Federal Budgets - HIV/AIDS

According to the White House, the budget supports and expands opportunity for the LGBT community by:

posted Apr 9, 2015, 12:05 PM by MOJO MICHELE   [ updated Sep 17, 2015, 9:19 PM ]

#GOMOJO #AIDSFREE #GLOBALCITIZEN


The President’s Budget provides a roadmap for accelerating economic growth, expanding opportunity for all Americans, and ensuring fiscal responsibility.

The President’s Budget provides a roadmap for accelerating economic growth, expanding opportunity for all Americans, and ensuring fiscal responsibility. It invests in infrastructure, job training, preschool, and pro-work tax cuts, while reducing deficits through health, tax, and immigration reform.


According to the White House, the budget supports and expands opportunity for the LGBT community by:

Expanding Access to Health Coverage.


The Affordable Care Act ensures that Americans have secure, stable, and affordable insurance. As of January Insurance companies are no longer able to discriminate against consumers due to pre-existing conditions, and because of the law, insurers can no longer turn someone away just because he or she is lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender.

Addressing Health Care Disparities.


The Budget supports community effort to focus on prevention, including using evidence-based interventions to address tobacco control, obesity prevention, and better nutrition and physical activity. The Budget also invests in expanding the health care workforce, as well as investing in community health centers to provide primary care services in communities across the country. And continuing efforts to improve data collection on health disparities will help policymakers have the knowledge and tools they need to continue to address the health needs and concerns of the LGBT community.

Continuing Progress Toward Ending Homelessness.


The Budget provides $2.4 billion for the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Homeless Assistance Grants, $301 million above the 2014 enacted level. This funding supports new permanent supportive housing units and maintains over 330,000 HUD-funded beds that assist the homeless Nationwide. Through this investment as well as collaborative partnerships with local governments, non-profit organizations, and among Federal agencies, the Administration will continue to make progress towards the President's ambitious goals to end homelessness across the country. To advance the goal of ending youth homelessness by 2020, Federal agencies have partnered to develop and promote a research-informed framework that focuses on improving data quality and improving service capacity to support highly vulnerable homeless youth, including LGBTQ youth, youth involved in the foster care or juvenile justice systems, and pregnant and parenting youth.

Expanding Access to HIV/AIDS Treatment, Care, and Prevention.


The Budget expands access to HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment activities and supports the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and HIV Care Continuum Initiative to reduce HIV incidence, increase access to care, and reduce HIV-related health disparities. The Budget invests $2.3 billion in the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to provide treatment and care completion services for people living with HIV, which includes $900 million for the AIDS Drug Assistance Program to ensure that people living with HIV have access to life-saving antiretroviral medications. The Budget also invests $1.1 billion for CDC HIV/AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Tuberculosis, and Viral Hepatitis activities, and aligns HIV funding with the epidemic by requiring public health departments to target resources where the epidemic is most concentrated.

Supporting Housing Assistance for People Living with HIV/AIDS.


The Budget provides $332 million for HUD’s Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) program to address housing needs among people living with HIV/AIDS and their families. The program provides States and localities with the resources to create comprehensive strategies for providing housing assistance that gives patients the stability needed for effective treatment. In partnership with Federal agencies through the HIV Care Continuum, HUD is working to improve outcomes that promote greater achievements in viral suppression through the coordination and alignment of housing support with medical care.


Employ evidence-based strategies to create demand for, and utilization of, male and female condoms, such as ensuring that high-quality condoms are available, that offered condoms correspond to consumer preferences, and that a variety of price points for different distribution channels are used.



The GOMOJO Capacity Building program exists to fill the gaps in condom distribution,  address health and poverty disparities within high-prevalent communities by providing technical assistance through skills-building learning to: civic groups, organizations, foundations, corporations, public-policy makers, churches, universities, colleges or non-profit organizations. Trainings can be offered in a variety of forms and formats. These include: webinars, phone consultations, face-to-face trainings, and conferences.


(b) conduct basic behavioral and social science research that is needed to advance the development of innovative interventions,

and (c) translate and operationalize the findings from these basic studies to develop interventions and assess their feasibility.


Educate all Americans about the threat of HIV and how to prevent it

Anticipated Results:

By 2015, lower the annual number of new infections by 25% (from 56,300 to 42,225).

Reduce the HIV transmission rate, which is a measure of annual transmissions in relation to the number of people living with HIV, by 30% (from 5 persons infected per 100 people with HIV to 3.5 persons infected per 100 people with HIV).

By 2015, increase from 79% to 90% the percentage of people living with HIV who know their serostatus (from 948,000 to

1,080,000 people).


Increasing Access to Care and Improving Health Outcomes for People Living with HIV


Action Steps:

Establish a seamless system to immediately link people to continuous and coordinated quality care when they are diagnosed with HIV.

Take deliberate steps to increase the number and diversity of available providers of clinical care and related services for people living with HIV.

Support people living with HIV with co-occurring health conditions and those who have challenges meeting their basic needs, such as housing.


