Microphone Plays‎ > ‎

The Terrible Meek

Skippy Hollywood Theater

The Terrible Meek

Apr 08 1949



CAST:

VOICE (1 line)

ANNOUNCER, Van Des Autels

HOST, Les Mitchel


CAPTAIN, gentlemanly, well-bred

MOTHER, a poor woman (LURENE TUTTLE)

SOLDIER, a common man

MAN (1 horrific cry of pain)

CROWD, briefly terrified




VOICE: The following program was produced in Hollywood and transcribed for release at this time.


ANNOUNCER: If you like peanuts, you'll love Skippy.


MUSIC: DRUM ROLL


ANNOUNCER: From Hollywood, Skippy, America's largest-selling peanut butter, presents the finest in comedy--


MUSIC: COMIC ACCENT


ANNOUNCER: --romance--


MUSIC: ROMANTIC ACCENT


ANNOUNCER: --drama--


MUSIC: DRAMATIC ACCENT


ANNOUNCER: --in the Skippy Hollywood Theater!


MUSIC: FILLS PAUSE ... THEN BEHIND--


ANNOUNCER: Presenting this week Charles Rann Kennedy's "The Terrible Meek"!


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: And now here is our popular director-actor of the Skippy Hollywood Theater, Mr. Les Mitchel.


HOST: Well, thank you, Van, and hello, ladies and gentlemen. Yes, this week I'm an actor as well as director thanks to my good friends and fans who have written us demanding that I again play a part. We're gratified and honored, to put it mildly. And, er, we've decided to repeat the story which last spring drew hundreds of approving letters. "The Terrible Meek" is a story known and loved by millions the world over. It's a holy story, full of meaning, and we feel it's a great privilege to be a part of its telling. We'll be back in just a moment. Now, here is Van Des Autels.


ANNOUNCER: Because of the seriousness of the drama the Skippy Hollywood Theater brings you tonight, we are eliminating our customary middle and final commercials. Because I have only one brief opportunity to talk to you about Skippy tonight, I hope you'll pay particular attention. 


Right now, instead of emphasizing what's inside a jar of Skippy Peanut Butter, I'd like to talk briefly about the label on the outside of the jar. Now, what is the purpose of the label on the jar of Skippy? Well, first, it's to help you quickly, easily, and unmistakably identify Skippy when you shop. Second, it serves as your assurance that the jar of Skippy you buy next week or next month will be exactly the same fine quality as the Skippy you buy today. Third, the label tells you something about the product before you buy. 


At the top of a Skippy label, you'll see the words "Stays fresh, no oil separation." That statement is true. Skippy does stay fresh, sweet, and easily spread to the last spoonful at the bottom of the jar, with never a trace of oil separation, stickiness, dryness, or rancidity. The color of the label quickly tells you whether you're buying Skippy Creamy Style or Chunk Style. Creamy Style carries the blue label and is triple-milled to a buttery smoothness. Chunk Style has the red label and has crunchy little nuggets of peanuts generously distributed throughout. 


So look for the Skippy -- S-K-I-P-P-Y -- the Skippy label when you shop. It identifies America's largest-selling peanut butter.


HOST: Thank you very much, Van.


ANNOUNCER: I understand that the role of the captain in "The Terrible Meek" is quite an important part to you.


HOST: That's right, Van. I've presented and played in this holy story a number of times. And, Van, I'm very proud that Lurene Tuttle, a truly remarkable actress, will portray the mother in our story, a parallel of the sainted woman whose son died that the world might be free from sin.


TUTTLE: Well, Les, I consider it a great privilege to be invited to play the role of the mother. It is a part that I approach with humility, believe me.


HOST: (SOLEMNLY) As do all of us.


MUSIC: THEME ... IN BG


ANNOUNCER: The Skippy Hollywood Theater presents "The Terrible Meek," written by Charles Rann Kennedy and adapted by Les Mitchel -- and starring Les Mitchel as the captain and Lurene Tuttle as the mother. 


MUSIC: FOR THE CURTAIN GOING UP


ANNOUNCER: The curtain is up and here is the play.


MUSIC: FANFARE ... THEN SOLEMN CHURCH BELLS .... THEN BELLS BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: The scene, a wind-swept hill. Three crosses are a trinity of pain.


