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The Young Shoplifter

Nick Harris, Detective

The Young Shoplifter, Part 1

Jul 01 1938



CAST:

ANNOUNCER, Frank Russell

NICK HARRIS, detective

SECRETARY

MARIE DiNUZZO, operative

PEARL LeSHAY, the young shoplifter

MARGARET LeSHAY, Pearl's sister

MR. HEMPSTEAD, folksy store owner

HAZEL GORDON, operative

LULA LANE, operative

LILLIAN BROOKS, operative

CHARLES DEAVERS, Pearl's debonair one-armed escort

MISS HARPER, sales clerk

HEAD SALESWOMAN




SOUND: POLICE SIREN ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: Presenting Detective Nick Harris in "A Salute to the Law"!


SOUND: POLICE SIREN ... UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, we bring you Detective Nicholas B. Harris, chief of the internationally known Los Angeles detective agency bearing his name in one of his dramatizations of true-life crime stories -- proving to the youth of today the folly of committing crime.


MUSIC: ORGAN ... THEME


ANNOUNCER: And now Mr. Harris.


HARRIS: Thank you, Mr. Russell. Ladies and gentlemen, time and again I have repeated the statement that crime does not pay. Whether the criminal is one who has committed murder or petty larcenies, still he cannot win against the combined forces of a decent social order and the law enforcement officers. And the story I have chosen to now dramatize serves to once more emphasize the point in question. And so, as we draw back the curtains of this true-life drama, which I have entitled "The Young Shoplifter," let us trail the career of a young girl who got started down the wrong road of life. For the purpose of this story we will call her Pearl LeShay. I first heard of her one spring afternoon some years ago when the tingling of my telephone bell--


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP ... PHONE VOICES ARE SLIGHTLY MUFFLED


HARRIS: Hello?


SECRETARY: I'm sorry, Mr. Harris, but Miss DiNuzzo insists she must talk to you.


HARRIS: Well, all right. Put her on.


SECRETARY: Thank you, Mr. Harris. Here she is.


MARIE: (BEAT) Mr. H?


HARRIS: Yes, Miss DiNuzzo? What is it?


MARIE: I've just caught a very young girl stealing a pair of silk stockings.


HARRIS: Well, turn her over to the police.


MARIE: Oh, but I don't want to do that. She's so young! And the owner of the store says he will not prosecute.


HARRIS: Well, then take her home or let her go.


MARIE: Mr. Harris, I think something could be done with this child if you would talk to her or her family. Won't you go with her to her home? She's crying and I can't do a thing with her.


HARRIS: All right, Marie. I'll meet you in front of the building in ten minutes.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


HARRIS: (MUSES, TO HIMSELF) Hmm. A petty thief. An uncontrollable love for pretty things, I suppose.


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR OPENS


SECRETARY: (APPROACHES) Mr. Harris? Uh, here are those papers in that case. I got them just as quickly as I could.


HARRIS: Yes. Thank you very much, but put them on my desk. I've got a call to go out.


SECRETARY: Yes, sir.


HARRIS: (AMUSED) Miss Marie DiNuzzo. She's got a young girl shoplifter and wants me to see what I can do.


SECRETARY: Oh, Miss DiNuzzo again?


HARRIS: Yeah, and I hate to turn her down. Any person Marie wants to help is usually worth helping. And this time-- Well, we'll see. Make note of any calls while I'm out.


SECRETARY: Yes, sir.


SOUND: SCENE FADES OUT ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... SCENE FADES IN ... RUNNING AUTO ENGINE ... CAR PULLS TO A STOP, ENGINE OUT, CAR DOORS OPEN AND SHUT


HARRIS: All right, Pearl, come along with Miss DiNuzzo and me right up to your doorstep.


PEARL: (TEARFUL) I'm awfully sorry, sir. I'll never do it again, honest I won't.


MARIE: We hope you mean that.


PEARL: Oh, I do, I do. But, Mr. Harris--?


HARRIS: Yes, what do you want?


