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Streets of Love

STREETS OF LOVE

STREETS OF LOVE

STREET of LOVE!
GOMOJO STREET OF LOVE Outreach intervention programs are defined by the location and nature of the prevention activities. We involve the participation of peer and non-peer activity leaders. 

GOMOJO Street of LOVE outreach interventions take place in the community environment and target people who otherwise may not receive HIV, Sexually Transmitted Infection and Unwanted Pregnancy prevention messages
Gave some mojos out last night...lol... good kids here
. Conducting community outreach interventions involves taking prevention activities to neighborhoods, streets, bars, buses, causal pathways, gyms, music, art, and cultural festivals, college campuses, and many other place where the Black community gets together, whether all together or just one.

GOMOJO outreach programs are not always a standard form of intervention, but a large variety of interventions that share a set of unique techniques and characteristics.
Such as catching kids in the streets while out for the night.
Our community outreach does not impose a formal structure of activities on the target population because it occurs on our own terms. It is based on the face-to-face contact between the outreach worker and the community members. Our outreach interventions provide information, some provide counseling, and some provide both, depending on our sponsors desired components.

Street of Love -is MOBILIZATION #AIDSFREEGEN


We want to fill our streets with Love.

We need HELP OUT HERE!  
INCREASE CONDOM AVAILABILITY AND APPEAL
We have aligned and coupled our condom distribution campaigns that promote condom use as sexy and desirable and cool to carry in a MOJO LIFESAVER condom and catch all keychain holder.
GOMOJO Street of LOVE combined MOJO Lifesaver Condom Ho—is the community’s single most powerful and enduring feet-on-the-street response to the AIDS pandemic. 


#GOMOJO’s cross-cutting and multi-pronged strategies fills the gap in mobilizing and distributing free public sector male and female condoms to the people who need them the most in the places they live, learn, work, travel, play, stay and get _____. We have integrated and are ready to reach the streets primarily subsidized commodities poor and vulnerable populations lacking disposable income those at elevated risk of HIV transmission and/or acquisition populations frequently not reached by private sector supply chains.

A very important part of why we believe we can be successful is because we are a win, win, win for those in charge of HIV/AIDS prevention and condom distribution programs ensuring the people who need them the most have access to condoms to the places the go, anytime, in place and in any element,a consistent supply and availability of quality male and female condoms,

linkage to testing 

access to medications which are key and critical toward achieving an AIDS-free generation.

Not only are MOJO LIFESAVERS designed in cool prints we are also able to provide outreach interventions provide information, some provide counseling, and some provide both.

Our information inserts will be customized by locations to get free condoms, testing, treatment, support and community outreach programs for education, training and job placement resources.

This includes ensuring that male condoms, which continue to play a key role in HIV prevention, are widely available and accessible to both men and women. 

We are seeking support to implement these programs in Downtown, Low Income Areas, High Risk Jurisdictions and College and University campuses. 

Unprotected sex is the leading cause of HIV transmission, accounting for more than 80 percent of the total number of infections. Male and female condoms, when worn correctly, serve as an impermeable barrier to the sexual exchange of secretions that carry HIV and a number of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), providing protection against transmission. Comprehensive condom programming remains an essential component of combination prevention programs.

Female condoms are unique in providing a female-controlled HIV prevention option, and PEPFAR will work with partner governments and other donors to promote them wherever effective programs can build sustainable demand.

Street of Loves is tailored to address the social, community, financial, and structural factors that place specific populations at risk. 

Our intervention programs are defined by the location and nature of the prevention activities. They involve the participation of peer and non-peer activity leaders. 

GOMOJO Street of love outreach interventions take place in the community
environment and targets people who otherwise may not receive HIV, sexually transmitted infections and unwanted pregnancy prevention messages. We are conducting community outreach interventions that involve taking prevention activities to neighborhoods, streets, bars, or many other places where the target community gets together. Our outreach programs are not always a standard form of intervention, but a variety of interventions that share a set of techniques and characteristics.

Our community outreach does not impose a formal structure of activities on the target population because it occurs in the client's own terms. It is based on the face-to-face contact between the outreach worker and the community members. Some of our outreach interventions provide information, some provide cou
nseling, and some provide both.

We have undertaken years of research and countless studies to understand causal pathways and synergies and antagonism among potential combination intervention components including those that have previously demonstrated efficacy; this includes implementation/programs offering components, in combination at one site and multiple programs with separate individual components offered to the same population.

