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The Plot Murder

The Shadow

The Plot Murder

Feb 27 1938






CAST:


The Shadow Team:

ANNOUNCER

JOHN BARCLAY, Blue Coal's heating expert


Dramatis Personae:

LAMONT / THE SHADOW, mystery man

MARGOT, his lovely friend and companion

GENERAL LEVITT, of the Army

LIEUTENANT WILSON, innocent mechanic

PROFESSOR ARKELES, evil foreigner

BARLOFF, Arkeles' chief assistant

CAPTAIN (3 lines)

COUNSEL (2 lines)

GUARD

ORDERLY

OFFICER

SERGEANT

WESTON, police commissioner

and a COURTROOM CROWD





MUSIC: SHADOW THEME 


SHADOW: (SINISTER LAUGH) The Shadow knows. (LAUGHS)


MUSIC: THEME UP ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: Again, Blue Coal dealers present radio's strangest adventurer, the Shadow, mystery man who strikes terror into the very hearts of sharpsters, lawbreakers, and criminals. Today, Blue Coal brings you the Shadow's latest adventure, "The Plot Murder."


MUSIC: THEME UP ... THEN OUT BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: In just a moment, the Shadow's exciting adventure will begin. Meanwhile, I have something important to tell all you home owners. During this treacherous winter season, you can protect your family's health by burning Blue Coal, for Blue Coal's harmless blue coloring is your guarantee of clean, uniform, healthful heat all winter long. Blue Coal saves you money, too, for it burns steadily, completely, down to a fine powdery ash. So next time you're buying fuel, ask for Blue Coal by name. It's Pennsylvania's finest anthracite. Order a trial ton from your nearest Blue Coal dealer tomorrow.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


ANNOUNCER: An important announcement! Just before going on the air with today's adventure of the Shadow, we received a telegram from the American Police Review, presenting "The Shadow" with a special award. Be sure to hear this official presentation at the close of this program. And now Blue Coal presents the Shadow in "The Plot Murder."


MUSIC: INTRODUCTION


SOUND: GAVEL BANGS THREE TIMES ... COURTROOM CROWD MURMURS BRIEFLY


LEVITT: Captain Hines, read the findings of this court martial.


CAPTAIN: (READS) "We find the accused, Lieutenant John Wilson, guilty of treasonable sabotage against the government--"


WILSON: No!


CAPTAIN: (READS) "--in that he willfully destroyed a secret device known as the flying torpedo, invented by one George Arkeles and acquired exclusively for use by the government."


LEVITT: Has the prisoner anything to say before sentence is pronounced?


WILSON: Yes! Yes, I--


ARKELES: (INTERRUPTS, ANGRY) What can he say?! He admits he broke the mechanism on the demonstration torpedo!


LEVITT: Quiet, please, Professor Arkeles. As the inventor, we understand your concern in this matter, but please don't interrupt. (BEAT) Well, Lieutenant Wilson?


WILSON: (STAMMERS) I - I don't know, sir. I - I can hear all that's going on, but-- I - I went into the--


COUNSEL: (INTERRUPTS) It's obvious, General Levitt, that Lieutenant Wilson is not mentally accountable.


LEVITT: (STERN) He was sufficiently accountable to enter the testing shed by virtue of his authority as an army lieutenant, and to tamper with the flying torpedo and render it useless the very day it was to be demonstrated to the government. (TO CAPTAIN) Read the sentence of the court.


CAPTAIN: (READS) "Lieutenant Wilson, this court decides, subject to the approval of the President, that you'll be dishonorably discharged from the service of your country, and sentenced to imprisonment for the term of no less--"


WILSON: No! No!


LEVITT: Look out, he's got a revolver!


COUNSEL: Don't shoot!


WILSON: That's the man! Professor Arkeles!


SOUND: TWO GUNSHOTS!


CAPTAIN: He's wounded Professor Arkeles!


SOUND: COURTROOM CROWD MURMURS EXCITEDLY


LEVITT: Call a doctor! Take Lieutenant Wilson back to his cell!


SOUND: COURTROOM CROWD FADES FOR--


MUSIC: BRIDGE


MARGOT: Lamont Cranston, I tell you John Wilson can't be guilty. He just can't!


LAMONT: Well, why not, Margot? After all, traitorous army officers are not unknown to history.


