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The Phantom Lady

The Lux Radio Theatre

Phantom Lady

Mar 27 1944





CAST:


The Lux Team:

ANNOUNCER, John Milton Kennedy

HOST, Cecil B. DeMille

JIM (2 lines)

MARY

1ST LADY (2 lines)

2ND LADY (2 lines)

SALLY (3 lines)

2ND ANNOUNCER (1 line)


Dramatis Personae:

SCOTT HENDERSON / ALAN CURTIS

JACK MARLOW / BRIAN AHERNE

CAROL RICHMAN / ELLA RAINES

MAC, the bartender

ANN TERRY, the phantom lady; distant, depressed

USHER (1 line)

WOMAN (1 line)

VENDOR (1 line)

STAGE MANAGER

ESTELA MONTEIRO, a Carmen Miranda-type diva

INSPECTOR BURGESS, New York City police

DAVE HILL, police detective

STEWARD, Spanish accent (2 line)

CAB MAN (2 lines)

MIKE, the cab driver

JUDGE (2 lines)

PROSECUTOR (1 line)

JURY FOREMAN (1 line)

1ST JAILER (1 line)

CITIZEN (male)

CLIFF MILBURN, the drummer

2ND JAILER (2 lines)

MADAME KETTISHA, luxury milliner

MISS PAYTON, hat designer

DR. CHASE (female)

ATTENDANT (1 line)

and a few CROWDS






ANNOUNCER: Lux presents Hollywood!


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: THE LUX RADIO THEATRE brings you Brian Aherne, Ella Raines, and Alan Curtis in the Universal screen play, "The Phantom Lady." Ladies and gentlemen, your producer, Mr. Cecil B. DeMille.


MUSIC: THEME ... UP AND OUT


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: Greetings from Hollywood, ladies and gentlemen. 


We must thank Edgar Allan Poe for the modern mystery story. But I'm sure this genius of a century ago never dreamed that his brainchild would turn into "big business" -- that authors, publishers, magazine editors, and producers of plays and motion pictures by the hundreds would labor into the wee small hours for the avowed purpose of scaring the daylights out of customers. Today the mystery is a favorite form of American entertainment and we have a classic of the art tonight. It's the Universal screen hit, "The Phantom Lady." And starring in this play we have Brian Aherne and two of Universal's most promising players, the brand-new discovery Ella Raines, and Alan Curtis.


An odd thing about "The Phantom Lady" is that we let you know who the murderer is rather early in the proceedings. But that very thing makes this manhunt -- or rather, "lady hunt" -- even more exciting. The young lady in the play turns out to be a very competent detective. Up to now, our hard-working writers have given us some immortal names -- like Sherlock Holmes, Philo Vance, and Bulldog Drummond -- but very few feminine sleuths. Naturally, the makers of Lux Toilet Soap are only too happy to help supply this lack, because our sponsors have known right along that the ladies of America were sleuths of the first order. All of them, at one time or another, have tried to solve a very elusive mystery -- the mystery of a lovely complexion. And one of the things that helped thousands of these "beauty detectives" arrive at the solution was Lux Toilet Soap.


And now you can start guessing on the secret of "The Phantom Lady" because here's the first act, starring Brian Aherne as Jack, Ella Raines as Carol, and Alan Curtis as Scott Henderson.


MUSIC: BREEZY INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND HOST--


HOST: The engineering firm of Scott Henderson, Incorporated is never rushed with business, but on this stifling afternoon in mid-August, it's much too hot to work anyway. Ruthie, the receptionist, is lazily manicuring her nails. Carol Richman, secretary, absently thumbs through a file of blueprints. And in his office, Scott Henderson, the other member of the firm, is saying goodbye to an old friend.


SCOTT: (LIGHTLY) What a lucky guy. A second-rate sculptor like you gets an assignment in Brazil, and I -- New York's best engineer -- has to sit in this bake oven! 


JACK: Oh, you're doing all right, aren't you, Scott? 


SCOTT: Yeah, I'm just kidding. But I sure wish I going to be with you on that boat tonight. 


JACK: Well, I'll drink up one extra Ocean Breeze and a Planter's Punch -- just for you. 


SCOTT: A boat to Brazil. Well, you've certainly earned it, Jack. Say, just what will you work on down there? 


JACK: Well, oddly enough, I don't quite know. I don't know if they want to buy what I've got or if they have a commission in mind for something new. 


SCOTT: No way of telling then when you'll be back? 


JACK: No, no, it's all pretty indefinite. 


SCOTT: Gonna miss you, Jack. 


JACK: Thanks. I'm sorry you can't come down to the boat tonight. 


SCOTT: Yeah. I feel like a heel. 


JACK: Oh, cut it out. You promised to take Marcella to the show, didn't you? 


SCOTT: It's just that it's been so hard to get tickets, and now that I've got them, I hate to disappoint her. 


JACK: You'd be crazy to.


SOUND: KNOCK ON OFFICE DOOR 


SCOTT: Come in. 


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR OPENS


CAROL: These are the blueprints you wanted, Mr. Henderson. 


SCOTT: Thanks, Carol. Say goodbye to a very lucky fellow. 


CAROL: (CHUCKLES) Yes. Congratulations, Mr. Marlow. Have a good trip. 


JACK: Thanks, Miss Richman. Take care of the great engineer while I'm gone.


CAROL: Well, I'll try. Goodbye, Mr. Marlow. 


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR CLOSES 


JACK: Huh! You call me lucky, eh? That's a very pretty girl! 


SCOTT: Hm? Oh. Oh, yeah, not bad. 


JACK: Well, Scott, I've got to close up the apartment so I guess I'd better get going. 


SCOTT: Goodbye, old man. Write to us, now. 


JACK: Oh, of course. Give my best to Marcella. (MOVING OFF) So long, Scott. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE 


SCOTT: (UNHAPPY) Say, Mac--?


MAC: (OFF) Yeah? 


SCOTT: Another Scotch and soda. 


MAC: You sure, buddy? You ain't lookin' so good. 


SCOTT: I've had exactly one drink. Do I look drunk? 


MAC: All I said was you ain't lookin' so good. Maybe it's the heat.


SCOTT: (IRRITATED) It's not the heat. I had a little battle with my wife. 


MAC: Then maybe you need another drink. 


SOUND: DRINK POURED BEHIND--


SCOTT: I slammed the door and walked out. I told her-- Well, whatever I told her, it's none of your business, is it?


MAC: That's right. Here.


SOUND: GLASS SET DOWN 


SCOTT: Say, uh, where's all the trade tonight? 


MAC: You got me. It's too hot to think about it.


SCOTT: Yeah. What time do you knock off?


MAC: Huh? Oh. One A. M. 


SCOTT: Oh, too bad. I've got a couple of tickets. I was gonna make you a present. 


MAC: Thanks.


SCOTT: Hey, uh, your only other customer looks as if she wants some service.


MAC: Yeah. (TO ANN) Yes, miss? 


ANN: (OFF) Pack o' cigarettes. Any brand. 


MAC: Okay. 


SCOTT: (LOW) Will you look at the hat she's wearing? What a hat! 


MAC: Yeah. (SLIGHTLY OFF) Here ya are, miss.


SCOTT: (APPROACHES) Miss, I don't mean to annoy you, but, uh, are you doing anything tonight?


MAC: Now, look buddy--


SCOTT: These tickets. I thought maybe you could use them. They're no good to me. 