Anticipated Results:

By 2015, increase the proportion of newly diagnosed patients linked to clinical care within three months of their HIV

diagnosis from 65% to 85% (from 26,824 to 35,078 people).

By 2015,increase the proportion of Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program clients who are in care (at least 2 visits for routine HIV

medical care in 12 months at least 3 months apart) from 73% to 80% (or 237,924 people in continuous care to 260,739

people in continuous care).

By 2015, increase the number of Ryan White clients with permanent housing from 82% to 86% (from 434,000 to 455,800 people). (This serves as a measurable proxy of our efforts to expand access to HUD and other housing supports to all needy people living with HIV).


Reducing HIV-Related Health Disparities and Health Inequities


Action Steps:


Reduce HIV-related mortality in communities at high risk for HIV infection.

Adopt community-level approaches to reduce HIV infection in high-risk communities.

Reduce stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV.


Anticipated Results:

By 2015, increase the proportion of HIV diagnosed gay and bisexual men with undetectable viral load by 20%.

By 2015, increase the proportion of HIV diagnosed Black Americans with undetectable viral load by 20%.

By 2015, increase the proportion of HIV diagnosed Latinos with undetectable viral load by 20%.

Achieving a More Coordinated National Response to the HIV Epidemic in the United States

Increase the coordination of HIV programs across the Federal government and between federal agencies and state, territorial, tribal, and local governments.


Fact Sheet: Shared OPWA currently supports housing for over 61,614 households


2013-Budget Moving Forward-The National HIV/AIDS Strategy

posted Apr 9, 2015, 11:55 AM by MOJO MICHELE

Responsibility to Strengthen Results for an AIDS-Free Generation


The National HIV/AIDS Strategy


To reinvigorate leadership and accountability in the domestic response to HIV, in 2010 President Obama released the first comprehensive National HIV/AIDS Strategy, which has four primary goals: to reduce new HIV infections; to improve health outcomes for people living with HIV; to reduce HIV-related health disparities and inequities; and to achieve a more coordinated national response to the epidemic. Ongoing implementation of the Strategy means:

  • Focusing on science-driven HIV prevention efforts by supporting and expanding targeted use of evidence-based HIV prevention approaches;

  • Making smarter investments by intensifying HIV prevention in the communities where HIV is most heavily concentrated;

  • Increasing access to HIV screening and medical care, including through implementation of the Affordable Care Act;

  • Supporting a shared response to the domestic epidemic through the support of HIV prevention efforts across all levels of society, including Federal, state, and local governments, centers of learning, faith-based communities, and the private sector.

The President’s proposed FY 2014 budget allocated $23.2 billion to address HIV domestically, and includes increases in discretionary funding for HIV prevention, care, and treatment.


Moving Forward


In July 2013, the President signed an Executive Order creating the HIV Care Continuum Initiative. The initiative calls for coordinated action in response to data that shows only a quarter of people living with HIV in the United States have achieved the treatment goal of controlling the HIV virus. In fact, along the entire HIV care continuum—the sequential stages of care from being diagnosed to suppressing the virus—there are significant gaps.  To address this need, the HIV Care Continuum Initiative is mobilizing Federal efforts in line with the recent advances in our understanding of how best to prevent and treat HIV infection.

Today, the White House released the report Improving Outcomes: Accelerating Progress Along the HIV Care Continuum. The report has four main sections:

  1. State of the Epidemic:  Provides an update on the Strategy’s indicators. There’s been positive progress in eight of nine indicators, with one stable.  Overall, our collective response to the epidemic will need to accelerate to meet all nine 2015 Strategy targets. The data are from 2010 and 2011, so cannot be used to grade the success of the Strategy. Instead, they are the most recently available data that give an accurate assessment of the domestic epidemic.

  2. Recommendations of the HIV Care Continuum Working Group:  Describes actions Federal agencies will take to improve outcomes along the HIV Care Continuum. Recommendations focus on supporting innovative models of HIV care; addressing stigma that limits engagement in care; strengthening data collection; promoting research to better address barriers to care; and providing technical assistance to improve care continuum outcomes.

  3. Local Success:  Highlights the progress of Washington D.C., San Francisco, and New York City. These jurisdictions implemented approaches that are consistent with the principles of the Strategy (widespread access to treatment and testing, focusing on populations at greatest risk). They are reporting tangible improvements in HIV prevention and treatment outcomes.

  4. Public-Private Partnerships:  Describes examples across the country of innovative projects supporting improvements along the care continuum. This includes work being done in partnership with Social Innovation fund, industry, and local community-based organizations.

Investing in research to improve treatments for HIV: The HIV Cure Initiative

Better treatments mean better outcomes along the care continuum; a cure represents the ultimate outcome in that regard. Today, President Obama announced that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will invest $100 million in reprioritized funding over the next three years to launch a new HIV Cure Initiative.

  • Although several individuals appear recently to have been cured of HIV through aggressive therapy, these approaches are too toxic or premature to apply beyond the research setting.

