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This Lonely Year

Something for the Girls
This Lonely Year

June 01 1944




CAST:

ANNOUNCER, Tom Shirley

SINGERS, of theme song


THE GIRL (HELEN HAYES)

THE BOY

BABY, gurgles and coos (2 lines)

VOICE (1 line)





MUSIC: FANFARE ... "ANCHORS AWEIGH"


ANNOUNCER: "Something for the Girls"!


MUSIC: SWING BAND INTRO ... THEN BAND ACCOMPANIES SINGERS--


SINGERS: 

Listen, listen--

Listen, listen--

Though your hair is long and wavy,

And your name's not Joe or Davey,

You can take the job of any gob

Who's servin' in the Navy!

Join the WAVES, WAVES, WAVES, WAVES

WAVES, WAVES, WAVES, WAVES --

As you join the Navy!


MUSIC: SWING BAND OUT


ANNOUNCER: "Something for the Girls," another all-star salute to WAVES in Navy blue. In our Navy spotlight, Miss Helen Hayes in "This Lonely Year," written by Jean Holloway.


MUSIC: INTRODUCTION ... SOMBER, NOBLE STRINGS ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]


BABY: (GURGLES AND COOS AND BABY TALKS)


GIRL: What's that? You'd like to know about your father?

Well, he's tall --

A foot or two above my heart as I recall.

And his eyes are brown,

And he has a way of looking down

And smiling that won my heart completely. [X]

We met in Santa Clara. Someone said--


VOICE: Have you met Mary's second cousin Fred?


BOY: Hello, Miss Lane; how are you? 

Could you spare a guy a dance or two?


GIRL: We stood there, willing the music to start.

Then he gave me his hand, and I gave him my heart.


MUSIC: LUSH ROMANTIC STRINGS ... THEN IN BG


GIRL: Spring in Santa Clara. 

There's a lovely place in springtime, 

With the blossoms laced against the sky 

And the heart lifting to the wild sweet kiss of winds and sunshine, 

And somehow ready to voice those shy words, "love" and "going steady." 

We danced away the springtime -- a lovely spring of stars and promises -- 

Parting each night as though it were the last, 

Reluctant to say good night and hating the fast-

Fleeing hours. We danced and dreamed. Young dreams. You said--


BOY: It seems so like a miracle we should have met. 

We won't forget 

One thing that happened. No, not one.


GIRL: And life was young and gay and, oh! such fun!


MUSIC: UP, TO FILL A PAUSE ... 1942 SONG HIT "I DON'T WANT TO WALK WITHOUT YOU" (MUSIC BY JULE STYNE, LYRICS BY FRANK LOESSER) ... THEN IN BG


GIRL: We had a song.

There's always one somewhere along

The way for young people.

We sang it all that spring.

"I Don't Want to Walk Without You."

A lovely thought to sing.


MUSIC: UP, OMINOUSLY ... THEN OUT


GIRL: The war was headlines then.

The war was screaming, "Men! 

Where are the men?" And I began to pray,

"Oh, no, please stay. Please stay."

But never said the words to him --

Or let the luster dim.

And came to know that song that filled my heart

Was meant for lovers who knew they had to part.


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... UP, FOR A BRIEF BRIDGE


GIRL: And then one day he said--


BOY: I may be going soon.


GIRL: And the words burned and bled

Inside me. And my heart grew cold.

And I was old,

And tired of the springtime.


BOY: We'll wait, my dear, until the war is won.

And then we'll see about ourselves, and what can be done.


MUSIC: WISTFUL ... BEHIND GIRL--


GIRL: Wait?

I had dreamed a house in Santa Clara with kitchen aprons and a picture gate.

And, oh my darling, I had planned to 'wait you there come evening.

I had dreamed a garden -- Christmas trees, breakfasts, dolls, picnics --

Memories made daily as the hours flew --

And I spent them living that splendid life with you.

Wait? "Oh, no!" I cried,

Before I thought, and could have died

For blushing.


