U.S. Histor 1877 - Present
 2008 / 2009 School Year

U.S. History provides a student with a historical, sociological and citizenship's  perspective of the United States and it’s people over time.  Geography will be incorporated in the learning process as we examine the American heritage.  The objective is to provide the students with the information, knowledge and practices that will allow them to gain a solid foundation that includes a historical understanding of the United States and a practical perspective of the principles of our Constitution.

 

 

 



                                


VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL WASHINGTON D.C.


ANNOUNCEMENTS &  

INFORMATION

Welcome ... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Betsy Ross U.S. Flag


State of Michigan Flag

 

 

 THE FIRST AMERICANS

 

 INDUSTRIAL AGE

 

 

 

 



 U.S. History Syllabus
1st, 4th & 5th  Hours / Room 98
Genesee High School


Topics Covered:  (2008 / 2009 School year - subject to change)

Contact Information:  

    School Phone:     810-591-1450
    Web Page:           http://mrdbest.googlepages.com/home
    Email:          dbest@geneseeschools.org

Textbook Information:

“The Americans’ Danzer, Klor De Alva, Krieger, Wilson, Woloch (2002).  McDougal Littell, Houghton Mifflin Company, Evanston IL

Required Items:
    
    Pencil
    Paper
    Textbook
    Computer Authorization & Password
    Promptness / Daily Attendance / Prepared to work
    Following the classroom policies and procedures

Course Objective:

U.S. History provides a student with a historical, sociological and citizenship  perspective of the United States and it’s people over time.  Geography will be incorporated in the learning process as examine the American heritage.  The objective is to provide the students with the information, knowledge and practices that will allow them to gain a solid foundation that includes a historical understanding of the United States and a practical perspective of the principles of our Constitution.

Topics Covered:  (First Semester 2007/2008 School year)

First 6 weeks:    Chapters 1 – 12 (REVIEW FROM 8TH GRADE)
    Time Periods:    1763 – 1877
Colonial Period, Revolution, Growth, Civil War, Reconstruction. 

 

Second 6 weeks:    Chapters 13 – 17
    Time Periods:    1877 – 1914
Industrial Revolution & Culture, Immigration, Progressive Era, Imperialism



Third 6 weeks:    Chapters 18 – 21
    Time Periods:    1914 – 1929
WWI, Roaring Twenties, Lead up to the Great Depression (Before and After)    

        
January ?        SEMESTER EXAMS


Fourth 6 weeks:    Chapters 22 – 24
Time Periods:    1929 – 1940
The Great Depression Begins, The New Deal, World War Looms
 

Fifth 6 weeks:    Chapters 25 – 28
    Time Periods:    1941 – 1960
The United States in World War II, Cold War Conflicts, The Postwar Boom
 

Sixth 6 weeks:    Chapters 28 – 34
    Time Periods:    1960 – 1996 / Present
The New Frontier and the Great Society, Civil Rights, The Vietnam War Years, An Era of Social Change, An Age of Limits, The Conservative Tide, The United States in Today’s World 


** NOTE:  ON MANY OCCASIONS WHEN CLASS BEGINS THERE WILL BE A 'WARM UP' QUESTION ... THIS MAY PERTAIN TO CURRENT EVENTS, PREVIOUS LEARNING, KNOWLEDGE OF UPCOMING MATERIAL, OR OTHER TOPICAL ISSUES ... YOU WILL HAVE APPROXIMATELY 2 TO 4 MINUTES TO GIVE A WRITTEN RESPONSE ... KEEP THESE UNTIL I COLLECT THEM.  

THANKS  : )

 

Class Policies:


  • Attendance and promptness is necessary to be successful. 
  • Positive class participation is encouraged.
  • Homework is due the following day unless otherwise noted – lose 20% per day that it is late. ( key is to stay on top of the h/w !)
  • Approximately 45% of the grade will be based on quizzes and tests.
  • Approximately 45% of the grade will be based homework, in class work, group activities.
  • Approximately 10% of the grade will come from Warm-Ups and other activities
  • Homework will be due at the beginning of the hour – a tray / slot is provided for you place your homework/paper - thanks.  

 

Class Guidelines:

 

  • Please Be Prepared to work when the bell rings - duh!
  • Students speak by raising their hand and being called on by the teacher - prevents chaos
  • Water Only with cap - prevents messes / smells
  • No Food - same thing prevents messes / smells / bugs
  • R*E*S*P*E*C*T for others and yourself - just common sense



Grading Policy / Scale:



  • Approximately 45 % of your grade will come from 3 tests each marking period (about 1 every two weeks).
  • Approximately 45 % will come from homework.  (about 15 points per week). 
  • Approximately 10 % will come from Warm-Ups and other activities
  • Participation and conduct may have either a positive or negative affect on the final grade.



        94 - 100 %   A                                      90 – 93%    A-

        87 – 89%      B+        84 – 86%    B         80 – 83%    B-

        77 – 79%      C+        74 – 76%    C        70 – 73%    C-

        67 – 69%      D+        64 – 66%    D        55 – 63%    D-

        0 – 54 %       E

 Note:  Time frames for each topic covered may vary due to special events, snow days, or other unforeseen factors.

 

Together we can make this a successful and fun year … keeping in mind the reasons that we are here; to learn and grow as people. 