MARGOT: Yes, but the peculiar way John Wilson talked on the stand makes me think there's something strange about the whole thing. He acted-- Well, almost like a man in a trance. Lamont, just what is this flying torpedo he's supposed to have tampered with?


LAMONT: It's what its name implies. A sort of aerial torpedo filled with high explosive, flying under its own power. Once it's launched into the air, instead of flying a predetermined course, its direction can be guided by radio beams from an observation plane flying high above it.


MARGOT: I see.


LAMONT: You can imagine its tremendous effectiveness in warfare. Deadly accuracy in hitting even a fast moving target like a troop train or a supply ship.


MARGOT: Sounds tremendously important. Who invented it?


LAMONT: This man Arkeles, who was to have demonstrated it last week at the proving grounds before a large delegation from the capital. Besides the members of the War Department, a great many high officials and other branches of government were to attend the tests.


MARGOT: Well?


LAMONT: Since your friend Wilson gained access to the laboratory and put the flying torpedo out of commission, the test has been postponed until tomorrow.


MARGOT: And who is Arkeles? Where did he come from?


LAMONT: A famous foreign inventor. Quite a reputation abroad.


MARGOT: Lamont, you don't suppose it's possible Arkeles has the boy under some strong mental influence?


LAMONT: Possible.


MARGOT: They've got Wilson temporarily in the city jail. Won't you call on him -- as the Shadow?


LAMONT: Margot, do you honestly think that this case warrants my attention as the Shadow?


MARGOT: Lamont, I don't ask many favors, but I have a feeling John Wilson is innocent.


LAMONT: All right, Margot. If you're really serious, the Shadow will pay a call on John Wilson -- in the city jail.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: LARGE CLOCK CHIMES EIGHT TIMES ... AROUND THE FOURTH CHIME, A METAL DOOR OPENS


GUARD: Lieutenant Wilson is in that last cell, Professor Arkeles.


ARKELES: Thank you, guard. This pass that General Levitt gave me -- do you take it or do I keep it?


GUARD: You better keep it, sir, in case you want to use it again.


ARKELES: Yes, that's right.


GUARD: You'll have to talk to Wilson through the bars. 


ARKELES: Oh?


GUARD: No one's allowed in his cell.


ARKELES: Thank you, I have no desire to go in. I already have one arm in a sling due to the young man's temper. There's only one or two questions I want to ask him, then I'll leave.


GUARD: Very well.


SOUND: ARKELES' FOOTSTEPS TO CELL


WILSON: (AS ARKELES APPROACHES) Well? Who is it? 


SOUND: ARKELES' FOOTSTEPS STOP


WILSON: (BEAT, UPSET) You! Arkeles!


ARKELES: Don't get excited, Lieutenant Wilson. I only came to tell you that you're a much better mechanic than a marksman. Your bullet only injured my arm.


WILSON: I'm only sorry I didn't-- Didn't--


ARKELES: Kill me? The only way you can break the spell I have over you, isn't it? To kill me.


WILSON: (CALLS LOUDLY) Will somebody--?!


ARKELES: (INTERRUPTS) Stop! (BEAT) Look in my eyes. 


WILSON: No.


ARKELES: Look!


WILSON: No, I won't!


ARKELES: John Wilson-- Look in my eyes.


WILSON: No!


ARKELES: Look in my eyes, Wilson!


WILSON: (ENTRANCED) Uh--


ARKELES: That's right.


WILSON: (WEAKLY) Uh--


ARKELES: Now repeat after me. I destroyed the torpedo. I destroyed the torpedo. Say it.


WILSON: (HALTINGLY) I - I - destroyed - the torpedo.


ARKELES: Sabotage, against my country.


WILSON: Sab-o-tage, against my country.


ARKELES: I - am guilty!


WILSON: (TEARFUL) I - am - guilty!


ARKELES: And that is all you remember!


SHADOW: (SINISTER LAUGH) Are you sure that's all he remembers, Professor Arkeles?


ARKELES: Who said that? 


SOUND: ARKELES TAKES A FEW STEPS DOWN THE PASSAGE


ARKELES: Guard, you are there?


SHADOW: No, not the guard, Professor. He's waiting at the end of the passage.


ARKELES: Ah, you hide somewhere. In the next cell perhaps.