PEARL: Do you--? Do you have to go up to the door of my house with me? Can't you leave me here on the walk? I hate for Margaret and Blanche to know.


HARRIS: Well, better your family know than the police.


PEARL: (WEEPS, THEN IN BG)


MARIE: [?], Pearl, and don't cry. You said your mother was a widow and that she works daytimes. Well, she won't be here now. And your younger sister, Blanche, won't understand much about it anyway. Oh, come along, my dear. We're only trying to keep you out of more serious trouble.


PEARL: (TEARFUL) But - but, you see, Margaret-- She sort of takes care of all of us while Mother's working, and she's older than I am and-- Oh, if she just didn't have to know!


HARRIS: Yeah, but she's gonna know, Pearl, so - come along with us.


PEARL: (WEEPS, THEN IN BG)


SOUND: KNOCK AT DOOR ... DOOR OPENS


MARGARET: Pearl! Pearl, what's the matter? Why, you're crying!


PEARL: (TEARFUL) Oh, Margaret! (WEEPS, THEN IN BG)


MARIE: Your name is LeShay? Margaret LeShay?


MARGARET: Yes. Who are you people?


MARIE: I'm Marie DiNuzzo, Special Department Store Operative. This is Detective Harris.


MARGARET: Oh.


MARIE: We're just bringing your sister home.


HARRIS: Yes, Miss LeShay -- instead of taking her to jail.


PEARL: (WAILS BRIEFLY, THEN WEEPS IN BG)


MARGARET: Jail?!


HARRIS: She was caught stealing a pair of expensive silk stockings. More expensive than I imagine she could have paid for.


MARGARET: (STERN) Pearl, come into the house this instant!


PEARL: (TEARFUL) But, Margaret, don't - don't be too hard on me! I didn't mean to! I didn't-- (WEEPS, THEN IN BG)


MARGARET: Get into your room and stay there! Just you wait till Mom gets home! She'll give you a good licking that you won't forget!


PEARL: (MOVES OFF, WEEPING)


MARIE: I'm sorry we had to do this, Margaret.


MARGARET: (GRATEFUL, APOLOGETIC) Oh, I'm sure-- I'm sure that Pearl will never do anything like this again!


HARRIS: Er, Miss LeShay, it's because we hope she won't -- because we hope that this scare may be the only lesson she needs -- that we brought her home to you. Now the responsibility is mostly yours and your mother's. (TO MARIE) Come, Miss DiNuzzo, I've got to hurry back to the office.


MARIE: All right, Mr. Harris. (WOMAN TO WOMAN, SUPPORTIVE) Goodbye, Margaret. I hope everything turns out all right.


MARGARET: Oh, thank you! Thank you! Thank you, both!


MUSIC: ORGAN ... BRIDGE ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: Months pass and all thoughts of Pearl LeShay, the young shoplifter, have vanished. However, one afternoon in the late fall of the same year--


HARRIS: Mr. Hempstead? You asked me to come down here to your store. What'd you want to see me about?


HEMPSTEAD: Well, Mr. Harris, I have a cashier whom I believe is taking money from us somehow. So far, I haven't be able to actually catch her at it, but I have strong suspicions. I wonder if you'd shadow her and see if there's anything to it.


HARRIS: Surely, Mr. Hempstead. But where'll I find your suspect working?


HEMPSTEAD: It's the main floor, at the cashier's box, along the hosiery counter.


HARRIS: Very well. I'll go outside now and come back in from the street. I'll simply be a shopper, you understand, Mr. Hempstead?


SOUND: SCENE FADES OUT ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... SCENE FADES IN ... MURMUR OF BUSY DEPARTMENT STORE CROWD ... THEN IN BG


HARRIS: (TO HIMSELF) So it's Pearl LeShay again? Well, I'll have a little chat with her and see what--


SOUND: MURMURING CROWD TOPS HARRIS FOR A BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN FADES BACK DOWN


HARRIS: Hello, Pearl.


PEARL: (SURPRISED) Oh! Oh, Mr. Harris! (PLEASANTLY) What are you doing here? Checking up on me?


