Bartlett, Sir Frederick Charles
 
 
(b. 1886, Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire, England, d. 1969, Cambridge, England, M.A. Moral Sciences, University of Cambridge). Bartlett is best know for his studies of memory and social psychology. His most significant and influential work is Remembering (1932), which examines the influence of social factors on memory in an experimental setting.
 

Details:
 
From 1922 to 1952, Bartlett was reader in experimental psychology, director of psychology laboratory, and first professor of experimental psychology, at Cambridge University. He was also editor of the British Journal of Psychology from 1924 to 1948, held honorary doctorates from seven universities, and was knighted in 1948. Bartlett influenced the course of British psychology as an administrator and an educator. His program at Cambridge was one of the few British graduate programs in psychology for many years. Bartlett is best know for his studies of memory and social psychology. His most significant and influential work is Remembering (1932), which examines the influence of social factors on memory in an experimental setting. Instead of traditional nonsense syllables, Bartlett used meaningful materials to study the effects of past experience on the assimilation of materials. He showed how individuals, instead of merely reproducing the materials, reworked them in the light of their past experience. The notion of schema or conceptual model originated with Bartlett. His book marked a break with the German tradition in psychology and the advent of methods to study higher thought processes without the use of introspection. Other books include Textbook of Experimental Psychology (1925), Political Propaganda (1941), and Thinking: An Experimental and Social Study (1958).
 
 
Tadeusz Zawidzki