ANN: No. No, thank you. 


SCOTT: I thought maybe you could call up a friend.


ANN: I'm afraid not. 


SCOTT: Oh. Well, I don't suppose you'd go with me? 


ANN: Please--


SCOTT: Really, I didn't mean anything wrong. I just thought-- 


ANN: All right, I'll surprise you. I will go with you. 


SCOTT: Swell. What time is it? 


ANN: Five minutes after eight. 


SCOTT: Oh, there's plenty of time. (TO MAC) Say, Mac, what do we owe you? (TO ANN) By the way, my name is-- 


ANN: Please. No names. If you want me to go, that's the way it has to be. 


SCOTT: Okay, that suits me. 


MAC: Dollar sixty, buddy. 


SCOTT: Here you are. Keep it. (MOVING OFF) There's a taxi outside; let's take it. 


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... THEN TAXI INTERIOR BACKGROUND


SCOTT: You live in New York? 


ANN: Yes.


SCOTT: Well, then you're used to this heat. You know, there's something that gets me about this town on a Saturday night. Do you ever watch the people's faces? It's fun. There's a typical New York character for you -- Mike Frelano, the taxi driver. There's his picture on his hack license. 


ANN: Look. I'm - I'm afraid I'm not gonna be very good company.


SCOTT: You should relax. You know, you shouldn't be alone any more than I should. 


ANN: You're right. 


SCOTT: You're smiling. (CHUCKLES) Now, that's more like it. Let's have fun and-- Maybe the show is as good as they say.


ANN: I hope so. I'd like to laugh. It'd be wonderful to laugh again. 


SOUND: SCENE FADES ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... FADE IN MURMUR OF THEATER CROWD WHICH CONTINUES IN BG


USHER: There's a ten-minute intermission! Ten minutes!


WOMAN: No smoking in the theater! Please step out into the lobby! No smoking in the theater! 


VENDOR: Ice-cold orange drinks! Ice-cold, folks! Plenty of time during intermission!


SCOTT: Cigarette? 


ANN: Thank you. 


SOUND: CIGARETTE LIGHTER STRIKES


SCOTT: You like the show? 


ANN: It's wonderful. (OVERLAPS WITH BELOW) Apparently, my hat-- 


SCOTT: (OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE) Say, that hat of yours--


BIZ: SCOTT AND ANN LAUGH AT THEIR SIMULTANEOUS EXCHANGE


SCOTT: Well, we agree -- it's quite a hat. 


ANN: The star of the show didn't think so. 


SCOTT: What do you mean? 


ANN: The singer -- Monteiro. I understand she's so terribly proud of her exotic hats. 


SCOTT: Well? 


ANN: Didn't you notice? The hat she was wearing is exactly like mine. 


SCOTT: I'll be darned. No, I was talking about the drummer in the orchestra. He was giving you "the eye" at every opportunity. 


ANN: Yes. Yes, he made me feel a little - uncomfortable. 


SCOTT: But not half as uncomfortable, I'll bet, as you've made the great lady, Monteiro. 


ANN: I'll bet she's burning up. And not from the temperature. 


SOUND: CROWD FADES OUT ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE


MUSIC: FADE IN THE THEATER ORCHESTRA AS IT FINISHES ITS INTERMISSION


STAGE MGR: On stage, everybody! Curtain, Miss Monteiro. Oh! Your hat, Miss Monteiro--


MONTEIRO: (UPSET) Oh, you noticed it, too, eh? 


STAGE MGR: What? All I meant was--


MONTEIRO: I'll throw it away! I will never wear it again! Who is she?! Who is that woman?! No one dares copy my hats! I will not have it! 


MUSIC: QUICK, LIGHT BRIDGE 


SOUND: TAXI PULLS UP ... MOTOR IDLING IN BACKGROUND


SCOTT: Well, here we are. This is the bar, isn't it? 


ANN: Yes. I met you here, and here I'll say goodbye.


SCOTT: Why can't I buy you a nightcap? 


ANN: Please. You've been very kind. Thank you. 


SCOTT: I must confess, I'd like to know who you are.


ANN: No. It's better this way. 


SCOTT: Well, I guess I'll go on home, then. Good night. 


ANN: (A LITTLE SAD) Good night. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE 


SOUND: APARTMENT DOOR UNLOCKS, OPENS AND CLOSES 


SCOTT: (CALLS) Marcella? Listen, Marcella, I know you're awake. I saw your bedroom light from downstairs. Now, come on, I want to talk to you. 


BURGESS: You Scott Henderson? 


SCOTT: Who the devil are you? Say, what is this? What's up? Let me go in there. 


BURGESS: My name's Inspector Burgess. The man at the bedroom door is Detective Hill. 


SCOTT: Where's my wife? 


BURGESS: In there. (TO DAVE) Let him go in, Dave. 


SOUND: SCOTT'S FOOTSTEPS TO BEDROOM DOOR WHICH OPENS 


SCOTT: (PAUSE, LOW, STUNNED) Oh-- Oh, no. 


BURGESS: Uh, I'll have to ask you some questions, Henderson. 


SCOTT: (WEAKLY) Go ahead. 


SOUND: BEDROOM DOOR CLOSES 


BURGESS: When was the last time you saw Mrs. Henderson?


SCOTT: Oh, around seven. 


BURGESS: Have dinner at home? 


SCOTT: No.


BURGESS: You ate out? With your wife? 


SCOTT: I intended taking her to dinner and the theater, but-- Well, she changed her mind. 


DAVE: (ACCUSINGLY) A little squabble, maybe? 


SCOTT: For a long time, things haven't been right between us. I came home from the office early and got dressed. And then she told me she had no intention of going out with me. She kept laughing at me. We had an argument and --- I asked her for a divorce. 


BURGESS: Oh? 


SCOTT: She said I could do what I pleased, but she wouldn't even consider a divorce. 


DAVE: Makin' a "patsy" of ya, huh? 


SCOTT: (SNAPS) Don't say that! (QUIETLY) It was just that she was too spoiled and --- too beautiful. 


BURGESS: Henderson, where were you tonight, say, about eight o'clock? 


SCOTT: Oh, in a bar. 


BURGESS: Alone? 


SCOTT: No, I met a woman there. I asked her to go to the show with me. 


BURGESS: Who was she? 


SCOTT: I don't know; she didn't tell me her name.


DAVE: (LAUGHS) 


SCOTT: (DEFENSIVE) Well, she didn't! What's that got to do with it? 


BURGESS: You're a very neat dresser, Mr. Henderson. Nice tie you're wearing. 


SCOTT: (EXASPERATED) Tie? Look, what are you tryin' to do to me?


DAVE: I never saw a man so nervous. 


SCOTT: Give me a break! Marcella's dead! What's the difference what my tie looks like? 


BURGESS: Your wife was strangled with one of your ties. 


DAVE: Knotted so tight, I had to cut it loose with a knife. 


BURGESS: Know what bar you were in? 


SCOTT: Yes. I could find it. 


BURGESS: Well, it's kind of late. We'll have to lock you up, Mr. Henderson. In the morning, we'll let you find that bar for us. Let's go, Dave. 


SOUND: BRIEF BRIDGE 


SCOTT: This is the place. 


BURGESS: "Anselmo's Bar and Grill," huh? 


SCOTT: Where's the bartender? 


BURGESS: He'll be here any minute. (CALLS) Dave? 


DAVE: (OFF) Yeah? 