  • However, these cases provide clues to explore for possible new treatments, including other strategies that may eliminate or put HIV into remission without requiring lifelong therapy.

  • This new investment will catalyze further research into this area, and could lead to a new generation of therapies to improve outcomes for people living with HIV.

Activities across the Federal Government are already working to help improve outcomes across the HIV care continuum. Examples include:

Increasing healthcare coverage:

The Affordable Care Act will expand health insurance coverage to millions of Americans, including thousands living with HIV. Under the law, starting in 2014 new health insurance plans will be required to cover HIV testing without additional out-of-pocket costs. Starting in 2014, insurance companies cannot deny coverage based on pre-existing conditions, including HIV.

The Ryan White Program is the largest Federal program solely dedicated to providing HIV care and treatment. The Ryan White Program will continue to play a vital role in completing coverage and ensuring people living with HIV continue to receive treatment without service gaps. With support of ongoing supplemental investments from the Administration, the number of people living with HIV on waiting lists for the joint state-Federal AIDS Drug Assistance Program decreased from a peak of 9,310 in September 2011 to zero as of November 27, 2013. Sustaining this momentum will require continued effort, including ongoing partnership with States and Congress enacting a budget that replaces the sequester in a balanced, fiscally responsible manner.

Standardizing HIV data to improve health outcomes along the care continuum:  

In June 2013, the Secretary of Health and Human Services approved plans submitted by nine HHS operating divisions to adopt and deploy seven HIV common core indicators and streamline data collection for HIV services grantees. HHS offices are working to include these indicators as clinical quality measures in electronic health record systems beginning in 2016.

Supporting research to improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum:  

The NIH has expanded its investment in research to address gaps and opportunities in the HIV care continuum. Highlights include investigations of the effectiveness of methods to identify people living with HIV earlier and to link them to care; community-level interventions to expand HIV testing and treatment; interventions to improve HIV outcomes among substance users; and evaluation of innovative network approaches for HIV testing and referral for uninfected persons in the correctional system.

Supporting HIV prevention, care and treatment for veterans living with HIV/AIDS:  

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is focusing on increasing HIV testing rates and the number of veterans who are aware of their HIV status and linked to care and treatment.  Since the release of the Strategy, the VA has increased the number of veterans screened for HIV by 217%.

Supporting innovation to link and engage persons living with HIV into care:  

Funded through the Secretary's Minority AIDS Initiative Fund, the Care and Prevention of HIV in the United States demonstration project is underway in eight states and is designed to reduce HIV-related morbidity, mortality, and related health disparities among racial and ethnic minorities.

Focusing on prevention interventions that work:  

CDC and its partners are pursuing a High-Impact Prevention approach to reducing new HIV infections. This approach is using combinations of scientifically proven, cost-effective, and scalable interventions targeted to the right populations in the right geographic areas to increase the impact of HIV prevention efforts.  CDC funded programs conducted more than 3.5 million HIV tests in 2012 and newly diagnosed more than 13,000 people.


Addressing HIV-related stigma and discrimination:  

Stigma (Social stigma is the extreme disapproval of a person or group on socially characteristic grounds that are perceived) and discrimination keep people from getting tested, care and treatment.  The Department of Justice (DOJ) will continue its aggressive HIV non-discrimination enforcement efforts, specifically targeting enforcement and outreach to the geographic areas with the highest prevalence of HIV, and continue its efforts to address HIV criminalization laws. DOJ will also increase its work under the Barrier-Free Health Care Initiative, which focuses on removing barriers to health care for people with HIV. The Federal Bureau of Prisons will continue its efforts to maximize optimal HIV treatment for inmates and improve clinical linkages upon their release.

Increasing employment opportunities for people living with HIV/AIDS:  

The Department of Labor (DOL) continues to support efforts in this regard. Efforts specific  to HIV include publishing a suite of “Employment and Living with HIV/AIDS” materials, including a resource guide for individuals; a business case for employers; a series of individual, employer and service provider success stories; and an online toolkit with information for individuals, employers and service providers.

Supporting stable housing for people living with HIV/AIDS:  

Ongoing support of the Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) program and other HUD programs means thousands of  people living with HIV and their families have stable housing, which is vital to improving health and wellness. H

2016 Budget-Middle Class Economics: Enhancing the Lives of Americans Living with HIV/AIDS, and Fighting the HIV/AIDS Epidemic

posted Apr 9, 2015, 11:37 AM by MOJO MICHELE   [ updated Apr 28, 2015, 12:45 PM ]

Middle Class Economics: Enhancing the Lives of Americans Living with HIV/AIDS, and Fighting the HIV/AIDS Epidemic

FOLLOW THE MONEY THIS WAY…

Let’s Talk About the GLOBAL BUDGET


Middle Class Economics: Enhancing the Lives of Americans Living with HIV/AIDS, and Fighting the HIV/AIDS Epidemic The President's 2016 Budget is designed to bring middle class economics into the 21st Century.