HARRIS: No, just shoppin'. I happened to see you, so I thought I'd speak to ya.


PEARL: Oh. Oh, sure.


HARRIS: How do you like your new job?


PEARL: Oh, I like it lots. And I've been behaving myself, too, just like I promised I would.


HARRIS: Well, I'm glad to hear that, Pearl. Just keep straight and you'll never regret it. Got to be goin' now, so -- goodbye.


PEARL: Goodbye, Mr. Harris.


SOUND: MURMURING CROWD UP AND OUT


MUSIC: ORGAN ... BRIDGE ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: The next morning, the Monarch Department Store had a new clerk: Mrs. Lillian Brooks from the Harris office. And this special operative noted that Pearl LeShay "forgot" to ring up several sales. However, as yet, Lillian Brooks hadn't discovered the girl's method of making away with the money not registered. But after working hours, the tails who shadowed Pearl when away from the store were Lula Lane and Hazel Gordon, two other special women operatives, and as they began their vigilance, they noted--


SOUND: MURMUR OF BUSY DEPARTMENT STORE CROWD ... THEN IN BG


LULA: Hazel, look! She's meeting someone. That chap with only one arm. See the grin on his face and the happy smile on hers?


HAZEL: Yes. Who is he? Do you know him, Lula?


LULA: That's Charles Deavers -- a dirty rat, Hazel. He works the department stores, on the lookout for young girls just out of school. He's been up several times on sex charges.


HAZEL: Well, he seems to be a very good friend of our little suspect right now. Come on! There they go into the crowd. We're following that pair all night if necessary!


SOUND: MURMURING CROWD UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: The following morning--


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP


HARRIS: (INTO PHONE) Hello?


HAZEL: Mr. Harris? This is Hazel Gordon. We tailed Pearl LeShay nearly all night. She didn't go home until almost four this morning.


HARRIS: Anything else, Hazel?


HAZEL: Yes. She's going with Charles Deavers. They hit all the nightspots [?] -- dancing, drinking, [?] -- then he took her home. [?]


HARRIS: Okay. Keep right after her.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


ANNOUNCER: And the morning following that--


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP


HARRIS: (INTO PHONE) Yes? What is it?


HAZEL: Hazel Gordon again, Mr. Harris. Lula Lane and I followed Pearl LeShay again last night. The same story -- [?] nightspots with young Deavers. That's all.


HARRIS: All right, Hazel. Don't give up.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


ANNOUNCER: Several nights of vigil by the two women investigators brought nothing more to light. But during working hours, Pearl LeShay was not so successful in hiding her undercover activities. For Mrs. Lillian Brooks, the operative posing as a new clerk, made a startling discovery.


SOUND: MURMUR OF BUSY DEPARTMENT STORE CROWD ... THEN IN BG


LILLIAN: (TO LULA AND HAZEL) And now, Miss Lane, Miss Gordon -- Pearl LeShay puts the money she fails to ring up in a small cardboard box under the counter.


LULA: Oh, so that's it, Mrs. Brooks?


LILLIAN: Yes. Uh, she keeps her make-up there, too, to hide the coins.


LULA: Pretty clever.


LILLIAN: But every once in a while, usually about this time of the morning, she goes to the restroom and there destroys the sales slips which balance against the amount she steals. She also transfers the money to her person.


LULA: Look! She's leaving the counter now!


HAZEL: Yes! And the little cardboard box is under her arm. 


LILLIAN: That's our cue, girls. Come on, let's go and get the police and there'll be three of us who can testify as witnesses!


MUSIC: ORGAN ... BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG


HARRIS: Mr. Hempstead? So you refuse to prosecute?


HEMPSTEAD: Yes, Mr. Harris. That girl-- Well, blame it, she's a darn young one. We'll let her go. She can't work here any more. Nosirree, she can't do that.


