Miklos Gyori

my courses at the University of Vienna, Institute for Linguistics


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CURRENT COURSE, WINTER SEMESTER 2012

Cognitive Psychology for Linguists 

(lectures, 2 teaching hours/week,  blocked)


COURSE DESCRIPTION

The course is aimed at giving a comprehensive introduction to cognitive psychology (and, more broadly, to cognitivism), with special emphasis on general issues relevant to linguistics. Some historical roots, key concepts, methodologies, fundamental approaches and hot issues which characterise this science of (human) mind will be explored. The topics therefore will include, among others, the followings: kinds of explanation in cognitive psychology/science; the concept of internal (mental) representations; kinds  of representations and forms of knowledge; levels of description/explanation; the relationship between neuroscience, computer modelling, psychology and linguistics; core views on mental architecture; debates on the origins of knowledge; analogies and dis-analogies between language and other domains of knowledge; the problem of human consciousness in cognitive psychology/science. Discussing these issues we shall use human linguistic  capacities and their various explanations as recurring examples.


REQUIRED READINGS

Eysenck, M. & Keane, M.T. (2005 or 2006): Cognitive Psychology: A Student's Handbook (5th Edition). Psychology Press. The following chapters: chapter 1. Approaches to cognitive psychology;  chapter 2. Basic processes in visual perception; chapter 3. Object recognition;  chapter 4. Perception, motion and action; chapter 5. Attention and performance; chapter 6. Learning and memory; chapter 7. Long term memory systems;  chapter 8. Everyday memory;  chapter 9. Concepts and categories;  Part V. Present and future. (Corresponding chapters of later editions can also be used.)


REQUIREMENTS

    written exam

    > short essays, 60 minutes
    > covering required readings & lectures
    > a list of key concepts will soon be available (check out below at 'downloadables')

    exam must be done by end of SSM 2013


    EXAM OCCASIONS  will be offered:

    > 1st exam occasion: FRI 11.01.2013, 12:30, Seminar Room 7 Sensengasse 3a.

    > 2nd exam occasion: FRI 08.02.2013, 11:00, Seminar Room 2 Sensengasse 3a.

    > further 2 occasions in SSM 2013 (to be announced later)
 



DATES & TIMING OF LECTURES

Block 1
  • THU 18.10.2012 14.00-18.00: Seminar Room 7 Sensengasse 3a;
  • FRI 19.10.2012 11.00-14.00: Seminar Room 7 Sensengasse 3a;
Block 2 
  • THU 15.11.2012 13.00-15.00: Seminar Room 4 Sensengasse 3a;
  • FRI 16.11.2012 11.00-14.00: Seminar Room 7 Sensengasse 3a;
Block 3
  • THU 13.12.2012 11.00-14.00: Seminar Room 7 Sensengasse 3a AND THEN 16.00-18.00: Seminar Room 3 Sensengasse 3a;
Block 4
  • THU 10.01.2013 11.00-17.00: Seminar Room 7 Sensengasse 3a;
  • FRI 11.01.2013 11.00-14.00: Seminar Room 7 Sensengasse 3a.
    • 11:00  -12:00: consultation
    • 12:30 written exam (1st occasion)

CONSULTING HOURS

on special arrangement via e-mail (gyorimiklos (at) elte (dot) hu); preferably before or after lectures.

DOWNLOADABLES BY TOPICS

  • course description (pdf)
  • topic 1: historical & conceptual introduction (pdf)
  • topic 2: consciousness & cognition (pdf)
  • topic 3: kinds of knowledge (pdf)
  • topic 4: cognitive architecture (pdf)
  • topic 5: cognitive development & knowledge acquisition (pdf)
  • topic 6: action control, cognitive control (pdf)
  • topic 7: the communicating mind (pdf)
  • list of key concepts from required book chapters (for the exam) (pdf)


==========


previous course: Summer Semester 2011

Introductory Seminar on Cognitive Psychology for Linguists:
Eye-tracking technique in the study of language, communication and cognition


COURSE DESCRIPTION

In the second part of a two-semester introductory course on cognitive psychology (‘cognitivism’) we shall focus on a more specific issue, both methodologically and in terms of the issues to be explored. That is, this proseminar is intended to give an intensive introduction into how certain key aspects of language, communication and cognition are interrelated, as this relationship is seen though he eyes of contemporary cognitive psychology, and is studied by eye-tracking methodology. Eye-tracking (or gaze-tracking) is an innovative, fast developing technology that have gained more and more significance in the experimental study of language, communication and cognition in the last decade. In the course, the foundations of this research technique will be discussed in a detailed way. Then we shall turn to some specific issues to demonstrate the use of this research technology. These specific issues will include, among others, the following: sentence integration, its relation to intentional communication and social cognition; atypical language, communication and social cognition (primarily in autism).