This Budget shows what we can do if we invest in America's future and commit to an economy that rewards hard work, generates rising incomes, and allows everyone to share in the prosperity of a growing America. It lays out a strategy to strengthen our middle class and help America's hard-working families get ahead in a time of relentless economic and technological change. And it makes the critical investments needed to accelerate and sustain economic growth in the long run, including in research, education, training, and infrastructure.  


These proposals will help working families feel more secure with paychecks that go further, help American workers upgrade their skills so they can compete for higher-paying jobs, and help create the conditions for our businesses to keep generating good new jobs for our workers to fill, while also fulfilling our most basic responsibility to keep Americans safe.


We will make these investments, and end the harmful spending cuts known as sequestration, by cutting inefficient spending and reforming our broken tax code to make sure everyone pays their fair share. We can do all this while also putting our Nation on a more sustainable fiscal path. The Budget achieves about $1.8 trillion in deficit reduction, primarily from reforms to health programs, our tax code, and immigration. *****************************************


The Budget advances the President's commitment to reaching an AIDS-free generation in the U.S. and around the world by:


Continuing to Support the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) and Expanding Access to HIV/AIDS Treatment, Care, and Prevention.


The Budget expands access to HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment activities and supports the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy to reduce HIV incidence;


  • Increase access to care and optimize health outcomes for people living with HIV; and reduce HIV-related health disparities.


  • By providing resources for Affordable Care Act implementation, the Budget will support increased health coverage for thousands of people living with HIV/AIDS and expand access to HIV testing for millions of Americans.


The Budget makes smarter investments by prioritizing HIV/AIDS resources within high-burden communities and among high-risk groups


  • including gay and bisexual men,

  • African Americans and Latino Americans.


  • Compared to 2015, the Budget increases domestic discretionary Health and Human Services (HHS) HIV/AIDS by $118 million, including a doubling of funds for the Office of Women's Health.


Overall, total U.S. Government-wide spending on HIV/AIDS increases by nearly $1 billion from $30.7 billion in FY15 to $31.6 billion in FY16.


Supporting the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program.


  • The Budget invests $2.3 billion in the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to provide treatment and care completion services for people living with HIV, and includes $900 million for the AIDS Drug Assistance Program to ensure that people living with HIV have access to life-saving antiretroviral (ARV) treatments. By helping people living with HIV remain in care and on their medications, the Ryan White program plays a critical role in preventing the spread of the HIV epidemic, as recent research has shown that ARV treatment reduces HIV transmission by 96 percent.


  • THE PRESIDENT’S BUDGET FISCAL YEAR 2016 Increasing Funding for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Service Integration.


  • The Budget invests $799 million, an increase of $12.6 million, for Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to continue implementing the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy by preventing HIV/AIDS among high-risk communities using evidence-based interventions.


  • The increase will be directed to those most at risk for acquiring HIV including youth, high risk HIV negative persons, and persons at risk for transmitting HIV, particularly those not engaged in care. CDC will continue to align prevention activities with the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and to promote high-impact prevention by focusing resources on effective, scalable, and sustainable prevention strategies along the HIV continuum of care for persons living with HIV and populations at highest risk for HIV.


  • Part of the increase will support efforts to better link persons diagnosed and living with HIV to appropriate care and examine how new biomedical interventions are being used.


  • Additionally, investments will be used to improve HIV prevention activities with school-aged youth.


  • The Budget dedicates approximately $2.5 million to support States in developing integrated HIV plans to include prevention, care and treatment, and other supportive services such as substance abuse treatment and housing. This effort will help ensure that State and local health departments develop systems of prevention, care and treatment that are responsive to the needs of persons at risk for HIV infection and persons living with HIV, while also continuing the Administration's commitment to streamlining and reducing reporting burden.


  • The Budget also doubles funding for viral hepatitis to prevent deaths due to viral hepatitis, reduce hepatitis C among young people, and reduce mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B.

  • Supporting Housing Assistance for People Living with HIV/AIDS.


  • The Budget provides $332 million for Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) program to address housing needs among people living with HIV/AIDS and their families. The program provides States and localities with the resources to create comprehensive strategies for providing housing assistance that gives patients the stability needed for effective treatment. In partnership with Federal agencies through the HIV Care Continuum, HUD is working to improve outcomes that promote greater achievements in viral suppression through the coordination and alignment of housing support with medical care.


  • The Administration is also proposing legislative reforms that would update HOPWA's grant formula to distribute funds based on more robust CDC data on persons living with HIV, rather than the cumulative number of HIV cases.


  • Supporting Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).


  • To address the critical AIDS research priorities, the Budget requests $3.1 billion for trans-NIH AIDS research, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2015 level.


  • The Budget request reflects several shifts of funds to address the many new and exciting scientific opportunities in AIDS research, including


  • etiology and pathogenesis that provides the underlying foundation for all HIV research;


  • development of vaccines and microbicides; and new and innovative approaches for research toward a cure. Increasing Support for Our Veterans Living with HIV/AIDS.


  • The Budget includes $1.15 billion within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), including


  • a $62 million increase for medical care, to ensure that veterans living with HIV/AIDS receive high quality, comprehensive clinical care, including diagnosis of their infection and timely linkage to medical care.


