Beginning Reading Design

The ‘Ahhhhhhh’-ha Moment


I.                 Rationale

This lesson is designed to teach the short vowel correspondence o=/o/.  To be successful readers children must learn essential phonemes such as these so that they can recognize, read, and spell words.  This specific lesson focuses on recognizing, reading, and spelling o=/o/.  They will learn a memorable motion to help them understand and recognize this correspondence.  The motion will be holding up their handing and pointing their finger, representing an “aha” moment, meaning that moment when something they have been pondering finally clicks.  There will be a letterbox lesson that will help children to learn how to read and spell these words and read a decodable book focusing on the correspondence.

II.               Materials

·       SmartBoard with access to the “Write On Phonics” app

·       Image of light bulb (to represent the “aha” moment) 

·       Cards with words containing the o=/o/ correspondence and some without it (ball, fog, wet, lock, big, stop)

·       Cover up critter

·       Tongue tickler sheet

·       Copy of decodable text In the Big Top

·       Assessment worksheet including words from the letter box lesson

III.              Procedure

1.     Say:  So far we have learned about /a/, /e/, and /i/.  Who can tell me what /a/ says? (Students will respond “aaaaaa”).  Very good!  Now who can tell me what /e/ says? (Students will respond “ehhhhh”).  Excellent.  Who can tell me what /i/ says? (Students will respond “iiiiiiiiiii”).  Great job class!  Today we are going to learn a new sound.  We are going to learn short o.

2.     Say:  Have you ever understood something that was really confusing and said “Aha!”?  I know I have.  Who can tell me what shape our mouths make when we say that word?  Let’s stretch it out and see:  “Aaaaaaaaaaaahhhaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.”  Our mouths make an /o/ shape when we say that sound.  I want to see everyone make their best /o/ shape with their mouth!

3.     Say:  Now I’m going to say a word and you tell me if you hear the /o/ sound in it.  Do you hear it in ‘hot’?  (Wait for student response).  Very good, yes, there is a short /o/ in hot.  Let’s try another one.  Do you hear short /o/ in ‘hope’?  (Wait for student response).  That’s right, our mouths did not open up for that “aha” moment, so it is not a short /o/.  I’m going to hold up some cards with words on them that might have the /o/ sound and read them to you.  Hold up your finger in an “aha” moment when you hear the short /o/ sound (demonstrate the motion)!  Ball, fog, wet, lock, big, stop.

4.     Say:  Now I’m going to read a tongue twister.  Hold up your finger in that “aha” moment when you hear the short ‘o’ sound.  The octopus and Oliver went to the opera in October.  Now let’s all read it together.  The octopus and Oliver went to the opera in October.  I’m going to write it on the board and let’s mark which parts of the tongue twister make the ‘o’ sound.  The aaaaaaahctopus and aaaaahliver went to the aaaaaahpera in aaaaaahctober.  Raise your hand and tell me if you hand any “aha” moments (Wait for student response and then mark the correct responses on the board).  Now let’s practice the tongue twister together a few more times, pointing our fingers when we have “aha” moments and really stretching out our ‘o’ sound.  The aaaaaaahctopus and aaaaahliver went to the aaaaaahpera in aaaaaahctober (repeat two or three times).

5.     Say:  Let’s look at the cards we used earlier to see if we can learn something about their spelling.  What if I want to spell the word ‘fog’? “The fog made it hard for me to see.”  To spell ‘fog,’ I need to know how many phonemes, or sounds, it has, so I need to stretch it out and count what I hear: /f/o/g/.  How many sounds did you hear?  (Students will respond ‘3’).  Good, that’s what I heard, too.  That means we need to use three boxes (draw the boxes on the board using the Write On phonics app).  I heard that /o/ in the middle, right before /g/, so I’m going to go ahead and put it in the middle box.  Which letter do I need to use for the /f/ sound in ‘fog’?  (Students will respond ‘f’).  Yes, we need to use an ‘f,’ and we heard it at the beginning of the word, so we will put that in the first box.  Which letter do I need to use for that last sound, /g/?  (Students will respond ‘g’).  Exactly right, we need a ‘g,’ and there’s only one box left, so this one goes in that last box. 

6.     Say:  Now I’m going to have you spell words in the letter boxes using the iPad!  Everyone should only be using the Write On Phonics app.  Draw your letter boxes first, using four boxes.  I’m going to read you the word and you put the correct sounds in each part of the letter box.  I’ll be walking around checking your boxes as we do this.  Be sure you are listening for the /o/.  Our first word is /l/o/ck/ (give students time to get the letters and divide the phonemes into the letter boxes).  Eyes to the front!  We are going to check your work (Divide ‘lock’ into the correct letter boxes).  Everyone’s box should look like mine because we know that /l/o/ck/ has three phonemes, /l/, /o/, and /ck/.  /L/ goes in the first box, so I put an ‘l’ there.  I heard the /o/ sound in the middle, so our short ‘o’ goes there.  Lastly we heard /ck/, so that whole sound goes in the last box as ‘ck.’  Here’s another one that you can try:  /s/t/o/p/ (give students time to get the letters and divide the phonemes into the letter boxes).  Eyes to the front!  Let’s check this one (divide ‘stop’ into the correct letter boxes).  Which phoneme goes in the first box?  (Wait for student response).  That’s right, we hear /s/ first, so ‘s’ goes in the first box.  Which phoneme do you hear next?  That’s right, we hear /t/, s ‘t’ goes in the next box.  Everyone should know which “aha” sound we hear next!  That’s right, the /o/ goes in the next box, so we write an ‘o’.  And who can tell me what the last phoneme we hear is?  Good job, /p/ is the last sound in ‘stop,’ so ‘p’ goes in our last box. 

7.     Say:  Now we are going to read a book that uses the /o/ sound and look for it in all the words we read.  This book is called In the Big Top, and it is about a family that grabs a lot of strange items and hops into a tiny little car.  What could they possibly be doing?  Let’s read and find out. 

IV.             Assessment

The teacher will assess while students are completing letter boxes on the iPads at their desk.  The students will also complete a worksheet at the conclusion of the lesson identifying words from the letter box lesson with the /o/ sound. 

V.               References

http://www.auburn.edu/~haw0003/wilsonbr.htm

http://www.auburn.edu/~cng0007/gainesbr.htm

Light Bulb Imageà https://www.google.com/search?q=light+bulb+cartoon+image

Phonics Readers-Short Vowels-Short O- In the Big Top 

Subpages (1): Emergent Literacy Design
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