DOWNLOADABLES

  • detailed course description PDF

==========

earlier course: Winter Semester 2010

Cognitive Psychology for Linguists I.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The course is aimed at giving a comprehensive introduction to cognitive psychology (and, more broadly, to cognitive science), with special emphasis on general issues relevant to linguistics. Historical roots, basic concepts, methodology, key problems and fundamental approaches which characterise the present-day science of human mind will be explored. The topics therefore will include, among others, the followings: kinds of explanation in cognitive science; the concept of internal (mental) representations; types of representations; levels of description/explanation; the relationship between neuroscience, computer modelling, psychology and linguistics; the nativism/empiricism/constructivism debate; basic views on mental architecture; analogies and dis-analogies between language and other domains of knowledge; the problem of human consciousness in cognitive science. Discussing these issues we shall use human linguistic capacities and their various explanations as recurring examples.

(See more below at the downloadable course description!)

DOWNLOADABLES

  • course description (pdf)

==========

earlier course: Summer Semester 2009

Communication,Theory of Mind, Autism
(Cognitive Psychology for Linguists II.) 
Proseminar, 2 teaching hours / week

 brief course description 

In the second part of a two-semester introductory course on cognitive psychology (cognitive science) we shall focus on a more specific issue: the relationship between three highly-complex and exclusively human cognitive capacities, language, flexible communication and naive theory of mind. We shall explore the important analogies and dis-analogies between these capacities, overview the some important facts and psychological models about their functioning and development, with a special emphasis on their relationships in functioning and acquisition. We shall also discuss the relationships of these abilities in autism, a specific human neurodevelopmental disorder that has appeared as an exceptional window to the cognitive, neural and developmental bases of language, communication and theory of mind. For those who are interested in the mental basis of language and communication, the relevance of the topic lies in the issue, how communicative function of language rests on our ability to read each others’ minds.

  •   detailed course description, reading list, presentation topics (pdf)

  

==========

earlier course: Winter Semester 2008

Cognitive Psychology for Linguists I.

 course description 

This two-semester course is aimed at giving a comprehensive introduction to cognitive psychology (and, more broadly, to cognitive science), with special emphasis on general issues relevant to linguistics. The first semester is devoted to exploring the historical roots, basic concepts, methodology, key problems and fundamental approaches which characterise cognitive psychology, and then discussing a few central issues with an illustrative aim. The topics therefore will include, among others, the followings: kinds of explanation in cognitive science; the concept of internal (mental) representations; types of representations; levels of description/explanation; models of knowledge acquisition and mental architecture; the way language is represented in the structure of human memory and its relationship to communication and social cognition; the problem of human consciousness in cognitive psychology. Discussing these issues we shall use human linguistic capacities as recurring examples and themes. Analogies and dis-analogies between language and other domains of knowledge will also receive special attention.
        The second part of the course (SSM 2009) will be devoted to a narrower topic with both cognitive psychological and linguistic relevance. The two parts of the course (in the two semesters) can be attended independently of each other.


 downloadables

  • detailed course description, requirements, reading list, etc. (pdf)

 

==========

earlier course: Summer Semester 2007

LANGUAGE AND NAIVE THEORY OF MIND:
ANALOGIES, DIS-ANALOGIES, INTERACTIONS
(Introduction to Cognitive Psychology for Linguists, II)
160 372, lecture, 2 hours/week 

 BRIEF DESCRIPTION

In the second part of a two-semester introductory course on cognitive psychology (cognitive science) we shall focus on a more specific issue: the relationship between two highly-complex and exclusively human cognitive capacities, language and naive theory of mind. We shall explore the important analogies and dis-analogies between these capacities, overview the some important facts and models about their functioning, analyse apparent cases of developmental dissociation between the two capacities (such as autism spectrum disorders and SLI), and also we shall have a brief look at the underlying neural substrates and their development. Finally, we shall explore how this issue is related to fundamental debates about human cognitive development - such as the nativism/constructivism debate. For those who are interested in cognitive science/psychology, in general, this course serves with an example of how cognitivism approaches such complex human phenomena. For those who are interested in the mental basis of language and communication, the relevance of the topic lies in the central idea of the course, that the communicative function of language rests on our ability “to read” each others’ minds (‘naive theory of mind’ ability).

  •  course decription, reading list, requirements (pdf)

  

==========

earlier course: Winter Semester 2006 

Cognitive Psychology for Linguists I.

 

 course description 

This two-semester course is aimed at giving a comprehensive introduction to cognitive psychology (and, more broadly, to cognitive science), with special emphasis on general issues relevant to linguistics. The first semester is devoted to exploring the historical roots, basic concepts, methodology, key problems and fundamental approaches which characterise the present-day science of human mind. The topics therefore will include, among others, the followings: kinds of explanation in cognitive science; the concept of internal (mental) representations; types of representations; levels of description/explanation; the relationship between neuroscience, computer modelling, psychology and linguistics; the nativism/empiricism/constructivism debate; basic views on mental architecture; analogies and dis-analogies between language and other domains of knowledge; the problem of human consciousness in cognitive science. Discussing these issues we shall use human linguistic capacities and their various explanations as recurring examples.
The second part of the course (SSM 2007) will be devoted to a narrower topic with both psychological and linguistic relevance. The two parts of the course (in the two semesters) can be attended independently of each other.

  • detailed course description, requirements, etc. (pdf)