MUSIC: UP FOR A BRIDGE ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: Another year passed -- a year in which no word of Pearl LeShay was heard. Perhaps the little shoplifter had reformed. But one day, reappearing out of the clear sky, Pearl was once more seen by Lula Lane -- seen and trailed -- as she was entering one of Los Angeles' smartest department stores, and her companion was the debonair Charles Deavers.


CHARLES: Is this the floor, dear?


PEARL: Yes, Charles. Oh, here comes the clerk now.


MISS HARPER: May I help you?


PEARL: Yes. You see, uh, I'm-- Well, we're going to be married soon and I'd like to select a wedding gown.


MISS HARPER: Oh, a wedding gown? Won't you step this way, please?


PEARL: Certainly. Come along, Charles.


CHARLES: All right, darling.


MISS HARPER: (PAUSE) Now, here are several lovely gowns that I'm sure you'll be interested in.


PEARL: Oh, that one! Charles, do you like it?


CHARLES: Well, Pearl, I - I believe I prefer that one there.


PEARL: Well, then I'll try them both on and see which you like the best.


MISS HARPER: Yes. Just step this way, please.


SOUND: SCENE FADES OUT ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... SCENE FADES IN 


PEARL: All right, then. We'll leave it that way. We'll make the five-dollar deposit now and tomorrow I'll bring my mother down to see the gown. I'm crazy about it myself, but--


HEAD SALESWOMAN: (APPROACHES, AGITATED) That wedding gown! Where is it?! Have any of you clerks seen it?!


CHARLES: (LOW, TENSE, TO PEARL) Honey! Hurry! Let's get going! The head saleswoman's wise, I think. Come on!


PEARL: (LOW) Oh, yes. (UP, CHEERFUL, TO MISS HARPER) Well, uh, we'll be back tomorrow. (MOVING OFF) Goodbye!


MISS HARPER: Thank you, miss.


HEAD SALESWOMAN: Miss Harper, have you seen that gown? That pearl-trimmed wedding gown? Oh, it's gone!


MISS HARPER: Why, it was there -- in the dressing room -- just a moment ago.


HEAD SALESWOMAN: No, you must be mistaken. It's nowhere to be found! And I have a customer ready to take it -- a debutante, one of our most important customers! She saw it yesterday and she wants it. Oh, where is it?!


MISS HARPER: I don't know. But I do know that gown was there. That young woman who just left -- the one with the young man -- why, she just tried it on. It couldn't have vanished into thin air.


HEAD SALESWOMAN: But it has -- it has! -- and we've got to find it. That gown, Miss Harper, was valued at five hundred dollars!


MUSIC: ORGAN ... CURTAIN


HARRIS: And so, ladies and gentlemen, you may guess -- and rightfully enough -- that Pearl LeShay stole the wedding gown valued at five hundred dollars. But how did she do it? And how was she caught with the goods upon her own person? Well, remember, Miss Lula Lane saw every move of what you have just heard enacted upon our radio stage, and therefore-- But suppose we bring you the conclusion of this story next week -- because there's a strong moral lesson yet to be pointed out in the case of Pearl LeShay.


ANNOUNCER: Thank you, Mr. Harris. Ladies and gentlemen, you have just heard another true-life story brought to you by Detective Nicholas B. Harris, internationally famous Los Angeles criminologist and chief of the detective agency bearing his name. Although this was a true story, fictitious names and places have been used throughout this narrative. The story was dramatized by Howard W. Bull and produced under the direction of Carolyn Carroll with Wesley Tourtelot at the organ. Mr. Harris wishes me to thank the following cast for their participation this evening: Olive Thomas, Mary Ryan, Gertrude Harris, Helen O'Reagan, Betty Carmine, Lenore Thompson, Robert Moore, Elizabeth Bates, Marion O'Moore, and Earl Hurt. The Nick Harris Program will again be heard over this station next Friday evening at eight forty-five. We invite you to tune in at that time and hear the concluding episode of the true-crime story, "The Young Shoplifter." This is Frank Russell speaking.