SOUND: OMINOUS ROLL OF THUNDER


MUSIC: A FEW SIMPLE NOTES BEHIND A DYING MAN--


MAN: (LONG HORRIFIC UNEARTHLY CRY OF PAIN)


SOUND: NOISY HARSH WIND SWEEPS IN ... ANOTHER ROLL OF THUNDER, UP BIG ... CLAMOR OF VOICES AND HURRYING FEET AS A TERRIFIED CROWD MURMURS AND RUNS AWAY ... WIND AND CROWD FADE OUT ... SILENCE


MUSIC: SOMBER ... IN BG


MOTHER: (WEEPS BITTERLY) Oh! ... (CONTINUES TO WEEP IN BG)


CAPTAIN: (QUIETLY, TO HIMSELF) This is awful. I can't stand it. 


MOTHER: (HER WEEPING FILLS A PAUSE)

 

CAPTAIN: Listen, my good woman, it's all over now. There's no earthly help for it. You can't remain here, you know.


MOTHER: Leave me be. Leave me be. (WEEPS, IN BG)


CAPTAIN: You must be reasonable about this. All the others left long ago. They hurried off home the moment that-- The moment the storm came. Come now, it's too bleak and dreadful for you up on this hill. Let me send you back to town with one of the soldiers.


MOTHER: (STOPS WEEPING) One of the - soldiers? 


CAPTAIN: Yes. (LIFTS HER TO HER FEET, WITH EFFORT) Come, come now.


MOTHER: Leave me be! Don't touch me! (ACCUSING) There's the smell of death on you. (WEEPS, IN BG)


CAPTAIN: (TAKEN ABACK) What? Well-- Since you-- After all--


SOUND: CAPTAIN TAKES A FEW STEPS AWAY ... MOTHER'S WEEPING FADES OUT DURING FOLLOWING--


CAPTAIN: (SLOWLY, TO HIMSELF) The smell of death. She's right. (INHALES WITH HORROR) It's true.


MUSIC: FADES OUT


SOUND: DISMAL BLEAT OF SHEEP ... WIND, GENTLY IN BG ... SOLDIER STUMBLES BLINDLY UP HILL, HIS APPROACHING FOOTSTEPS CRUNCH ... SOLDIER BUMPS INTO CAPTAIN--


CAPTAIN &

SOLDIER: (STARTLED EXCLAMATIONS)


SOLDIER: Oh, I - I beg pardon, sir. I didn't know it was you, Captain.


CAPTAIN: That's all right, sentry.


SOLDIER: You certainly scared the daylights out of me, sir. What with this storm and the darkness, and this here little job we've been doin', I-- Well, for a moment, [I thought] you was-- Well, somethin' else. Wasn't quite a nice thing what happened up here just now, sir, was it?


CAPTAIN: No. It wasn't.


SOLDIER: I'm on guard myself, sir; or I don't know as I'd 'a' come up. Not by choice. Have you been here all the time, Captain?


CAPTAIN: Have I? Yes, I have. I've been here - ever since.


SOLDIER: It's not exactly the place to spend a pleasant afternoon, is it, sir?


CAPTAIN: No, I suppose not.


SOLDIER: (DRY) Of course, there's company, as you might say. Not quite congenial company, eh what?


CAPTAIN: (STIFFLY) That depends entirely upon the point of view.


SOLDIER: Awful creepy, I call it. Well, we done things up good and proper, anyway.


CAPTAIN: (WITH DISTASTE) Yes. We know how to do our business.


SOLDIER: (CHUCKLES) Well, it's - it's an ill wind what blows nobody any good. I got something out of this, all said an' done.


CAPTAIN: What's that? 


SOLDIER: I got some of his togs. 


CAPTAIN: His togs? How do you mean?


SOLDIER: Why, me an' the boys, we pitched an' tossed for the whole bag lot, one by one, till they was all divided up. I got his shoes.


CAPTAIN: Oh. You got his shoes, did you?


SOLDIER: Yeah, poor devil. He won't want 'em no more. Not quite my fit, but they'll do to take home for a keepsake. My little missis 'll think a lot of 'em.


CAPTAIN: (IRONIC) I imagine they'll be a pleasant memento.


SOLDIER: (MISSES THE IRONY) Just what I say, sir. My missis, she's got a nose for curiosities. She really has.


CAPTAIN: She must be an attractive young woman, your missis.


SOLDIER: Oh, no, sir, no. Just ordinary, just ordinary. Suits me, all right. (BEAT) Funny thing, Captain, how this here foreign service keeps you-- Oh, sort of thinkin', don't it? Suppose it's the lonely nights and the long sentry duties and such like.


CAPTAIN: You've felt that, too, then, have you?


