Aleksándr Púshkin (1799-1837)

 

Prologue to ‘Ruslan and Lyudmilla

 

There’s a green oak by the bay,

on the oak a chain of gold:

a learned cat, night and day,

walks round on that chain of old:

to the right – it spins a song,

to the left –  a tale of wrong.

 

Marvels there: the wood-sprite rides,

in the leaves a mermaid hides:

on deep paths of mystery

unknown creatures leave their spoor:

huts on hen’s legs you can see,

with no window and no door.

Wood and valley vision-brimming:

there at dawn the waves come washing

over sands and silent shore,

and thirty noble knights appear

one by one, from waters clear,

attended there by their tutor:

a king’s son passing by

takes a fierce king prisoner:

a wizard carries through the sky

a knight, past all the people there,

over forests, seas they fly:

a princess in a prison pines,

whom a brown wolf serves with pride:

A mortar, Baba Yaga inside,

takes that old witch for a ride.

King Kaschey grows ill with gold.

It’s Russia! – Russian scents unfold!


And I was there and I drank mead,

I saw the green oak by the sea,

I sat there while the learned cat

told its stories – here’s one that

I remember, and I’ll unfurl,

a story now for all the world…

***
By an arc of sea a green oak stands; 

to the oak a chain of gold is tied;
and at the chain’s end night and day
a learnèd cat walks round and round.
Rightwards he goes, and sings a song;
leftwards, a fairy tale he tells.
There’s magic! It’s a wood sprite’s haunt –
a rusalka sits among the boughs –
on footpaths no one has explored
are tracks of beasts no one has seen – 10
a hut stands there on chicken’s legs,
no windows in its walls, nor doors –
unnumbered wraiths stalk wood and dale –
at dawn the ocean waves roll in
and surge across the empty sands,
while from the limpid waters strides
a troop of thirty champions,
fine men, and their sea-tutor too –
a king’s son passing by that way
takes prisoner an awesome tsar – 20
up in the clouds for all to see
above the sweep of woods and waves
a wizard hauls a warrior brave –
a princess pines in prison there,
a brown-haired wolf her loyal page –
a mortar in a witch’s form
moves to and fro as if alive –
frail Tsar Kashchéy wilts by his gold.
The place breathes Russia… reeks of Rus!
I was there once: I sipped some mead; 30
I saw the green oak by the sea;

I sat beneath it, while the cat,
that learnèd cat, told me his tales. 
One of those tales I still recall, 
and this I’ll share now with you all…
Alexander Pushkin 
Translated by Roger Clarke


You can and you can't
You shall and you shan't
You will and you won't
You're damned if you do
And damned if you don't.

The Saying: DAMNED IF YOU DO AND DAMNED IF YOU DON'T
Who Said It: Lorenzo Dow
When: Before 1834
The Story behind It: American evangelist Lorenzo Dow decided at a very early age to devote his life to teaching the word of God and began preaching at the age of 19. Although his views were similar to those of the Methodists, he was never formally affiliated with them. He roamed on horseback throughout the northern and southern parts of the U.S. Dow's dramatic sermons, eccentric manners, and strange looking clothes made him a frequent topic of conversation. He died in 1834, and in 1836 his written works were edited and published. They included "Reflections on the Love of God," a strong criticism of preachers who supported the doctrine of Particular Election and confused their congregations by pointing out conflicting statements in the Bible. In it Dow chastised"... those who preach it up, to make the Bible clash and contradict itself, by preaching somewhat like this: 'You can and you can't-You shall and you shan't-You will and you won't-And you will be damned if you do-And you will be damned if you don't.' "

"Buddy Bolden's Blues"
Thought I heard, buddy bolden say
The nasty and dirty, take it away
You're terrible and awful, take it away
I thought I heard him say

Thought I heard, buddy bolden shout
Open up that window, and let that bad air out
Open up that window, and let that stinky air out
Thought I heard buddy bolden say

Thought I heard judge Fogerty say
Give him 30 days in the market
Take him away
Give him a broom to sweep with
Take him away
Thought I heard him say

Thought I heard Franky Dirson say
Gimme that money, girl,
or I'm gonna, I'm gonna take it away
Gimme that money you owe me, or I'll take it away
Thought I heard Franky Dirson say

The Grand Old Duke of York

Oh, the grand old duke of York
He had ten thousand men.
He marched them up to the top of the hill
And he marched them down again.

When they were up, they were up.
And when they were down, they were down.
And when they were only half way up,
They were neither up nor down.


If all the seas were one sea

If all the seas were one sea,
What a great sea that would be!
If all the trees were one tree,
What a great tree that would be!

If all the axes were one axe,
What a great axe that would be!
If all the men were one man,
What a great man that would be!

And if the great man took the great axe,
And cut down the great tree,
And let it fall into the great sea,
What a splash-splash that would be!

POEMS OF WAR AND PATRIOTISM

Only a man harrowing clods
In a slow silent walk
With an old horse that stumbles and nods
Half asleep as they stalk
Only thin smoke without flame
From the heaps of couch-grass;
Yet this will go onward the same
Though Dynasties pass
Yonder a maid and her wight
Come whispering by:
War's annals will cloud into night
Ere their story die.

The chief defect of Henry King

The chief defect of Henry King
Was chewing little bits of string,
At last he swallowed some which tied
itself in ugly knots inside,
Physicians of the utmost fame
were called at once; but when they came
They answered, as they took their fees,
"There is no cure for this disease.
Henry will very soon be dead"
His parents stood about his bed
Lamenting his untimely death,
When Henry, with his latest breath,
Cried "Oh, my friends, be warned by me,
That Breakfast, Dinner, Lunch and Tea
Are all the human frame requires..."
With that the wretched child expires

Sleep, sleep, beauty bright

Sleep, sleep, beauty bright
Dreaming o'er the Joys of night
Sleep, sleep: in the sleep
Little sorrows sit and weep.

Every time I climb a tree

Every time I climb a tree
Every time I climb a tree
Every time I climb a tree
I scrape a leg
Or skin a knee
And every time I climb a tree
I find some ants
Or dodge a bee
And get the ants
All over me.
And every time I climb a tree
Where have you been?
They say to me
But don't they know that I am free
Every time I climb a tree?
For every time I climb a tree
I see a lot of things to see
Swallows, rooftops and TV
And all the fields and farms there be
Every time I climb a tree
Though climbing may be good for ants
It isn't awfully good for pants
But still it's pretty good for me
Every time I climb a tree.

Friends a hundred miles apart

Friends a hundred miles apart
Sit and chatter heart to heart,
Boys and girls from school afar
Speak to mother, ask papa.

What does he plant who plants a tree?

What does he plant who plants a tree?
He plants the friend of sun and sky,
He plants the flag of breezes free,
The shaft of beauty, towering high,
He plants a home to heaven anigh.

There once was a lady from Guam

There once was a lady from Guam
Who said, "Now the ocean's so calm
I will swim for a lark."
She encountered a shark.
Let us now sing the th Psalm.

And there are many other balls

And there are many other balls
We find at pleasure's source -
The croquet-ball, the hockey-ball.
The skittle-ball, lacrosse,
And smaller balls, the marble balls,
And bearing balls, of course.
The earth's a ball, on which we play,
With other balls in sight,
The ball of gold that plays by day,
The silver ball by night.
And all the stars, for what are they
But balls of golden light?

An open door says, "Come in."

An open door says, "Come in."
A shut door says, "Who are you?"
Shadows and ghosts go through shut doors.
If a door is shut and you want it shut,
why open it?
If a door is open and you want it open,
why shut it?
Doors forget but only doors know what it is
doors forget.