MUSIC: ORGAN ... THEME

___________________________________


Nick Harris, Detective

The Young Shoplifter, Part 2

Jul 08 1938



CAST:

ANNOUNCER, Frank Russell

NICK HARRIS, detective

PEARL LeSHAY, the young shoplifter

CHARLES DEAVERS, Pearl's shifty one-armed escort

LULA LANE, operative

JUDGE

HAZEL GORDON, operative

ISABEL CARPENTER, operative

1ST CLERK

2ND CLERK

ESTELLE GRAHAM, operative

MR. JEROME, detective

MISS DENNING, clerk 

MR. MARTIN, floorwalker

GIRL, Pearl's shoplifting companion

MR. JONES, floorwalker

LT. PARKER




SOUND: POLICE SIREN ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: Presenting Detective Nick Harris in "A Salute to the Law"!


SOUND: POLICE SIREN ... UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, once again we bring you Detective Nicholas B. Harris, chief of the internationally known Los Angeles detective agency bearing his name in a dramatization of one of his "true crime" stories -- proving to the youth of today the folly of committing crime.


MUSIC: ORGAN ... THEME


ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, often I have repeated that the criminal cannot win in the long run. And this evening, as we continue to unfold the true-life account of Pearl LeShay, the young blonde shoplifter, we shall see more clearly than ever the truth of my statement. And now Mr. Harris.


HARRIS: Thank you, Mr. Russell, and good evening, everyone. You will remember last week that Pearl LeShay had an overwhelming desire for things that were pretty -- an expensive luxury which, as a young girl, she had been denied. And so Pearl fell into the habit of picking up from department store counters such articles as high-priced silk hose, costly hats, and many similar items. Last week we traced her early career, from a petty theft of an expensive pair of silk stockings to a more serious offense of shortchanging a large department store. And we finally left her in the act of stealing a five-hundred-dollar wedding gown from one of the city's smartest stores. But as Pearl LeShay left the store with a frantic saleswoman trying to trace the lost gown, Lula Lane, one of my best women operators, followed. Out in the street, Miss Lane approached Pearl LeShay and her shifty one-armed escort, Charles Deavers.


SOUND: CITY STREET BACKGROUND


CHARLES: Pearl! Hurry up! I think a woman dick spotted us in the store. I don't know, but--


PEARL: Aw, I ain't afraid of them! I've had dealings with them before. And besides, Charles--


CHARLES: Can the chatter and come along with me, quick!


PEARL: All right.


LULA: Wait a minute, Pearl!


PEARL: Oh! What do you want, you?


LULA: I want that five-hundred-dollar wedding gown you've got stuffed inside your clothing. Come with me, both of you. If you try to get away, you won't make it. There's a plainclothesman watching us now.


CHARLES: Might as well give up, Pearl. They've got us.


PEARL: (SMUG) Okay, Miss Lane. I remember you from before. But someday I'm going to shake you for good!


MUSIC: ORGAN ... BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG


JUDGE: Pearl LeShay, I sentence you to six months in jail for attempted theft. Charles Deavers, this court can prove nothing against you at this time, and so you may go free. Case closed.


HARRIS: And thus Pearl LeShay, innocent-looking blonde shoplifter, served her first jail term. During this period, downtown Los Angeles department stores breathed a combined sigh of relief, but during her incarceration, I instructed my operatives to become thoroughly familiar with Pearl's features and, upon her release, Hazel Gordon again took up her vigil, now aided by Isabel Carpenter, another shrewd woman operative. One day, the pair spotted Pearl sauntering along Broadway, dressed smartly, and made-up to kill.


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


SOUND: CITY STREET BACKGROUND


HAZEL: That's Pearl LeShay.


ISABEL: That blonde with the Hollywood swagger and the thick coat of war-paint?


HAZEL: Yes! She looks as if she's working in pictures, doesn't she? You know that "extra girl" attitude? "Here I am, all dolled up -- look me over!"


ISABEL: Well, from that past record of hers, she's up to something, you can be sure.


HAZEL: Yes, but what?


ISABEL: Come on, Hazel, let's follow her.