SHADOW: No, I am here. In the shadows, Professor Arkeles. Perhaps you've heard of me.


ARKELES: Who are you?


SHADOW: The Shadow.


ARKELES: The Shadow?


WILSON: Help me. Help me!


SHADOW: I am your friend, John Wilson. Think now. Concentrate. What is it you're trying to remember?


WILSON: It's-- It's that torpedo. Dangerous! I--


ARKELES: Wilson, be quiet!


SHADOW: (TO WILSON) Steady now. Think! Think! You can break through this spell.


WILSON: I - I - I tried to make them understand. I--


ARKELES: Stop!


WILSON: I destroyed the torpedo because--!


ARKELES: I command you to stop!


SHADOW: John! Your friends believe in you. They're trying to help you!


ARKELES: (SLOWLY) Wilson, what have you committed?


WILSON: (ENTRANCED) Sab-- Sab-o-tage against my country. I am guilty. I am guilty.


ARKELES: (QUIETLY TRIUMPHANT) So, Mr. Shadow -- whoever you are -- you see?


SHADOW: You have a powerful spell over the boy, Professor. But there is a way to break it.


ARKELES: What way, Shadow?


SHADOW: If you don't know, I have no intention of telling you. Yet.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


SOUND: EERIE WHIR! AS SHADOW MAKES MENTAL CONTACT WITH MARGOT ... THEN IN BG


SHADOW: Margot Lane? Margot Lane, stand by. Arkeles has put Wilson under some strong mental influence, a sort of hypnotic telepathy. The voice of conscience is dominated by the thoughts Arkeles plants there. We must weaken Arkeles' hold on Wilson's mind, so we can find out if he's guilty or not. Stand ready for another call. Tonight I'm going to pay a surprise visit to Professor Arkeles at his hotel. I have a feeling that if we're not successful in getting Wilson to talk, this country of ours may suffer a terrible disaster.


SOUND: EERIE WHIR ... UP AND OUT


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: DOOR OPENS


ARKELES: Barloff, lock the door.


BARLOFF: (OFF) All right.


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES AND LOCKS


ARKELES: Did anyone follow you here to the hotel?


BARLOFF: (CLOSER) No. No one, Professor Arkeles.


ARKELES: Good. The test will take place tomorrow?


BARLOFF: Yes. At three o'clock. The War Department is so convinced your invention will render any nation possessing it invincible that the high command of both the Army and Navy are to be there to witness the test.


ARKELES: The president, too?


BARLOFF: Yes. The president and the vice president expect to attend -- together with the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy.


ARKELES: So they've fallen into my trap. They'll be blown off the face of the earth, just as I planned. Barloff, be sure you make a final inspection before the torpedo is taken out to the grounds, and see that the steering mechanism is set.


BARLOFF: I understand. (NERVOUS) But since I am your chief assistant, they might ask me to go along with them!


ARKELES: No, they won't; I fixed that. Their bungling army mechanics think they understand the flying torpedo perfectly. So to satisfy their pride I've let them take complete charge of the demonstration.


BARLOFF: Good.


ARKELES: Don't worry, Barloff.


BARLOFF: And afterwards?


ARKELES: Afterwards, with the guiding brains of the nation wiped out at a single stroke, the country will be thrown into confusion; disorganized. So we'll have nothing to fear.


BARLOFF: I see.


ARKELES: There are only two things that bother me slightly, though. Lieutenant Wilson for one.


BARLOFF: Wilson! Did he really discover the secret trick of the steering mechanism?


ARKELES: Yes, he knows what we intend to do and how we intend to do it.


BARLOFF: You should have disposed of him at once!


ARKELES: I thought of that! I was afraid it would arouse suspicion. But I'm keeping Wilson under mental hypnotic control until it's too late for him to stop us.


BARLOFF: Wouldn't it be better if he was dead?


ARKELES: Perhaps. I can still visit him at the prison.


BARLOFF: And what is the other thing that bothers you, Professor?


ARKELES: Only a shadow, Barloff. But I'm not quite sure of the extent of its power.


BARLOFF: A shadow?


ARKELES: Don't worry. I think I can take care of it, too.


SOUND: FOOTSTEPS, OFF


ARKELES: (HUSHED) Listen!


BARLOFF: What is it?