BURGESS: Tell the janitor to leave the keys. 


DAVE: (OFF) Okay.


BURGESS: Funny you can remember the bar, but you can't recall what the woman was like. 


SCOTT: (IRRITATED) We've been over that all night long. Now, leave me alone; I'm tired!


BURGESS: Yeah. It's remarkable, though. You're with a woman for hours and you don't know who she is or what she looks like. 


SCOTT: I told you. She was about thirty. She wore a funny hat. That's all I remember. If you'd have asked me about her earlier last night, I might have been able to tell you more, but now she's - she's a complete blank. 


MAC: (OFF) What's the idea of gettin' me up at this hour?


DAVE: He's here, boss; the barman. 


MAC: (OFF) I only work the evening shift.


BURGESS: Come here, come here. (BEAT) I'm Inspector Burgess. Ever see this man before? 


MAC: Huh? To me, a face is a face. 


BURGESS: Take a good look. It's important. 


MAC: (EVASIVE) I, er-- I don't know. 


BURGESS: Don't look at me; look at him! Come on, think hard. 


MAC: Yeah. He was here last night, I think. 


SCOTT: (TRIUMPHANT, TO BURGESS) There. You see? 


BURGESS: What time last night? 


MAC: I go on at eight. It was sometime after eight. 


BURGESS: How much after eight?


MAC: I don't ask the customers to punch a clock! Sometime after eight. 


SCOTT: Ask him about the girl. Ask him! 


BURGESS: How about the woman who was in here? 


MAC: What woman?


SCOTT: The only other person at the bar! A woman--


BURGESS: I'll do the talking. (TO MAC) Are you sure there wasn't a woman here last night when he was here? He sat next to her. 


MAC: Sure I'm sure. 


SCOTT: She was wearing a crazy hat! 


MAC: To me, a dame is just another drink. 


SCOTT: But if you remember me, why can't you remember her? 


MAC: Now, look, bring the dame back here. Set her down at the bar, like you say she was last night. I may remember. 


SCOTT: But there were only the two of us. She ordered a pack of cigarettes, and we left here together. 


MAC: Lay off, will ya? Bring her down here, like I said. 


BURGESS: Okay, Henderson. (TO MAC) All right, that's all, bartender. Sorry to drag you down here. 


MAC: (MOVING OFF, MUTTERING) Guys comin' in here all the time--


SCOTT: But he must remember! 


BURGESS: Come on.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


STEWARD: Señor Marlow, if you'll go into that booth; your call to New York is coming through. 


JACK: (IMPRESSED) What, already? Gee, that's wonderful service. (HANDS OVER A TIP) Here, here -- thank you very much. That's amazing.


STEWARD: Thank you, señor. 


SOUND: PHONE BOOTH DOOR CLOSES ... RECEIVER UP


JACK: Hello? Hello, Miss Richman, is that you? 


CAROL: (FILTER) Yes. 


JACK: This is Jack Marlow. I just heard about Scott. Is there anything I can do? 


CAROL: (FILTER) Why, you're on shipboard, aren't you, Mr. Marlow? 


JACK: Yes, of course. It was in the ship's newspaper this morning. 


CAROL: (FILTER) Oh, it's awful, Mr. Marlow. Unbelievable. 


JACK: It's true? He - he's charged with - with murder? 


CAROL: (FILTER) Yes, but he didn't do it, Mr. Marlow. It's just impossible. 


JACK: Of course it is. Here I am, his best friend, and when he needs me most, I'm of no use to him. Miss Richman, will you please see Scott today? Tell him I'll take the first boat back if there's anything I can do.


CAROL: (FILTER) Oh, thank you, Mr. Marlow. 


JACK: I'll be in Rio in a few days. Be sure to write me there at the Continental.


CAROL: (FILTER) Well, I - I don't think there's anything you can do, but just hearing from you will make Mr. Henderson feel so much better. I'll write you immediately; the Continental.


JACK: That's right. Thank you, Miss Richman. 


CAROL: (FILTER) Goodbye, Mr. Marlow. 


JACK: Goodbye.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


MUSIC: BRIDGE 


SOUND: GARAGE BACKGROUND


BURGESS: This the Carter Cab Company garage? 


CAB MAN: That's right.


BURGESS: I phoned you about a driver named Mike Frelano. 


CAB MAN: Oh. Oh, yeah. (CALLS) Hey, Mike! Couple o' gents to see ya!


MIKE: (OFF) Me? What about?


SCOTT: That's the driver, Inspector! You see? 


BURGESS: I've seen nothing yet, Henderson, except that you've got a very erratic memory. 


MIKE: You want to see me? 


BURGESS: Yeah. Did you have a haul last night from a bar called Anselmo's to the Casino Theater? 


MIKE: Anselmo's? Let me see. Yeah, I did. 


BURGESS: Remember this man? 


SCOTT: Me! Do you remember me? 


MIKE: It was him, huh? 


BURGESS: You tell us.


MIKE: Yeah. Him. 


BURGESS: Was he alone? 


MIKE: Yeah, I think so.


SCOTT: There was a woman with me. You must have seen her! 


MIKE: If you was with a woman, I'd have noticed. 


BURGESS: You're sure now?


MIKE: Sure. There was no dame with this guy in my cab last night. 


BURGESS: All right, thanks. Come along, Henderson, we've got a date at the Casino Theater.


SCOTT: But why can't they remember her? I tell you, she was with me both times. At the bar and in the cab. They recognize me. Why can't they remember her? 


BURGESS: (DRY) Maybe they thought she wasn't there.


SCOTT: That's a lie. She was! She was there. 


BURGESS: So we'll try the theater. That stuff you told me about her hat. Dames don't forget hats! Maybe that Monteiro dame can save your hide. Let's go. (FADES OUT)


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE


MONTEIRO: (FADES IN, ANNOYED) I refuse to be disturbed now. Who are these men?


STAGE MGR: This man is a police inspector, Miss Monteiro, and he wants to talk to you. 


BURGESS: It's important, Miss Monteiro. It'll only take a minute. This man's Scott Henderson. He saw your show last night. Now do you remember a woman sitting with him, wearing a hat like yours?


MONTEIRO: (HIGHLY AMUSED) A hat like mine? Oh, really, this is too funny. No woman wears hats like mine. 


SCOTT: But she did! And you kept looking at her.


MONTEIRO: (INDIGNANT) No. You go away. This really is insulting. I'm an artiste -- I sing, I dance. I do not watch my audience. 


BURGESS: Think, Miss Monteiro. It's very important. 


SOUND: CLOSET DOOR SLIDES OPEN


MONTEIRO: There! All my hats are there in the closet. You look.


BURGESS: (BEAT) See anything, Henderson? 


SCOTT: (DISCOURAGED) A lot of hats. No, none like hers. 


MONTEIRO: What woman besides Monteiro could wear those hats and not look like -- how you say -- ridiculous?


SCOTT: You're lying! 


MONTEIRO: (OFFENDED) You--! You--! Get him out! Get him out of here!


BURGESS: All right, all right. We're going. Sorry to have troubled you. 


SOUND: MONTEIRO'S DOOR CLOSES


DAVE: Any luck, boss? 


BURGESS: No. 


DAVE: Where to now?


BURGESS: Maybe you can tell us, Henderson. 


SCOTT: She was real. And now you're trying to tell me she never existed! 


BURGESS: You need a drink, Henderson. We do, too.


DAVE: Yeah. 


