skepticism
 
 
The property of representations of a part of the world that captures that part as being a certain way; meaning.
 

Details:
 
Skeptical views come in two major varieties: global and local. Global skepticism denies that we have any knowledge at all. Less ambitiously, local skepticisms deny that we have knowledge of e.g., causation, God, other minds, or the external world. Arguments for skeptical conclusions come in as many varieties as there are necessary conditions for knowledge. While Gettier-style examples have shaken our faith that justified true belief is sufficient for knowledge, it is common to maintain that that tripartite analysis nonetheless supplies necessary conditions for knowledge.

The first kind of skeptical argument attacks the justification of some putative knowledge claim. Cartesian skeptical arguments comprise the most wide-spread and influential version of this kind of skeptical argument. The second kind of skeptical argument challenges whether the veracity condition for some putative knowledge claim has been met. The falsity induction (aka the pessimistic induction) is an example of this kind of skeptical argument against scientific knowledge. The third kind of skeptical argument challenges whether the doxastic condition for some putative knowledge claim has been met. Some of Berkeley's arguments against our knowledge of mind-independent material objects take this form. Berkeley argued that we could not entertain mental states about mind-independent things, because any attempt to do so would automatically make them mind-dependent.
 
 
Pete Mandik