Place Values After Million

     If you asked a friend or relative what place value comes after a million, what would their answer be? Many would likely be able to answer a billion and some would get a trillion, but it is very unlikely that they would get anything beyond a trillion. The reason these numbers are not common knowledge is because they are not typically used outside of science. We sometimes use "billions" to descibe the accumulated wealth of the richest men in the world (Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, etc.) and  we can use "trillions" to express the United States national debt ($14 trillion as of 2011). However, it is less often that we hear that the Orion Nebula is approximately 7 quadrillion miles away.
Here are some place values greater than a million:
  • Million: 1,000,000
  • Billion: 1,000,000,000
  • Trillion: 1,000,000,000,000
  • Quadrillion: 1,000,000,000,000,000
  • Quintillion: 1,000,000,000,000,000,000
  • Nonillion: 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000
  • Decillion: 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000
  • Googol: 1 followed by 100 zeros
  • Centillion: 1 followed by 303 zeros
  • Googolplex: 1 followed by a googol zero  s
 
How are these numbers formed?
 
     To answer this question, we need to look at the roots of each place value: the mil in million represents one, the bi in billion equals two, the tri in trillion equals three, and so on. These numbers stand for the "n" in the equation 103n+3.  This is a general equation which represents place value written in exponential notation. Here's an example:
 
Million                MIL                  n = 1                    103n+3  =  103n+3  =  103n+3  =  1,000,000
 
Billion                 BIL                    n = 2                   103n+3  =  103n+3  = 103n+3  =  1,000,000,000
 
Trillion                TRI                    n = 3                   103n+3  =  103n+3  =  103n+3  =  1,000,000,000,000
 
etc...
 
 
What is the biggest number?
 
     The largest named number I could find is googolplex. This number was coined by Edward Kastner in 1938. His nine year old nephew  coined the term googol to represent 10100, which he believed to be the largest number in the universe. Kastner then created googolplex to show him that there is no largest number because any number can be made larger by performing operations to it. It is this concept that mathematicians are refering to when we use the term infinity.
 
 
How long would it take to count to a million? A billion?
 
     If each count was one second long, it woud take 12 days to count to a million and 32 years to count to a billion. In fact, if you started counting when the universe was first formed you would only be at approximately 433,917,000,000,000,000 or about 434 quadrillion.
 
 
References
Fact Monster/Information Please® Database, © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc.
 
2001 by Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
 
 
There are more place values listed below:
 

Place Value

Number of Zeroes

Exponential Notation

Thousand

3

103

Million

6

106

Billion

9

109

Trillion

12

1012

Quadrillion

15

1015

Quintillion

18

1018

Hextillion

21

1021

Septillion

24

1024

Octillion

27

1027

Nonillion

30

1030

Decillion

33

1033

Undecillion

36

1036

Duodecillion

39

1039

Tredecillion

42

1042

Quattuordecillion

45

1045

Quindecillion

48

1048

Hexdecillion

51

1051

Septendecillion

54

1054

Octodecillion

57

1057

Novemdecillion

60

1060

Vigintillion

63

1063

Unvigintillion

66

1066

Duovigintillion

69

1069

Trevigintillion  

72

1072

Quattourvigintillion

75

1075

Quinvigintillion

78

1078

Hexvigintillion

81

1081

Septenvigintillion

84

1084

Octovigintillion

87

1087

Novemvigintillion

90

1090

Trigintillion

93

1093

Untrigintillion

96

1096

Duotrigintillion

99

1099

Googol

100

10100

Googolplex

10100

10(10100)

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