The Camel's hump is an ugly lump

The Camel's hump is an ugly lump
Which well you may see at the Zoo;
But uglier yet is the hump we get
From having too little to do.
Kiddies and grown-ups too-oo-oo,
If we haven't enough to do-oo-oo,
We get the hump -
Gameelious hump -
The hump that is black and blue!
I get it as well as you-oo-oo-
If I haven't enough to do-oo-ool
We all get hump -
Gameelious hump
Kiddies and grown-ups tool.

U can be seen without a Q.

U can be seen without a Q.
But Q must always go with U.
So here is a Q all on its own.
Come on, Q. Stand up alone.
U keep out.
Alas poor Q feels qivery, qavery
Qietly sick...
Hurry back, U,
To the rescue - quick!

If you ever, ever, ever meet a grizzly bear,

If you ever, ever, ever meet a grizzly bear,
You must never, never, never ask him where
He is going,
Or what he is doing,
For if you ever, ever dare
To stop a grizzly bear,
You will never meet another grizzly bear.

Yes, weekly from Southhampton

Yes, weekly from Southhampton
Great steamers, white and gold,
Go rolling down to Rio
(Roll down-roll down to Rio!)
And I'd like to roll to Rio
Some days before I'm old!
I've never seen a Jaguar,
Nor yet an Armadil
O dilloing in his armour,
And I s'pose I never will,
Unless I go to Rio
These wonders to behold -
Roll down-roll down to Rio -
Roll really down to Rio!
Oh, I'd love to roll to Rio
Some day before I'm old!

No sun - no moon!

No sun - no moon!
No morn - no noon -
No dawn - no dusk - no proper time of day -
No sky - no earthly view -
No distance looking blue -
No road - no street - no "t'other side the way" -
No end to any Row -
No indications where the Crescents go -
No top to any steeple -
No recognition of familiar people!
No warmth, no cheerfulness, no healthful ease,
No comfortable feel in any member -
No shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees -
No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no birds
No - vember - !

The frost is here,

The frost is here,
The fuel is dear,
And woods are sear,
And fires burn clear,
And frost is here
And has bitten the heel of the going year
Bite, frost, bite!
The woods are all the searer,
The fuel is all the dearer,
The fires are all the clearer,
My spring is all the nearer,
You have bitten into the heart of the earth,
But not into mine.

I heard music unawares

I heard music unawares
Upstairs, downstairs,
Here and there and everywheres.
Never were such lovely airs
Upstairs, downstairs,
Here and there and everywheres .
Some one sings and some one shares
Upstairs, downstairs,
Here and there and everywheres.
Some one comes and some one cares
Upstairs, downstairs,
Here and there and everywheres.
Double love and double dares
Upstairs, downstairs,
Here and there and everywheres.

Here's a body - there's a bed!

Here's a body - there's a bed!
There's a pillow - here's a head!
There's a curtain - here's a light!
There's a puff -- and so good night!

Said the Wind to the Moon, "I will blow you out,

Said the Wind to the Moon, "I will blow you out,
You stare in the air like a ghost in a chair."
He blew a great blast, and the thread was gone.
In the air nowhere was a moonbeam bare.

They are not to be told by the dozen or score,

They are not to be told by the dozen or score,
By thousands they come, and by myriads and more,
Such numbers had never been heard of before,
Such a judgement had never been witnessed of yore.
And in at the window and in at the door,
And through the walls helter-skelter they pour,
And down from the ceiling and up through the floor,
From the right and the left, from behind and before.

Hop step step step,

Hop step step step,
Hop step step step
Go the Polish dancers.
Polka or Mazurka?
I wish I knew the answers.
Such names to me sound rigmarolish,
I must polish up my Polish.

But outer space,

But outer space,
At least thus far,
For all the fuss
Of the populace
Stays more popular
Than populous.

P stands for every pretty thing,

P stands for every pretty thing,
wherever you may find it,
The sweet Pea in the garden,
and the Pretty face behind it,
It stands for Peace and Plenty too,
'tis well that we should mind it.
P stands for many other things,
for Prejudice and Pride,
For Pertness, Pique, Perversity,
and Petulance beside,
And these are P's that we must mind,
and keep them far and wide.

B's the Bus

B's the Bus
The bouncing Bus,
That bears a shopper store-ward.
It's fun to sit
In back of it
But seats are better forward.
Although it's big as buildings are
And looks both bold and grand,
It has to stop obligingly
If you but raise your hand.

It is the duty of the student

It is the duty of the student
Without exception to be prudent.
If smarter than his teacher, tact
Demands that he conceals the fact.

This is a cat that sleeps at night,

This is a cat that sleeps at night,
That takes delight
In visions bright,
And not a vagrant that creeps at night
On box cars by the river,
This is a sleepy cat to purr
And rarely stir
It's shining fur,
This is a cat whose softest purr
Means salmon, steaks, and liver.
That is a cat respectable
Connectable
With selectable,
Whose names would make you quiver.
That is a cat of piety,
Not satiety,
But sobriety.
Its very purr is of piety
And thanks to its Feline Giver.

Lazy-bones Grundy

Lazy-bones Grundy
Must do sums for Monday.
"And today it is Tuesday",
Says lazy-bones Grundy,
"So, I'll do it on Wednesday,
If not - then on Thursday,
Or even on Friday,"
Says lazy-bones Grundy.
Now very soon comes Friday
And Saturday comes,
But lazy-bones Grundy
Has no time for sums.
"Never mind", says Grundy,
"I'll do it on Sunday"

When all the world is young, lad,

When all the world is young, lad,
And all the trees are green;
And every goose a swan, lad,
And every lass a queen;
Then hey for boot and horse, lad,
And round the world away;
Young blood must have its course, lad
And every dog his day.
When all the world is old, lad,
And all the trees are brown;
And all the sport is stale, lad,
And all the wheels run down;
Creep home, and take your place there,
The spent and maimed among:
God grant you find one face there,
You loved when all was young.

Clickety-clack

Clickety-clack
Wheels on the track
This is the way
They begin to attack;
Click-ety-clack,
Click-ety-clack ,
Click-ety-clack-ety;
Click-ety-click
Clack.
Clickety-clack,
Over the crack
Faster and faster
The song of the track:
Clickety-clack ,.
Clickety-clack ,
Clickety, clackety,
Clackety ..
Clack .

Our great steeple clock

Our great steeple clock
Goes Tick-Tock, Tick-Tock.
Our small mantel clock
Goes Tick-Tack, Tick-Tack,
Riding in front,
Riding in back,
Everyone hears the song of the track:
Clickety-clack,.
Clickety-clack,..
Clickety, clackety
Clackety
Clack..

Golden in the garden,

Golden in the garden,
Golden in the glen,
Golden, golden, golden
September's here again!
Golden in the tree-tops,
Golden in the sky,
Golden, golden, golden
September's passing by.

O the green things growing, the green things growing,

O the green things growing, the green things growing,
The faint sweet smell of the green things growing!
I should like to live, whether I smile or grieve,
Just to watch the happy life of my green things growing.

A centipede was happy quite,

A centipede was happy quite,
Until a frog in fun
Said, "Pray, which leg comes after which,"
This raised her mind to such a pitch,
She lay distracted in the ditch
Considering how to run.

Children, aunts are not glamorous creatures,

Children, aunts are not glamorous creatures,
As very often their features
Tend to be elderly caricatures of your own.

Algy met a bear,

Algy met a bear,
The bear was bulgy,
The bulge was Algy.

The rain it raineth on the just

The rain it raineth on the just
And also on the unjust fella;
But chiefly on the just, because
The unjust steals the just's umbrella.

God made the bees,

God made the bees,
And the bees make honey,
The miller's man does all the work,
But the miller makes the money.

Summer is the play-by-the-stream time,

Summer is the play-by-the-stream time,
Roll-in-the-meadow-and-dream time,
Lie-on-your-back-and-chew-grass time,
Watch-butterflies-as-they-pass time,
Try-and-pick-daisies-with-toes time,
Playing-where-nobody-knows time.

