*#GOMOJO 1111‎ > ‎GLOBAL GOALS‎ > ‎Hold Your Stake‎ > ‎

Youth

· Increase condom use through convenience and easy accessibility-ready anytime, anywhere, any element.
· Prevent and reduce number of new STD/HIV/AIDS and unwanted pregnancy cases
· Support, Encourage and Expect Safe Sexual Responsibility at ALL TIMES, ALL PLACES, IN ALL ELEMENTS
· Tangible solution to promote prevention, provide an a vehicle for everyday condom use and break and change unsafe sex behaviors in a non-offensive and discreet manner
• Increase the availability and reach of media campaigns 
• Increase the availability of online interventions
• Expand
• Increase condom availability and appeal the availability of free and low cost HIV testing
TO EDUCATE LOCAL, STATE, AND NATIONAL POLICY MAKERS ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S ACCESS TO ACCURATE AND CONFIDENTIAL SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH INFORMATION AND SERVICES, INCLUDING COMPREHENSIVE SEX EDUCATION. SUPPORTED DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL YOUTH ACTIVIST NETWORKS COMPRISED OF MORE THAN 45,000 YOUNG PEOPLE WHO USED ADVOCATES' WEB SITE, "AMPLIFY", TO PROMOTE THEIR RIGHT TO ACCESS SEXUAL HEALTH INFORMATION AND SERVICES AROUND THE WORLD.

ADOLESCENT SEXUAL HEALTH SERVICES: STRENGTHENED THE CAPACITY OF STATE TEEN PREGNANCY PREVENTION ORGANIZATIONS TO ACTIVELY PROMOTE SCIENCE- BASED TEEN PREGNANCY PREVENTION INITIATIVES. EDUCATED YOUNG

PEOPLE AND PROVIDERS ABOUT CONTRACEPTION AND IMPLEMENTED ADOLESCENT CONTRACEPTIVE ACCESS CAMPAIGNS IN SEVEN COMMUNITIES AROUND THE UNITED STATES, WITH A FOCUS ON REACHING YOUTH MOST AT RISK OF TEEN PREGNANCY AND HIV/STIS.

Work-Based Learning: A Promising Strategy for Re-engaging Opportunity Youth

For nearly a decade, the U. S. has partnered with the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to conduct reviews of various issues pertaining to career and technical education (CTE). Our efforts with OECD have enabled us to benchmark ourselves against other countries, as well as learn about international policies and practices that we might consider to improve the educational and employment outcomes for our nation’s youth and adults.

Building on our prior work, in July 2015, we again partnered with OECD—this time, on the topic of work-based learning. We were interested in this topic because we acknowledge the importance and promise of work-based learning as a way to re-engage youth, equip them with the skills that are in demand in the labor market, and connect them to potential employers.

The benefits of work-based learning are particularly important for at-risk youth as these individuals are most likely to face difficulties in connecting to the labor market and accessing good learning opportunities. At-risk youth are defined as young people who are not—or are at risk of not—working or being in school. In the U. S., there are roughly 5.5 million teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither working nor in school. This translates to one in seven teens and young adults. In OECD countries, there are around 40 million at risk youth. These numbers, while incredibly discouraging, present a tremendous opportunity for retooling our nation’s CTE programs and scaling up promising practices such as work-based learning to address the needs of our nation’s most vulnerable students.

OECD’s work-based learning project was designed for three purposes:

  1. Synthesize the evidence on how the benefits of work-based learning might be more fully exploited to achieve better economic and social outcomes;
  2. Document global experience of developments and innovations in policy and practice; and
  3. Deliver key policy messages on those foundations.

Eight other countries participated in the study—Australia, Canada, the European Commission, Germany, Norway, Scotland, Switzerland, the United Kingdom.

On December 7, 2016, the OECD reported the results of their U. S. review, as documented in Work-Based Learning for Youth at Risk: Getting Employers on Board. The report identifies a number of policy recommendations including encouraging and offering financial resources for pre-apprenticeships; providing remediation, mentoring, and coaching to support apprentices complete their training; and offering targeted training for apprenticeship supervisors to help them succeed. The full report can be found in the OECD iLibrary.

To further help employers work with youth, the Department released Employability Skills Fact Sheet and Resources: Supporting Opportunity Youth to Be Successful in Their First Job. This fact sheet outlines five easy steps that employers can take to help youth gain employability skills that employers are looking for and that are necessary for youth to be successful in the labor market at all levels and in all sectors. The Fact Sheet is available on the Perkins Collaborative Resource Network.

Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education

U.S. Department of Education


Add a RAINBOW SWIRL MOJO Lifesaver

MISSION

The MOJO Mission is to remove social stigma and spread safe sex with condom use for ANYONE-ANYWHERE. We will do this by educating, empowering and expecting readiness and achievement in safe sex with condom use. be the safe sex vehicle in consistent and correct condom use
A non-offensive 3-Condom Key Chain Container FOR HIM AND HER it is a unique, stylish, and practical way to carry, store and easily yet discreetly access 3 condoms. We understand the great challenge in carrying condoms, the social stigma (what people think of people who carry condoms) and in readiness and achievement with safe sex in condom use, and having them accessible especially for those unexpected moments of passion or planned.
THE NEED

• Community frustration with the quality and content of sexual health education that is delivered in schools

• Urgent need to develop sexual health programs that involve parents and include the roles of home and community 
• Limited resources and programming that target youth and young adult
Lack of coordination and collaboration with sexual health education programming in school districts
• Lack of parent/child intervention programs

• Lack of peer sexual health education programs for youth

• Limited support groups for HIV+ youth and youth adults

• Youth have become de-sensitized to HIV prevention messages

• Youth see HIV as a chronic manageable disease

• Youth are more concerned with pregnancy prevention than HIV/STD prevention

STRATEGY

• Develop sexual health education programs for parents and increase parent involvement in sexual health intervention
• Advocate for consistent and comprehensive sexual health education programs throughout all school districts in Nevada.

• Include a discussion of homosexuality in sexual health programs

• Address the stigma associated with discussion of sexuality, birth control and HIV/STD testing

• Create programs were HIV-positive youth share their experience with other youth

• Create a “tip sheet” on how to bring up condoms with a partner distributed at youth-focused events

• Provide opportunities for youth to role-play condom negotiation

• Create peer education and mentorship programs for young MSM, as well as heterosexual youth

Whom are we creating value?

We are creating value for all those whom may have a concern for young people, human lives, at great risk and jeopardy of being infected with lifetime struggles to overcome because of a choice often times, unexpected, unprepared for and natural
instinct, sexually transmitted infections.  

GOMOJO has included all those whom have been identified within a high risk jurisdiction of a new HIV/AIDS cases. We have followed the path created by the United States Federal Government and the State Of NV and included direct our focus to the 1,000's of people we have talked for behavioral intervention research and development study journey.  Over this I used my mind, body and spirit and dedicated the time to the many different people for many different reasons in Las Vegas, NV. and here in our Downtown Las Vegas neighborhood and surrounding areas.  We have identified and connected with our important customers, major stakeholders by applying a conscious culture, capitalism and management approach. 

GOMOJO mission in Downtown Las Vegas is getting our young , GOMOJO is committed to the streets and paved the ways and the people in  Downtown Las Vegas community participation and collaboration as a key component in the GOMOJOs goal of effective public health research and implementation.
As a result, we are seeking partnership of people who are affected and infected by the HIV epidemic will have input into the ideas that are developed, how the studies are designed, and the implementation of the actual research.

Youth
INCREASE THE NUMBER AND AVAILABILITY OF YOUTH-SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS



1. Target and tailor programming for sexually active and most-at-risk youth based on pattern of behavior and their needs.

2. Provide necessary information and skills building to help youth prepare to make their eventual transition to sexual activity safer and healthier, including delay of sexual debut.

3. Work with parents and guardians to help improve communication to youth about their values and expectations regarding adolescent behavior, as well as stressing the importance of monitoring and supervision of their adolescents.

4. Engage influential adults within the community to create an enabling environment conducive to the adoption of safer sex behaviors among youth.

5. Expand access to community-level prevention programs, including peer outreach, and curriculum-based programs for out-of-school youth.

6. Provide or refer sexually active youth to confidential youth HTC, and ensure linkages to care for HIV positive youth.

7. Encourage sexually-active youth to learn their HIV status, practice safer sex and reduce their number of sexual partners. 

Provide sexually active young people with risk reduction information and skills building,  including access to male and female condoms and information on correct and consistent condom use.

8. Prioritize interventions targeting evidence-based prevention, care and treatment for adolescents living with HIV/AIDS in the following areas: 

a) Measurement: Work with the UN and partner governments to better track the numbers of adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) and the coverage of critical HIV services for these populations.


b) Prevention: Work with global experts to identify the most effective interventions for preventing new HIV infections in vulnerable adolescent populations and support partner governments to bring them to scale.


c) Treatment: Work with partner governments and implementing partners to scale programs that increase access to treatment for ALHIV, and help those currently in pediatric care to effectively transition to adult care.


d) Advocacy: Work with UNICEF and other global partners to raise awareness of the needs of ALHIV and vulnerable adolescents, and 

Build commitments to bringing effective programs and interventions to scale.

9. Provide comprehensive packages of interventions for highly vulnerable youth and young member of key populations tailored to be accessible and acceptable to younger people.

10. Support structural interventions to reduce young people’s exposure to risk and increase protection.

11. Strengthen and expand gender-sensitive programs to respond to the unique needs of male and female youth, including addressing harmful gender norms that foster the spread of HIV.12. Evaluate the impact of PEPFAR-funded youth programs to build a stronger evidence base for these interventions.

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