SOLDIER: Yes, sir. Makes me think about my missis. I was expectin' to be a father just a couple of months after I sailed. Huh. Little man must be gettin' on, by now.


CAPTAIN: You've made up your mind for a boy then, huh?


SOLDIER: Yes, sir. She's been hankerin' after a youngster ever since we was married six years ago. I wonder if it's a boy. There's no gettin' no news out of--


MOTHER: (HAS BEGUN TO WEEP LOUDLY AGAIN)


SOLDIER: What's that? 


CAPTAIN: What?


SOLDIER: Behind us. Someone's sort of-- There, listen! What is it?


CAPTAIN: It's a woman.


SOLDIER: A woman? Up here?


CAPTAIN: Yes. She has every right to be here. This is her place.


SOLDIER: But does she know--? Does she know what's up yonder, over her head?


CAPTAIN: She knows more than we do. She is his mother.


SOLDIER: His mother?


CAPTAIN: Yes. He was her baby once.


SOLDIER: (GENUINELY) Poor fella. (OFFHAND) What was it he done, Captain? 


CAPTAIN: Don't you know?


SOLDIER: Not exactly. I got enough to look after with my drills an' vittles without messin' around with politics an' these here funny foreign religions.


CAPTAIN: And yet you, if I mistake not, were one of the four men told off to do the job.


SOLDIER: Well, I hope I know my duty, sir. I only obeyed orders. Come to that, sir, askin' your pardon, it was you that give them orders. I s'pose you knew all right what it was he done.


CAPTAIN: No, I don't know exactly, either. I'm only just beginning to find out. We both did our duty, as you call it, in blindness.


SOLDIER: That's strange language to be comin' from your lips, Captain.


CAPTAIN: Strange thoughts have been coming to me during the last six hours.


SOLDIER: Oh, it's difficult to know what's what in these outlandish places. It's not like at home, sir, where there's Law an' Order an' Patriotism an' God's Own True Religion. No, these foreigners make me sick. They do really.


CAPTAIN: Yes. Perhaps that has been the real mistake all along.


SOLDIER: What has, Captain?


CAPTAIN: Taking these people -- men like this one, for instance -- for foreigners.


SOLDIER: Well, you'll excuse me, sir, but what else are they?


CAPTAIN: I'm not quite sure; but supposing they were more nearly related. Supposing, after all, they happened to be made of the same flesh and blood as you and I. Supposing, even, they were -- brothers.


SOLDIER: Brothers?


CAPTAIN: Yes.


SOLDIER: Why, that's exactly what he used to say -- him, up there. Did you ever hear him, sir?


CAPTAIN: Once. Did you? 


SOLDIER: Once. I wonder what it was he really done.


CAPTAIN: It's rather late in the day for us to be considering that, seeing what we have done, isn't it?


SOLDIER: Well, I don't know. Perhaps it's funny of me, but I never done a job like this yet without thinkin' about it afterwards. If you ask me, sir, it was them. Well, them as begun the whole business.


CAPTAIN: Hmm. What was it they said he did?


SOLDIER: Wasn't nothin' he done. It was somethin' as he said what riled 'em.


CAPTAIN: Something he said?


SOLDIER: Yeah. Seems a terrible thing for a person to come to this just for usin' a few words.


CAPTAIN: There's great power in words. All the things that ever get done in the world, good or bad, are done by words.


SOLDIER: Well, there's somethin' in that, too. Only this thing he said - (CHUCKLE) - was nothin'.


CAPTAIN: And you yourself, of course, had nothing at all against him? Nothing personal? No more than I had?


SOLDIER: Lord bless ya, no, sir. Rather liked him, the bit I saw.


CAPTAIN: Only they found him guilty. So, of course, they had to hand him over to the magistrate.


SOLDIER: Yes, blast 'em. What'd they want to go and do that for?


CAPTAIN: It was perhaps their - duty, don't you see?


SOLDIER: Oh -- was it? Well, since you put it that way, of course--


CAPTAIN: And, of course, they all did their duty. That sacred obligation was attended to. They obeyed.


SOLDIER: I don't know. Don't ask me. I know nothin' about it.


CAPTAIN: Was there no one from among all those crowds that followed him to stand up and say a word for him? 


SOLDIER: I don't know. 


CAPTAIN: Well, then, this magistrate. He soon found out where his duty lay. It was his duty to hand him over to us -- to you and me.


SOLDIER: Yes, sir.


CAPTAIN: To you and me!


SOLDIER: (PUZZLED) I said, "Yes, sir."