ARKELES: I thought I heard footsteps outside in the hall! Go and look!


SOUND: BARLOFF'S STEPS TO DOOR, WHICH UNLOCKS AND OPENS 


BARLOFF: (OFF) There's no one here. The hall is empty.


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES AND LOCKS BEHIND--


ARKELES: Ah, must be my nerves. I'll be glad when this is all over.


BARLOFF: (CLOSER) Our escape is taken care of?


ARKELES: Yes, the freighter will be waiting for us at South Pier. But go now, Karl. And success to you.


SOUND: DOOR UNLOCKS AND OPENS ... IN BG, THE LARGE CLOCK CHIMES TEN TIMES IN THE DISTANCE ... THE TENTH CHIME COINCIDES WITH THE SHADOW'S LAUGH--


BARLOFF: (OFF) Good night, Professor.


ARKELES: Good night, Barloff.


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES 


ARKELES: (YAWNS, TO HIMSELF) The Shadow. If I can't put my will power against a shadow, then I deserve to lose. And I've never yet--


SHADOW: (SINISTER LAUGH) Good evening, Professor Arkeles.


ARKELES: (ASTONISHED) You! The Shadow; you've come!


SHADOW: Yes, Professor. Why do you hold Lieutenant Wilson in a hypnotic spell, Professor?


ARKELES: I don't know what you're talking about.


SHADOW: We shall see. And now I have something else to tell you.


ARKELES: What?


SHADOW: Wilson knows something about you, Professor. And I'm going to find out what it is.


ARKELES: All right, Shadow. You know a little, but you'll never learn more from Wilson. No one can break the spell! Not you, nor all your childish magic!


SHADOW: You forget ---- greater magic, Arkeles.


ARKELES: What?


SHADOW: Death.


ARKELES: Death?


SHADOW: Yes. It's on the way, Professor. And I can promise you this. If any blood is shed, it will be yours. Not the Shadow's. (SINISTER LAUGH) 


MUSIC: CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: The second part of the Shadow's adventure will continue in just a moment. Meanwhile, here's some interesting information. Every day, more and more families throughout this area are saving money on their heating and cooking bills. These families are getting better and more economical heat than ever before, with Blue Coal. Blue Coal is anthracite. It is an American product mined by the Glen Alden Coal Company, who are deeply grateful for the purchases of Blue Coal by families throughout this area. Today, Blue Coal is the largest selling brand of home fuel in America because it is the only fuel that so satisfactorily combines all of the essentials necessary for perfect heating results. It is superior in quality, cleaner than most fuels, and economical because it burns long and steadily, down to a fine powdery ash. Furthermore, there can be no substitution when ordering Blue Coal because it is the only solid fuel actually trademarked with a blue tint so that you can identify it at a glance. These are a few reasons why, in Watertown, New York, Blue Coal sales this winter show a twenty-nine percent increase over the same period a year ago. So take a tip from Watertown, New York families. Order Blue Coal by name. You will find the name of your nearest Blue Coal dealer listed in the "Where to Buy It" section of your classified telephone directory under the name Blue Coal!


MUSIC: SECOND ACT INTRODUCTION


LAMONT: But I - I tell you, General Levitt--


SOUND: PHONE RINGS


LEVITT: Excuse me, Cranston.


LAMONT: Go right ahead, General.


SOUND: RECEIVER UP


LEVITT: (INTO PHONE) Hello? General Levitt speaking. -- Oh, yes, good morning, Captain Hines. -- That's fine. You have the flying torpedo loaded and ready for the demonstration? -- Good. I'll expect a report. Sorry I can't be with you. Goodbye. 


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


LEVITT: Now, Cranston, to get back to this Lieutenant Wilson. I don't see what I can do.


LAMONT: But there may be some desperate plot at the bottom of this. Wilson acts as if he'd been put under some powerful hypnotic spell. He might know something about this flying torpedo that you ought to know!


LEVITT: For heaven's sake, Cranston, I haven't time to listen to any such drivel. I know you're a very agreeable young man and you mean well, but you're letting your imagination run away with you. Now, if you don't mind, I must get ready to leave for the capital.


LAMONT: Very well. Just do me one favor, General Levitt. It might prove something to you.


LEVITT: Well, what is it?