The Essential Elements of Condom Distribution Programs (www.effectiveintervention.org

We have the potential to increasing the number of condoms distributed and made accessible to high-risk populations to be enhanced by jurisdiction. 

In the United States, proven strategies we have included are included are reinforce availability, accessibility, and acceptance. 

We are experiencing difficulties and doing the best we can to continue working with local condom distribution programs and/or in conjunction with other programs we have implemented to rapidly scale up of combination prevention techniques.

Research proves conducting community-wide mobilization with condom distribution programs led to saving millions of dollars in future medical care costs efforts to support and encourage condom use. Photo
GOMOJO Lifesavers can also include inserts to provide counseling, referrals,  HIV prevention messaging and support, as well as HIV testing and counseling, within antenatal care, maternal and child
health, and family planning programs for both men and women.

Support quality assurance efforts to improve integrated health services for women, importantly transgender.

Continually conduct operations or implementation science research on effective integration approaches.

Strengthen public health and primary health care systems, including commodity procurement, information systems, and logistics and distribution systems designed to improve the availability of HIV and Family Planning commodities and to improve essential primary care and health maintenance services.


GoMOJO uses the principles of voluntarism and informed choice are prerequisites for good quality of care and must form the basis of integrated 
programs.

DON'T BE SILLY PROTECT YOUR WILLY

Show Some Love- Las Vegas Community

Pat h ways for Youth Employment: Federal Resources for Employers

posted Aug 8, 2016, 3:36 AM by MOJO MICHELE

Pat h ways for Youth Empl oyment: Federal Resources for Employers

FEBRUARY 2015 PATH WAYS FOR YOU TH EMPLOY MENT: FEDER A L R ESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS ★ 1 

★ Pathways for Youth Employment: Federal Resources for Employers In February 2014, President Obama launched the My Brother’s Keeper initiative to address persistent opportunity gaps facing boys and young men of color and ensure that all young people can reach their full potential. Across the country, elected officials, business leaders, non-profits, foundations and local school systems are also stepping up to answer the President’s call to action to implement their own cradle-to-college-and-career strategies for improving the life outcomes of all young people. Ensuring that every young adult has the tools and opportunities to successfully enter the workforce is a key component of the My Brother’s Keeper initiative. This handbook outlines a number of federal resources available to organizations that offer entry-level opportunities to young adults, including at-risk youth. Many of these resources are available to all employers, including private businesses, non-profits, faith and secular community-based organizations, public agencies, Indian tribes, labor organizations and academic institutions. Additional resources may be available on a state and regional level. Recruitment, Screening and Referrals I. One-Stop Career Centers and Youth Councils Employers interested in hiring youth can partner with One-Stop Career Centers and Youth Councils to recruit and pre-screen job candidates. One-Stop Career Centers offer job referrals and other employment-related services to job seekers. Youth Councils consist of local Workforce Investment Board members and youth policy experts who coordinate regional youth programs and initiatives. II. Job Corps Job Corps provides 60,000 young people with hands-on career and academic training every year. Employers can work with Job Corps to gain access to thousands of dedicated entry-level employees with industry-specific training. Job Corps also provides assistance in screening eligible students to help employers select the best candidates. III. YouthBuild The YouthBuild program annually provides academic and occupational skills training and leadership development to approximately 10,000 at-risk youth, ages 16 to 24. YouthBuild can also assist employers with recruitment efforts by assessing student readiness, recommending the best qualified candidates, providing a diverse candidate pool, offering a strong post-program placement support system and helping employers demonstrate investment in the community. Pat h ways for Youth Empl oyment: Federal Resources for Empl oyers 