BURGESS: Then we'll go back to headquarters. You better get some sleep, and then get a good lawyer. You're going to need 'em -- both. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: BUZZ OF COURTROOM CROWD UNTIL PROSECUTOR BEGINS 


JUDGE: Objection overruled. Will the prosecution continue, please?


PROSECUTOR: Thank you, your honor. The defense asks you to believe that Scott Henderson was in Anselmo's Bar at five minutes after eight; that he couldn't possibly have been in his own apartment two minutes before, at which time his wife was murdered. The defense has introduced witnesses. Each claims to have seen Henderson at the places he said he was. Yet not one even remotely remembers a woman with him. Where is this woman who was with him five minutes after eight? Who is she? Has she at any time been put on the witness stand? No! Because this woman, who alone could furnish Henderson with the alibi he has so flimsily constructed, simply does not exist! Scott Henderson murdered his wife. In a blind rage, he took a necktie, dropped it 'round her throat, and-- (FADES OUT WITH--)


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION


SOUND: BANG! OF GAVEL -- FOUR TIMES 


JUDGE: Will the foreman of the jury please stand? Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, have you reached a verdict?


FOREMAN: We have, your honor. We find the defendant guilty of murder in the first degree. 


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION


SOUND: JAIL DOOR UNLOCKS, OPENS


1ST JAILER: A Miss Richman to see ya, Mr. Henderson. You can have five minutes.  


SCOTT: Thanks. (BEAT) Hello, Carol. 


CAROL: Mr. Henderson. Oh, I - I don't know what to say. 


SCOTT: Skip it, Carol. I'll be all right now that I know where I stand. 


CAROL: Surely, you're going to appeal. 


SCOTT: With what? A set of old blueprints and my grandfather's watch? 


CAROL: Well, if it's a question of money, I--


SCOTT: No, Carol. You're swell. No, it's not just the money. It's a question of that girl. I've done everything -- hired detectives, advertised on the radio, in the newspapers. Everything possible was done to find her. She's simply vanished. 


CAROL: Why don't you let me write Mr. Marlow? Maybe he can think of something. 


SCOTT: I won't drag him back from Brazil. That's his big chance down there. And suppose I did. What good could he do? 


CAROL: But you just can't let that verdict stand. You've got to fight! 


SCOTT: It's no use. If I'd been in that jury box, I'd have agreed with them.


CAROL: But somebody has to go on looking for her. 


SCOTT: (HOPELESSLY) Oh, maybe there never was such a woman. It's just my word against theirs. Maybe I just imagined it.


CAROL: Stop talking like that! You couldn't kill anybody. 


SCOTT: Thanks, Carol. That makes you a minority of one. Well, if you feel like a train ride some time, you might visit me again. I'll have a new address tomorrow -- a big country estate up the Hudson River. 


CAROL: I'll come. Of course I will. 


SCOTT: Thanks, Carol. Well, g'bye. 


CAROL: Goodbye, Mr. Henderson. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE 


SOUND: DOORBELL BUZZES ... CAROL'S DOOR OPENS 


BURGESS: Hello, Miss Richman. May I come in? 


CAROL: (UNFRIENDLY) What do you want? 


BURGESS: Don't you remember me? I'm a tired policeman named Burgess. 


CAROL: You're very proud of yourself, aren't you? 


BURGESS: Not especially. Have you found a new job yet? 


CAROL: No. I've got other things to do. 


BURGESS: Like going to Anselmo's Bar? You've got that barman scared to death. 


CAROL: Have I? Why? I've hardly spoken to him. Maybe he has a guilty conscience.


BURGESS: I think that's more down in my department, isn't it? 


CAROL: Maybe it is. But Mr. Henderson is all alone. No one to do a thing for him. I have to do something.


BURGESS: You could have come to me. 


CAROL: You forget, Inspector. I think Scott's innocent. 


BURGESS: You do? (BEAT) So do I. 


CAROL: What? 


BURGESS: I've been doing a lot of thinking since the trial. His alibi; that woman. Only a fool or an innocent man would have stuck to an alibi like that. A guilty man would have been much smarter. 


CAROL: Aren't you just a little late? 


BURGESS: (SLOWLY) Yeah. Case is closed, officially. But I'd like to help. Maybe we can do something. You and me. Well? How about it? 


CAROL: (RELIEVED) Thanks. Oh, thanks.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: In a few moments, Mr. DeMille presents Brian Aherne, Ella Raines, and Alan Curtis in Act Two of "The Phantom Lady." And now -- a young soldier and his girl.


JIM: I sure hate to say goodnight, Mary.


MARY: It's late and we do have to get up early, Jim. Never mind, dear. We'll see each other tomorrow.


JIM: Yeah, but that's a long time off. Gosh, I'm a lucky guy to have a girl as pretty as you, sweetheart.


ANNOUNCER: And a few minutes later--


MARY: (YAWNS, TO HERSELF) Goodness, it is late. And am I sleepy. But little Mary mustn't neglect her beauty care. I want Jim to keep right on saying he likes my looks. So now for my Lux Soap facial.


MUSIC: CHEERFUL ACCENT


MARY: It's easy and quick. Turn on the water--


MUSIC: FOR TURNING ON WATER


MARY: Cover my face with plenty of nice, creamy lather. 


MUSIC: FOR COVERING HER FACE WITH LATHER


MARY: Work it in gently, but thoroughly.


MUSIC: FOR WORKING IT IN GENTLY AND THOROUGHLY


MARY: Rinse with warm water.


MUSIC: FOR RINSING


MARY: Then splash on cold.


MUSIC: FOR SPLASHING


MARY: Pat dry with a soft towel.


MUSIC: FOR PATTING


MARY: Now when I touch my skin, it feels so fresh and soft. And it is.


MUSIC: FOR A FINISH ... A LINE OF JEROME KERN'S "LOVELY TO LOOK AT"


ANNOUNCER: (AMUSED) Well, the musical effects are extra. But there it is -- the Lux Soap beauty facial clever girls everywhere depend on for gentle, protecting care -- care that really leaves skin softer, lovelier. In recent tests, actually three out of four complexions improved in a short time with daily Lux Soap facials. Famous Hollywood stars say these facials with Lux Soap's rich Active Lather do wonders for the skin. Why don't you try them? Ask for Lux Toilet Soap tomorrow. And, if you find your dealer is temporarily out of stock, he's sure to have more soon. Remember -- Hollywood's beauty soap is worth waiting for. (BEAT) We pause now for station identification. This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.


MUSIC: LUX SIGNATURE FILLS PAUSE


HOST: Act Two of "The Phantom Lady," starring Brian Aherne as Jack, Ella Raines as Carol, and Alan Curtis as Scott Henderson.


MUSIC: FOR AN INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND HOST--


HOST: With a sentence of death hanging over Scott Henderson, Carol Richman and Inspector Burgess race against time to find the only person who can save his life --- the woman with the funny hat --- the woman no one will admit having seen --- the phantom lady. Carol starts at the top of the list with Mac, the bartender at Anselmo's. 


MUSIC: CHANGES TO BAR PIANO ... "APRIL SHOWERS" ... CONTINUES IN BG


SOUND: BAR BACKGROUND ... PATRONS MURMUR, ET CETERA


MAC: (TENSE, NERVOUS) What do you want, miss? 


CAROL: Nothing. I didn't call you. 


MAC: But you keep lookin' at me. 


CAROL: Do I? 