The sun descending in the west,

The sun descending in the west,
The evening star does shine,
The birds are silent in their nest,
And I must seek for mine.
The moon like a flower,
In heaven's high bower,
With silent delight
Sits and smiles on the night.

If many men knew

If many men knew
What many men know,
If many men went
Where many men go,
If many men did
What many men do,
The world would be better -
I think so; don't you?

March in mighty millions pouring,

March in mighty millions pouring,
Forges flaring, cannon roaring,
Life and Death in final warring
Call you, Workingmen!
At your benches planning, speeding,
In the trenches baffling, bleeding,
Yours the help the world is needing,
Answer, Workingmen!

F is the fighting Firetruck

F is the fighting Firetruck
That's painted a flaming red.
When the signals blast
It follows fast
When the chief flies on ahead.
And buses pull to the curbing
At the siren's furious cry,
For early or late
They have to wait
When the Firetruck flashes by.

In spite of her sniffle,

In spite of her sniffle,
Isabel's chiffle.
Some girls with a sniffle
Would be weepy and tiffle,
They would look awful,
Like a rained-on waffle,
But Isabel's chiffle
In spite of her sniffle
Some girls with a snuffle,
Their tempers are uffle,
But when Isabel's snivelly
She's perfectly luffly.

I've watched you now a full half-hour,

I've watched you now a full half-hour,
Self-poised upon that yellow flower,
And, little butterfly! indeed
I know not if you sleep or feed.

The tide in the river,

The tide in the river,
The tide in the river ,
The tide in the river runs deep,
I saw a shiver
Pass over the river
As the tide turned in its sleep.

September was the seventh month

September was the seventh month
From romulus that came.
Ninth in the modern calender, it still
retains the name.
October eighth, November ninth,
December tenth of old.
Are now the tenth, eleventh and twelfth
but still these names they hold.

The more we study, the more we know,

The more we study, the more we know,
The more we know, the more we forget.
The more we forget, the less we know.
The less we know, the less we forget.
The less we forget, the more we know.
Why study?

Here's a health to all those that we love,

Here's a health to all those that we love,
Here's a health to all those that love us,
Here's a health to all those that love them
That love those that love us!

Sixteen

Sixteen
Sees and laughs,
Sleeps and eats,
Babbles, thinks,
Loves and hates,
Stretches, lives
And hopefully waits

In the morning the city

In the morning the city
Spreads its wings
Making a song
In stone that sings
In the evening the city
Goes to bed
Hanging lights
About its head

Are rose is a rose,

Are rose is a rose,
And was always a rose,
But the theory now goes
That the apple's a rose,
And the pear is, and so's
The plum, I suppose.
The dear only knows
What will next prove a rose.
You, of course, are a rose-
But were always a rose.

Brown eyes, straight nose

Brown eyes, straight nose
Dirt pies, rumpled clothes.
Torn books, spoilt toys;
Arch looks, unlike a boy's;
Little rages, obvious arts;
(Three her age is), cakes, tarts;
Falling down off chairs;
Breaking crown down stairs;
Catching flies on the pane;
Deep sighs-cause not plain;
Bribing you with kisses
For a few farthing blisses
New shoes, new frock;
Vague views of what's o'clock.
Bed gown white, kiss Dolly;
Good night! - that's Polly.

Two deep clear eyes,

Two deep clear eyes,
Two ears, a mouth, a nose,
Ten supple fingers,
And ten nimble toes,
Two hands, two feet,
two arms, two legs.
And a heart through which
Love's blessing flows.
Eyes bid ears
Hark:
Ears bid eyes
Mark:
Mouth bids nose
Smell:
Nose says to mouth,
I will:
Heart bids mind
Wonder:
Mind bids heart
Ponder.

A short direction

A short direction
To avoid dejection,
By variations
In occupations,
And prolongation
Of relaxation,
and combinations
of recreations,
And disputation
On the state of nation
In adaptation
To your station,
By invitations,
To friends and relations,
By evitation
Of amputation,
By permutation
In conversation,
And deep reflection
You'll avoid dejection.
Moral: Behave

I wish you health but not with wealth

I wish you health but not with wealth
I wish you work and worry
I wish you what I wish myself,
A share in man's sad story.
I wish you, on that next-door day
We coax the world to spin our way
A share in all its glory.

Digging for treasure?

Digging for treasure?
Nay, not a bit of it!
Digging for pleasure?
Aye, there's the wit of it!
Digging for treasure
We dig all day
With never a measure
For labour pay.
Digging for pleasure
We surely earn
A spadeful of treasure
At every turn.

When a man's busy, why, leisure

When a man's busy, why, leisure
Strikes him as wonderful pleasure:
'Faith, and at leisure once is he,
Straightaway he wants to be busy.

It was laughing time, and a tall Giraffe

It was laughing time, and a tall Giraffe
Lifted his head and began to laugh:
Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!
And the Chimpanzee on the gingko tree
Swung merrily down with a Tee
Hee Hee: Hee! Hee! Hee! Hee!
"It's certainly not against the law!"
Croaked Justice Crow with a loud guffaw
Haw! Haw! Haw! Haw!
The dancing bear who could never say "No'.
Waltzed up and down on the tip of his toe
Hol Но! Но! Но!
The donkey daintily took his paw,
And around they went: Hee-Haw! Hee-Haw
Hee-Haw! Hee-Haw!
The moon had to smile and it started to climb,
All over the world it was laughing time!
Ho! Ho! Ho! Hee-Haw! Hee-Haw!
Hee! Hee! Hee! Hee! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!

Heap high the farmer's wintry hoard

Heap high the farmer's wintry hoard
Heap high the golden corn!
No richer gift has autumn poured
From out her lavish hornl

What is all this washing about,

What is all this washing about,
Every day, week in, week out?
From getting up till going to bed,
I'm tired of hearing the same thing said.
Whether I am dirty or whether I am not,
Whether the water is cold or hot,
Whether I like it or whether I don't -
Whether I will or whether I won't -
Have you washed your hands, and washed your face?
I seem to live in the washing-place

Great, wide, beautiful wonderful world,

Great, wide, beautiful wonderful world,
With the wonderful water round you curled,
And the wonderful grass upon your breast -
World, you are beautifully dressed!
The wonderful air is over me,
And the wonderful wind is shaking the tree-
It walks on the water, and whirls the mills.
And talks to itself on the top of the hills.

The little boy who says "I'll try",

The little boy who says "I'll try",
Will climb to the hill-top;
The little boy who says "I can't",
Will at the bottom stop

The one- lama

The one- lama
He's a priest
The two- llama
He's a beast
And I will bet
A silk pajama
There isn't any
Three- lllama

I spot the hills

I spot the hills
With yellow balls in autumn
I light the prairie cornfields
Orange and tawny gold clusters
And I am called pumpkins.
On the last of October
When dusk is fallen
Children join hands
And circle round me
Singing ghost songs
And love to the harvest moon,
I am a jack-o'-lantern
With terrible teeth
And the children know
I am fooling.

The rain is raining all around, It falls on field and tree,

The rain is raining all around, It falls on field and tree,
It rains on the umbrellas here,
And on the ships at sea.

Big trucks for steel beams,

Big trucks for steel beams,
Big trucks for coal,
Rumbling down the broad streets,
Heavily they roll.
Little trucks for groceries,
Little trucks for bread,
Turning into every street,
Rushing on ahead.
Big trucks, little trucks,
In never ending lines,
Rumble on and rush ahead
While I read their signs.

Why do you listen, trees?

Why do you listen, trees?
Why do you wait? Why do you fumble at the breeze --
Gesticulate With hopeless fluttering hands -
Stare down the vanished road beyond the gate
That now no longer stands?
Why do you wait -
Trees -
Why do you listen, trees ?