★ 2 ★ Workforce Development IV. Registered Apprenticeship Registered Apprenticeship programs offer employers the tools to recruit, train and retain high-skilled workers to help grow their business while improving productivity. The U.S. Department of Labor has developed a playbook on how to leverage over $50 billion a year in federal funding to help support employer-driven apprenticeships—including resources to offset instructional costs and training wages (www.doleta.gov\oa\federalresources\playbook.pdf). The Department also currently has open a $100 million American Apprenticeships Grant competition for public-private partnerships, including employer-led, and state and regional consortia, to develop and implement innovative Registered Apprenticeship programs in high-skilled, high-growth industries (www.grants.gov/web/grants/viewopportunity.html?oppId=270372). Grants will support strategies to increase access to apprenticeship opportunities for underrepresented populations in apprenticeship, including young men and women of color. The deadline to apply for an American Apprenticeship Grant is April 30, 2015. Financial Assistance V. AmeriCorps Each year, AmeriCorps engages more than 75,000 Americans in intensive service. Many organizations partner with AmeriCorps to engage these service members on projects to address priority issues in their communities. AmeriCorps also provides funding to eligible organizations that use service to expand their impact and engage at-risk youth as AmeriCorps members. AmeriCorps initiatives include: Operation AmeriCorps, AmeriCorps State and National, AmeriCorps VISTA, AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC) and Employers of National Service. VI. Federal Bonding Program The Federal Bonding Program provides employers with fidelity coverage when they hire at-risk, hard-toplace job seekers, including youth who are of legal working age. The bond covers the first six months of employment and is available at no cost to the employer. VII. Work Opportunity Tax Credit The Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014 retroactively allows employers to claim the Work Opportunity Tax Credit for hiring certain qualifying workers, including summer youth employees, through December 31, 2014. If Congress reauthorizes the Work Opportunity Tax Credit in 2015, employers who hire a summer youth employee in 2015 may be able to reduce their federal income tax liability. ★ 3 ★ I. One-Stop Career Centers and Youth Councils Established by the Workforce Investment Act, One-Stop Career Centers and Youth Councils can assist employers in recruiting and pre-screening young people for entry-level positions. One-Stop Career Centers, also known as American Job Centers, are coordinated by the U.S. Department of Labor and offer training referrals, career counseling, job listings and other employment-related assistance to job seekers. Youth Councils are subgroups of local Workforce Investment Boards, regional entities that guide workforce development policy and direct federal, state and local funding to workforce development programs in the area. They include representatives of local public housing authorities, youth services agencies and other youth policy experts. Together, Workforce Investment Boards and Youth Councils coordinate activities and programs to support local youth employment and training. 

To learn more about One-Stop Career Centers, visit: www.careeronestop.org. Benefits • One-Stop Career Centers offer Business Services Representatives and other resources to help employers meet their recruitment goals. • Youth Councils provide employers with access to local youth networks to help fill entry-level, temporary or part-time positions. They also host job recruitment events and can help to prescreen candidates. Eligibility • All employers are encouraged to work with One-Stop Career Centers and Youth Councils to recruit and pre-screen young job candidates. How to Access • Find your local One-Stop Career Center or American Job Center by visiting jobcenter.usa.gov or calling (877) US2-JOBS or (877) 872-5627. • Find your local Youth Council by visiting www.servicelocator.org/youthcouncil.asp. ★ 4 ★ 

II. Job Corps Job Corps is a voluntary career training and education program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor that prepares young people ages 16 to 24 for careers in today’s job market. Job Corps serves approximately 60,000 young people each year at 125 centers in 48 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. To learn more about Job Corps, visit: www.jobcorps.gov. Benefits 