MAC: Now, look. I want you should cut that out! This is the third night you been in here. All you do is stare at me. 


CAROL: What's the matter? Does your conscience bother you? 


MAC: Cut it out, that's all. Now, cut it out! 


MUSIC: BAR PIANO ... UP AND OUT


SOUND: LATE NIGHT TRAFFIC BACKGROUND ... MAC AND CAROL'S FOOTSTEPS ... HE STOPS AND SHE APPROACHES HIM, THEN STOPS


MAC: (AGITATED) You been followin' me all the way uptown. 


CAROL: Yes. 


MAC: What's the idea? 


CAROL: You've got something to tell me. 


MAC: No. Now, go on, beat it. It's late.


CITIZEN: (SLIGHTLY OFF) Say, miss, is that guy bothering you? 


CAROL: No, it's all right. (TO MAC) Scott Henderson's going to die. You can prevent it. 


MAC: I ain't talkin', see? You got nothin' on me. Get out of here. 


CITIZEN: (APPROACHES) Say, what's he trying to do, miss, start an argument? 


CAROL: Let him alone. 


CITIZEN: (BACKS OFF) Okay, lady. 


CAROL: Who bribed you, Mac? 


MAC: (TOO QUICKLY) If you want to find out anything, ask the guy who give it to me. (REALIZES HE'S SAID TOO MUCH) I - I gotta go home. 


CAROL: Who was it, Mac? 


MAC: Let go of me. Let go of my coat. 


CAROL: (CALLS, TO CITIZEN) Mister? 


CITIZEN: (OFF) Yeah? 


CAROL: I want to call the police. Will you hold on to this man for me? 


CITIZEN: (APPROACHES) It's a pleasure, lady. 


MAC: (PANICS) Let go, you hear?! I don't know nothin'! (MOVING OFF) Let me alone!


CITIZEN: (MOVING OFF) I'll get him, lady. He can't get far. 


CAROL: Hurry, please--! Look out! 


MAC: (SCREAMS, OFF)


SOUND: CAR ROARS BY -- BRAKES SCREECH ... CROWD MURMURS EXCITEDLY


MUSIC: BIG ACCENT ... FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


CAROL: How is he, Inspector? 


BURGESS: Hospital just phoned. He never regained consciousness. Mac's dead, Miss Richman.


CAROL: But he knew something. 


BURGESS: Sure he did. Well -- forget it. Who's next? 


CAROL: The drummer in the orchestra. 


BURGESS: Oh, yeah. Cliff Milburn. 


CAROL: How can I get to him? 


BURGESS: Well, I'll get you a seat in the theater, right in front of him. He's not what you'd call a gentleman, so play up to him -- use another name, get some flashy clothes, splash on some perfume, and go to work. 


CAROL: I see. I'll call you the minute I get anything. 


BURGESS: And don't take any chances, Carol. It may be pretty risky. 


MUSIC: UP, FOR TRANSITION 


SOUND: CLIFF'S DOOR CLOSES 


CLIFF: Well, this is it, baby.


CAROL: Gee, Cliff. I'll bet you think I'm awful. Lettin' ya pick me up like that. 


CLIFF: Aw, go on. Forget it, baby. 


CAROL: Mmmmm, you're sure cute, Cliff. 


CLIFF: Hey, you haven't even told me your name yet. 


CAROL: See the initials on my purse? J. H. That stands for Jeannie, Cliff. Jeannie Harper.


CLIFF: Jeannie Harper. Hey-- Hey, you really go for me, don't ya, baby? Well, that's great. That's the way it should be. 


CAROL: Yeah. But I think you're gettin' the wrong impression of me, Cliff. I shouldn't'a' let you bring me here, to your apartment. 


CLIFF: Why not? 


CAROL: Awwww, you know.


CLIFF: Now look-- Look, we'll have a drink, I'll change my clothes, and I'll take ya out dancin' or somethin', like I said. 


CAROL: Yeah? I don't know why you wanna change your clothes. I ain't dressed up. 


CLIFF: You stick with me, baby, and I'll get you somethin' real classy. 


CAROL: Will ya, Cliff? Will ya? Honest? 


CLIFF: Just name it. What do ya want? 


CAROL: Do you like this hat? I don't like it so much myself. 


CLIFF: I'll stake ya to a carload o' hats. 


CAROL: Aw, Cliff, you're sure a swell guy. But you wouldn't know what sort of hat would look good on me. Guys don't bother about hats. 


CLIFF: Yeah? Me, I'm an authority. You see, I get paid for knowin' about hats. 


CAROL: Yeah, Cliff? 


CLIFF: Yeah. 


CAROL: Well, what do ya mean? You can tell me, Cliff. (SEDUCTIVELY) Ain't I your friend? Hmmm?


CLIFF: (LOW, HUNGRILY) You bet your life you are, Jeannie. Oh, baby. Give me a kiss.


CAROL: (THEY KISS, SHE LAUGHS, DRY) Yeah. What'd ya mean about gettin' paid for hats? 


CLIFF: Here, look. 


CAROL: Boy, what a pile o' dough. 


CLIFF: Five hundred bucks. Five hundred, baby.


CAROL: Where'd you get dough like that, Cliff? 


CLIFF: Like I said. Just for knowin' about hats.


CAROL: I don't get it, Cliff. But maybe you'd rather not tell me. 


CLIFF: Aw, some guy gimme it. 


CAROL: What for? 


CLIFF: "That's for you," he says. Five hundred bucks if you forget about the hat and the dame, no matter who asks ya, say no. That's what he told me. Hey, uh, have you got a cigarette? 


CAROL: Sure. Over there, in my purse. 


CLIFF: Huh. Thanks, kid. Thanks. (OFF, UPSET) Hey! Hey, what's this? 


CAROL: (WORRIED, QUICKLY) Say, I'll get 'em for you, Cliff. 


CLIFF: No! You stay there. Here in your purse; this piece of paper. "Homicide bureau," it says. "Cliff Milburn, trap drummer, Casino Theater." That's me. Everything's about me. They sent ya. Somebody's after me. (ACCUSINGLY) You made me believe you liked me! 


CAROL: (DESPERATELY) I do, Cliff, I do. I let you kiss me, didn't I? I came here, didn't I? 


CLIFF: You made me believe you liked me! 


CAROL: Cliff, that paper don't mean nothin'!


CLIFF: Get away from that lamp! 


CAROL: No, Cliff! No!


CLIFF: I'll get you for this! You'll wish you never even-- All right, turn out the lights out, but you ain't gettin' out of here, you dirty little double-crosser--!


SOUND: STRUGGLE ... FURNITURE OVERTURNED


CAROL: (SCREAMS)


SOUND: CLIFF'S DOOR OPENS ... CAROL'S FOOTSTEPS RUNNING AWAY  


MUSIC: BRIDGE 


SOUND: CLIFF'S DOOR OPENS


CLIFF: (TENSE, AND INCREASINGLY NERVOUS AND SCARED AS SCENE UNFOLDS) Who's that? 


JACK: It's only me, Cliff. 


CLIFF: Oh. 


SOUND: CLIFF'S DOOR CLOSES 


CLIFF: What do you want? What'd you come here for? 


JACK: (EERILY CALM THROUGHOUT SCENE) There. Feels good to sit down again. I've been standing outside for hours, waiting to see you, Cliff. Well, I noticed you met a nice girl outside the theater tonight, Cliff. An exciting girl. She seemed to like you. You brought her here. 