  • Additionally, VA promotes evidence based HIV prevention services and is implementing its plan to meet the goals outlined in the President's National HIV/AIDS Strategy.


President Obama released his Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 budget calling for overall funding increases, for HIV programs.


The total budget was increased by about $74 billion and is divided between $605 billion for defense discretionary funding and $563 for non-defense discretionary spending which covers all federal funding for domestic HIV programs.


The president’s Budget and next step’s for HIV reflect the broad policies and values that the president laid out in last month’s State of the Union


#GOMOJO, Inc. project

As federal activists for social entreprenuership

The President believes we must invest in the true engine of America’s economic growth – a rising and thriving middle class. He is focused on addressing three fundamental questions:


How To make America once again a magnet for jobs, the Budget invests in high-tech manufacturing and innovation, clean energy, and infrastructure, while cutting red tape to help businesses grow?


To give workers the skills they need to compete in the global economy, it invests in education from preschool to job training.


To ensure hard work is rewarded, it raises the minimum wage to $9 an hour so a hard day’s work pays more. do we attract more jobs to our shores?  


Full implementation of Here in Las Vegas we are in support of PLAN


How do we equip our people with the skills needed to do the jobs of the 21st Century?

Hold Your Stake


How do we make sure hard work leads to a decent living?


Art

Hope

Pitch


#GOMOJO follows The Budget presents the President’s plan to address each of these questions and this is our business model and  presents this plan to the answers how do we all win-win-win


The Budget does all of these things as part of a comprehensive plan that reduces the deficit and puts the Nation on a sound fiscal course. Every new initiative in the plan is fully paid for, so they do not add a single dime to the deficit.


The Budget also incorporates the President’s compromise offer to House Speaker Boehner to achieve another $1.8 trillion in deficit reduction in a balanced way. When combined with the deficit reduction already achieved, this will allow us to exceed the goal of $4 trillion in deficit reduction, while growing the economy and strengthening the middle class. By including this compromise proposal in the Budget, the President is demonstrating his willingness to make tough choices and his seriousness about finding common ground to further reduce the deficit.


Continue to Support the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) and Expand Investments in Prevention, Care, and Research.  


THIS IS BIG

#GOMOJO The Budget presents the President’s plan to address each of these questions and this is our business model and  presents this plan to the answers how do we all win-win-win


The Budget expands access to HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment activities and supports the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy to reduce HIV incidence; increase access to care and optimize health outcomes for people living with HIV; and reduce HIV-related health disparities.


By providing resources for Affordable Care Act implementation, the Budget will support increased health care coverage for thousands of people living with HIV/AIDS and expand access to HIV testing for millions of Americans.


The Budget makes smarter investments by prioritizing HIV/AIDS resources within high-burden communities and among high-risk groups, including gay men, black Americans and Latino Americans.


Compared to 2012, the Budget increases domestic discretionary Health and Human Services (HHS) HIV/AIDS funding by $73 million


Veterans Affairs (VA) HIV/AIDS funding by $155 million.


Overall, total U.S. Government-wide spending on HIV/AIDS increases from $27.8 billion in FY 2012 to $29.7 billion in the FY 2014 Budget.


ENDING HOMELESS BY 2020


The Budget provides $2.4 billion for the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Homeless Assistance Grants, $301 million above the 2014 enacted level. This funding supports new permanent supportive housing units and maintains over 330,000 HUD-funded beds that assist the homeless Nationwide.


Through this investment as well as collaborative partnerships with local governments, non-profit organizations, and among Federal agencies, the Administration will continue to make progress towards the President's ambitious goals to end homelessness across the country.


Advance the goal of ending youth


To advance the goal of ending youth homelessness by 2020, Federal agencies have partnered to develop and promote a research-informed framework that focuses on improving data quality and improving service capacity to support highly vulnerable homeless youth, including LGBTQ youth, youth involved in the foster care or juvenile justice systems, and pregnant and parenting youth.


Increase Funding for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Service Integration.


The Budget includes $833 million, an increase of $10 million for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to continue implementing the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy by preventing HIV/AIDS among high-risk communities using evidence-based interventions.

The Budget redirects $40 million from less effective activities to support a new $40 million Community High-Impact Prevention initiative to improve systems that link persons recently diagnosed with HIV to care.


Health Department Support


The Budget also increases funding for data collection by $10 million to improve timeliness of data and invests $10 million to build the infrastructure and capacity that State Public Health Departments and community-based organizations will need to bill private insurers for infectious disease testing.


Our services build capacity and support the implementation of sustainable, data-driven systems designed to help healthcare and community-based organizations efficiently and effectively implement CDC's High-Impact HIV Prevention strategies and decrease new infection rates.


We follow the Global, National, State and local health departments and help form alliance with local communities to maximixe the nation’s HIV prevention efforts ensuring cohesive approach to work with  local communities.


We take a new approach to health department funding that better matches prevention dollars to the HIV burden in every state, territory, and heavily affected city, focusing on high-impact interventions.