Spring grass, there is a dance to be danced for you.

Spring grass, there is a dance to be danced for you.
Come up, spring grass, if only for young feet.
Come up, spring grass, young feet ask you.
Smell of the young spring grass,
You're a mascot riding on the wind horses.
You came to my nose and spiffed me.
This is your lucky year.
Young spring grass just after the winter,
Shoots of the big green whisper of the year,
Come up, if only young feet.
Come up, young feet ask you.

The Early Bird

The Early Bird
The early bird, so I have heard,
Catches the worm, and 'pon my word,
I know two chaps and yet a third
Could learn a lesson from that bird.

Hurdy-Gurdy by Ogden Nash

Hurdy-Gurdy by Ogden Nash
Hurdy-gurdy organ-grinder
Lost his wife and couldn't find her.
He sought her late, he sought her early
With hurdy-gurdy hurly-burly,
Found her in a gingerbread house,
Waltzing with a waltzing mouse.
He locked them in his hurdy-gurdy,
Which suggested the plot of Aide to Verdi.

Queen Mab's Chariot by Michael Drayton

Queen Mab's Chariot by Michael Drayton
Fib, and Tib, and Pink, and Pin,
Pick, and Quick, and Jill, and Jin,
Tit, and Nit, and Wap, and Wim –
The train that wait upon her.

April by Ted Robinson

April by Ted Robinson
So here we are in April, in snowy, blowy April,
In frowsy, blowsy April, the rowdy, dowdy time,
In soppy, sloppy April, in wheezy, breezy April,
In ringing, stinging April, with a singing swinging rhyme!
The smiling sun of April on the violets, is focal,
The sudden showers of April seek the dandelions out,
The tender airs of April make the local yokel vocal,
And he raises rustic ditties with a most melodious shout.
So here we are in April, in tipsy gipsy April,
In showery, flowery April, the twinkly, sprinkly days,
In tingly, jingly April, in highly wily April,
In mightly flightly April with its highty-tighty ways!
The duck is fond of April, and the clucking chickabiddy.
And other barnyard creatures have a try at carolling.
There's something in the air to turn a stiddy kiddy giddy.
And even I am forced to raise my croaking voice and sing.

Golden Bells by Edgar A. Рое

Golden Bells by Edgar A. Рое
Hear the mellow wedding bells. Golden Bells!
What a world of happiness their harmony foretells!
Oh, from out the sounding cells,
What a gush of euphony voluminously wells!
How it swells!
How it dwells
On the future! How it tells
Of the rapture that impels
To the swinging and the ringing
Of the bells, bells, bells,
Of the bells, bells, bells, bells,
Bells, bells, bells –
To the rhyming and the chiming of the bells!

Eletelephony by Laura E. Richards

Eletelephony by Laura E. Richards
Once there was an elephant,
Who tried to use the telephant -
No! No? I mean an elephone
Who tried to use the telephone –
(Dear me! I am not certain quite
That even now I've got it right.)
Howe'er it was, he got his trunk
Entangled in the telephunk,
The more he tried to get it free,
The louder buzzed the telephee –
(I fear I'd better drop the song
Of elephop and telephong!)

Alas, Alack! by Walter de la Mare

Alas, Alack! by Walter de la Mare
Ann, Ann?
Come quick as you can!
There's a fish that talks
In the frying-pan.
Out of the fat,
As clear as glass,
He put up his mouth
And moaned "Alasl"-
Oh, most mournful,
"Alas, alackl"
Then turned to the sizzling
And sank him back.

Shoes and Stockings by A. A. Milne

Shoes and Stockings by A. A. Milne
There's a cavern in the mountain
where the old men meet
(Hammer, hammer, hammer...
Hammer, hammer, hammer...)
My lady is marrying her own true knight,
White her gown, and her veil is white,
But she must have slippers on her dainty feet.
Hammer, hammer, hammer...
Hammer.
There's a cottage by the river
where the old wives meet
(Chatter, chatter, chatter...
Chatter, chatter, chatter...)
My lady is going to her own true man,
Youth to youth, since the world began,
But she must have stockings on her dainty feet.
Chatter, chatter, chatter...
Chatter.

The Frog by Hilaire Belloc

The Frog by Hilaire Belloc
Be kind and tender to the Frog,
And do not call him names,
As "Slimy skin" or "Polly-wog",
Or likewise "Ugly James ",
Or "Gape-a-grin", or " Toad-gone-wrong"
Or "Billy Bandy-knees":
The Frog is justly sensitive
To epithets like these.
The Washing-up Song by Elizabeth Could
Sing a song of washing up,
Water hot as hot.
Cups and saucers, plates and spoons,
Dishes such a lot!
Work the dish mop round and round,
Wash them clean as clean
Polish with a dry white cloth,
How busy we have been!

The Listening Woods by Ida W. Benham

The Listening Woods by Ida W. Benham
I looked at the shadowed mosses,
I looked at the nests o'erhead,
I looked at the small brook dreaming
Alone in its sandy bed.

A Logical Song

A Logical Song
I would, if I could,
If I couldn't how could l?
I couldn't, without I could, could l?
Could you, without you could, could ye?
Could ye? could ye?
Could you, without you could, could ye?

The Brook by Alfred Tennyson

The Brook by Alfred Tennyson
Grumbling, stumbling,
Fumbling all the day,
Fluttering, stuttering ,
Muttering away,
Rustling, hustling,
Bustling as it flows,
That it how the brook talks,
Bubbling as it goes.

Tugs by James S. Tippet

Tugs by James S. Tippet
Chug! Puff! Chug!
Push, little tug.
Chug! Puff! Chug.!
Pull, strong tug.
Busy harbor tugs,
Like round water bugs,
Hurry here and there,
Working everywhere.

A Lazy Thought by Eve Merriam

A Lazy Thought by Eve Merriam
There go the grown-ups
To the office,
To the store.
Subway rush,
Traffic crush;
Hurry, scurry,
Worry, flurry.
No wonder
Grown-ups
Won't grow up
Any more.
It takes a lot
Of slow
To grow.
Dust of Snow by Robert Frost
The way a crow
Shook down on me
The dust of snow
From a hemlock tree
Has given my heart
A change of mood
And saved some part
Of a day I have rued.

A Puzzling Question by A.M.Pratt

A Puzzling Question by A.M.Pratt
Grandma says (though I don't know why)
That I am the apple of her eye,
Brother calls me a dunce; Aunt Fan
Always says I'm her little man;
Father says I'm a reg' lar boy,
And mother calls me her pride'n' joy.
Now this is what I should like to know –
How in the world a fellow can grow?
Who's a pride 'n' joy, an apple, a dunce,
A reg'lar boy and a man at once!

Scramble by Jack Prelutsky

Scramble by Jack Prelutsky
If the zebra were given the spots of the leopard
and the leopard the spots of the zebra
then the leopard would have to be renamed the zeopard,
and the zebra retitled the lebra.
And wouldn't we laugh if the gentle giraffe
swapped his neck for the hump on the camel?
For the camel would henceforth be called the camaffe,
the giraffe designated giramel.
It would be very funny, if the ears of the bunny
were exchanged for the horns of the sheep.
For the sheep would then surely be known as the shunny,
and the bunny quite simply the beep.

Spring Rain

Spring Rain
Rain, rain, rain, April rain,
You are feeding seed and grain,
You are raising plants and crops
With your gaily sparkling drops.
The Unwinged Ones by Ogden Nash
I don't travel on planes.
I travel on trains.
Once in a while, on trains,
I see people who travel on planes.
Every once in a while I'm surrounded
By people whose planes have been grounded
They feel that they have to explain
How they happen to be on a train.
They grumble and fume about how
They'd have been in Miami by now.
By the time that they're passing through Rahway
They should be in Havana or Norway,
And they strongly imply that perhaps,
Since they're late, the world will collapse.
Sometimes on the train I'm surrounded
By people whose planes have been grounded.
That's the trouble with trains:
When it fogs, when it smogs, when it rains,
You get people from planes.