CLIFF: Oh, Jeannie. Yeah. She - she left a little while ago. 


JACK: Yes. Rather in a hurry, wasn't she? I see she left her purse. 


CLIFF: Yeah. I'll - I'll give it back to her. 


JACK: No. I'll take it, Cliff. (BEAT) Oh, it has initials, "J. H." J for Jeannie? 


CLIFF: Harper, Jeannie Harper. That's her name.


JACK: She was magnificent. She loathed you, but she went with you. She would have humiliated herself to make you talk. 


CLIFF: I didn't tell her nothin'.


JACK: (SHARPLY) Cliff. Why lie?


CLIFF: Here. Here, you can have your dough back. It's almost all here. 


JACK: Don't come near me, please. 


CLIFF: Why? What do you mean? What are you thinkin' about? 


JACK: About hands. About how interesting a pair of hands can be. They can trick melody out of a piano keyboard. They can mold beauty out of a piece of clay. They can bring life back to a dying child. Yes, a pair of hands can do inconceivable good.


CLIFF: Sure. Sure. 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... OMINOUS 


JACK: And yet the same pair of hands can do terrible evil. They can destroy --- torture --- kill. (POINTEDLY) I wish I didn't have to use my hands to hurt another human being. 


CLIFF: No! No! No! 


JACK: (WITH SLIGHT EFFORT) Don't make any noise, Cliff. 


CLIFF: (CHOKING, AS HE IS STRANGLED) 


JACK: No noise.


CLIFF: (EXHALES, DEATH MOAN)


MUSIC: UP, FOR A BIG ACCENT / TRANSITION


2ND JAILER: (CALLS) Hey, Scott! (TO CAROL) Just sit there behind the screen, lady. He's comin'.


CAROL: Thank you. (BEAT) Hello, Mr. Henderson.


SCOTT: Carol. 


CAROL: How are you? 


SCOTT: Oh, I'm gaining weight. I'll be in fine shape for my big date. It's only eighteen more days. 


CAROL: Please don't talk like that. 


SCOTT: Sorry, but I don't feel very sociable. You happen to be the only one that comes up here to see me. 


CAROL: I'd come oftener, Mr. Henderson, except I can be more helpful to you in New York. 


SCOTT: Yeah? Any luck? 


CAROL: No. First it was Mac. Last night, Cliff Milburn. 


SCOTT: The drummer? Well--? 


CAROL: Milburn remembered the hat. He'd been bribed, too, Mr. Henderson. But he caught on. There was a fight. I managed to get away. Phoned Inspector Burgess. We went back to Milburn's apartment; he was dead. Strangled. 


SCOTT: Carol--


CAROL: I tried, Mr. Henderson. I'll keep trying. 


SCOTT: No, Carol. You've got to promise me to keep out of it. 


CAROL: Let's not talk about it. 


SCOTT: You've got to promise me. 


CAROL: I've got to do what I can.


SCOTT: I won't let you. I'll write Burgess. And don't call me Mr. Henderson. Even the guards call me Scott. Look, I'm grateful. I'm more grateful than you'll ever know. But you can't waste your time knocking your pretty head against a stone wall. You should be out having fun with some fellow. Don't tell me you're not in love, Carol. Well, look at you. I hit the nail right on the head. Now, come on, who is he?


CAROL: My boss. 


SCOTT: Well! I didn't even know you had another job. Well, gosh, that's fine. Yeah, that's swell. 


CAROL: I think so. 


SCOTT: Now, tell me, who--?


2ND JAILER: Warden gave permission for another visitor, Scott. 


SCOTT: Who? (SEES JACK; PLEASED) Jack! 


JACK: (APPROACHES) Scotty! 


SCOTT: Oh, gosh, I'm glad to see you. When did you get in? 


JACK: This morning. I flew in. Oh, hello, Miss Richman. 


CAROL: (WARMLY) Mr. Marlow! 


JACK: Scott, why didn't you send for me? 


SCOTT: There was nothing you could have done, Jack. Nothing.


JACK: I'm here now, and something's got to be done. Something will be done. 


SCOTT: Look. They give visitors only five minutes. Now, tell me, how was your trip? Did they like your work? 


JACK: You're in prison and you want me to tell you what a good time I had in Brazil? Oh, Scott -- I can't tell you how I feel.


SCOTT: I want to know all about it. As for me, take Carol back to New York with you. She can give you all the details. Come on, now, what about you? 


JACK: (AMUSED) Is that a date, Carol?


CAROL: I should say so. 


JACK: Okay, then. Well, they bought five subjects. It seems they built a new park in Rio and they wanted something-- (FADES OUT) 


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... FADE IN AUTO RUNNING INTERIOR ... THEN IN BG 


CAROL: The cab driver's left town. They can't find him. So our last hope is that Monteiro will talk. 


JACK: Monteiro? 


CAROL: You know, the star. 


JACK: Oh, yes. You mentioned her before. 


CAROL: Oh, if you only knew how much your coming back means to Scott. And me, too. 


JACK: Well, I just couldn't stay in Brazil with this happening to him. He's my best friend, Carol. Well, go on. I've got to have all the details. 


CAROL: Well, the show closes tomorrow night. Monteiro is leaving town. (FALTERS WEARILY) If we don't get to her right away, I-- 


JACK: You've worn yourself out. 


CAROL: I - I can't think of anything else. 


JACK: See, this is a man's job.


CAROL: I just can't sit by. That woman -- the woman with the hat -- must be some place in the city. One word from her and Scott will walk out a free man.


JACK: After what happened to that drummer, I'm-- Well, I'm afraid for you. 


CAROL: Let's not worry about me. Do you think I'd care what happens to me if Scott--


JACK: Ah, I think I knew it all the time. You know, I used to watch you at your desk, and the way you looked at Scott. 


CAROL: Eighteen more days to live. I just don't know what to do. Whoever it is, he always gets there first. He's so clever. 


JACK: Yes. There's genius behind such boldness. 


CAROL: No. Only madness. 


JACK: (DISTURBED) Madness? That's a frightening word. 


CAROL: What else can you call it? To kill and then go on killing. 


JACK: Ah, but perhaps he hates to kill. Perhaps he only feels horror. 


CAROL: I don't care what he feels. All I know is that we've got to find that woman. 


JACK: Hmm. Carol, as soon as we get back, I'd like to meet Inspector Burgess. 


CAROL: Of course. We can drive straight to headquarters.


JACK: And then we'll start on Monteiro, eh?


CAROL: Yes. (SIGHS) I'm so tired, Mr. Marlow. Do you mind if I doze off for a minute? 


JACK: No. It'll do you good.


CAROL: (BEAT) Jack?


JACK: That's better. Eh?


CAROL: Why do you keep looking at your hands? 


JACK: My hands--? Oh. Oh, I, er-- Heh. I don't know. Habit, I guess. Always afraid something might happen to them. 


CAROL: That would be bad - for a sculptor.


JACK: Yes. (POINTEDLY) I need my hands.


MUSIC: BRIDGE 


BURGESS: Sorry to keep you waiting, Mr. Marlow. Oh, where's Miss Richman? 


JACK: Well, the girl's exhausted. I took her home before I came here. 


BURGESS: I'm glad you did. Well, looks like we'll have to scratch Monteiro off the list. I got absolutely nowhere with her. The show's closed now and she's going to Mexico. If she'd only admit that our woman wore a hat like hers that night. But she never will. She's too vain. (DISHEARTENED) I think I'll go out and get good and drunk.