SOME SECRETS TO SUCCESS IN CLASS
BESIDES … DOING YOUR HOMEWORK, READING & STUDYING

  1. Get enough sleep and eat a nutritious breakfast.  

IT’S PROVEN TO WORK.

   

  2. Set up an healthy study, work, and sleep schedule 

Without relying on adults to do it for you.  TWO MORE YEARS AND YOUR IN THE REAL WORLD FOLKS.

   

  3. Always be polite.  

JUST A MATTER OF RESPECT; FOR OTHERS AND YOURSELF.

   

  4. When the teacher is speaking to the class, listen attentively without side conversations. 

Keep a paper on your desk to jot down questions so you will remember them at the appropriate time.  IT WILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE …

   

  5. In whole class and team discussions:
    

         1. Think before speaking.
         2. Attack ideas, not people.
         3. Direct your comments to the entire group.
         4. Look at and listen to the recognized speaker. 
         5. Avoid side conversations – it ultimately becomes rude.

   6. Use the SLANT teacher pleasing behaviors in all classes. It works!

            S Sit up straight.
            L Lean forward.
            A Act interested.
            N Nod and smile occasionally
            T Track the teacher.

Want to Talk about it?
 

If at any time you feel you need to speak with me about something  please request an individual conference for before school, after school or at lunch.


CORE DEMOCRATIC VALUES

ESSENTIAL INFORMATION FOR THE 

MME/ACT TESTING


This section is divided into two parts, the Fundamental Beliefs and the Constitutional Principals. Core democratic values are the basic beliefs that unite all Americans. These values are found in the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and other important documents of our nation.

Fundamental Beliefs


Life:  
   A person's right to life can't be violated except if your life or the lives of others is threatened. An individual has the right to life, except in extreme cases, such as when a person is killed when threatening the life of someone else.

Liberty:
    This includes personal freedom, political freedom, and economic freedom. This is the freedom for people to gather in groups. They have their own beliefs, ideas and opinions. People also have the right to express their opinions in public. A person has the freedom to act, to think and to believe as he/she wants without the government interfering.  This includes the freedom to believe what you want, freedom to choose your own friends, and to have your own ideas and opinions, to express your ideas in public, the right for people to meet in groups, the right to have any lawful job or business.

* Personal Freedom - the right to think and act without government
  control.

* Political Freedom - the right to participate in the political process. 

* Economic Freedom - the right to buy, sell and trade private            property and the right to employment without the government interfering.

The Pursuit of Happiness:
    As long as you don't interfere with others you have the right to seek happiness in your own way. A person has the right to find happiness in his/her own way as long as he/she does not step on the rights of others.


Common Good:
    Working together for the welfare of the community or the benefit of all. Citizens should work together for the good of all.  The government should make laws that are good for everyone.

Justice:   
  All people should be treated fairly in both the benefits and the obligations of society. No individual or group should be favored over another person or group. All people should be treated fairly when correcting wrongs or injuries and when making decisions.  All people should be treated fairly. No group should be favored.

Equality:  
   Everyone has the right to Political, Legal, Social and Economic Equality. Everyone has the right to the same treatment regardless of race, sex, religion, heritage, or economic status. Everyone should get the same treatment regardless of where their parents or grandparents were born, their race, their religion or how much money they have.  Citizens all have political, social and economic equality.

Diversity:  
   The differences in culture, dress, language, heritage and religion are not just tolerated, but celebrated as a strength. In our society, we respect variety in culture and ethnic background, race, lifestyle and belief. Differences in language, dress, food, where parents/grandparents were born, race and religion are acceptable.

Truth:     They should expect and demand that the government not lie to them and the government should disclose information to the people. The government and its people should not lie. The government and citizens should not lie.


Popular Sovereignty:     The power of the government comes from the people. The people are the ultimate authority over the government. The power of the government comes from the people.



Patriotism:
 
   The people or citizens show a love and devotion for their country and the values. They can show this by words or by actions. We should show respect and loyalty to our country and the core democratic values.


Constitutional Principles



Rule of Law:
 
   Both the people and the government must obey all laws. Everyone, including the governmental officials, must obey the law.

Separation of Powers:
    The executive, legislative and judicial branches of the government should be separate institutions so no one branch has all of the power. We have three branches of government (Legislative, Executive and Judicial). Each has different members and duties to balance the power between them.


Representative Government:
 
   People have the right to elect others to represent them in the government. Citizens elect others to represent their interests in government.

Checks and Balances:     The powers of the three branches of government, executive, legislative and judicial, should be balanced. No one branch should be dominate. Each branch should have powers to check the actions of the other branches. Different branches of the government have equal powers so that no branch can dominate the others. Each branch checks the power of the other branches so no one branch gets too much power.


Individual Rights:
    Each individual has the fundamental right to life, liberty, economic freedom and the pursuit of happiness. These rights are outlined in the Bill of Rights and the government should protect these rights and not place undo restrictions upon them. Each individual in the United States has certain basic rights: Right to Life, Liberty, Economic Freedom, and the Pursuit of Happiness. The government must protect these rights.

Freedom of Religion:
    The right to practice any or no religion without persecution by the government. Citizens have the freedom to choose whatever religion they want to follow.  They also have the right to follow no religion.

Federalism:  
   The states and the federal government share power as outlined by the Constitution. The state and national governments share power and responsibilities.

Civilian Control of the Military:
    The people control the military to preserve democracy. Civilian (non-military) people should be in charge of the military.