Diagram the Range of Motion

Diagram the Range of Motion (inside lesson)

 

1.     Have the students sit down on the carpet in front of you

2.     Explain to the students that we will be learning about the Range of Motion (ROM) for the different joints in our bodies.

3.     Explain that joints are places on your body where two joints are connected to each other.

4.     Some joints are immovable (they do not move) and some are movable. Some joints move a lot (like your shoulders and hips) whereas others do not move a lot (clavicle).

5.     Today we are going to learn about the major joints that we use while moving and diagram the range of motion. A diagram is like a drawing that we will show how the joints move and in which direction.

6.     When I had you your paper, go to your desk and write down your name, circle your teacher’s name, and write the date. Return to the carpet when you are finished.

7.     Hand out the papers to the students.

8.     Our first joint that we will diagram is in the arm. What is the name of the joint that we use to bend the arm from the forearm? (elbow) (Use a blank worksheet and the teacher’s copy as help) This is how the elbow bends. (Diagram) We can only move it forward or backwards and they cannot go too far (one way it will stop when touching the bicep and the opposite way it will stop when it reaches approximately 180 degrees-straight arm).

9.     Have the students write down Elbow in box #1 and diagram the RoM for the elbow. When finished they should sit down on the carpet.

10. We are now going to talk about the part that is between the head and the body (the neck). The neck is divided into tiny bones that we call (fancy name) vertebrae. The way the vertebrae stack on top of each other allows them to bend a lot. If it was one solid bone the neck wouldn’t bend very much but because the vertebrae has lots of bones we can move it pretty easily. It allows us to move our head both forward/backwards and side to side. We can also twist our neck to the left and right.

11. Have the students write down neck into Box #2. Have them diagram the RoM for the neck before returning to the carpet.

12. The hip is the next joint we are going to diagram. The hip is called a Ball and Socket joint because the top of the thigh (femur) looks like a ball and the hip bone looks like a socket that the ball fits into. This allows the thigh to move forward/backwards, side/side, and rotates both inward and outward.

13. Have the students write down Hip into Box #3. Have them diagram RoM for the hip before returning to the carpet.

14. The shoulder is the next joint we are going to diagram. The shoulder is also a ball and socket joint. The shoulder can move forward/backwards, side/side, and rotates both inward and outward.

15. Have the students write down Shoulder into Box #4. Have them diagram RoM for the shoulder before returning to the carpet.

16. The knee is the next joint we are going to diagram. This is a hinge joint (like the elbow) and we can see a simple hinge when we open the door to the classroom. This joint only does one thing, bends forward and backwards.

17. Have the students write down Knee into box #5. Have them diagram the RoM for the knee before returning to the carpet.

18. The last joint we will talk about is the ankle. The ankle is also a hinge joint so it can only move upward or downward (toes up or toes down). When we have the toes up it is called flexion and when the toes are down it is called extension.

19. Have the students write down ankle into box #6. Have them diagram the RoM for the ankle before returning to the teacher with their completed assignment.


ĉ
Matthew Bassett,
Nov 8, 2011, 2:12 PM
Comments