LAMONT: Suggest to Professor Arkeles that he be present with the other official visitors at the proving grounds when the demonstration starts.


LEVITT: Of course Professor Arkeles will be there. Why shouldn't he be?


LAMONT: That's what I'd like to know. Unless I'm very much mistaken, General, Professor Arkeles has made arrangements to be far, far away from the scene of his triumph.


LEVITT: By George, Cranston, I believe you know something.


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR OPENS


ORDERLY: Oh, excuse me, sir.


LEVITT: Well?


ORDERLY: There are two gentlemen here to see you, sir. Professor Arkeles and another man.


LEVITT: Oh. All right, show them in.


ORDERLY: (TO ARKELES) General Levitt will see you now.


ARKELES: Thank you. I'm sorry to interrupt you, General Levitt.


LEVITT: That's all right. (INTRODUCTIONS) This is Mr. Cranston. Professor Arkeles and Mr. Barloff.


ARKELES: How do you do?


LAMONT: How do you do?


ARKELES: If you don't mind, Mr. Cranston, I'd like to speak to General Levitt alone.


LAMONT: Oh, not at all. I'm, uh, sure you have weighty matters to discuss. (MOVING OFF) Good day, gentlemen.


LEVITT: Thanks, Cranston. Goodbye. Oh, orderly?


ORDERLY: Yes, General Levitt?


LEVITT: Is my luggage ready?


ORDERLY: Yes, sir.


LEVITT: Fine, then take the next train. There's one leaving in twenty minutes. Can you make it?


ORDERLY: Yes, sir; if I go now, sir.


LEVITT: Go ahead then. I'll close the office. I'll meet you in the capital tomorrow.


ORDERLY: Yes, sir.


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR CLOSES


LEVITT: Well, what brings you here, Professor? Oh, uh, sit down, Mr. Barloff.


BARLOFF: Thank you, sir.


ARKELES: Barloff here has just returned from the proving grounds, General. He supervised the loading of the torpedo early this morning.


LEVITT: Everything was all right, I hope?


ARKELES: Perfect. Your army mechanics seemed very proud they're going to handle the torpedo by themselves. Of course, we'll be anxious to know how it comes out.


LEVITT: Oh? Aren't you going to be at the demonstration, Professor Arkeles?


ARKELES: I'm afraid not. Another engagement unfortunately prevents my attending.


LEVITT: Oh, yes, I see. 


ARKELES: Mm.


LEVITT: But I can't understand how anything could be more important to you than seeing your own invention demonstrated before the highest officials of our government.


ARKELES: I admit I am terribly disappointed, General. However, I've left instructions for a telephone message to be sent to me at my hotel the minute the demonstration is over.


LEVITT: Oh. Professor, I'm not sure that this test should be made without your being there.


ARKELES: (UNHAPPY) What do you mean?


LEVITT: Suppose I order you to go.


BARLOFF: (NERVOUS) But no; that's impossible!


LEVITT: (QUICKLY) Why impossible, Mr. Barloff?


ARKELES: You must excuse Barloff, General Levitt. He is a little excited.


LEVITT: Excited? What about? Look here, Professor Arkeles, why don't you want to go to the proving grounds?


ARKELES: Must I repeat my previous statement?


LEVITT: This stalling and hedging is very suspicious. By George, you'll go whether you want to or not!


SOUND: PHONE RECEIVER UP


BARLOFF: Don't touch that phone!


ARKELES: Barloff, be careful!


LEVITT: You can't give me orders in my own office--! 


SOUND: BARLOFF PUNCHES LEVITT


LEVITT: Uh! 


SOUND: LEVITT HITS HEAD ON DESK AS HE COLLAPSES


LEVITT: (EXHALES AS HE FALLS UNCONSCIOUS)


SOUND: LEVITT COLLAPSES TO FLOOR


ARKELES: (BEAT) You hit him too hard, Barloff. His head is bleeding.


BARLOFF: He struck the desk when he fell.


ARKELES: Here, drag him in this closet and lock the door.


SOUND: BARLOFF DRAGS LEVITT TO CLOSET BEHIND--


BARLOFF: (WITH EFFORT) He knows something, Professor.


ARKELES: Yes, the fool suspects something, but how?


BARLOFF: Then we've got to act quickly!


ARKELES: I wonder if Lieutenant Wilson has talked.