Dream Song by Walter de la Mare

Dream Song by Walter de la Mare
Sunlight, moonlight –
Twilight, starlight –
Lanternlight, taper-light,
Torchlight, no-light:
EIf-light, bat-light,
Touchwood-light, and toad-light.
And the sea ashimmering gloom of grey,
And a small face smiling
In a dream's beguiling
In a world of wonders far away.

The Lion by Ogden Nash

The Lion by Ogden Nash
Oh, weep for Mr. and Mrs. Bryan!
He was eaten by a lion,
Following which, the lion's lioness
Up and swallowed Bryan's Bryaness.

Something untitled by Lewis Carroll

Something untitled by Lewis Carroll
Said the Crab unto the Oyster
Do not loiter in this cloister,
Join me in a voyage rare,
Up into the moist salt air.
Noise and turmoil would annoy me,
Toil and trouble, too would cloy me,
Should I leave this royal cloister
Adroitly rejoined the oyster.

Take me Back to Toyland

Take me Back to Toyland
Please take me back to Toyland,
E'vryone's happy there.
It's more than a girl and boy land,
Where dreams, just like toys, can be shared.
If you believe in Toyland,
Believe in things that you cannot see;
All the world would become a Joy land,
What a wonderful world this would be!

Autumn Leaves by Eve Merriam

Autumn Leaves by Eve Merriam
Down
Autumn leaves tumble down,
Down.
Autumn leaves bumble down,
Down..
Autumn leaves bumble down ,
Red
Flaking and shaking,
Yellow
Tumbledown leaves.
Brown

Primer Lesson by Carl Sandburg

Primer Lesson by Carl Sandburg
Look out how you use proud words,
When you let proud words go, it is not easy to call them back.
They walk off proud; they can't hear you calling –
Look out how you use proud words.

No, No, November

No, No, November
Autumn crowns the glowing sphere,
Winter's grasp is full of cheer,
You between them, sad and dear,
Bind your brows with leafage sere,
Saying, "I remember
When the year was not a bier"–
Ah, woe, November!

Bacon and Eggs by Sir A. P. Herbert

Bacon and Eggs by Sir A. P. Herbert
Now blest be the Briton, his beef and his beer,
And all the strong waters that keep him in cheer,
But blest beyond cattle and blest beyond kegs
Is the brave British breakfast of bacon and eggs–
Bacon and eggs,
Bacon and eggs;
Sing bacon,
Red bacon, Red bacon and eggs!
O breakfast! O breakfast! The meal of my heart!
Bring porridge, bring sausage, bring fish for a start,
Bring kidney and mushrooms and partridges' legs,
But let the foundation be bacon and eggs
Bacon and eggs ,
Bacon and eggs ;
Bring bacon,
Crisp bacon,
And let there be eggs!

Old Ellen Sullivan by Winifred Welles

Old Ellen Sullivan by Winifred Welles
Down in our cellar on a Monday and a Tuesday,
You should hear the slapping and the rubbing and the muttering,
You should see the bubbles and the steaming and splashing.
The dark clothes dripping and the white clothes fluttering.
Where old Ellen Sullivan
Cross Ellen Sullivan,
Kind Ellen Sullivan,
Is washing and ironing, and ironing and washing.
Like a gnarled old root, like a bulb, brown and busy,
With earth and air and water angrily tussling,
Hissing at the flatirons, getting hot and huffy,
Then up to the sunlight with the baskets bustling
Comes old Ellen Sullivan,
Cross Ellen Sullivan,
Kind Ellen Sullivan ,
The clothes like blossoms, all sweet and fresh and fluffy.

To my Grammatical Niece by W. R. Spencer

To my Grammatical Niece by W. R. Spencer
The Nom'native Case which I study's - "A Niece"
Who is Genitive ever of kindness to me;
When I am sad, she's so Dative of comfort and peace,
That I scarce against fate can Accusative be!
O Friendship (this Vocative most I prefer),
Makes my case always Ablative - "by and with her".
Your Mother's a Verb from Anomaly free,
Though Indicative always of learning and sense
In all of her moods she's Potential o'er me,
And the Perfect is still her invariable Tense!
Though Passive in temper, most Active in spirit,
And we are Deponents - who swear to her merit)

The Golden Legend by Joe Wallace

The Golden Legend by Joe Wallace
A thousand faiths with a common dream
A thousand tongues with a common theme
A thousand thoughts with a single plan:
Peace on earth and goodwill to man!

Clocks and Watches by Olive Sansom

Clocks and Watches by Olive Sansom
Our great
Steeple clock
Goes Ticl.-Tock.
Tick-Tock.
Our small
Mantel clock
Goes Tick-Tack, Tick-Tack ,
Riding in front ,
Riding in back ,
Everyone hears
The song of the track:
Clickety-clack,...
Clickety-clack,....
Clickety, clackety..
Clackety..
Clack...
Tick-Tack, Tick-Tack.

There was a Boy whose name was Jim,

There was a Boy whose name was Jim,
His friends were very good to him.
They gave him Tea, and Cakes, and Jam,
And slices of delicious Ham,
And Chocolate with pink inside,
And little Tricycles to ride,
And read him Stories through and through,
And even took him to the Zoo -
But there it was the dreadful Fate
Befell him, which I now relate.
You know - at least you ought to know,
For I have often told you so -
That children never are allowed
To leave their Nurses in a Crowd;
Now this was Jim's especial Foible,
He ran away when he was able,
And on this inauspicious day
He slipped his hand and ran away!
He hadn't gone a yard when - Bang!
With open Jaws, a Lion sprang,
And hungrily begun to eat
The Boy: beginning at his feet.
Now just imagine how it feels
When first your toes and then your heels,
And then by gradual degrees,
Your shins and ankles, calves and knees,
Are slowly eaten, bit by bit.
No wonder Jim detested it!
No wonder that he shouted 'Hi!'
The Honest Keeper heard his cry,
Though very fat he almost ran
To help the little gentleman.
'Ponto!' he ordered as he came
(For Ponto was the Lion's name),
'Ponto!' he cried, with angry Frown.
'Let go Sir! Down, Sir! Put it down!'
The Lion made a sudden stop,
He let the Dainty Morsel drop,
And slunk reluctant to his Cage,
Snarling with Disappointed Rage
But when he bent him over Jim,
The Honest Keeper's Eyes were dim.
The Lion having reached his Head,
The Miserable Boy was dead!
When Nurse informed his Parents, they
Were more Concerned than I can say:-
His Mother, as She dried her eyes,
Said, 'Well - it gives me no surprise,
He would not do as he was told!'
His Father, who was self-controlled,
Bade all the children round attend
To James' miserable end,
And always keep a-hold of Nurse
For fear of finding something worse.