MUSIC: ORGAN ... BRIDGE


SOUND: CITY STREET BACKGROUND


ISABEL: We've trailed that girl for five hours, Hazel, and we haven't seen a single suspicious action.


HAZEL: No, she just keeps going, does a little honest shopping, and stops at nearly every drugstore she passes.


ISABEL: "At nearly every drugstore she passes." Hmm. Say, Hazel, do you suppose--? Do you think she may be up to something with the drugstores now?


HAZEL: Oh, I don't know, but it's a hunch worth following up.


ISABEL: Yes, I think it is. Come along. We'll go in the next drugstore behind her.


HAZEL: Now, wait a minute. You go in behind her. She doesn't know you yet, and she knows me, for we've had dealings before, you know, Isabel. Now, go ahead and keep close to her. I'll keep my distance and meet you later on.


ISABEL: All right. Here goes.


SOUND: CITY STREET BACKGROUND CHANGES TO DRUGSTORE INTERIOR


1ST CLERK: Yes, ma'am? What can I do for you?


PEARL: (UNEASY) Give me a ten-cent bottle of paregoric, please.


1ST CLERK: Paregoric? Certainly, ma'am.


ISABEL: (TO HERSELF) Oh! So that's it! She drinks paregoric. The whole bottle! I'll trail her farther on and make sure.


MUSIC: ORGAN ... BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG


2ND CLERK: Yes, lady? What will you have?


PEARL: (TENSE) Paregoric -- the ten-cent bottle.


2ND CLERK: All right, a bottle of paregoric.


MUSIC: UP BRIEFLY ... THEN IN BG


PEARL: (AGITATED) Clerk? Clerk, give me a ten-cent bottle of paregoric, quick. Please hurry!


ISABEL: (TO HERSELF, SLOWLY) So! Pearl LeShay is a dope addict.


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


SOUND: BUSY DEPARTMENT STORE BACKGROUND


ESTELLE: Well, Mr. Jerome, I didn't expect to see you here in this store.


JEROME: Hello, Estelle. What are you doing? Keeping an eye out for shoplifters?


ESTELLE: Well, Christmas is a good time for them. Besides, I do have a little shopping to do myself.


JEROME: (CHUCKLES) Yes.


ISABEL: Mr. Jerome!


JEROME: What? Oh, Hazel and Isabel. Well, well -- what are you two up to?


ISABEL: Oh, we've been tailing Pearl LeShay again, Mr. Jerome.


JEROME: Pearl LeShay?


HAZEL: Yes. And Isabel found out why she stops at nearly every drugstore she passes! 


JEROME: Well, tell us about it.


ISABEL: (WITH DISAPPROVAL) She buys a ten-cent bottle of paregoric, goes to the ladies room, and drinks the contents of the bottle.


ESTELLE: Then she's a dope fiend!


ISABEL: Yes!


JEROME: I see. Well, why are you two here now?


HAZEL: Oh, well, Pearl's in here somewhere, but we've lost her!


JEROME: Well, get back on her trail. I'm just shopping, but Estelle and I'll keep our eyes open, too. Now, you two had better cover one of the other floors. We'll stick here on the main floor.


ISABEL: (MOVING OFF) All right, Mr. Jerome.


HAZEL: (MOVING OFF) We'll find her again if it takes all day.


JEROME: (BEAT) Good reliable pair, those two, Estelle.


ESTELLE: Yes. And you can see those two are worn out tracking down that blonde shoplifter.


SOUND: MURMURING CROWD UP BRIEFLY FOR QUICK TRANSITION


MISS DENNING: (URGENT, LOW) Mr. Martin? Mr. Martin? 


MR. MARTIN: Yes, Miss Denning? What's the trouble?


MISS DENNING: Those girls -- the two over there by the mirrors; I don't know for sure, but I think I saw them take a twenty-dollar hat from its pedestal.


MR. MARTIN: What?!


MISS DENNING: Yes! But I don't know where they put it! Why, it simply vanished.