BARLOFF: But you said he's still under your hypnotic spell.


ARKELES: Perhaps it would be better if Lieutenant Wilson dies.


BARLOFF: Yes. Are we going to murder him?


ARKELES: No, I'll merely suggest that he kill himself. Now, Barloff, if you'll tie up the general--


BARLOFF: Professor! Look at him.


ARKELES: What?


BARLOFF: General Levitt -- is dead.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


LAMONT: Well, here's General Levitt's office, Margot.


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR OPENS


MARGOT: No one seems to be here, Lamont.


LAMONT: Well, that's odd. The general was here less than an hour ago. (CALLS) General? (NO ANSWER) General Levitt?


MARGOT: Look! Here on the corner of the desk.


LAMONT: (HUSHED) Blood! (QUICKLY) Get word to Commissioner Weston at once. Tell him something's happened to General Levitt.


MARGOT: Yes. Anything else?


LAMONT: Yes, tell him to send a squad of men to South Pier. I overheard Professor Arkeles and Barloff talking about meeting on a freighter there.


MARGOT: Where are you going?


LAMONT: I'm going to the jail. I'm going to make one more desperate attempt to get John Wilson to talk. We've got to find out what this is all about before it's too late.


MUSIC: BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG


BARLOFF: Do you want me to wait here at the jail, Professor Arkeles?


ARKELES: No, go down to South Pier, Barloff. I want to be alone with Lieutenant Wilson.


BARLOFF: Yes.


ARKELES: I'll follow after I've taken care of him.


BARLOFF: All right, but first I'll collect the baggage.


MUSIC: UP, FOR BRIEF BRIDGE


ARKELES: But you remember only this, Lieutenant Wilson. See always my eyes in front of you.


WILSON: (ENTRANCED) Yes.


ARKELES: You will forever do what I tell you to.


WILSON: (RESISTS) Stop! Leave me alone!


ARKELES: No, never! Look, Wilson. See what I have? A knife! Here, take it. 


WILSON: (EXHALES AS HE TAKES THE KNIFE)


ARKELES: Now listen to me. You are disgraced -- your family disgraced. You have nothing more to live for. Say it!


WILSON: (ENTRANCED) I have nothing more to live for. I - I have nothing more to live for.


ARKELES: Then draw the knife across your wrists. It's easy. Try it.


SHADOW: Stop, John. Don't do it.


ARKELES: The Shadow!


WILSON: He's trying to make me--


SOUND: WILSON GRABS ARKELES THROUGH THE CELL BARS


ARKELES: Keep away from me, Wilson!


WILSON: (RESISTS) I've - got - you! By God, I've--


ARKELES: Let go of me, Wilson!


WILSON: I've got you, Arkeles. Did you feel the knife yourself?


ARKELES: Yes, you've cut me, you fool!


SHADOW: Your blood is being shed, Professor. Remember what I told you?


ARKELES: (MOVING OFF QUICKLY) Let me out of here! Let me out!


SHADOW: He's gone, John.


WILSON: Something's-- Something's happened to me. I - I feel I can talk now!


SHADOW: Then talk. Tell me what you know. Arkeles' spell is weakened.


WILSON: (BREATHLESSLY) I can't see you, and I don't know who you are, but you've got to help me. I first suspected Arkeles and his crowd when - when I saw that the steering mechanism of the flying torpedo had an extra attachment.


SHADOW: An extra attachment?


WILSON: Yes, you see, the flying torpedo is supposed to be steered by radio beams from an accompanying plane. But this extra attachment I'm talking about would - would render the radio beams ineffective. In other words, the rudder is set so the torpedo will fly in a complete circle and come back and strike the point from which it was sent. Like a boomerang!


SHADOW: If it does that in the demonstration today, it will wipe out all the important government officials.


WILSON: Yes, that's their plan! Just as I made the discovery, Arkeles came in - into the workshop. I accused him and - he put me under this spell. I - I tried to talk, but I couldn't!


SHADOW: Never mind that! Now get in touch with Commissioner Weston. Have him go to the proving grounds. He can stop the test flight of this flying torpedo if he gets there soon enough!


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: PIER BACKGROUND (SHIP ENGINE, BOAT HORNS, WATER, ET CETERA)


SERGEANT: What's the idea of having us wait around here at the South Pier? There don't seem to be anything stirring.