Оглавление

  1. 1 Aleksándr Púshkin (1799-1837)
    1. 1.1 ***By an arc of sea a green oak stands; 
    2. 1.2 "Buddy Bolden's Blues"Thought I heard, buddy bolden sayThe nasty and dirty, take it awayYou're terrible and awful, take it awayI thought I heard him sayThought I heard, buddy bolden shoutOpen up that window, and let that bad air outOpen up that window, and let that stinky air outThought I heard buddy bolden sayThought I heard judge Fogerty sayGive him 30 days in the marketTake him awayGive him a broom to sweep withTake him awayThought I heard him sayThought I heard Franky Dirson sayGimme that money, girl,or I'm gonna, I'm gonna take it awayGimme that money you owe me, or I'll take it awayThought I heard Franky Dirson say
    3. 1.3 The Grand Old Duke of York
    4. 1.4 If all the seas were one sea
    5. 1.5 POEMS OF WAR AND PATRIOTISM
    6. 1.6 The chief defect of Henry King
    7. 1.7 Sleep, sleep, beauty bright
    8. 1.8 Every time I climb a tree
    9. 1.9 Friends a hundred miles apart
    10. 1.10 What does he plant who plants a tree?
    11. 1.11 There once was a lady from Guam
    12. 1.12 And there are many other balls
    13. 1.13 An open door says, "Come in."
    14. 1.14 The Camel's hump is an ugly lump
    15. 1.15 U can be seen without a Q.
    16. 1.16 If you ever, ever, ever meet a grizzly bear,
    17. 1.17 Yes, weekly from Southhampton
    18. 1.18 No sun - no moon!
    19. 1.19 The frost is here,
    20. 1.20 I heard music unawares
    21. 1.21 Here's a body - there's a bed!
    22. 1.22 Said the Wind to the Moon, "I will blow you out,
    23. 1.23 They are not to be told by the dozen or score,
    24. 1.24 Hop step step step,
    25. 1.25 But outer space,
    26. 1.26 P stands for every pretty thing,
    27. 1.27 B's the Bus
    28. 1.28 It is the duty of the student
    29. 1.29 This is a cat that sleeps at night,
    30. 1.30 Lazy-bones Grundy
    31. 1.31 When all the world is young, lad,
    32. 1.32 Clickety-clack
    33. 1.33 Our great steeple clock
    34. 1.34 Golden in the garden,
    35. 1.35 O the green things growing, the green things growing,
    36. 1.36 A centipede was happy quite,
    37. 1.37 Children, aunts are not glamorous creatures,
    38. 1.38 Algy met a bear,
    39. 1.39 The rain it raineth on the just
    40. 1.40 God made the bees,
    41. 1.41 Summer is the play-by-the-stream time,
    42. 1.42 The sun descending in the west,
    43. 1.43 If many men knew
    44. 1.44 March in mighty millions pouring,
    45. 1.45 F is the fighting Firetruck
    46. 1.46 In spite of her sniffle,
    47. 1.47 I've watched you now a full half-hour,
    48. 1.48 The tide in the river,
    49. 1.49 September was the seventh month
    50. 1.50 The more we study, the more we know,
    51. 1.51 Here's a health to all those that we love,
    52. 1.52 Sixteen
    53. 1.53 In the morning the city
    54. 1.54 Are rose is a rose,
    55. 1.55 Brown eyes, straight nose
    56. 1.56 Two deep clear eyes,
    57. 1.57 A short direction
    58. 1.58 I wish you health but not with wealth
    59. 1.59 Digging for treasure?
    60. 1.60 When a man's busy, why, leisure
    61. 1.61 It was laughing time, and a tall Giraffe
    62. 1.62 Heap high the farmer's wintry hoard
    63. 1.63 What is all this washing about,
    64. 1.64 Great, wide, beautiful wonderful world,
    65. 1.65 The little boy who says "I'll try",
    66. 1.66 The one- lama
    67. 1.67 I spot the hills
    68. 1.68 The rain is raining all around, It falls on field and tree,
    69. 1.69 Big trucks for steel beams,
    70. 1.70 Why do you listen, trees?
    71. 1.71 Spring grass, there is a dance to be danced for you.
    72. 1.72 The Early Bird
    73. 1.73 Hurdy-Gurdy by Ogden Nash
    74. 1.74 Queen Mab's Chariot by Michael Drayton
    75. 1.75 April by Ted Robinson
    76. 1.76 Golden Bells by Edgar A. Рое
    77. 1.77 Eletelephony by Laura E. Richards
    78. 1.78 Alas, Alack! by Walter de la Mare
    79. 1.79 Shoes and Stockings by A. A. Milne
    80. 1.80 The Frog by Hilaire Belloc
    81. 1.81 The Listening Woods by Ida W. Benham
    82. 1.82 A Logical Song
    83. 1.83 The Brook by Alfred Tennyson
    84. 1.84 Tugs by James S. Tippet
    85. 1.85 A Lazy Thought by Eve Merriam
    86. 1.86 A Puzzling Question by A.M.Pratt
    87. 1.87 Scramble by Jack Prelutsky
    88. 1.88 Spring Rain
    89. 1.89 Dream Song by Walter de la Mare
    90. 1.90 The Lion by Ogden Nash
    91. 1.91 Something untitled by Lewis Carroll
    92. 1.92 Take me Back to Toyland
    93. 1.93 Autumn Leaves by Eve Merriam
    94. 1.94 Primer Lesson by Carl Sandburg
    95. 1.95 No, No, November
    96. 1.96 Bacon and Eggs by Sir A. P. Herbert
    97. 1.97 Old Ellen Sullivan by Winifred Welles
    98. 1.98 To my Grammatical Niece by W. R. Spencer
    99. 1.99 The Golden Legend by Joe Wallace
    100. 1.100 Clocks and Watches by Olive Sansom
    101. 1.101 There was a Boy whose name was Jim,
      1. 1.101.1  3. Hey Diddle, Diddle.                                                            2
      2. 1.101.2 3. Hey Diddle Diddle.
      3. 1.101.3 Hey Diddle Diddle. The Cat and the Fiddle. The Cow jumped over the Moon. The little Dog laughed to see such sport. And the Dish ran away with the Spoon.
    102. 1.102 43. Chook-Chook-Chook
    103. 1.103 Chook-Chook-Chook Good morning, Mrs. Hen. How many chickens have you got? Madam, I've got ten. Four of them are yellow, And four of them are brown, And two of them are speckled red, The nicest in the town.
  2. 2 Visit the ‘Nursery Rhymes - Lyrics and Origins!’ at http://www.rhymes.org.uk/



Fifty Favourite Nursery Rhymes. Table of Contents

 

 1. Presentation                                                                        2

 2. There was an old woman                                                    2

 3. Hey Diddle, Diddle.                                                            2

 4. The man in the moon                                                          2

 5. Little Jack Horner                                                               2
 6. Jack Sprat                                                                           2

 7. Pussycat ate the dumplings                                                 2

 8. Sing a song of sixpence                                                      3

 9. Pop goes the weasel                                                            3

10. The queen of hearts                                                           3

11. Little Tommy Tucker                                                         4

12. Old Mother Hubbard                                                         4

13. Little Miss Muffet                                                              4

14. Itsy Bitsy Spider                                                                4

15. This is the house that Jack built                                         4

16. Polly put the kettle on                                                        5

17. Pat a cake                                                                          6

18. Simple Simon                                                                    6

19. Little boy blue                                                                   6

20. Little Bo Peep                                                                    6

21. Baa baa black sheep                                                          7

22. The north wind doth blow                                                 7

23. The jolly miller                                                                  7

24. Rub-a-dub-dub                                                                  7
25. There was a crooked man                                                  7

26. Doctor Foster                                                                     7
27. If all the seas were one sea                                                8

28. Mary, Mary quite contrary                                                 8

29. Pussycat, pussycat                                                             8

30. Three blind mice                                                                8

31. A farmer went trotting                                                       8

32. There was an owl                                                               9

33. Jack and Jill                                                                       9

34. Humpty Dumpty                                                                9

35. The grand old Duke of York                                             9

                         36. Old King Cole 10                                                          10

 37. There was a Lady                                                             10
 38. Curly Locks, Curly Locks                                                 10

 39. I saw a ship a-sailing                                                         10
 40. I had a little nut tree                                                          11

 41. Ride a cockhorse                                                              11

 42. Cock a doodle doo                                                           11
 43. Chook-Chook-Chook                                                       11

 44. Hickety, pickety                                                               12

 45. Hickory Dickory Dock                                                    12

 46. Cobbler, cobbler                                                               12

 47. Oranges and lemons                                                         12

 48. Boys and girls come out to play                                        13

 49. Wee Willie Winkie                                                            13

 50. Goosey, goosey, gander                                                    13
 51. Twinkle Twinkle Little Star                                               13

 52. Star light star bright                                                           14

                        53. How many miles to Babylon                                                          14

1. Presentation

 

2. There was an old woman

 

There was an old woman tossed up in a basket.
Seventeen times as high as the moon.
And where she was going, I couldn't but ask it,
For in her hand she carried a broom.

