Vocaloid Interface

[This Article is Under Construction]


Vocaloid is a vocal synthesizer program developed by Yamaha corporation. The goal is to take samples of a human voice, and string them together to 'sing' using a computer. Yamaha is already the world's largest manufacturer of musical instruments, sound and audio equipment. Ranging from traditional strings, woodwinds, percussion and brass to keyboard synthesizers and much more.




Can I install Japanese Vocaloids on an English PC?

It has been done, yes. What you need to do is set your System/User locale to Japanese. You can do this using the installer disk that came with your windows XP. If you bought your computer with XP pre-installed you should still have gotten an installation disc with it in the box. Just a fair warning, part A of the article will require a reboot, part B probably won't.

What is 'System Locale?'

Refer to this page.

"Examples of system locale usage:

  1. A German user wants to run a non-Unicode Japanese application that was designed for Japanese Windows 95. The user has to select Japanese as the system locale to do this. Note: Non-Unicode German applications will not run flawlessly anymore. German umlauts will not be displayed correctly.

  2. The same German user wants to type Japanese text in a non-Unicode German application. The user selects Japanese as the system locale. Note: Non-Unicode German applications will not run flawlessly anymore. German umlauts will not be displayed correctly.

  3. An Arabic user wants to type Arabic, French, and English in a non-Unicode Arabic application. The user should choose one of the Arabic system locales."

-Microsoft


Can't I just download the Japanese Language packs?

If you haven't got a disc, try Microsoft.com for the Japanese language packs, but really you should install it with your system disc. It's faster and doesn't require you to be connected to the internet.

Could I install my Japanese Vocaloids as singers on English Vocaloid Software?

No. Not only is the software a different version (Save for Sonikka, Prima and Tonio?), but the English phenoms used are different than in the Japanese versions.