OFFICER: Who are the guys we're supposed to pick up?


SERGEANT: Uh, two birds by the name of Professor Arkeles and Barloff.


OFFICER: Oh. Foreigners, huh?


SERGEANT: Yeah.


OFFICER: What are they gonna do? Make a getaway?


SERGEANT: I don't know. Commissioner Weston just said to make sure we got 'em, that's all.


OFFICER: Ah, if it had been that important, don't you think the commissioner would have come down here himself?


SERGEANT: Well, he was comin', but he got a last-minute call to go over to the place where they're tryin' out that new flyin' torpedo.


OFFICER: Oh, yeah, I read about that. All these inventions--


SERGEANT: Wait a minute. Somebody comin' down the dock.


OFFICER: Oh, yeah.


SOUND: BARLOFF'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH


SERGEANT: Hey, you!


SOUND: BARLOFF'S FOOTSTEPS STOP ... THEN START RUNNING 


SERGEANT: Hey, stop where you are, or I'll shoot!


SOUND: BARLOFF'S FOOTSTEPS SLOW TO A STOP


SERGEANT: Well, what's this all about?


BARLOFF: Nothing.


SERGEANT: Where are you goin'?


BARLOFF: That is my business.


OFFICER: What's your name? (NO ANSWER) Come on, what's your name? 


SERGEANT: Are you Barloff?


BARLOFF: What is it to you?


SERGEANT: Answer me! Are you Barloff?


BARLOFF: Yes.


SERGEANT: Well, that's all we wanted to know!


OFFICER: Yeah. Come on!


BARLOFF: Where are you taking me? I have done nothing!


OFFICER: Look out, he's got a gun, Sarge!


SOUND: OFFICER BLACKJACKS BARLOFF


BARLOFF: (AS HE'S HIT) Uh-- (EXHALES)


SOUND: BARLOFF COLLAPSES TO THE PIER


OFFICER: I'm sorry, Sergeant. I had to do it.


SERGEANT: That's okay. This Arkeles will probably be along in a minute. Put this bird behind those boxes. We don't want Arkeles to--


OFFICER: Hey, look out, here comes another guy down the dock.


SERGEANT: All right, quick. 


OFFICER: Right.


SOUND: OFFICERS DRAG BARLOFF OFF 


SERGEANT: (WITH EFFORT) Behind this piling here. Come on.


OFFICER: This one must be Arkeles coming now.


SERGEANT: Yeah, I guess so.


SOUND: ARKELES' FOOTSTEPS APPROACH AND STOP WITH--


SERGEANT: Professor Arkeles?


ARKELES: (WARILY) Who are you?


SERGEANT: The police. We want to ask you what--


ARKELES: Well, you can't get me to talk! You'll never make me--


OFFICER: Look out! Look out, Sarge, he's got a gun there!


SERGEANT: Drop that gun, Arkeles!


ARKELES: You can't take me! The police can't touch me!


SOUND: GUNSHOT! FROM ARKELES' GUN


SERGEANT: You asked for it!


SOUND: TWO GUNSHOTS!


OFFICER: You nailed him, Sarge.


SERGEANT: Did he get you?


OFFICER: No, I'm okay.


SOUND: POLICE SIREN APPROACHES


OFFICER: Ah, here comes a [patrol car?]. Must have heard those shots.


SERGEANT: Naw, they didn't have time.


SOUND: POLICE CAR WITH SIREN PULLS UP AND STOPS ... SIREN OUT ... CAR DOOR OPENS


SERGEANT: Oh, Commissioner Weston?


WESTON: Yes, Sergeant? I see you got our man.


SERGEANT: Yep.


WESTON: Is he dead?


SERGEANT: I don't think so, sir.


WESTON: Well, Arkeles, maybe you'll talk.


ARKELES: (WEAKLY) I'll never talk.


SHADOW: (SINISTER LAUGH) Commissioner Weston.


WESTON: The Shadow! What are you doing here?


SHADOW: We can't waste time, Commissioner. Did you stop the test of the flying torpedo?


WESTON: Yes, but--


SHADOW: Good. Commissioner, you've saved the lives of thousands of spectators, to say nothing of some of our highest government officials.


WESTON: Then it was you who--?