In addition, the HPPGs continue to work on Engagement Plans to identify how to better reflect communities impacted by HIV and to assure that there is representation in the HIV planning process.


The community planning process supports a broad-based community participation in HIV prevention planning.


Middle Class Economics: Enhancing the Lives of Americans Living with HIV/AIDS, and Fighting the HIV/AIDS Epidemic
https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/budget/fy2016/assets/budget.pdf


2012 Budget Fighting the HIV/AIDS Epidemic and Supporting People Living with HIV/AIDS

posted Apr 9, 2015, 11:16 AM by MOJO MICHELE   [ updated Apr 9, 2015, 11:51 AM ]

Fighting the HIV/AIDS Epidemic and Supporting People Living with HIV/AIDS


Fighting the HIV/AIDS Epidemic and Supporting People Living with HIV/AIDSHaving emerged from the worst recession in generations, the President has put forward a plan to rebuild our economy and win the future by out-innovating, out-educating, and out-building our global competitors and creating the jobs and industries of tomorrow. But we cannot rebuild our economy and win the future if we pass on a mountain of debt to our children and grandchildren. We must restore fiscal responsibility, and reform our government to make it more effective, efficient, and open to the American people. The President’s 2012 Budget is a responsible approach that puts the nation on a path to live within our means so we can invest in our future – by cutting wasteful spending and making tough choices on some things we cannot afford, while keeping the investments we need to grow the economy and create jobs. It targets scarce federal resources to the areas critical to winning the future: education, innovation, clean energy, and infrastructure. And it proposes to reform how Washington does business, putting more federal funding up for competition, cutting waste, and reorganizing government so that it better serves the American people.
To address HIV/AIDS in the U.S. and around the world, the Budget will:


Fund Cross-Cutting Innovative Efforts for Care and Prevention. 

To take advantage of potential synergies across the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) agencies to implement the Strategy, the Budget authorizes HHS to transfer 1 percent of HHS domestic HIV program funding (approximately $60 million) to support cross-cutting collaborations in areas such as increasing linkages to care and developing effective combinations of prevention interventions.


Increase HIV/AIDS Research

While we have made great strides in understanding the AIDS virus and in devising ways to combat it, there is still more work to be done. The Budget increases funding for intramural and extramural HIV/AIDS-related research supported by the National Institutes of Health by $74 million from the 2010 enacted level, for a total of nearly $3.2 billion in 2012.


Support the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) and Expand Investments in Prevention, Care, and Research.



The Budget expands access to HIV/AIDS prevention and care activities and supports the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy: reducing HIV incidence, increasing access to care and optimizing health outcomes, and reducing HIV-related health disparities.


The Budget prioritizes HIV/AIDS resources within high-burden communities and among high-risk groups, including gay and bisexual men, Black Americans, Latino Americans and substance users. 

Compared to 2010, the Budget increases domestic discretionary HIV/AIDS funding at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) by $219 million and Veterans Affairs (VA) HIV/AIDS funding by $173 million, while maintaining HIV/AIDS funding levels at the Department of Justice (DOJ) and Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Overall, total US Government-wide spending on HIV/AIDS increases from $26 billion to approximately $28 billion in 2012.


Expand the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program.



The Budget includes an increase of $88 million for care and treatment through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program. Of the $2.4 billion total amount proposed for Ryan White, $679 million is for Ryan White Part A medical and support services in eligible metropolitan areas and transitional grant areas.


The Budget also includes $940 million for AIDS drug assistance programs, an increase of $80 million above 2010 levels to support access to life saving HIV-related medications for approximately 13,000 additional people living with HIV/AIDS.


The Budget increases funding for the Ryan White Part C program by $5 million to maintain access to critical early intervention and primary care services for people living with HIV/AIDS. To address the disproportionate impact of HIV/AIDS on communities of color, there is a $15 million increase in funding above 2010 for Ryan White Minority AIDS Initiative activities, totaling $161 million in 2012.


Increase Funding for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Service Integration.



The President’s Budget includes an increase of $58 million for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to reduce the number of new HIV infections, reduce behaviors associated with HIV transmission and acquisition, and increase the number of infected individuals who are aware of their infection.


The increase includes $30 million from the Prevention and Public Health Fund


The 2012 Budget for HIV Prevention includes four major highlights. 

First, the Budget creates a new formula for funding allocations to health departments’ prevention programs, in alignment with the NHAS, to “ensure that Federal HIV prevention funding allocations go to the jurisdictions with the greatest need.”


Second, the Budget expands flexibility by allowing CDC and States to transfer up to 5 percent across all CDC HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases (STD), and tuberculosis (TB) activities for program coordination and service integration activities.



Third, the Budget redirects $51 million within CDC’s HIV/AIDS budget authority from less effective base activities to comprehensive and effective grants focusing on high-risk populations that align with interventions outlined in the NHAS. 


