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Forensics

The Eagleview Forensics Team is an interscholastic competitive speech team. Students in grades 6, 7, and 8 compete with other schools in a variety of events, all of which help students to hone their public speaking skills, creative story-telling skills, acting skills, and literary interpretation skills. (Continue scrolling down to read about the events)


Students who wish to join must submit the Commitment Form below and pay the one-time team dues of $30 (the money is used as entrance fees at competitions, hosting budgets, and team t-shirts) by November 1st, 2018. This fee is required but does not guarantee a spot at each tournament; registrations for tournaments depend on whether or not acts are performance ready


EMS Forensics is fun, challenging, and always produces great memories! Practices for the 2018-2019 season will be on Thursdays, from 3:30-4:30 PM in room 108 beginning September 27th and running through the end of February.


Coach: Julie Harris (7th LA Maroon and 7th AVID)
Assistant Coach: Jeanine Prescott (8th SS Maroon)


All competitions are on Saturdays from roughly 7 AM to 5 PM. Students who do not advance to the finals may leave after results are posted. The 2018-2019 Forensics Tournament Calendar is below:


December 8th @ Woodland Park Middle School
(January 25th will be the tentative date for our team retreat @ EMS)
January 26th @ Eagleivew Middle School
February 9th @ Lewis Palmer Middle School
February 23rd @ Timberview Middle School


2016-2017 Forensics Commitment Form


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Below are descriptions of the events offered at the middle school level. There are two patterns: A and B, and students may participate in both patterns. Students may not participate in more than one event per pattern, per meet. Students who compete go through up to three rounds of judging: two preliminaries and one final. Students are then ranked first through sixth place, and are awarded based on their placement.


Pattern Events and Event Descriptions


Pattern A - -

Interpretation of Drama

Interpretation of Humor

Duet Acting- Serious

Original Oratory

Storytelling

Impromptu Speaking


Pattern B - -

Extemporaneous Speaking

Solo Acting

Interpretation of Poetry

Reader’s Theater

Duet Acting- Humorous

Creative Storytelling


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Interpretation of Drama (A)


Dramatic interpretation is the re-creation and sharing of dramatic, serious literature with an audience. The function of the interpreter is to act as the middleman between the author who created the literature and the audience. Selection of material must be made from a printed, published source with literary merit. Evaluation is based upon the student’s ability to reveal insight into the mood and implications of the selection, projection of the dramatic qualities, and success in creating a unified scene or story.


Performances should be no more than 10 minutes.

Vocal, facial and bodily expressions are good as long as they do not detract from the meaning of the material.

Most judges prefer NO movement of feet unless such movement is meaningful to the interpretation. Only a pivot foot is permitted.

Performer MUST use a script


Interpretation of Humor (A)


Humorous interpretation is the re-creation and sharing of humorous literature with an audience. The function of the interpreter is to act as the middleman between the author who created the literature and the audience. Selection of material must be made from a printed, published source with literary merit. Evaluation is based upon the student’s ability to reveal insight into the mood and implications of the selection, projection of the dramatic qualities, and success in creating a unified scene or story.

Performances should be no more than 10 minutes.

Vocal, facial and bodily expressions are good as long as they do not detract from the meaning of the material.

Most judges prefer NO movement of feet unless such movement is meaningful to the interpretation. Only a pivot foot is permitted.

Performer MUST use a script


Interpretation of Poetry (B)


Poetic interpretation is the re-creation and sharing of poetry with an audience. The function of the interpreter is to act as the middleman between the poet and the audience. Selection of material must be made from a printed, published source with literary merit. Evaluation is based upon the student’s ability to reveal insight into the mood and implications of the selection, projection of the dramatic qualities, and success in creating a unified scene or story.


The performer should read the poetry in a lively and creative manner. The performer should re-create the emotion behind the poetry. Selections may be one long poem or several shorter selections by one poet, or a group of poems concerning a central theme. All selections must be identified as to the poet and the title. Transitions between different poems must be made clear.


Performances should be no more than 10 minutes.

Vocal, facial and bodily expressions are good as long as they do not detract from the meaning of the material.

Most judges prefer NO movement of feet unless such movement is meaningful to the interpretation. Only a pivot foot is permitted.

Performer MUST use a script.

Do NOT overpower the meaning of the poetry by over-stressing rhyme and rhythm; just read it naturally.


Duet Acting Humorous (B) and Dramatic (A)


Two performers act out a scene from a piece of literature, either a comedy or a drama. The piece must contain two and only two characters. Each actor must remain the same character throughout the entire presentation. Each person speaks only one part. The presentation is done like a fully developed play. Emphasis should be placed on the interaction between the two characters.


Performances should be no more than 10 minutes.

Movement in stage area is required.