• Job Corps saves employers time and money by providing no-cost access to entry-level workers with an average 8 to 12 months of career training and hands-on experience gained through internships with employers in a variety of career areas, including: − Advanced Manufacturing − Automotive and Machine Repair − Construction − Finance and Business − Health Care − Homeland Security − Hospitality − Information Technology − Renewable Resources and Energy − Retail Sales and Services − Transportation • Job Corps also provides assistance in screening eligible students to help employers select the best candidates. • Graduates are highly motivated, have earned their high school diplomas or high school equivalency credentials and have experience working in teams. Eligibility • All employers are encouraged to work with Job Corps to recruit and pre-screen well-trained youth for entry-level positions. How to Access • Find the nearest Job Corps center by visiting www.jobcorps.gov/centers.aspx, or calling (800) 733-JOBS or (800) 733-5627. ★ 5 ★ III. Youth Build YouthBuild is a full-time, alternative education program funded by the U.S. Department of Labor to assist at-risk youth ages 16 to 24 in obtaining high school diplomas or GED credentials while learning job skills by building affordable housing for homeless and low-income people in their communities. Around 10,000 young adults participate in the program each year at over 250 sites in 46 states, Washington, DC and the Virgin Islands. The primary target populations are adjudicated youth, youth aging out of foster care, out-of-school youth and other at-risk populations. To learn more about YouthBuild, visit: www. youthbuild.org. Benefits • YouthBuild helps employers with recruitment efforts by assessing student readiness, screening and recommending the best qualified candidates, providing a diverse candidate pool, instituting a strong post-program placement support system that increases student retention and reduces turnover costs, and assisting employers demonstrate investment in the community. Eligibility • All employers are encouraged to work with YouthBuild to recruit and screen candidates for entry-level positions. How to Access • Find the nearest YouthBuild site by visiting www.youthbuild.org/siteview. ★ 6 ★ IV. Registered Apprenticeship The U.S Department of Labor administers the national Registered Apprenticeship program. Registered Apprenticeship is an employer-driven, “earn and learn” model that combines on-the-job learning with classroom instruction. It is a proven solution for recruiting, training and retaining world-class talent. It also improves productivity, reduces turnover costs and provides opportunities for tax credits and employee tuition benefits in some states. With a network of over 150,000 employers in more than 1,000 occupations, Registered Apprenticeship has already trained millions of America’s workers. To learn more about Registered Apprenticeship, visit: www.dol.gov/apprenticeship. FEDERAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING INVESTMENTS Over $50 billion a year in federal funding is available to help employers launch and sustain apprenticeship programs. The U.S. Department of Labor Federal Resources Playbook for Registered Apprenticeship provides information on how to leverage these funds: www.doleta.gov\oa\federalresources\playbook. pdf. Benefits • The U.S. Department of Education’s Pell Grants and Federal Work Study funds, can be used to support a portion of apprenticeship training wages paid by an employer. For more information on how federal student aid programs can support apprenticeship programs, visit: http://www. ifap.ed.gov/dpcletters/GEN1422.html. • Funds from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), administered by the U.S. Department of Labor, can be used to cover apprenticeship and job-related training costs worth up to 50 percent of a trainee’s wages. For more information on WIOA funds, visit: http://www. doleta.gov/wioa. • The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is expanding a fast track program for employers to help veteran apprentices access a tax-free monthly stipend of up to nearly $1,500. To learn more about available benefits for veterans in Registered Apprenticeship, visit: http://www.doleta. gov/oa/docs/BenefitsVeteransRegisteredApprenticeship.pdf. • Construction contractors that employ apprentices from communities served by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, particularly apprentices that are YouthBuild graduates, will receive priority in serving on contracts for more than $19 billion in annual construction investments. For more information on providing Registered Apprenticeship opportunities for Section 3 residents and YouthBuild graduates, visit: http://portal.hud.gov/ hudportal/documents/huddoc?id=HUD-DOL_FACTSHEET.PDF. Eligibility • For eligibility information and to view a more comprehensive list of federal resources, visit: http://www.doleta.gov/oa/federalresources/playbook.pdf. ★ 7 ★ Pat h ways for Youth Empl oyment: Federal Resources for Empl oyers How to Access • To view a Toolkit on Building Registered Apprenticeship Programs, visit: http://www.doleta.gov/ oa/employers/apprenticeship_toolkit.pdf. AMERICAN APPRENTICESHIP GRANTS The U.S. Department of Labor is currently inviting public-private partnerships to apply for American Apprenticeship grants to develop and implement innovative, high-quality registered apprenticeship programs. This grant competition will help more Americans become apprentices, a proven path to quality employment and the middle class. Benefits • Approximately $100 million is currently available to fund approximately 25 grants. Grant awards are expected to range between $2.5 million and $5 million. Eligibility • Grantees must focus on helping more employers and workers participate in American Apprenticeships within high-growth occupations and industries, including but not limited to Information Technology, Advanced Manufacturing, Business Services, and Healthcare. • Applicants should demonstrate strategies to employ and train underserved populations in apprenticeships such as women, young men and women of color, persons with disabilities, low-skilled populations, veterans, including transitioning service members and others. • To be eligible, the applicant must show evidence of a public-private consortium that consists of at least one each from the following: 1. Private Sector: A business, a consortium of businesses, a business-related nonprofit organization, a joint labor-management organization, a labor organization or a private organization functioning as a workforce intermediary for the express purpose of serving the needs of businesses; and 2. Public Sector: At least one representative from one of the following three types of entities: the workforce investment system; public education or training provider; or a DOLrecognized State Apprenticeship Agency. • The lead applicant must be a public or non-profit organization that meets the definition of one of the types of eligible entities. • Participants served through these grants should be at least 16 years old and not currently enrolled in school, or at least 18 years old. How to Access • To learn more about the American Apprenticeship Grants, visit: www.grants.gov and search for “American Apprenticeship” or go to: www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity. html?oppId=270372. Applications must be received no later than 4:00PM ET on April 30, 2015. ★ 8 ★ V. AmeriCorps AmeriCorps is administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) and provides funding to eligible organizations that use service to expand their impact and engage youth as AmeriCorps members. Each year, AmeriCorps engages more than 75,000 Americans in intensive service focused on disaster services, economic opportunity, education, the environment, healthy futures, and support for veterans and military families. AmeriCorps initiatives include: Operation AmeriCorps, AmeriCorps State and National, AmeriCorps VISTA, AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC) and Employers of National Service. For more information on AmeriCorps programs, visit: www. nationalservice.gov/americorps. OPERATION AMERICORPS Operation AmeriCorps uses national service to address local problems with a focus on quick results and measurable outcomes. Through this program, tribal and local leaders identify a high priority local challenge in a community that AmeriCorps members can address within two years. Examples include ensuring every third grader is reading on grade level, greatly increasing energy efficiency or ending veterans’ homelessness in the community. To learn more about Operation AmeriCorps, visit: www. nationalservice.gov/operation-americorps. Benefits • Operation AmeriCorps provides funding to local and tribal governments that engage service members in transformational projects. • Operation AmeriCorps also allows organizations to request AmeriCorps State and