JACK: Oh, could you delay it for a couple of minutes? I haven't had much of a chance to talk to you.


BURGESS: I thought this case would be a cinch. Just get the lowdown on everyone, friends, relatives. Well, I did that. Even on you, Marlow.


JACK: Oh, I was on the ocean when it happened.


BURGESS: Yes. The S. S. Volcania, sailed Thursday, August sixteenth at eight thirty-three P. M., Stateroom C, middle deck. Arrived Rio, August twenty-ninth. 


JACK: What an incredible memory.


BURGESS: A lot of good it does me. No, no. The fact remains that none of you could have committed these murders. 


JACK: Oh? Why not? 


BURGESS: You're all too normal.


JACK: Ohhhh, but the murderer must be normal enough. He's just, uh, clever, that's all. 


BURGESS: All paranoiacs are. Diabolically clever. I've met paranoiacs before. Their insanity gives them incredible ego, abnormal cunning, contempt for life.


JACK: You make our man sound unbeatable. Maybe he's more astute than we are, but to call him insane--


BURGESS: I'd stake my life on it. 


JACK: You might lose.


BURGESS: No, I won't lose. And I'll get him. Sooner or later. It's just there's so little time left. Well, let's call it a night. Coming, Marlow? 


JACK: (DISTRACTED) What? (DISTRESSED) Oh--


SOUND: CHAIR SCRAPES AS JACK RISES UNSTEADILY 


BURGESS: Marlow? What's the matter?


JACK: I - I'm all right. It's just a dizzy spell. I - I've been having them lately. Doctor says they're nothing at all. 


BURGESS: Sure you're all right?


JACK: Yes-yes-yes, of course I'm all right. Look, don't - don't tell Carol. She - she'll just be upset. 


BURGESS: Yeah.


BURGESS: (LIGHTLY) Well, you had an idea before. What about that drink? 


SOUND: PHONE RINGS 


BURGESS: Excuse me. 


SOUND: RECEIVER UP


BURGESS: (INTO PHONE) Yes?


CAROL: (FILTER) It's Carol, Inspector. I've got some news. 


BURGESS: (INTO PHONE) I thought you went home. (TO JACK) It's Carol.


CAROL: (FILTER) I tried, but I just couldn't. I went to the airport. 


BURGESS: (INTO PHONE) Why? Monteiro?


CAROL: Yes. I saw her luggage. There was a hat box. 


BURGESS: (INTO PHONE) Yes?  


CAROL: (FILTER) A milliner's hat box, with the name Kettisha. 


BURGESS:(INTO PHONE) Kettisha?


CAROL: A very exclusive hat shop; Madison Avenue. 


BURGESS: (INTO PHONE) Uh, can you meet me there in fifteen minutes? 


CAROL: (FILTER) You bet. 


BURGESS: (INTO PHONE) Wonderful, Carol. Goodbye. 


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


BURGESS: Well, Mr. Marlow, we've got a lead -- Monteiro's milliner. 


JACK: Kettisha, huh? 


BURGESS: Yeah. Let's go. 


SOUND: BURGESS' DOOR OPENS


DAVE: The commissioner wants to see you, boss. 


BURGESS: Well, tell him I'm not in.


DAVE: It's the Venzelli case, boss. Looks like we got to go Newark right away. 


BURGESS: (DISAPPOINTED) Oh. Yeah. All right. Well, tell him I'll be right in. (BEAT, TO JACK) Well, Mr. Marlow, I guess you'll have to meet Carol by yourself.


JACK: I'll do whatever I can, Inspector. 


BURGESS: Thanks. Heh. I keep forgetting. I'm not on the case any more. Officially, that is. Tell Carol I'll call her as soon as I get back from Newark. 


JACK: Yes, I'll be glad to. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION 


KETTISHA: (IMPERIOUS) Our hats cost a lot of money, Mr. Marlow. A good part of the price is to guarantee the client that her hat will be exclusive. Miss Richman can understand that. That it will never be copied -- at least not in this shop! 


SOUND: KETTISHA'S DOOR OPENS


PAYTON: Uh, Madame Kettisha? 


KETTISHA: Oh, come in, Payton. You made a hat for Monteiro?


PAYTON: Yes, madame. 


KETTISHA: Now, I want the truth. Did you ever make a copy of this hat for anyone? Here. Here is the original sketch. 


PAYTON: (GASPS) Madame! I'd never do a thing like that! 


KETTISHA: I believe you, Payton. (TRIUMPHANT, TO CAROL) There, Miss Richman, you see? 


CAROL: Please forgive me for asking, Miss Payton. But if you can tell me anything at all about it. You see, a man is going to die unless-- 


PAYTON: (QUICKLY, NERVOUSLY) I'm sorry. I just can't tell you anything. 


KETTISHA: Thanks, Payton; that's all.


PAYTON: Yes.


SOUND: KETTISHA'S DOOR CLOSES 


KETTISHA: I'm sorry, Miss Richman. (STARTLED) Why-- Why, you look all in. 


JACK: (GENTLY) How about going home, Carol?


CAROL: Oh, I tried so hard not to build up my hopes--


SOUND: KETTISHA'S DOOR OPENS 


PAYTON: (TIMIDLY) Miss--? I--


KETTISHA: Well, Payton?


PAYTON: Did you say, "a man's life"? I mean-- Well, what has that got to do with a hat? 


KETTISHA: Payton, what are you trying to say? 


PAYTON: (DEEPLY EMBARRASSED) I copied the hat. She gave me fifty dollars. 


JACK: Who, Miss Payton? Who gave you fifty dollars?


PAYTON: Miss Ann Terry. She's one of our regular customers. She saw the sketch of Monteiro's hat and she asked me to--


KETTISHA: (SEVERELY) You and I will talk about that later, young lady. Now sit down and give these people her name and address. (PLEASANTLY, TO JACK) Uh, Miss Terry's quite wealthy, Mr. Marlow. She lives somewhere out in Long Island.


MUSIC: BRIDGE 


DR. CHASE: How do you do? Come in, please. 


JACK: Thank you. My name is Marlow. This is Miss Richman. 


CAROL: Miss Terry, we came to ask you-- 


DR. CHASE: I'm afraid you're making a mistake. I'm Dr. Chase. I'm looking after Miss Terry.


JACK: Oh? She's, uh-- She's ill? 


DR. CHASE: She collapsed last July. Her fiancé died very suddenly. It was a terrible shock to her. 


CAROL: Please, doctor. I can't go away without talking to her. I've been looking for her for months. 


DR. CHASE: Perhaps if you tell me--


JACK: Someone is going to be executed for a crime he never committed. He has a perfect alibi. He spent the evening with Miss Terry. 


CAROL: She's the only one who can save him. Oh, please, can't we see her? 


DR. CHASE: All right. But only you, Miss Richman. 


JACK: All right, I'll wait here. 


DR. CHASE: I must warn you, Miss Richman. Don't do or say anything to excite my patient. 


CAROL: I'll do my best, doctor. 


DR. CHASE: Come along, then. But I'm afraid you're wasting your time. 


CAROL: What do you mean? 


DR. CHASE: I don't know what Miss Terry's word can mean to you. I do know that in a court of law it would be worthless. Miss Terry is mentally ill.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: After a brief intermission, Mr. DeMille returns with Brian Aherne, Ella Raines, and Alan Curtis for Act Three of "The Phantom Lady." And now -- a lady with a letter.