"Old woman, old woman, old woman," called I.
"Oh wither, oh wither, oh wither so high?"
"To sweep the cobwebs off the sky."
"Shall I go with you?"
"Aye, bye and bye."

 

3. Hey Diddle Diddle.

 

Hey Diddle Diddle.
The Cat and the Fiddle.
The Cow jumped over the Moon.
The little Dog laughed to see such sport.
And the Dish ran away with the Spoon.

 

4. The man in the moon

 

The man in the moon came down too soon
And asked his way to Norwich;
He went by the south and burnt his mouth
With supping cold plum porridge.

 

5. Little Jack Horner

Little Jack Horner
Sat in the corner
Eating his Christmas pie.
He put in his thumb
And pulled out a plum
And said
What a good boy am I.

 

6. Jack Sprat

 

Jack Sprat could eat no fat,
His wife could eat no lean,
And so, between them both you see,
They licked the platter clean.

Jack had all the lean

Joan had all the fat

The bone, they picked it clean

And gave it to the cat.

 

7. Pussycat ate the dumplings

 

Pussycat ate the dumplings,

The Master stood by,
And cried, "oh, Fie!
Why did you eat the dumplings?"

8. Sing a song of sixpence

 

Sing a song of sixpence, a pocket full of rye,
Four and twenty blackbirds, baked in a pie.
When the pie was opened, the birds began to sing.
Now, wasn't that a dainty dish to set before a King.

 

The King was in his Counting House
Counting out his money.
The Queen was in the parlour
Eating bread and honey.
The maid was in the garden
Hanging out the clothes ...
When down came a blackbird
And pecked off her nose.

 

They sent for the King’s doctor

Who sewed it on again

And he sewed it on so neatly

The scene was never seen.

 

9. Pop goes the Weasel

 

Up and down the City road,
In and out the Eagle,
That’s the way the money goes,
Pop! Goes the weasel.

 

A halfpenny for a cotton bowl

A farthing for a needle

That’s the way the money goes,
Pop! Goes the weasel

 

Half a pound of tuppenny rice,
Half a pound of treacle.
Mix it up and make it nice

Pop! Goes the weasel.
 

Every time my mother goes out

The monkey’s on the table

Cracking nuts and eating spice

Pop! Goes the weasel.

If you want to buy a pig

Buy a pig with hairs on

Every hair a penny a pair

Pop! Goes the weasel.

10. The Queen of Hearts

 

The Queen of Hearts… she made some tarts all on a summer's day

The Knave of Hearts… he stole the tarts and took them clean away.
The King of Hearts called for the tarts and beat the Knave full sore
The Knave of Hearts brought back the tarts and vowed… He'd steal no more.

 

 

11. Little Tommy Tucker 

 

Little Tommy Tucker sings for his supper,
What shall we give him? White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it without a knife?
How will he be married without a wife?

 

12. Old Mother Hubbard

 

Old Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard
To get her poor dog a bone,
When she got there
The cupboard was bare
And so the poor dog had none.

 

13. Little Miss Muffet 

 

Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet
Eating her curds and whey,
There came a big spider,
Who sat down beside her
And frightened Miss Muffet away

 

14. Itsy Bitsy Spider

 

Itsy Bitsy spider climbing up the spout
Down came the rain and washed the spider out
Out came the sunshine and dried up all the rain
Itsy Bitsy spider climbing up again!

 

15. This is the House that Jack built

 

This is the house that Jack built!
This is the malt that lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cat that killed the rat
That ate the malt that lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the maiden all-forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the farmer sowing his corn
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built!

 

This is the horse, and the hound, and the horn

That belonged to the farmer sowing his corn
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built!

 

16. Polly Put the Kettle on

 

Polly put the kettle on,
Polly put the kettle on,
Polly put the kettle on,
We'll all have tea.
Sukey take it off again,
Sukey take it off again,
Sukey take it off again,
They've all gone away.

 

 

17. Pat a cake

 

Pat a cake, Pat a cake, baker's man
Bake me a cake as fast as you can; 
Pat it and prick it and mark it with ‘T’, 
And put it in the oven for Tommy and me. 

 

18. Simple Simon

 

Simple Simon met a pieman going to the fair;
Said Simple Simon to the pieman "Let me taste your ware"
Says the pieman to Simple Simon "Show me first your penny"
Says Simple Simon to the pieman "Indeed, I have not any!"

Simple Simon went a-fishing for to catch a whale;
All the water he had got was in his mother's pail.
Simple Simon went to look if plums grew on a thistle;
He pricked his fingers very much which made poor Simon whistle.
He went for water in a sieve but soon it all fell through;
And now poor Simple Simon bids you all "Adieu"

 

19. Little Boy Blue

 

Little Boy Blue come blow your horn,
The sheep's in the meadow the cow's in the corn.
But where's the boy who looks after the sheep?
He's under a haystack fast asleep.
Will you wake him? No, not I - for if I do, he's sure to cry

 

20. Little Bo Peep

 

Little Bo peep has lost her sheep
And doesn't know where to find them.
Leave them alone and they'll come home,
Bringing their tails behind them.
Little Bo peep fell fast asleep
And dreamt she’d heard them bleating,
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they were all still fleeting.
Then up she took her little crook
Determined for to find them.
She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they left their tails behind them.
It happened one day, as Bo peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by; 
There she espied their tails side by side
All hung on a tree to dry.
She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,
And over the hillocks went rambling,
And tried what she could,
As a shepherdess should,
To tack again each to its lambkin.

 

 

 

 

21. Baa baa black sheep

 

Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full!
One for the master, one for the dame,
And one for the little boy who lives down the lane.

 

22. The North wind doth blow

 

The North wind doth blow and we shall have snow,
And what will poor robin do then, poor thing?
He'll sit in a barn and keep himself warm
And hide his head under his wing, poor thing.

 

23. The Jolly Miller

    

There was a jolly miller once
Lived on the river Dee;
He worked and sang from morn till night,
No lark blither than he.
And this the burden of his song
Forever used to be:
I care for nobody, no! Not I,
If nobody cares for me.

 

24. Rub-a-dub-dub

Rub-a-dub-dub
Three men in a tub
Who do you think they be?
The butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker.

Turn 'em out, knaves all three!
They all jumped out of a rotten potato.

 

Three wise men of Gothem

Went to sea in a bowl

If the bowl had been stronger

My story had been longer.

25. There was a crooked man

 

There was a crooked man and he walked a crooked mile,
He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stile.
He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse.
And they all lived together in a little crooked house

 

26. Doctor Foster

Doctor Foster
Went to Gloucester
In a shower of rain. 
He stepped in a puddle
Right up to his middle
And never went there again!

 

 

27. If all the seas were one sea

 

If all the seas were one sea,
What a great sea that would be!
If all the trees were one tree,
What a great tree that would be!

If all the axes were one axe,
What a great axe that would be!
If all the men were one man,
What a great man that would be!

And if the great man took the great axe,
And cut down the great tree,
And let it fall into the great sea,
What a splash-splash that would be!

 

If only

 

If ifs and ands were pots and pans

There’d be no work for tinkers

If herrings grew on a blackberry bush

Then we should all the drinkers.