CAPTAIN: Whereupon, though we were ignorant as to the charge upon which this man was convicted, though we had grave doubts as to whether he were guilty at all. We even liked him, sympathized with him, pitied him. It became our duty to do to him the terrible thing we did just now.


SOLDIER: I can't see what you're drivin' at, sir. You wouldn't have a man go agin his duty, would ya?


CAPTAIN: Duty, duty -- we talk of duty. What sort of devil's duties are there in the world when they lead blindly, wantonly, wickedly to the murder of such a man as this?


SOLDIER: Well, far as I'm concerned, I only obeyed my orders.


CAPTAIN: Orders! Obeyed orders!


SOLDIER: Well, sir, it was you as give 'em to me.


CAPTAIN: Why didn't you strike me in the teeth the hour I gave them?!


SOLDIER: (BEWILDERED) Me, sir? Strike my superior officer?


CAPTAIN: You struck this defenseless man. You had no scruples about his superiority. You struck him to the death.


SOLDIER: I only did my duty!


CAPTAIN: We have murdered our brother. We have destroyed a woman's child.


SOLDIER: Well, there's one thing certain: it's no use cryin' over spilt milk. He's dead an' done for now, whatever comes.


CAPTAIN: So - you think he's dead, do you?


SOLDIER: Well, what do you think? A man don't live forever, hung up as high as we got him yonder. 


CAPTAIN: And that, you think, means - death?


SOLDIER: Well, don't it? 


CAPTAIN: That's what I'm wondering. 


SOLDIER: Six hours, mind ya. It's a long time. 


CAPTAIN: Ah, there's something mightier than time. How many millions of our sort have there been in the long history of the world? I wonder how many more millions there will be in the years to come. Blind, dutiful, bloody-handed. Tell me, brother murderer, have you ever prayed?


SOLDIER: Me, sir? Well, sir, now you ask me-- Yes, I have. Once.


CAPTAIN: When was that?


SOLDIER: Well, sir, about a couple of months after I set sail for this blasted little hole. 


CAPTAIN: I understand. You prayed, then, for the birth of an innocent child?


SOLDIER: Yes, sir.


CAPTAIN: You will have need to pray again tonight. Both of us will have need. This time for the death - of an innocent man.


SOLDIER: (CLEARS THROAT, UNCOMFORTABLY) Well, it's time I was down yonder, lookin' after the boys. Any orders, sir?


CAPTAIN: (WITH DISGUST) No. No orders. 


SOUND: SOLDIER STUMBLES AWAY ... FOOTSTEPS FADE


CAPTAIN: (TO HIMSELF, READY TO CRY) My God-- My God-- Oh, my God!


MUSIC: SOMBER TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


SOUND: WIND, UP ... SHEEP BLEAT ... DOG BARKS IN DISTANCE ... WIND IN BG


MOTHER: Thirty-three years ago he was my baby. I bore him. I warmed him; washed, dressed him. I fed his little mouth with milk. Thirty-three years ago. And now he's dead. Dead! Hung up in the air like a thief: broken and bleeding like a slaughtered beast. All the life gone out of him. 


And I'm his mother.


He had a strange way with him, my son: always had, from the day he first came. His eyes -- they were wonderful. They held folk. That and his tongue and his tender, pitiful heart. He's dead. Oh, my son -- my own son -- child of my sorrow, my lad. Come back to me. It's me; it's your mother calling to you. Cannot you hear me out of the lone waste and the darkness yonder? My lad, come back, come back!


He's gone. I shall never know the touch and the healing gladness of him again, my son, my little lad.


SOUND: WIND BLOWS A LITTLE MORE FIERCELY ... THEN SUBSIDES IN BG


MUSIC: DURING ABOVE, A MYSTICAL VIBRAPHONE ACCOMPANIES THE WIND ... THEN FADES OUT WHEN WIND SUBSIDES--


MOTHER: What's that? (REALIZES) Only the wind blowing up over the moors. (RESUMES HER SOLILOQUY) Are you cold, my lad? I cannot reach you yonder. Only your feet, your poor broken feet.


SOUND: FLUTTERING OF BIRDS' WINGS BRIEFLY


MOTHER: The night-birds and the bats may come 'nigh you, they with their black wings; but not your mother, the mother that gave you life, the mother that held you warm, my son, my son -- my little cold lad. 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN BEHIND MOTHER--


MOTHER: That was a cold night, too, the night you was born, way out in the country, in the barn with the beasts. And then, that other night, before you came. It was a kind of light. It was a kind of glory. Like sunshine. I remember every word he said. About you. About you, my little lad.