National, AmeriCorps NCCC and/or AmeriCorps VISTA resources in a single application. Eligibility • Tribal and local governments—including counties, cities, towns and school districts—and state service commissions are eligible to apply for grants. • Projects that focus on ensuring that all high school seniors in the community have career or educational opportunities upon graduation receive a higher preference for funding. Other eligible focus areas include: disaster services, economic opportunity, education, environmental stewardship, healthy futures, veterans and military families. • Preference is also given to applicants that demonstrate strong local support or are part of the Promise Zone or Strong Cities, Strong Communities initiatives. How to Access • CNCS intends to make available the next round of Operation AmeriCorps grants after October 1, 2015, depending on the availability of appropriations. ★ 9 ★ Pat h ways for Youth Empl oyment: Federal Resources for Empl oyers • To contact your local State Service Commission for details on how to apply for Operation AmeriCorps, visit www.nationalservice.gov/about/contact-us/state-service-commissions. • For updates on AmeriCorps funding opportunities, visit: www.nationalservice.gov/ funding-opportunities. AMERICORPS STATE AND NATIONAL AmeriCorps State and National provides grants to organizations that engage AmeriCorps members in direct service or capacity building to address local and national challenges. Members serve as mentors, tutors, home builders, counselors and community liaisons, among other roles. To learn more about AmeriCorps State and National, visit: www.nationalservice.gov/programs/americorps/ americorps-state-and-national. Benefits • Grantee organizations gain access to AmeriCorps members who can help address unmet community needs by expanding services, building capacity, developing partnerships, leveraging resources, creating sustainable programs, recruiting and managing volunteers. • AmeriCorps State and National funds can support member living allowances and a portion of program operating costs, including supervision, administration and oversight. First-time grantees are required to match at 24 percent for the first three-year funding period. Eligibility • Non-profits, faith and secular community-based organizations, public agencies, Indian tribes, labor organizations and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply for these grants. • In the most recent round of funding, CNCS prioritized applications with programing that expands opportunity for all young people, consistent with the goals of My Brother’s Keeper. How to Access • CNCS intends to make available the next round of AmeriCorps State and National grants after October 1, 2015, depending on the availability of appropriations. • For updates on AmeriCorps funding opportunities, visit: www.nationalservice.gov/ funding-opportunities. AMERICORPS VISTA AmeriCorps VISTA offers organizations the opportunity to engage service members in a year of full-time service to address issues related to poverty through building organizational capacity. To learn more about AmeriCorps VISTA, visit: www.nationalservice.gov/americorps-vista. ★ 10 ★ Pat h ways for Youth Empl oyment: Federal Resources for Empl oyers Benefits • Organizations that serve as AmeriCorps VISTA sponsors can work with AmeriCorps VISTA members to create and expand programs designed to improve literacy, expand job opportunities, reduce homelessness and improve health services. Members also build capacity by managing projects, writing grants and mobilizing volunteers. • AmeriCorps VISTA provides health coverage, payroll services, training in project management and leadership, liability coverage, child care for income-eligible members, FICA and assistance with recruiting members. Eligibility • Public, private or faith-based nonprofit organizations, as well as local, state and federal agencies, can become AmeriCorps VISTA sponsors. • Project sponsors must be able to direct the project, supervise the service members and provide necessary administrative support to complete the goals and objectives of the project. How to Access • Contact the state office where the proposed project is located by visiting: www.nationalservice. gov/about/contact-us/state-offices. • There is no required match for new project sponsors, but there is the option to cost-share. AMERICORPS NATIONAL CIVILIAN COMMUNITY CORPS (NCCC) AmeriCorps NCCC is a full-time, team-based residential program for young people ages 18 to 24 that provides organizations with human capital surge capacity for short-term infrastructure, education, environmental and other projects. To learn more about AmeriCorps NCCC, visit: www.nationalservice. gov/nccc. Benefits • AmeriCorps NCCC teams assist organizations with a range of short-term projects from revitalizing a community park to creating special reading areas for children in libraries. Eligibility • Non-profits—secular and faith based—local municipalities, state governments, federal government, national and state parks, Indian tribes and schools can request assistance from AmeriCorps NCCC teams. • Project sponsors are responsible for providing project oversight and housing. How to Access • Organizations requesting the assistance of AmeriCorps NCCC teams for a project must submit a project application to the regional campus that covers your state. The regional campus can provide assistance in completing the application, developing a work plan and preparing the project sponsor for the arrival of the team. For application instructions and a list of AmeriCorps NCCC regional campuses, visit: www.nationalservice.gov/nccc and click on “Sponsor an AmeriCorps NCCC Team.” EMPLOYERS OF NATIONAL SERVICE In September 2014, President Obama launched Employers of National Service, an initiative that connects national service alumni who have served through AmeriCorps or Peace Corps with leading employers from the private, public and nonprofit sectors to create recruitment, hiring and advancement opportunities. Over 1 million Americans have participated in either AmeriCorps or Peace Corps. To learn more about Employers of National Service, visit: www.nationalservice.gov/special-initiatives/ employers-national-service. Benefits • Through this initiative, employers gain new access to a dedicated, highly qualified and missionoriented pool of potential employees. • Participating employers can also have their job opportunities highlighted via promotional channels that reach a vast network of talented job seekers. Eligibility • Any company, organization or agency can become an Employer of National Service. How to Access To sign up to be an Employer of National Service or request additional information, contact employers@ cns.gov. A commitment to be an Employer of National Service could include the following: • Explicitly indicating in relevant job announcements an interest in recruiting AmeriCorps members and returned Peace Corps volunteers. (For example, include “AmeriCorps, Peace Corps, and other national service alumni are encouraged to apply.”) • Providing an opportunity for job applicants to identify themselves as AmeriCorps or Peace Corps alumni. (For example, placing a check box on your employment application that asks a question along the following lines: “Did you serve in an AmeriCorps, Peace Corps or another national service program?”) ★ 12 ★ VI. Federal Bonding Program The U.S. Department of Labor provides fidelity bonds to employers who hire at-risk, hard-to-place job seekers, including youth who are of legal working age. To learn more about Federal Bonding, visit: www. bonds4jobs.com. Benefits • Federal bonds are available at no cost to the employer and can be issued for at-risk workers of legal working age, full or part-time, including youth, persons with poor credit, individuals with a criminal record, recovering substance abusers, welfare recipients, individuals dishonorably discharged from the military and adults who lack a work history. • Bonds cover any type of stealing—theft, forgery, larceny and embezzlement—during the first six months of employment. Federal bonding does not cover liability due to poor workmanship, job injuries or work accidents. • Employers are reimbursed for any loss due to employee theft of money or property without a deductible. The typical bond amount is $5,000 with larger amounts issued on a case-by-case basis. • Federal bonds can be issued by local One-Stop Career Center staff and do not require employers or job applicants to submit or sign paperwork. Eligibility • All employers are encouraged to apply, including private employers, non-profits, faith and secular community-based organizations, public agencies, Indian tribes, labor organizations and academic institutions. • Self-employed individuals cannot be bonded. How to Access • Find your local One-Stop Career Center by visiting jobcenter.usa.gov or www.bonds4jobs.com/ state-coordinators.html, or calling (877) US2-JOBS or (877) 872-5627. ★ 