SHADOW: Yes. Yes, I had a friend of mine call you. (TO ARKELES) And now, Professor Arkeles, let's have the story. You haven't much time.


ARKELES: I know. I'm dying, Shadow.


SHADOW: It was a plot against our national defense, wasn't it?


ARKELES: It was.


SHADOW: Who employed you to do it?


ARKELES: That I won't tell you!


SHADOW: But Lieutenant Wilson is innocent.


ARKELES: Yes. Wilson is innocent.


SHADOW: Commissioner, you're a witness. Lieutenant Wilson is cleared.


WESTON: Yes, Shadow.


SHADOW: And what about General Levitt?


ARKELES: Barloff killed him.


SHADOW: Where is Barloff?


SERGEANT: We got him behind these boxes.


ARKELES: How - how did you know about General Levitt, Shadow?


SHADOW: We found blood on his desk. But this time the blood is yours, Arkeles.


ARKELES: (DYING, SLOWLY) Yes. Mine. (EXHALES)


SOUND: ARKELES' HEAD DROPS TO PIER


WESTON: Well, Shadow, Arkeles is dead.


SHADOW: Yes, Commissioner. And you've been instrumental in averting a national calamity. (SUMMING UP, THOUGHTFULLY) Arkeles is dead, the innocence of Lieutenant Wilson has been proved, and the integrity of the men who protect our liberty is again vindicated.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: And now here is John Barclay, Blue Coal's heating expert, with helpful heating hints for you.


BARCLAY: Thank you, Ken Roberts. Good evening, friends. I've received numerous letters from home owners asking what they can do to prevent "chimney loss" -- wasted heat that goes up the chimney instead of through the pipes of your heating system. It is really a simple matter to prevent this, and you will save money on your fuel bills, too. The next time you refuel the fire, move the handle of the turn damper -- that plate-like damper inside the smoke pipe -- one-sixteenth of an inch toward the closed, upright position. Then, if the fire still burns too freely, close the turn damper another sixteenth of an inch. Repeat this operation until you've found the correct adjustment. Once you've found this ideal adjustment of the turn damper, mark the position on the smoke pipe with a piece of chalk or something that can be plainly seen, then leave the damper set at that mark. Remember, the nearer the turn damper is set to a closed position, the smaller the chimney loss and the greater the volume of useful heat. If you follow the suggestions that I give every Sunday on this program, they should enable you to heat your home with the utmost efficiency and economy. However, if you're experiencing trouble with your heating plant, call your nearest Blue Coal dealer and ask him to send a John Barclay-trained service man to your home to inspect your furnace. This service is free to all Blue Coal customers. I thank you.


ANNOUNCER: Thank you, Mr. Barclay. And here's the official telegram advising of the award the American Police Review has made to the Shadow program. Quote: "The American Police Review salutes the producers and sponsors of 'The Shadow' for their contribution to the cause of better law enforcement. Thirteen thousand police executives throughout the United States read the Review, so our purpose is to help them find the best tools and methods to combat crime. The editors of the Review have turned a critical ear toward 'The Shadow' program for some time and are gratified to note that your presentation of police roles truly reflects the intelligence and character of the high type of police officer now found throughout the land. We therefore take pleasure in presenting to you the American Police Review Certificate of Award for distinguished service to the cause of better law enforcement. Signed, J. Norble Birch, editor of the American Police Review, Chicago, Illinois."


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: And so, on behalf of Blue Coal dealers and of all those who assist in the weekly programs of "The Shadow," we tender our thanks and appreciation to editor J. Norble Birch and the American Police Review for their splendid testimonial.


MUSIC: ACCENT


ANNOUNCER: You have just heard a dramatized version of one of the many copyrighted stories which appear in The Shadow Magazine. All the characters and all the places named are fictitious. Any similarity to persons living or dead is purely coincidental.


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG


SHADOW: (SINISTER LAUGH) As you sow evil, so shall you reap evil. Crime does not pay. The Shadow knows. (SINISTER LAUGH) 


MUSIC: THEME ... UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: Next week -- same time, same station -- Blue Coal, America's finest anthracite, will again present another thrilling adventure of the Shadow. Be sure to listen. And be sure to burn Blue Coal, the solid fuel for solid comfort.


MUSIC: CHORD


ANNOUNCER: This is the Mutual Broadcasting System.


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