Fourth, the Budget transfers HIV prevention programming for youth ($40 million) to the CDC’s National Center for HIV, STD, Viral Hepatitis and TB Prevention. Priority investments in the Budget include $22 million for the Enhanced Comprehensive HIV Prevention program for metropolitan areas most affected by the HIV epidemic.



Support Housing Assistance for People Living with HIV/AIDS.



The President’s Budget maintains funding at $335 million for the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) program, to address housing needs among people living with HIV/AIDS and their families. The program is designed to provide states and localities with the resources to create comprehensive strategies for providing housing assistance and supportive services such as case management. The Administration recognizes special needs among people living with HIV and AIDS, and HOPWA program benefits are one component of the President’s commitment to increasing permanent housing among low-income individuals and families, supporting short-term and transitional housing, and reducing the risk of homelessness.

Fight the Stigma of HIV/AIDS. To strengthen civil rights enforcement against racial, ethnic, sexual orientation, religious, and gender discrimination, the Budget includes an 11 percent increase in funding to the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division. This investment will not only help the Division handle enforcement of civil rights protections for people living with HIV/AIDS, but align with a key action steps for reducing HIV-related disparities – reducing stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV.


CDC funding: $359 million annually, FY2012-FY2016 (assumes level funding)

A new approach to health department funding that better matches prevention dollars to the HIV burden in every state, territory, and heavily affected city, focusing on high-impact interventions.


Expanded Testing Initiative

CDC funding: $111 million total, FY2007-FY2010

Targeted funding for HIV testing in communities at risk. Between 2007 and 2010, provided 2.8 million tests; resulted in more than 18,000 new HIV diagnoses; and helped avert $1.2 billion in direct medical costs.


Enhanced Comprehensive HIV Prevention Planning (ECHPP)

CDC funding: $34.8 million anticipated total, FY2010-FY2012

Innovative demonstration projects implementing combination prevention in 12 cities with the highest AIDS burden. For example, the Houston ECHPP project brought together a diverse range of government agencies to create new links between prevention, care, substance abuse, and other services that can reduce new HIV infections.


Community-Based HIV Prevention for Young MSM and Transgender Persons of Color

CDC funding: $50 million total, FY2012-FY2016 (assumes level funding)

Support for local HIV prevention efforts to reach young MSM and transgender people of color with HIV testing and linkages to care, support, and prevention services, as well as targeted behavioral interventions and other effective approaches.


We have worked really hard over years of following the money. Our programs


Estimated Return on U.S. Investment in HIV Prevention, 1991 – 2006


More than 350,00 infections averted


More than $125 billion in direct medical costs saved


Our national investment in HIV prevention has contributed to dramatic reductions in the annual number of new infections since the peak of the epidemic in the mid-1980s, and an overall stabilization of new infections in recent years.14 Given continued increases in the number of people living with HIV, this stabilization is in itself a sign of progress. Other important signs of progress include dramatic declines in mother-to-child HIV transmission and reductions in new infections among injection drug users and heterosexuals over time.

HIV prevention has also generated substantial economic benefits. For every HIV infection that is prevented, an estimated $360,000 is saved in the cost of providing lifetime HIV treatment, resulting in significant cost-savings for the health care systems

http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/factsheet/fighting-the-hiv-aids-epidemic

Increase Support for Global AIDS Programs.

Increase Support for Global AIDS Programs.



Over the past two years, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has nearly doubled the number of people it supports to 3.2 million. This includes an increase in support to pregnant women allowing them to have a child free of HIV, which has resulted in an estimated 114,000 HIV-free births in 2010. While achieving these results, the per-patient cost to the U.S. of providing anti-retroviral treatment has fallen by over 50 percent since 2008 because PEPFAR has investing carefully, tailoring prevention to countries’ urgent needs, using generic drugs, shipping more efficiently, and linking PEPFAR to other needed health services.



Since taking office, President Obama and his Administration have taken enormous steps to address the HIV epidemic, both domestically and globally. This World AIDS Day, we remember those lost to this epidemic, and reflect on the progress of the past year to prevent HIV infections, improve the health of people living with HIV worldwide, and address HIV stigma and discrimination. Earlier this year, PEPFAR celebrated its tenth anniversary. Domestically, we are refocusing our efforts to lower new HIV infections, improve health outcomes, and reduce disparities. In July, President Obama signed an Executive Order to launch the HIV Care Continuum Initiative, the next step in implementing the National HIV/AIDS Strategy.




Global Leadership on HIV/AIDS

The Obama Administration has strengthened the impact and sustainability of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and led efforts to reform and drive increased investments in the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The U.S. was the largest donor to HIV efforts in low- and middle-income countries in 2012, accounting for 64% of total international assistance for HIV/AIDS. Together, the PEPFAR and the Global Fund account for over 90% of donor funding for the AIDS response in the world’s highest-burdened and lowest-resourced countries. PEPFAR and the Global Fund are working together to invest resources in a coordinated, complementary, and synergistic manner to combat HIV/AIDS. 