★ VII. Work Opportunity Tax Credit The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a federal tax benefit administered by the U.S. Department of Labor that was retroactively authorized through December 31, 2014 by the Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014. It allows employers to reduce their federal income tax liability if they hired individuals from certain target groups in 2014. Employers of summer youth employees living in Empowerment Zones, for example, are eligible to reduce their liability by as much as $1,200 per youth. If Congress retroactively enacts this tax credit again, employers could be eligible for similar tax benefits in 2015. To be eligible during the authorization lapse, employers must have submitted the required WOTC forms for certification within 28 days of the new employee start date. Even though Congress has previously approved retroactive certifications, there is no guarantee that this will happen again or that new hires during the hiatus will be certified for the tax credit. To learn more about the WOTC, visit: www.doleta.gov/wotc. Benefits • Employers can receive tax credits when they hired from the following target groups in 2014: − Summer youth employees living in Empowerment Zones − Unemployed veterans (including disabled veterans) − Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients − Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients − Designated residents living in Empowerment Zones or Rural Renewal Counties − Vocational rehabilitation referred individuals − Formerly incarcerated individuals − Supplemental security income recipients • Allowable tax credits ranged between 20 and 40 percent of a new employee’s first-year wages, up to the maximum permitted for the target group to which the employee belonged. • There was no limit on the number of workers an employer could hire to qualify for the tax credit. Eligibility • All organizations are encouraged to apply, including private employers, non-profits, faith and secular community-based organizations, public agencies, Indian tribes, labor organizations and academic institutions. Pat h ways for Youth Empl oyment: Federal Resources for Empl oyers ★ 14 

