tan)

"Southern History" (Trethewey)

Persuasive Techniques and Rhetorical Devices

Rhetorical Analysis with SOAPS

Suggested Unit Study Guide

 

Maus I

Maus I Chapter Questions

"NPR Intersections:  Of Maus and Spiegelman"

     "NPR Intersections:  Of Maus and Spiegelman" (Recording)

    Comedian Harmonists Image

    1954 Mad Cover

Maus I Discussion Questions

Maus I Seminar Questions

 

‎"And now I write books for teenagers because I vividly remember what it felt like to be a teen facing everyday and epic dangers. I don't write to protect them. It's far too late for that. I write to give them weapons--in the form of words and ideas--that will help them fight their monsters. I write in blood because I remember what it felt like to bleed." -Sherman AlexieThis unit asks you to consider what it means to be American, as well as giving you the opportunity to consider multiple perspectives about the immigrant experience throughout the history of this nation.  At the end of the unit, you will be able to define your beliefs about America in a metacognitive sense, discover rhetorical devices and why they are used in the written and spoken word, and further develop your analytical and writing skills.  We will spend our time in this unit examining many shorter pieces while we practice with the art of rhetoric, but our longer text for this unit will be Spiegleman's Maus I.  At first glance a novel about the Holocaust and its harrowing effects, this graphic novel "bleeds" the ethos of the American through the vibrant retelling of Spiegelman's father's story.  We will also spend time working with authors like Alexie, Anzaldúa, and Tan, among others.  This is my favorite unit to teach in American Literature, and by the end of the unit, you'll understand why.

 

Comparing Perspectives I

Playground in Tenement Alley, Boston (Hine, 1909)

"The New Colossus" (Lazarus)

    About the Colossus of Rhodes

"I Hear America Singing" (Whitman)

"Let America Be America Again" (Hughes)

    About anaphora (literary device)

 

Comparing Perspectives II

"In Response to Executive Order 9066" (Okita)

"Immigrants" (Mora)

 

"The Joys of Reading and Writing:  Superman and Me" (Alexie)

"How to Tame a Wild Tongue" (Anzaldúa)

"Mother Tongue" (Tan)

"The Fourth of July" (Lorde)

"Two Kinds" (Tan)

"Southern History" (Trethewey)

Persuasive Techniques and Rhetorical Devices

Rhetorical Analysis with SOAPS

Suggested Unit Study Guide

 

Maus I

Maus I Chapter Questions

"NPR Intersections:  Of Maus and Spiegelman"

     "NPR Intersections:  Of Maus and Spiegelman" (Recording)

    Comedian Harmonists Image

    1954 Mad Cover

Maus I Discussion Questions

Maus I Seminar Questions

 

‎"And now I write books for teenagers because I vividly remember what it felt like to be a teen facing everyday and epic dangers. I don't write to protect them. It's far too late for that. I write to give them weapons--in the form of words and ideas--that will help them fight their monsters. I write in blood because I remember what it felt like to bleed." -Sherman AlexieThis unit asks you to consider what it means to be American, as well as giving you the opportunity to consider multiple perspectives about the immigrant experience throughout the history of this nation.  At the end of the unit, you will be able to define your beliefs about America in a metacognitive sense, discover rhetorical devices and why they are used in the written and spoken word, and further develop your analytical and writing skills.  We will spend our time in this unit examining many shorter pieces while we practice with the art of rhetoric, but our longer text for this unit will be Spiegleman's Maus I.  At first glance a novel about the Holocaust and its harrowing effects, this graphic novel "bleeds" the ethos of the American through the vibrant retelling of Spiegelman's father's story.  We will also spend time working with authors like Alexie, Anzaldúa, and Tan, among others.  This is my favorite unit to teach in American Literature, and by the end of the unit, you'll understand why.

 

Comparing Perspectives I

Playground in Tenement Alley, Boston (Hine, 1909)

"The New Colossus" (Lazarus)

    About the Colossus of Rhodes

"I Hear America Singing" (Whitman)

"Let America Be America Again" (Hughes)

    About anaphora (literary device)

 

Comparing Perspectives II

"In Response to Executive Order 9066" (Okita)

"Immigrants" (Mora)

 

"The Joys of Reading and Writing:  Superman and Me" (Alexie)

"How to Tame a Wild Tongue" (Anzaldúa)

"Mother Tongue" (Tan)

"The Fourth of July" (Lorde)

"Two Kinds" (Tan)

"Southern History" (Trethewey)

Persuasive Techniques and Rhetorical Devices

Rhetorical Analysis with SOAPS

Suggested Unit Study Guide

 

Maus I

Maus I Chapter Questions

"NPR Intersections:  Of Maus and Spiegelman"

     "NPR Intersections:  Of Maus and Spiegelman" (Recording)

    Comedian Harmonists Image

    1954 Mad Cover

Maus I Discussion Questions

Maus I Seminar Questions

 

‎"And now I write books for teenagers because I vividly remember what it felt like to be a teen facing everyday and epic dangers. I don't write to protect them. It's far too late for that. I write to give them weapons--in the form of words and ideas--that will help them fight their monsters. I write in blood because I remember what it felt like to bleed." -Sherman Alexie

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