Gibson, Eleanor J.
 
 
(b. 1910, Ph.D. Psychology, Yale University, 1938). Gibson’s research has embraced learning in humans and animals, studies of controlled rearing in animals, development of reading skill, and especially perceptual development in infants and young children.
 

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Gibson’s research has embraced learning in humans and animals, studies of controlled rearing in animals, development of reading skill, and especially perceptual development in infants and young children. She view perceptual development as a process of differentiation, and perceptual learning as an active process of information pickup. The perceptual world is not constructed by add-on processes of association and inference; rather, the infant explores the array of stimulation, searching for invariants underlying the permanent properties of the world and the persisting features of the layout and objects in it. Much of this is revealed in events, as change (transformations over time) discloses invariant properties. What comes to be perceived are affordances for action of places, things, and events in the world. These ideas are expressed in Principles of Perceptual Learning and Development, and in papers such as "The Concept of Affordances in Development: The Renascence of Functionalism."
 
 
Tadeusz Zawidzki