★ How to Access The WOTC application process involves six simple steps with limited paperwork. The forms listed below can also be found online at www.doleta.gov/wotc. 1. Obtain certification from a State Workforce Agency that the new hire is a member of a WOTC target group (www.doleta.gov/business/incentives/opptax/State_Contacts.cfm). 2. Complete page 1 of IRS Form 8850 by the day the job offer is made and page 2 after the individual is hired (http://www.irs.gov/uac/Form-8850,-Pre-Screening-Notice-and-CertificationRequest-for-the-Work-Opportunity-Credit). 3. Complete one of the following DOL Employment and Training Administration (ETA) forms: a. www.doleta.gov/business/incentives/opptax/PDF/WOTC_ETA_Form_9061.pdf b. www.doleta.gov/business/incentives/opptax/PDF/eta_form_9062_cert.pdf 4. Submit the completed and signed IRS and ETA forms to your State Workforce Agency within 28 calendar days of the employee’s start date. 5. Receive final determination from the State Workforce Agency. 6. File for the credit with the IRS. 

Growing Roots and Ties

posted Apr 14, 2015, 9:41 PM by MOJO MICHELE   [ updated Apr 14, 2015, 9:41 PM ]


YES I am My Brother's and Sister's Keeper

posted Mar 25, 2015, 9:03 PM by MOJO MICHELE   [ updated Apr 17, 2015, 6:04 PM ]

The MY BROTHER's & SISTER'S initiative  takes us through the many facets of whom and what we are as Black people. Nobody is disposable a
nd we have to challenge that mindset in our homes, communities, workplace, churches, mosques, temples, fraternities and sororities, causal pathways, We have a chance to be better than we have ever been and not beat one another down for not doing whatever someone else thought we should have done la
st year.
GOMOJO is dedicated to providing leadership to prevent new HIV infections and our products and programs have a global reach to recruit and provide linkage to HIV prevention & education, housing, transportation, medical and dental treatment, support groups, outreach, case management, employment and much more. 
#GOMOJO Street of Love is our community’s single most powerful and enduring feet-on-the-street response to the AIDS pandemic, and we hope you can be a part of that response. We thank you in advance for being as generous as you can and for joining us in this important cause.