It was all promise in those days, all promise and hope. You were to be no common man. You were to be a master of men, you were. And now you're dead. Dead. Killed by the soldiers and the judge. Killed by the men you called your brothers. Killed by the children of your kingdom. Killed, and the golden crown of your glory torn off, battered, and cast to the ground. Beaten, mocked, murdered by the mighty masters of the world. Hung up, high up in the air like a thief. Broken and bleeding like a slaughtered beast. (WEEPS, THEN BEHIND--)


SOUND: CAPTAIN'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH ... WIND, IN BG  


CAPTAIN: Woman, will you let me speak to you?


MOTHER: Who are you?


CAPTAIN: I am the captain who spoke to you just now. I'm in charge here. I am the man who gave the order that - that killed your son.


MOTHER: (TEARFUL) Go away, let me be!


CAPTAIN: Won't you hear me? I must talk with you.


MOTHER: What do you want to say? What is there for you to say?!


CAPTAIN: It's about myself. I--


MOTHER: (BEAT, QUIETLY) Go on. I'm listening.


CAPTAIN: I am a murderer. I want you to forgive me. I did it. I did it with a word. One word, and I was a murderer. There's nothing more terrible in the world than to be a murderer. And now I want you to forgive me. 


MOTHER: Why did you do it?


CAPTAIN: I didn't know. Killing's my trade. It was the only thing they brought me up to do. Great states are built that way.


MOTHER: By murder?


CAPTAIN: By murder. By the blood of good men. Women and little children, too.


MOTHER: What makes them do it?


CAPTAIN: They want money. They want power. They want great states. They want to possess the earth.


MOTHER: And they have won! They have it.


CAPTAIN: Have they? Not while your son hangs there.


MOTHER: Why, what do you mean? My son-- My son is dead.


CAPTAIN: Is he? Not while God is in Heaven.


MOTHER: But I don't understand. Only a little while ago I heard his blood dripping down here in the darkness. The stones are dank with it. Not an hour ago. He's dead.


CAPTAIN: He's alive.


MOTHER: Why do you mock me?! Are you God, that you can kill and make alive, all in one breath?


CAPTAIN: He's alive. I can't kill him. All the empires can't kill him. How shall hate destroy the power that possesses and rules the earth?


MOTHER: The power--? Who?


CAPTAIN: This broken thing up here. Your son.


MOTHER: (CONFUSED) My son, the power--


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN BEHIND CAPTAIN--


CAPTAIN: Listen. I will tell you. I am a soldier. I have been helping to build this state for over twenty years. Build, conquer, rule, empire, the state.  They're proud of it. The little children in the schools are drilled in obedience to it; they're taught hymns in praise of it; they're brought up to reverence its symbols. Children! Young children! 


And so we go on building our kingdoms -- the kingdoms of this world. We stretch out our hands, greedy, grasping, tyrannical, to possess the earth. Domination, power, glory of the state and of self! Those are the things we aim at; but what we really gain is pest and famine, slave labor, the hate of men and women! It can't last; it never has lasted, this building in blood and fear. Possess the earth?! Why, we have lost it. We never did possess it. We have lost both earth and ourselves in trying to possess it; for the soul of the earth is man and the love of him, and we have made of both, a desolation. 


I tell you, woman, this dead son of yours -- disfigured, shamed, spat upon -- has built a kingdom this day that shall never die. He and his brothers have been molding and making it through the long ages. They are the only ones who ever really did possess it. Something has happened up here on this hill today to shake all our kingdoms of blood and fear to the dust. The earth is his, the earth is theirs, and they've made it. The meek, the terrible meek, the fierce agonizing meek, are about to enter into their inheritance.


SOUND: DURING LAST SENTENCE ABOVE, THE QUIET BLEAT OF SHEEP


MUSIC: UP AND GENTLY OUT


MOTHER: (ENLIGHTENED) Then it was not all wasted. It was the truth, that night. I have borne a man.


CAPTAIN: A man and more than a man. A king.


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... IN BG


MOTHER: (EXULTANT) My peasant lad, a king. Yes. And more yet. He was what he said he was. He was God's Son. 


CAPTAIN: It will take a new kind of soldier to serve in his kingdom. A new kind of duty.


MOTHER: A newer courage. More like woman's. Dealing with life, not death.


CAPTAIN: I can see the end of war in this -- some day.


MOTHER: I can see the joy of women and little children.


CAPTAIN: I can see cities and great spaces of land full of happiness.


MOTHER: I can see love shining in every face.


