McCarthy, John
 
 
(b. 1927, Boston, MA. Ph.D. Mathematics, Princeton, 1951). McCarthy has been interested in artificial intelligence since 1948 and coined the term in 1955. His main current research (1995) is formalizing common sense knowledge and reasoning.
 

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McCarthy taught mathematics at Stanford (1953-1955), mathematics at Dartmouth (1955-1958), communication science at MIT (1958-1962), computer science at Stanford (1962-present), and directed the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at Stanford (1965-1980). McCarthy has been interested in artificial intelligence since 1948 and coined the term in 1955. He invented the LISP programming language in 1958, and the circumscription method of non-monotonic reasoning in 1978. His main research (1995) is formalizing common sense knowledge and reasoning. His most recent paper is on formalization of context. On of McCarthy’s early papers, "Programs with Common Sense,"is probably the first paper on logical AI, in which logic is the method of representing information in computer memory and not just the subject matter of the program, given at the Teddington Conference on the Mechanization of Thought Processes in December 1958 and printed in the proceeding of that conference. Other influential papers include "Some Philosophical Problems from the Standpoint of Artificial Intelligence" (with Pat Hayes, 1969), "Artificial Intelligence, Logic and Formalizing Common Sense (1989, published in Philosophical Logic and Artificial Intelligence, edited by Richmond Thomason), "Circumscription - A Form of Nonmonotonic Reasoning"(1980), "Ascribing Mental Qualities to Machines" (1979, reprinted in his 1990 book Formalizing Common Sense), and "Making Robots Conscious of their Mental States" (1995).
 
 
Tadeusz Zawidzki