If all the world were paper,
And all the sea were ink,
If all the trees
Were bread and cheese,
What should we have to drink?

28. Mary, Mary quite contrary

 

Mary, Mary quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With silver bells and cockle shells
And pretty maids all in a row.

 

29. Pussycat, pussycat

 

Pussycat, pussycat, where have you been?
I've been to London to look at the Queen.
Pussycat, pussycat, what did you there?
I frightened a little mouse under her chair.

30. Three blind mice

 

Three blind mice,
See how they run!
They all ran after a farmer's wife,
Who cut off their tails with a carving knife.
Did ever you see such a sight in your life,
As three blind mice?

 

31. A farmer went trotting

 

A farmer went trotting upon his grey mare.
Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
With his daughter behind him so rosy and fair.
Lumpety, lumpety, lump!
A raven cried, "Croak!"
And they went tumbling down.
Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
The mare broke her knees,
And the farmer his crown.
Lumpety, lumpety, lump!
The mischievous raven flew laughing away.
Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
And vowed he would serve them,
The same the next day.
Lumpety, lumpety, lump!

 

32. There was an Owl

 

There was an Owl lived in an oak.
Whiskey, whaskey, weedle!
And all the words he ever spoke,
Were fiddle, faddle, feedle!

A Gunner chanced to come that road,
Whiskey, whaskey, weedle!
Says he, "I'll shoot you, Stupid Bird!
So fiddle, faddle, feedle!"

 

33. Jack and Jill

 

Jack and Jill

Went up the hill
To fetch a pail of water.
Jack fell down

And broke his crown
And Jill came tumbling after.

Up Jack got

And home did trot
As fast as he could caper
He went to bed

To mend his head
With vinegar and brown paper.

 

34. Humpty Dumpty

 

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall.
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the king's horses and all the king's men
Couldn't put Humpty together again!

35. The Grand Old Duke of York

 

Oh, the grand old duke of York
He had ten thousand men.
He marched them up to the top of the hill
And he marched them down again.

When they were up, they were up.
And when they were down, they were down.
And when they were only half way up,
They were neither up nor down.

 

36. Old King Cole

 

Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he.
He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers three.

Now every fiddler had a fiddle fine,
And a very fine fiddle had he, had he.
Tweedle dum, tweedle dee, went the fiddlers three,
Tweedle dum dee, dum dee deedle dee.

Tweedle dum, tweedle dee, went the fiddlers three,
Tweedle dum dee, dum dee deedle dee.

 

37. There was a Lady 

Honey, quoth she,
Pig-hog, wilt thou be mine?
Hoogh, quoth he.

I'll build thee a silver sty,
Honey, quoth she,
And in it thou shall lie.
Hoogh, quoth he.

Pinned with a silver pin,
Honey, quoth she,
That thou may go out and in.
Hoogh, quoth he.

Wilt thou have me now,
Honey, quoth she,

Speak or my heart will break
Hoogh, hoogh, hoogh, quoth he.

38. Curly Locks, Curly Locks

 

Curly Locks, Curly Locks
Will thou be mine?
Thou shall not wash dishes,
Nor yet feed the swine,
But sit on a cushion
And sew a fine seam,
And feed upon strawberries,
Sugar, and cream.

39. I saw a ship a-sailing

I saw a ship a-sailing,
A-sailing on the sea.
And, oh, but it was laden
With pretty things for thee.

There were comfits in the cabin,
And apples in the hold;
The sails were made of silk
And the masts were all of gold.

The four-and-twenty sailors
That stood upon the decks,
Were four-and-twenty white mice
With chains about their necks.

The captain was a duck
With a packet on his back,
And when the ship began to move
The captain said, "Quack! Quack!"

 

40. I had a little nut tree

 

I had a little nut tree, nothing would it bear

But a silver nutmeg and a golden pear.
The King of Spain's daughter came to visit me,

And all for the sake of my little nut tree.

I skipped over water, I danced over sea,
And all the birds in the air couldn't catch me.

41. Ride a cock horse

 

Ride a cock horse to Banbury Cross
To see a fine lady upon a white horse.
Rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,
She shall have music wherever she goes.

42. Cock a-doodle doo

Cock a-doodle doo,
My dame has lost her shoe;
My master's lost his fiddling stick,
And knows not what to do.

Cock a-doodle doo,
What is my dame to do?
Till master finds his fiddling stick
She'll dance without her shoe.

Cock a-doddle doo,
My dame has found her shoe,
And master's found his fiddling stick
Sing doddle doddle doo
Cock a-doodle doo,
My dame will dance with you,
While master fiddles his fiddling stick,
For dame and doodle doo.

 

43. Chook-Chook-Chook

 

Chook-Chook-Chook
Good morning, Mrs. Hen.
How many chickens have you got?
Madam, I've got ten.
Four of them are yellow,
And four of them are brown,
And two of them are speckled red,
The nicest in the town.

 

44. Hickety pickety

 

Hickety pickety, my black hen,
She lay's eggs for gentlemen;
Sometimes nine, sometimes ten,
Hickety pickety, my black hen.

 

45. Hickory Dickory Dock

 

Hickory Dickory dock
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck one
The mouse ran down
Hickory Dickory dock

 

Hickory Dickory there

The pig flew up in the air

The man in brown

Soon brought him down

Hickory Dickory there

 

Hickory Dickory Sacaradown

How many miles to Richmond town

Turn to the left and turn to the right

And you may get there by Saturday night

 

46. Cobbler, cobbler, mend my shoe

 

Cobbler, cobbler, mend my shoe,
Get it down by half past two

Stitch it up and stitch it down

Then I’ll give you half a Crown


47. Oranges and lemons

 

Oranges and lemons
Say the bells of St Clements
You owe me five farthings
Say the bells of St Martins
When will you pay me?
Say the bells of Old Bailey
When I grow rich
Say the bells of Shoreditch
When will that be?
Say the bells of Stepney
I'm sure I don't know
Says the great bell at Bow
Here comes a candle to light you to bed
Here comes a chopper to chop off your head

 

 

 

 

48. Boys and girls come out to play

 

Boys and girls come out to play,
The moon doth shine as bright as day,
Leave your supper, and leave your sleep,
And join your playfellows in the street.
Come with a whoop, come with a call,
Come with a good will, or not at all.
Up the ladder and down the wall,
A halfpenny loaf will serve us all.
You find milk, and I'll find flour,
And we'll have a pudding in half an hour.

 

49. Wee Willie Winkie

 

Wee Willie Winkie
Runs through the town.
Upstairs, and downstairs
In his night gown.
Tapping at the window
Crying through the lock
Are the children all in bed?
For now’s  eight o'clock.

 

50. Goosey, Goosey, gander,

Whither shall I wander?
Upstairs, and downstairs,
And in my lady's chamber.

There I met an old man
Who wouldn't say his prayers!
I took him by the left leg
And threw him down the stairs.

 

51.Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

 

Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.
 
When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.
 
Then the trav'ler in the dark
Thanks you for your tiny spark;
How could he see where to go,
If you did not twinkle so?
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!

In the dark blue sky you keep, and
Through my curtains often peep,
For you never shut your eyes,
Till the morning sun does rise.

 As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the trav'ler in the dark,
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle on, please, little star.
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,

52. Star light star bright

 

Star light star bright,
The first star I see tonight,
I wish I may, I wish I might,
Have the wish I wish tonight.

 

53. How many miles to Babylon

 

How many miles to Babylon?
Three score and ten.
Can I get there by candlelight?
Aye, and back again.
If your feet are nimble and light,
You'll get there by candlelight.

 

 

Educational Resource
Alchin, L.K. Rhymes.org.uk (Nursery Rhymes lyrics and Origins), retrieved November 16 2004 from www.rhymes.org.uk

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