Anderson, John R
 
 
(b. 1947, Vancouver, BC, Canada: Ph.D. Psychology, Stanford University, 1972.) Anderson is well known for proposing ACT theory, intended to be a complete theory of higher-level human cognition, according to which human cognition arises as an interaction between declarative and procedural knowledge structures.


Details:

After spending a few years at Yale and the University of Michigan, Anderson moved to Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in 1978, where he has been ever since. Anderson is well known for proposing ACT theory, intended to be a complete theory of higher-level human cognition, according to which human cognition arises as an interaction between declarative and procedural knowledge structures. The theory was first proposed in his 1976 book Language, Memory, and Thought. Anderson modeled declarative memory as the semantic network structure that had been introduced in HAM, a model of human associative memory that he developed with Gordon Bower in the book Human Associative Memory, while he was a graduate student at Stanford. In his early period at CMU, Anderson published the textbook Cognitive Psychology and its Implications (1980), now in its fourth edition, and the research monograph The Architecture of Cognition (1983), which describes a much more mature ACT theory. This book is Anderson’s most cited work. In the mid-1980s, Anderson became interested in cognitive development, attempting to simulate language acquisition, and exploring the applications of cognitive psychology to mathematics education. Most recently, Anderson has been integrating research into the statistical structure of the problems solved by ‘subsymbolic’ processes with the ACT architecture. This research has led to ACT-R theory, first described in Rules of the Mind (1993).
 
 
Tadeusz Zawidzki