MUSIC: UP, FOR CHURCH ORGAN INTERLUDE ("OH PROMISE ME") ... THEN IN BG


GIRL: We said the old words in the country twilight.

No veils, no satin. Only music and our friends 

There to hear the old, old promises --

Vows for the heart to cherish until time ends. 


BOY: For better, for worse, for richer, for poorer,

In sickness and in health, until death do us part.


GIRL: Until death do us part.

No death to our future with spring in my heart.

But I found myself weeping -- happy and sad --

Heartsick for tomorrow, though today was glad.


MUSIC: STRINGS ... UP, FOR A BITTERSWEET BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG


GIRL: We had a week. 

One shining week in which to seek

Whatever joy there was in this cold-shouldered world that leveled steel 

At hearts like mine. And this was real

Terror. But I choked it down -- and for that week there was no war.

There was only those shining wedding rings 

And that gay ecstatic feeling that springs 

From nowhere when your heart is with its own.


BOY: I love you. And I will forever.


GIRL: (ECSTATIC) "I love you. And I will forever."


BOY: Never anywhere was there anything like this.


GIRL: No, never anywhere. No smile or kiss 

To equal, or a sweeter hour than each one I knew,

Those lovely, laughing, shining days with you.

For that week, there were the words and laughter

That I was to remember ever after.


MUSIC: STRINGS ... UP, FOR A WARM BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG


GIRL: My heart recorded pictures. The night we climbed a hill 

To keep a tryst with summer and its still,

Dark beauty. The way he looked, laughing down at 

Me in the moonlight. And the night we sat 

Till dawn.


BOY: I'd like to stay here always by this fire.


GIRL: You'd tire.


BOY: Oh, no. I'd like to watch the sparks go higher and higher

Into the dark, and never leave you.

I'd like to sit here, planning a safe tomorrow.

Is there a safe tomorrow?


GIRL: I said, "Of course!" But sorrow

Sifted in.

(BEAT, BRIGHTLY) Summer mornings!


MUSIC: FOR A FROLIC IN THE LAKE, IN BG


BOY: (PLAYFUL) Hey, you! Get down into this lake!


GIRL: (AMUSED) A whole week of mornings spent pulling me into that cold lake!

Howling with joy because he knew I couldn't take it.


MUSIC: MELANCHOLY, IN BG


GIRL: And later, watching him across the breakfast table, 

Blinking back the sudden tears,

Hoping I would be able

To say goodbye lightly, with a smile,

But knowing all the while

I couldn't. 

A week goes too fast when you're happy.

A week suddenly dissolves into--


BOY: (GENTLY) Goodbye. (BEAT) And write. If I can, I'll phone.


MUSIC: OUT GENTLY


GIRL: (SLOWLY, SADLY) And then - you are - alone.


MUSIC: A SWEET WALTZ BRIDGE THAT ENDS ON A DARK NOTE


GIRL: No one had to tell me. 

There was a coldness settled on my heart one evening 

With the chill sharpness of a sword. 

And I knew some ship somewhere had sailed to keep a date with history -- 

With him on board.


MUSIC: SOMBER, IN BG


GIRL: I think it must be easier to go than wait at home,

To wonder what fate lurks behind those bullets in the headlines,

To feel the hot breath of shell fire and the sweat of fear

Must be easier when you're near

To it, than when you wake, panicked by your sleep, 

And rise to walk and pray and keep

A vigil until day,

And the clean sunshine, comes to chase the dark away.


MUSIC: UP, FOR A SUNRISE ... THEN OUT BEHIND GIRL--


BABY: (GURGLES AND COOS AND BABY TALKS)


GIRL: And now there's you, my son, looking back at me with your father's eyes.

And in them I see the skies

Of Santa Clara, and the promise of an earlier spring beautifully fulfilled.

(BEAT) And that's the story. 

There's not so much to tell after all.

There wasn't time for the ardor and the glory 

Of great romance. Yet there was a glory there.


MUSIC: FOR A HOMECOMING, IN BG


GIRL: He'll be coming home one of these days; you'll see.