MR. MARTIN: All right, Miss Denning, you come with me and--


JEROME: (TAKING CHARGE) Now, just a minute, floorwalker. I'm a Harris detective. What's the matter here?


MR. MARTIN: A detective?


JEROME: Yes. And this young woman is Miss Graham, department store operative. My name's Jerome.


MISS DENNING: Well, those two girls over there by that mirror near the hat counter-- They've hidden an expensive hat somewhere.


MR. MARTIN: Mr. Jerome, what shall we do? We haven't any actual proof! Yet Miss Denning saw them--


JEROME: All right. Now, don't you or your clerk do anything. Just leave them to us. Come along, Estelle. We're shopping; you're the wife and I'm the shoppery husband. Come on, we'll go closer. (PAUSE, AS THEY MOVE CLOSER TO SUSPECTS, LOW) Can't see their faces yet, Estelle.


ESTELLE: I wish they'd turn around.


JEROME: Well, go ahead and pretend to be looking at these hats here. I'll watch them.


ESTELLE: Okay. Oh, look! Did you see that, Mr. Jerome?


JEROME: (IMPRESSED) Yes! Pret-ty slick. She slipped her old hat on that rack and put a new one on her head. Come on, Estelle, they're turning, ready to leave. We'll get 'em now.


MR. MARTIN: (EXCITED) Mr. Jerome! That girl stole another one of our hats just then. I saw her and I'm going to grab her.


JEROME: Just a minute, Mr. Floorwalker. Don't you know there's a law in this state that says an arrest for shoplifting can't be made until the suspect has shown intent to take, steal, and carry away the article in question?


MR. MARTIN: Well, isn't that intent enough?


JEROME: No, not until she takes it out of your store. Now, stay here. My operator and I will get her outside.


ESTELLE: Mr. Jerome, look! That face-- Is that the face of that girl, that blonde one?


JEROME: Yes! It's Pearl LeShay! Come on, let's get her! (LOW) All right, Estelle, you grab the other girl's arm; I'll take care of Pearl.


ESTELLE: Okay!


PEARL: What's the big idea?!


GIRL: Look out!


SOUND: BRIEF SCUFFLE AND ANGRY CROSSTALK OF JEROME, ESTELLE, PEARL, AND PEARL'S COMPANION


ESTELLE: Calm down, calm down!


JEROME: And you, Pearl LeShay, come along with us. We want you and those two hats you just took from the store.


MUSIC: ORGAN ... BRIDGE


HARRIS: So Pearl LeShay was once again arrested and convicted on charges of theft, and once more she went to prison. Her younger companion, in whose blouse was found the twenty-dollar hat first stolen, was sentenced to juvenile hall. And so twice the young blonde shoplifter beat the law. Twice she had gone up for brief terms. Another year passed and then, with reports of stolen dresses coming into our office from other department stores, I detailed Estelle Graham. She was put back on the job. This time, she put to use a brand new idea, and this is how it worked out--


MR. JONES: (WORRIED) She went into that fitting room, Miss Graham.


ESTELLE: I see, Mr. Jones. And you say you first saw her wearing a salesgirl's apron, with a sales book in place, carrying a frock that way?


MR. JONES: Yes. And I don't know that girl. I'm a floorwalker here, you know, and I know on sight all of our clerks. 


ESTELLE: It's probably that Pearl LeShay again! Follow me. I've got a little gadget fixed up in all the fitting rooms here, Mr. Jones. Perhaps we shall discover something!


HARRIS: And Estelle Graham and the floorwalker tiptoed to a secluded spot behind the fitting room just entered by this new suspect! And, standing on a chair, Estelle looked into a small cylinder of an ingenious periscope she had fitted out for this very purpose!


ESTELLE: (TO MR. JONES) You were right! It's a steal! And it's Pearl LeShay wrapping that frock around her waist! I'll nab her outside!


MUSIC: ORGAN ... BRIDGE


JEROME: Now, Lieutenant Parker, that rent receipt we found on Pearl brought us here. But, under the doorbell outside, the name listed was Pearl Farley.