It’s a quick and easy way to help in the fight against AIDS, not only on Feb 7th but EVERYDAY of the year. Please help us in acknowledging that the fight is not over, by purchasing and donate MOJO Lifesavers to our Downtown Las Vegas community partners at The Center for LGBQTIA and low income community members most at need and delivered to the places they frequent

PAY ONLINE


CLICK HERE


1. Please use the below name(s) in acknowledgements? 

YOUR NAME, ORGANIZATION , SPECIAL MESSAGE or IN LOVING MEMORY OF...TO BE PRINTED ON THE LABEL 



2. Specify pledge payment for campaign? 

MOJO LIFESAVERS


3. Send us an email so we can publicly thank you in our PR campaigns and social media : Michele@Themojobags.com or Call 702-427-1611


CHECK OR CASH


MAKE CHECK TO 
be sure to specify in the memo FOR PURCHASE OF MOJO LIFESAVERS 

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Pledge payment for campaign 
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AND

Name(s) in acknowledgements and 
 

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3. Send us an email so we can publicly thank you in our PR campaigns and social media : Michele@Themojobags.com or Call 702-427-1611
We can pick up the check or cash you can mail 
THE CENTER 401 S. Maryland Pkwy. Las Vegas, NV 89101 be sure to specify in the memo FOR PURCHASE OF MOJO LIFESAVERS

Condom Distribution

posted Mar 25, 2015, 8:59 PM by MOJO MICHELE   [ updated Apr 17, 2015, 6:05 PM ]

Don't Be Silly PROTECT Your Willy!

Condom Distribution Las Vegas #AIDSFREE
GOMOJO bags are a unique, stylish and practical way to discreetly carry, safely 
store, easily access and use your small essentials.

MOJO bags are airtight, waterproof, sealed and beautifully concealed plastic key chain container tubes topped off with a secure and snug fit vinyl key chain hanger and cap. Beautifully wrapped in your choice of endless, yet limited edition design prints.

1. #GOMOJO provides condoms free of charge through our CBO and HBO CD partnerships

2. #GOMOJO conducts wide-scale distribution through our street teams and delivery of free condoms to Downtown Las Vegas businesses and places that serve alcohol

3. #GOMOJO has implemented several social marketing campaigns linked back to our site to promote not only condom use, stats, facts, policy, but also to education training, community partners, events, and endless other opportunities.

4. Conduct both promotion and distribution activities at the individual, organizational, and environmental levels.

5. Target:

a. Individuals at high-risk

b. Venues frequented by high-risk individuals

c. Communities at greatest risk for HIV infection

d. The general populations within jurisdictions with high HIV incidence.

6. GOMOJO Supplements the condom distribution program with more intense risk reduction interventions, or other prevention or health services, for individuals at highest risk.

Integrate distribution program activities within other community-level intervention approaches to promote condom use and other risk reduction behaviors.

7. GOMOJO has established jurisdictional organizations and seeking support for condom distribution and promotion activities in traditional and nontraditional venues.

8. GOMOJO has spent 4 years conducting community-wide mobilization efforts to support and encourage condom use.


An effective condom distribution program can change the way a community thinks about and engages in safe sex behavior.

Condom distribution programs can be cost-effective structural interventions that provide communities with the resources they need to prevent the spread of HIV.

Making condoms widely available is integral to successful HIV prevention. Condom distribution programs have been shown to increase condom availability and use among a wide range of populations, including youth and adult males, commercial sex workers, and those who engage in risky sexual activities.

An effective condom distribution program can change the way a community thinks about and engages in safe sex behavior. To achieve that goal, condom distribution programs should strive to make condoms available, accessible, and acceptable. This section of effectiveinterventions.org offers tools to help with the design, management, and monitoring of a successful condom distribution program in your community.

Click the links under "More Info…" on the right to access program development information, links to existing condom distribution programs, educational resources, and sources of technical assistance.

Three "A's" for Condom Distribution Program Success

Available
Ensure that condoms are available in the environment where members of the target population are found, such as pharmacies, condom dispensing machines, and outreach workers.
Accessible
Ensure unrestricted access to condoms that are available in the environment by providing free condoms that are conveniently located in multiple locations.
Acceptable
Ensure that the norms within a community support the use of condoms and that the types are acceptable to community members by producing products that are popular and supported by opinion leaders and public figures.

CDC Policy on Youth Peer Outreach Workers

CDC funded (directly or indirectly) agencies using youth (either paid or volunteer) in program outreach activities need to use caution and judgment in the venues/situations where youth workers are placed. Agencies should give careful consideration to the "age appropriateness" of the activity or venue. Additionally, agencies should comply with all relevant laws and regulations regarding entrance into adult establishments/environments. Laws and curfews should be clearly outlined in required safety protocols developed and implemented by agencies directly and indirectly funded by CDC.

If you have specific questions, please contact your CDC project officer.

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