CAPTAIN: There shall be no sin, no pain. 


MOTHER: No loss, no death!


CAPTAIN: Only life, only God!


MOTHER: And the kingdom of my Son! 


CAPTAIN: Some day. 


WOMAN: When the world shall have learned. 


CAPTAIN: (INHALES SHARPLY) Mother! I am a murderer!


MOTHER: (SLOWLY, SIMPLY) I have borne a son. I forgive you.


MUSIC: OUT ABRUPTLY


SOUND: SOLDIER'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH


SOLDIER: (APPROACHES) Hello?! Are you there, Captain?! 


CAPTAIN: Yes. I'm here.


SOLDIER: The fog's liftin' down below there, liftin' fast. It'll soon be up off this hill. General wants to see you, sir.


CAPTAIN: What does he want with me? Do you know?


SOLDIER: Been a bit of disturbance down in the town. The boys have their orders, sir. General wants you to take command.


CAPTAIN: Tell him I refuse to come.


SOLDIER: You--? Beg pardon, sir? 


CAPTAIN: I refuse to come. I disobey.


SOLDIER: (CONFUSED) I don't think I quite heard, sir.


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... IN BG


CAPTAIN: I disobey. I have sworn duty to another General. I serve the Empire no longer.


SOLDIER: Beg pardon, sir, it's not for the likes of me; but-- Well, you know what that means.


CAPTAIN: Perfectly. It means what you call death. Tell the General.


SOLDIER: Tell him as you refuse to obey orders, sir?


CAPTAIN: His; yes. (HALF TO HIMSELF) Oh, how simple it all is, after all.


SOLDIER: (BEAT) I'm sorry, Captain. 


CAPTAIN: Thank you, brother.


SOLDIER: (BEAT) Look, sir! What did I tell ya? 


SOUND: BLEAT OF LAMBS, IN BG


SOLDIER: It's 'coming light again.


CAPTAIN: Yes. (BEAT) Eternally.


MUSIC: UP, FOR A FINISH


ANNOUNCER: And so concludes the Skippy Hollywood Theater's presentation of the great play by Charles Rann Kennedy, "The Terrible Meek." On behalf of our sponsor, the makers of Skippy Peanut Butter, I want to compliment Les Mitchel on this presentation of "The Terrible Meek" and for his sensitive portrayal of the captain.


HOST: Thank you very much, Van. As I said at the beginning of the program, I love this story and revere its teachings. And now I want to thank particularly Lurene Tuttle for her magnificent characterization of the mother.


TUTTLE: It is the most significant part it has ever been my privilege to play, Les. I appreciate your asking me to do it. 


ANNOUNCER: How did you happen to select "The Terrible Meek" for this week, Les?


HOST: Well, Van, as I remarked earlier, for a number of years on the stage and in radio, I had been privileged to do this great story. Last year we presented it and the response of our audience was so great that we felt it would bear repeating. With everyone concerned with the threat of atomic warfare, quarreling between the nations and the subjection of minorities, strife of one kind or another, various "-isms" foisting their bitter philosophies on the world, it just seemed to me that in this play we find an answer to the needs of the people.


ANNOUNCER: I take it you mean spiritual guidance?


HOST: Yes.


ANNOUNCER: It is a wonderful story, Les, and I for one am very glad we did it again.


HOST: Well, I hope the audience feels the same way, Van. Now, I want to thank also Ken Christy for his fine portrayal of the soldier and also my good companion and wife, Madeline Mitchel, who was invaluable as the director of this show. We'll be back next week with an interesting story and another movie personality.


MUSIC: THEME ... IN BG, UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: In the cast, you heard Miss Lurene Tuttle as the mother, Mr. Ken Christy as the soldier, and, as the captain, our regular director Les Mitchel, who is also our host. 


HOST: It's been a privilege bringing you "The Terrible Meek." We hope that you'll be with us next week and every week. Coming attractions include Virginia Bruce, Cesar Romero, John Howard co-starring with Denny Shane, Maxie Baer, and many other fine stars. I wish to thank our sponsors, the makers of Skippy Peanut Butter, for relinquishing their middle and closing commercials in order that we might present an uninterrupted performance of "The Terrible Meek" and to also extend our appreciation to Charles Rann Kennedy for permission to present his play. 


ANNOUNCER: "The Terrible Meek" was adapted for radio and produced by Les Mitchel. Van Des Autels speaking -- for the Skippy Hollywood Theater. This program was produced in Hollywood and transcribed for release at this time.



Comments