First Grade Essential Outcomes


Swift Creek Elementary School

A North Carolina School of Excellence & a Professional Learning Community (PLC)

Wake County Public School System

Raleigh, NC

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The staff at Swift Creek Elementary School utilizes the educational philosophy of Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) to meet the needs of all students.  PLCs value six common traits:

  1. Shared Mission, Vision, and Values;
  2. Collaborative teams focused on learning;
  3. Collective inquiry into research based best practices and current practices;
  4. Action Orientation/Experimentation by teachers and teams;
  5. Commitment to continuous improvement; and
  6. Results orientation. 

Furthermore, PLCs revolve around the constant discussion, collaboration, and reflection upon four critical questions.  The four questions are vital in meeting the needs of all students at Swift Creek. 

  1. What is it we expect children to learn?  Answer: Essential Learning Outcome
  1. How do we know when the children have learned them?  Answer: Constant formative assessments and data analysis
  2. What do we do when the children do not learn the essential learning outcomes?  Answer:  Real-time remediation
  3. What do we do when the children already know the essential learning outcomes? Answer:   Curriculum Compacting and real-time enrichment activities


1st Quarter

Reading

  • Reads at least 25 sight words in text or on a list
  • Uses strategies like beginning sound and simple rimes to decode while reading
  • Uses schema and prior knowledge to make connections to new text
  • Familiar with a variety of texts (poetry, storybooks, etc.)

Writing

  • Uses basic capitalization with first word in a sentence
  • Uses a period to end a telling sentence
  • Writes about a familiar topic
  • Writes short, patterned, repetitive sentences

Math

  • Uses grouping of 2's, 5's and 10's with models and pictures to count collections of objects
  • Develop fluency with single digit addition and corresponding differences
  • Read and write numbers 0-99
  • Create, model, and solve story problems that use addition, subtraction and fair shares

 

Social Studies

2nd Quarter

Reading

  • Reads at least 50 sight words in text or on a list
  • Creates and states a series of rhyming words that may include consonant blends (tag, flag)
  • Retells characters and setting from a story
  • Uses the following strategies to fix mistakes while reading text: look at the pictures - meaning cues; say the right sounds for the letters and chunks - visual cues; does it sound right - structure cues

Writing

  • Uses word families and word chunks to spell and write
  • Relates sentences to a topic
  • Uses specific words to name and tell action in written language
  • Uses complete sentences

Math

  • Develop fluency with single digit addition and corresponding differences
  • Create, model, and solve story problems
  • Identify, build, draw and name parallelograms, squares, trapezoids and hexagons
  • Applications of time: clock and calendar

Social Studies

3rd Quarter

Reading

  • Read at least 75 sight words in text or on a list
  • Use strategies to fix your mistakes while you are reading
  • Retell text by making story maps, venn diagrams and T-charts
  • Discuss responses to text by having conversations about connections, questions and predictions and inferences.

Writing

  • Uses words that describe and name characters and setting and words that tell actions and events
  • Spells many high frequency words (word wall words) correctly in own writing
  • Uses question mark to end an asking sentence

Math

  • Create, model, and solve story problems
  • Connect model, number word and number of objects in a set: Incredible Equations
  • Tell time to the hour and half-hour
  • Tell time over a period of time, hours, days, and weeks later
  • Identify name and value of penny, nickel, dime and quarter

Social Studies

4th Quarter

Reading

  • Read at least 100 sight words in text or on a list
  • Read and comprehend fiction and non-fiction text: by using prior knowledge to activate schema; summarize the text in 2-3 sentences; create graphic organizers to express comprehension; and ask questions before during and after reading.
  • Self-monitor comprehension by using strategies: summarizing and/or retelling.
  • Increase vocabulary, concepts, and reading stamina by reading self-selected text independently for at least 15 minutes daily

Writing

  • Spells many high frequency words correctly
  • Applies phonics to write independently using temporary and/or conventional spelling that can be generally read by others
  • Uses details in writing
  • Handwriting is legible

Math

  • Develop fluency with single-digit addition and corresponding differences.
  • Create, model, and solve story problems that use addition, subtractions and fair shares
  • Connect, model, number word and number of objects in a set
  • Build understanding of place value: ones and tens

Social Studies

Science

Pebbles, Sand and Silt

  • Rocks have a variety of properties including color, hardness, shape.
  • Rocks can be categorized by size.
  • The physical properties of earth materials make them useful in different ways.
  • Soil is a mixture of earth materials

Balance and Motion

  • Objects can be balanced in many ways.
  • Objects and systems that turn on a central axis exhibit rotational motion.
  • Axles support wheels.  Wheel-and-axle systems move in many different ways.

Solids and Liquids

  • Some properties of solids and liquids can be identified by careful observation with the senses alone.
  • Some properties of solids and liquids can be identified only by testing.
  • Liquids have unique properties that may be identified by the senses and testing.
  • Solids and liquids have both similiarities and differences.

Organisms: Plants and Animals

  • Plants and animals are two kinds of organisms.
  • The starting point in the life cycle of a plant is a seed.
  • Models can be used to observe interactions between plants and animals in thier natural environments.
  • Animals and plants have specific characteristics that can be compared and contrasted.