No props, music, or costumes may be used, but two chairs are provided for use.

Actors may NOT use scripts; it MUST be memorized.


Solo Acting (B)


One performer acts out a scene from a piece of literature. The performer acts as ONLY ONE character and remains the same, single character throughout the presentation.


Performances should be no more than 10 minutes.

The actor may NOT use a script.

Movement in the stage area is good.

One person plays the role of ONE character but acts as if other characters are present.

No props, costumes, or music are allowed.


Storytelling (A)


One person tells a story. Selections may be short stories or excerpts from literature that have been appropriately cut. Humorous and lively stories work best. Costumes and props MAY be used.

The performer may NOT use a script. Scripts can be from a published source, such as short stories or excerpts from novels, but students may also write their own. The storytelling is judged for the inclusion of story elements and complete plots.

Movement is the stage area is good, and the performers may interact with judges and audience members.

Props O.K., but reliance on them shows weakness to many judges.

The performer may be different characters but should use different voices for different characters.

Performances should last no longer than 10 minutes.


Reader’s Theater (B)


A group of three or four performers read an excerpt from a piece of literature or a short play. They add enough facial and bodily expressions to make the piece come alive.


Performances should last no longer than 10 minutes.

Participants must remain seated the entire performance.

All participants must have their own script and must reference it at least once.

Vocal, facial and bodily expressions are good as long as they do not detract from the meaning of the material.

Performers are NOT allowed to touch or look at one another during the performance; all acting must be done toward the audience.


Original Oratory (A)


An oration is a speech, not an essay. It may deal with a current problem and propose a solution; however, this is not the only acceptable form of oratory. The oration may simply alert the audience to a threatening danger, strengthen their devotion to an accepted cause, or eulogize a person. The subject should be of political, economic, social, or philosophic significance and should be limited to a specific thesis. Oratories are usually, but not always persuasive in nature. The orator may employ any suitable pattern of organization, which will provide a clear, logical development of the thesis. The oration should be the result of research, analysis, evaluation, and personal conviction. No more than 150 words may be a direct quotation from any other speech or writing, and such quotation shall be identified in an in-text citation. Any non-factual or personal reference must be so identified.


Speeches should last no longer than 10 minutes.

The speech must be imaginative and original.

There must be a clear introduction and conclusion.

The speaker may use a script but is not required to do so.

The speaker may move around the performance area but is not expected to.


Extemporaneous Speaking (B)


The performer will deliver a speech on a topic relating to international or national current events. Thirty (30) minutes before the scheduled round, the student will be given three topic cards and will choose one. S/he will be allowed to prepare a speech in a designated preparation room. Only published reference materials are allowed in the prep room. The use of electronic files is allowed, but access to the internet is not. Books, magazines, clippings, and basic bibliographies are allowed. Annotated bibliographies, prepared notes, outlines, and speeches are NOT allowed. Judgment is based on clear thinking, good speaking, and the use of interesting material. The speaker must stick to the assigned topic and may not digress from it. Information must be logically organized, and supporting material must be documented with sources cited. Several sources should be referred to, as opposed to the memorization of a single magazine article.


Speaker speaks a maximum of 7 minutes.

ONE note card may be used (3×5, 4×6, 5×7). No other reference materials are allowed during the speech

The speaker must give the topic card to the judge before beginning.


Impromptu Speaking (A)


Impromptu is a speech on one of three topics after preparing for a short time. Contestants may use notes during preparation time and during the speech (maximum size is a 5″x7″ note card). Speakers are judged on their introduction to the topic, the body of the speech, conclusion of the speech, the overall impression of the speech, and delivery. Whereas Extemporaneous Speaking addresses a question, Impromptu allows more freedom for the speaker; speakers are given a topic and asked to develop their own thesis in relation to that topic. Impromptu is not an acting category–speakers should talk, not act. Because this category is not acting or research-related, speakers have five(5) minutes to read the topics, think about them, develop a thesis/point of view, and then five (5) minutes to speak.


ONE note card may be used (3×5, 4×6, 5×7). No other reference materials are allowed during the speech.


Creative Storytelling (B)


Students who participate in creative storytelling are given thirty (30) minutes to write and then retell their story. The story they write will reflect an idea that they randomly select (one character, one setting, one conflict/situation). Students are encouraged to speak to the audience, breaking the fourth wall and telling the story to the audience, rather than performing it for them. Students should remember that their writing should reflect not only the prompt, but also the literary elements: characterization, conflict, plot, setting, point of view, and theme.


Students are allowed to read their story (no memorization required) from a piece of paper or note cards. In order to qualify for the finals, students MUST meet the time requirement** of a minimum of three (3) minutes, and no more than seven (7).

ONE note card may be used (3×5, 4×6, 5×7). No other reference materials are allowed during the speech.