Minsky, Marvin
 
 
(Ph.D. Mathematics, Princeton, 1954). His research has led to both theoretical and practical advances in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, neural networks, and the theory of Turing Machines and recursive functions. He has made major contributions in the domains of knowledge representation, computational semantics, machine perception, and symbolic and connectionist learning.
 

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Minsky is Toshiba Professor of Media Arts and Sciences, and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, at MIT. His research has led to both theoretical and practical advances in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, neural networks, and the theory of Turing Machines and recursive functions. He has made major contributions in the domains of knowledge representation, computational semantics, machine perception, and symbolic and connectionist learning. Minsky was one of the pioneers of intelligence-based mechanical robotics, designing and building some of the first mechanical hands with tactile sensors, visual scanners, and their software and computer interfaces. In 1951, he built the first randomly wired neural network learning machine (called SNARC, for Stochastic Neural-Analog Reinforcement computer), based on the reinforcement of simulated synaptic transmission coefficients. In 1959, Minsky co-founded what became the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory with John McCarthy, which he co-directed until 1974. His influential publications include Perceptrons (with Papert, 1969), which explores the limitations of connectionist models of cognition, and A Framework for Representing Knowledge (1974), where he proposes a model of knowledge representation, involving ‘frames’ that inherit their variable assignments from previously defined frames, to account for many cognitive phenomena. Minsky’s notion of ‘frame’ is often considered a precursor of object oriented programming. In 1985, Minsky published The Society of Mind, proposing a theory of mind that he had been developing throughout the 1970s and 1980s, according to which intelligence is not the product of any singular mechanism, but comes from the managed interaction of a diverse variety of resourceful agents.
 
 
Tadeusz Zawidzki