LT. PARKER: The same Pearl LeShay, says the landlady, Mr. Jerome.


JEROME: But, Lieutenant, what about all these stolen luxuries here -- gowns, coats, jewelry? I wonder why she didn't sell them to a fence.


LT. PARKER: Huh, she didn't need to, Inspector. The landlady told me Miss Farley, as Pearl LeShay called herself here, did sell these things. She had a swell trade -- with all the movie extras from Hollywood. Here, Mr. Jerome, is where they got their fancy wardrobes.


JEROME: So that's it, huh? Sold this stuff to the extras, and probably dirt cheap, too.


LT. PARKER: That's right.


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE


HARRIS: And thus Pearl LeShay was put out of circulation for a third time. And, after her release, nothing was again heard of her -- until about a year later.


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE


JEROME: Guess this is the place, Lieutenant Parker.


LT. PARKER: Yeah, those Case brothers, who robbed telephone boxes of nickels, dimes, and quarters, gave this address for Ed Farley, the guy they said sold them the master key to open telephones.


JEROME: Farley? Farley? Say! That brings something back to my mind! Come on, let's knock!


SOUND: KNOCK ON DOOR ... NO ANSWER ... KNOCK AGAIN


LT. PARKER: Ah, no answer. Here's a passkey.


JEROME: Fine, let's have it.


SOUND: KEY IN LOCK ... DOOR UNLOCKS AND OPENS


JEROME: Well, nobody here. Let's look around, Parker.


LT. PARKER: Sure.


JEROME: Wonder where they said Farley kept those--


SOUND: RATTLE OF WINDOW


LT. PARKER: Hey, wait a minute. What's that?


JEROME: A dame. Pearl LeShay!


PEARL: (STARTLED EXCLAMATION) Oh!


JEROME: Lieutenant! After her! Get her!


SOUND: WINDOW OPENS


LT. PARKER: The little devil! She's trying to get away!


JEROME: Pearl, Pearl, get away from that window.


PEARL: Get away from me! Take your hands off me!


LT. PARKER: Inspector, she threw something out of the window.


JEROME: What was it, Pearl? You might as well tell. We'll search below anyhow.


PEARL: Oh-- Oh, you know, Mr. Jerome, I don't want to go in stir again for that.


JEROME: For what? I didn't ask you that. I want to know what you threw out of that window.


PEARL: (GIVES UP) Oh-- Oh, hypos.


JEROME: Dope again, eh, Pearl? Well, come along with me. Right now, we want to know something about master keys that fit telephone coin boxes! You stay here and search the place, Parker.


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE


HARRIS: And this nearly ended the case of Pearl LeShay, who was exonerated on the telephone coin box charge. And she gave us information leading to the arrest of the maker of the master telephone box keys. But, several months later, the final chapter of the blonde shoplifter was at last written in San Francisco. Telegram came through to me from that city, stating simply, "Pearl LeShay, former morphine addict, now cocaine fiend, jumped from window of a San Francisco doctor's office. Died instantly, a suicide." And that's all. And so, as I say to the youth of today again, this case also proves that crime does not pay.


ANNOUNCER: Thank you, Mr. Harris. Ladies and gentlemen, you have just heard the concluding chapter of another true-life story brought to you by Detective Nicholas B. Harris, internationally famous Los Angeles criminologist and chief of the detective agency bearing his name. Although this was a true story, fictitious names and places have been used throughout this narrative. The story was dramatized by Howard W. Bull and produced under the direction of Carolyn Carroll with Wesley Tourtelot at the organ. Mr. Harris wishes me to thank the following cast for their participation in this program: Betty Carmine, Olive Thomas, Mary Ryan, Lenore Thompson, Marion O'Moore, Earl Hurt, George Conkling, Lawrence Travers, and Eric Loring. Mr. Harris will again be heard over this station next Friday evening at eight forty-five in another interesting true-life story entitled "The Fatal Ace of Spades." This is Frank Russell speaking.


MUSIC: ORGAN ... THEME


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