He'll leap the fence and bang the door and say to me --

And you, of course--


BOY: (HAPPY) I'm home! Hey, I'm home! I'm home, I'm home!


MUSIC: UP, FOR A LOVING BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG


GIRL: He will come back, I know it in my heart.

It is a faith unshakable I wouldn't part

With. And then, my baby, this is what we'll do.

We'll have a picnic -- father, mother, you.

We'll take along hot dogs and soda pop

And climb the highest hill. And then say, "Pop?

Thank you for everything we see today --

For meadows, mountains, skies, and for the way 

The trees arch overhead, for grass and flowers 

And for all the things your fighting has kept ours. 

And thank you most for dreams that still can sing

Through unscarred Santa Clara, in the spring."


MUSIC: OUT


GIRL: And how we'll dance that day and sing and shout!

(QUIETLY, A PRAYER) Soon, dear God. Please bring it soon about.


MUSIC: SOMBER, NOBLE STRINGS ... FOR A LENGTHY CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: Thank you, Helen Hayes, for consenting to appear on our program. I am sure there's no American woman -- bride, mother, or sister -- who doesn't breathe a silent prayer with you to "bring it soon about."


HAYES: And not only American women, Mr. Shirley. All over the world women are praying, hoping, working, and many even fighting for that day. Today, you women in America who are not in war work are being asked to join the WAVES, to serve your country in Navy blue and bring your man home sooner. Not only are you contributing to victory, you're being offered a chance to enjoy a fuller, better life after the war. Think about it. You won't regret it.


ANNOUNCER: I'm sure they won't, Miss Hayes. 


Women, now is the time, this very minute. Write for the booklet, "The Story of You in Navy Blue," to WAVES, Washington Twenty-Five, D. C. That's WAVES, Washington Twenty-Five, D. C. or drop in at your local recruiting office. The officer in charge will gladly answer all your questions.


You have been listening to "Something for the Girls." Our thanks to Helen Hayes for volunteering to appear on the program and to Earle McGill for his direction. And thank you, Dick Widmark, Madeleine Pierce -- and Lyn Murray for your music and your orchestra. Our special thanks to Jean Holloway for her script. This is Tom Shirley saying goodbye and reminding you to listen in again for another program of "Something for the Girls," with tributes to America's first ladies -- the women in blue, who put their country above their comfort!


MUSIC: ORCHESTRA ... A BRISK "ANCHORS AWEIGH" .. THEN IN BG, UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: And now a further word for you.


__________________________________________________


[Alternate version of Helen Hayes' announcement, from rehearsal recording:]


HAYES: And not only American women, Mr. Shirley. All over the world women are praying, hoping, working, and many even fighting for that day. The idea that women can work and fight the same as men isn't new. The Chinese realized it when Japan attacked. The British discovered it; that women can perform most of the duties assigned to army and navy men. In Russia, they went further, and women go into the front lines with their men.


Today in America, women who are not in war work are being asked to join the WAVES. The unusual factor in this is the word "asked." Ours is one of the few nations at war where the word "voluntary" is still common usage. Here, you can or cannot join as you wish. There is no compulsion, no draft. Women who are between the ages of twenty and thirty-six are asked to become WAVES, to serve your country in Navy blue and bring your man home sooner. 


The job, just as important and vital as that done by the man you replace. Navy pay, in a great many cases, is higher than civilian pay. The training, the best in the world. Training which will qualify you for a better job after the war. You see, you can't miss. Not only are you contributing to victory, you're being offered a chance to enjoy a fuller, better life after the war. Think about it. You won't regret it.

__________________________________________________



CRY-BABY

Madeleine Pierce is a cry-baby, While this term is considered the apogee of opprobrium in some circles, (especially the younger ones), Miss Pierce is proud of the fact that she is the leading exponent of the art of crying on the NBC networks. The one-woman nursery plays everything from the smallest, sleepy sigh to the loudest, milk-hungry wail.


[Image and caption from October 1940 Radio Varieties]




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