Ballard, Dana
 
 
(b. 1947-, Ph. D., UC, Irvine, 1974). His main research interest is in computational theories of the brain with an emphasis on human vision. In 1985, with Chris Brown, he led a team that designed and built a high speed binocular camera control system that is capable of simulating human eye movements.
 

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Ballard has held the following positions: Visiting Consultant, Laboratorio Technol. Biomediche, Rome, Italy (1974-75), Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Radiology (1975-82), Associate Professor of Computer Science (1982-87), Professor of Computer Science (1987-present), all at the University of Rochester. His main research interest is in computational theories of the brain with emphasis on human vision. In 1985, with Chris Brown, he led a team that designed and built a high speed binocular camera control system that is capable of simulating human eye movements. The system is mounted on a robotic arm that allows it to move at one meter per second in a two meter radius workspace. This system has led to an increased understanding of the role of behavior in vision. The theoretical aspects of that system were summarized in a paper ``Animate Vision,'' which received the Best Paper Award at the 1989 International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence. Dana is also interested in models of the brain that relate to detailed neural models. With Raj Rao, Virginia DeSa, Steve Whitehead and Andrew McCallum, he has been investigating the role of reinforcement learning in the learning of simple tasks such as Block Stacking. The solutions that can be learned are suboptimal but extend to complex environments that cannot be handled by traditional approaches. This work has been the basis for the study of human eye and hand movements using virtual environments. Relevant publications: ``Reference Frames for Animate Vision."(1989), and ``Animate Vision."(1991).
 
 
Tadeusz Zawidzki