PEPFAR has delivered on the President’s 2011 World AIDS Day targets:


PEPFAR has exceeded the President’s 2011 World AIDS Day target to put 6 million people on lifesaving treatment. As of September 30, 2013, PEPFAR is supporting treatment for 6.7 million people. This signifies an almost four-fold increase (from 1.7 million in 2008 to 6.7 million in 2013) since the start of the Obama Administration. 


PEPFAR has reached the prevention of mother-to-child transmission target by reaching 1.5 million pregnant women with HIV with antiretroviral drugs to prevent HIV transmission to their children. 


As of September 30, 2013, PEPFAR will have directly supported more than 4.2 million voluntary medical male circumcision procedures worldwide, and by the end of calendar year 2013, PEPFAR will have reached the President’s target of 4.7 million. 


In June 2013, we reached the one millionth infant born HIV-free because of PEPFAR support. In Fiscal Year 2013 alone, PEPFAR’s investments meant that over 240,000 babies were born HIV-free. 


The most recent UNAIDS data shows that, in sub-Saharan Africa, the number of AIDS-related deaths decreased by 32% from 2005 to 2012, and the number of new HIV infections fell by nearly 39% from 2001 to 2012, due in large part to the efforts of PEPFAR and the Global Fund. 

PEPFAR’s success in treating 6.7 million people with HIV has helped to drive down new infections and AIDS-related deaths in many PEPFAR-supported countries. To address the high rates of HIV in key populations, PEPFAR supports initiatives to end stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV and key populations, improving their access to, and uptake of, comprehensive HIV services. As outlined in the PEPFAR Blueprint, to prevent the spread of HIV, PEPFAR will continue to make strategic, scientifically sound investments to expand core HIV prevention, treatment and care interventions and maximize impact.

U.S. Investment in the Global Fund


The U.S. has been the largest donor to the Global Fund, contributing $8.5 billion to date. The Global Fund is a vital partner to the United States in supporting a country-owned response to AIDS, tuberculosis (TB), and malaria.  The Obama Administration has driven transformational reforms of the Global Fund, tying its last pledge to development and implementation of a comprehensive reform agenda, and conditioning its current pledge to successful execution of critical reforms. The Administration’s goal is to further secure the Global Fund’s role as an efficient, accountable and results-driven mechanism to fight HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria. 

In 2010, following our successful three-year, $4 billion pledge to the Global Fund for FY 2011-2013, the President’s FY 2014 Budget requested $1.65 billion for the Global Fund. To leverage future funding from other donors, the U.S. announced that its commitment for the 2014 replenishment is conditional on other donors’ stepping up their contributions to match the U.S. investment two-to-one, and the Global Fund's continuing implementation of its ambitious reform agenda. The U.S. will match incoming contributions to the Global Fund through September 2014 and will provide 33% of investments in the Global Fund for the 2014-2016 replenishment. As of December 2013, the Global Fund reports that supported programs have helped:


6.1 million people receive antiretroviral treatment for HIV/AIDS; 


Detect and treat 11.2 million new cases of infectious TB; and 


Distribute 360 million bed nets to protect families from malaria.

Contents

  1. 1 Fund Cross-Cutting Innovative Efforts for Care and Prevention. 
  2. 2 Increase HIV/AIDS Research
    1. 2.1 Support the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) and Expand Investments in Prevention, Care, and Research.
    2. 2.2 Compared to 2010, the Budget increases domestic discretionary HIV/AIDS funding at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) by $219 million and Veterans Affairs (VA) HIV/AIDS funding by $173 million, while maintaining HIV/AIDS funding levels at the Department of Justice (DOJ) and Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Overall, total US Government-wide spending on HIV/AIDS increases from $26 billion to approximately $28 billion in 2012.
      1. 2.2.1 Expand the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program.
    3. 2.3 Increase Funding for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Service Integration.
    4. 2.4 The increase includes $30 million from the Prevention and Public Health Fund
      1. 2.4.1 First, the Budget creates a new formula for funding allocations to health departments’ prevention programs, in alignment with the NHAS, to “ensure that Federal HIV prevention funding allocations go to the jurisdictions with the greatest need.”
      2. 2.4.2 Second, the Budget expands flexibility by allowing CDC and States to transfer up to 5 percent across all CDC HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases (STD), and tuberculosis (TB) activities for program coordination and service integration activities.
      3. 2.4.3 Third, the Budget redirects $51 million within CDC’s HIV/AIDS budget authority from less effective base activities to comprehensive and effective grants focusing on high-risk populations that align with interventions outlined in the NHAS. 
      4. 2.4.4 Fourth, the Budget transfers HIV prevention programming for youth ($40 million) to the CDC’s National Center for HIV, STD, Viral Hepatitis and TB Prevention. Priority investments in the Budget include $22 million for the Enhanced Comprehensive HIV Prevention program for metropolitan areas most affected by the HIV epidemic.
    5. 2.5 Support Housing Assistance for People Living with HIV/AIDS.
  3. 3 http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/factsheet/fighting-the-hiv-aids-epidemic
  4. 4 Increase Support for Global AIDS Programs.
    1. 4.1 U.S. Investment in the Global Fund

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