1ST LADY: I just heard from my brother overseas, and what do you think he wants me to send him?


2ND LADY: Hmm, lots of smokes and chewing gum, maybe?


1ST LADY: Well, you'll never guess. Here, read it.


2ND LADY: (READS) "You say you want to send me something. Try and send me about seven cakes of Lux Soap. Make sure it's Lux and nothing else. I can get the other kinds." (LAUGHS) Well, goodness, you'd better send off those cakes of Lux right away. I think he wants them.


ANNOUNCER: Now, that's a real letter -- a letter actually received by the sister of a soldier in our Combat Engineers abroad. You may be sure those seven cakes of Lux Soap are on their way. We hope they reach him safely. One thing's certain. When they do, he's going to get real enjoyment out of using this fine white soap, like many another soldier and sailor.


SALLY: Did you know, Mr. Kennedy, that Lux Soap is a bestseller in post exchanges here and in the ship's service stores?


ANNOUNCER: Yes, Sally, and it's easy to tell why. Men certainly go for that rich, quick lather Lux Soap gives. Even in hard water it lathers in a jiffy.


SALLY: I'll bet when a man comes in dog-tired from a day in the field, a shower with Lux Soap feels wonderful.


ANNOUNCER: Well, Sally, a refreshing bath with Lux Toilet Soap feels good no matter where you are. On the home front, too. It seems as though Lux Soap is almost as popular with the men in the family as it is with the ladies.


SALLY: I've noticed that, Mr. Kennedy.


ANNOUNCER: So here's a tip to women everywhere who do the family shopping. Why not let everyone at your house enjoy the real luxury of a daily Lux Soap bath? It's a thrifty luxury because Lux Toilet Soap is hard-milled; can be used to the last thin sliver. And always put your soap in a dish that's dry. Remember, it's patriotic to avoid waste. (BEAT) Now, our producer, Mr. DeMille.


HOST: There'll be a curtain chat with our stars after the play. But now Act Three of "The Phantom Lady," starring Brian Aherne, Ella Raines, and Alan Curtis.


MUSIC: FOR AN INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND HOST--


HOST: It's a few minutes later. Carol is face-to-face with the Phantom Lady -- only to see for herself that Ann Terry's mental condition makes it impossible for her to testify in Scott's behalf. In a fading ray of hope, only one lone glimmer is still alive --- the hat --- the phantom lady's funny hat. 


CAROL: This is a lovely room, Miss Terry. 


ANN: It was my grandmother's. She was very happy here. She married the man she loved. Are you - married? 


CAROL: No. 


ANN: But you're in love. 


CAROL: Yes. 


ANN: He was sick for two days. He'd never been sick before. He was so full of life. We were to be married the following week. I had my trousseau all bought. And a special dress and a hat for the wedding. 


CAROL: They must have been lovely. Do you still have them? 


ANN: I don't want to talk any more. 


CAROL: Can't I see them, Miss Terry? 


ANN: I don't want-- Yes. You may see them. They're in that closet. 


SOUND: ANN'S FOOTSTEPS TO CLOSET DOOR WHICH OPENS 


CAROL: How beautiful.


ANN: He always said he loved my clothes. But he never saw these. 


CAROL: And this hat, Miss Terry, it's beautiful. I wish I had a hat like this. 


ANN: Take it. 


CAROL: Oh, no. But if you wouldn't mind, may I borrow it? 


ANN: You want to wear it. For him?


CAROL: Yes. 


ANN: Is he nice, the man you love? 


CAROL: Very. 


ANN: Then take it. Keep it. I don't want it! He's dead! I don't want it! He's dead! (BURSTS INTO TEARS, WEEPING EXTRAVAGANTLY)


CAROL: (CALLS) Dr. Chase?! (SOOTHING, TO ANN) Miss Terry, please. Please don't cry. 


ANN: (WEEPS) 


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: AUTO INTERIOR BACKGROUND


CAROL: We've got the hat. (EXHALES IN RELIEF) I can hardly wait to tell Burgess. 


JACK: Last night, everything seemed so hopeless. Last night, you-- (IN PAIN) Oooh! (GROANS)


CAROL: Jack! What's the matter? 


JACK: It's nothing. I'll be all right. It's just a - a headache. 


CAROL: Do you want me to drive? 


JACK: No, it'll go away. I get them so often lately. 


CAROL: Oh, it's my fault. We haven't eaten for hours. Oh, Jack, I don't know what I'd've done without you.


JACK: (CHUCKLES) Forget it. 


CAROL: Look! There's a service station up ahead. Could we stop there and phone the news to Burgess? 


JACK: Yes. Good idea. 


CAROL: Don't you bother, I'll get out. 


JACK: No, no. It'll do me good to stretch. Need some gas anyway. (FADES OUT)


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE


ATTENDANT: (FADES IN) All right, sister. Checked the tires for free.


CAROL: Jack? Did you get Burgess? 


JACK: Er, no, no. He isn't back from Newark yet. 


CAROL: Well, maybe we'd better go straight to headquarters and wait for him. 


JACK: No, I left word for him to meet us at my place. We can all have a drink. 


CAROL: Oh. (LIGHTLY) I almost feel good again. 


JACK: Carol, I hate to discourage you, but what good can this hat do for Scott? What does it prove? 


CAROL: It proves that Monteiro lied. That there is another hat exactly like the one she wore. And, sick or not, there's Ann Terry. 


JACK: But she can't testify. 


CAROL: No, but there's such a thing as reasonable doubt. And for the first time in this case, at last, there's cause for reasonable doubt. 


JACK: (PENSIVELY) Yes. I see. Yes. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE


JACK: More coffee, Carol? 


CAROL: Thanks. My, what a place you have here. Well, Burgess should be here by now. 


JACK: Yes.


CAROL: (PLAYFULLY) Look! How do you think this hat fits this statue of yours? (LAUGHS) Rather smart, don't you think?


JACK: I've never heard you laugh before. 


CAROL: (CHUCKLES) Oh, Burgess will be so excited. I can hardly wait to tell him. Oh, Jack, isn't it wonderful? This silly hat. It'll save Scott. Burgess can reopen the case. He'll find the murderer this time. And I want to hear the court sentence him as they sentenced Scott.


JACK: You hate him, don't you? 


CAROL: I hate him. 


JACK: (IN PAIN) Oh-- Oh--


CAROL: Your head again? It's aching?


JACK: Yes.


CAROL: Lie down on the couch, Jack. 


JACK: Oh, I - I'll be all right. 


CAROL: No, no, I insist. Now, do as I say. Come on. 


JACK: (WEARILY) Oh--


CAROL: You can get some rest before Burgess comes. 


JACK: (GRUNTS AS HE LIES DOWN)


CAROL: That's better. Oh, I'm a mess. Look at me. You stay there now and I'll go inside and freshen up a bit. Do you mind?


JACK: No. No, no. Go ahead. 


CAROL: Try to sleep, won't you? 


JACK: (EXHALES) Yes.


SOUND: CAROL'S STEPS TO BEDROOM DOOR WHICH OPENS AND CLOSES 


CAROL: (SINGS WORDLESSLY; THEN TO HERSELF) Brush, brush -- where's a brush? Probably in a drawer, stupid. 


SOUND: DRAWER OPENS 


CAROL: (GASPS, READS) "J. H."? (REALIZES) My purse! (READS) "Homicide bureau, Cliff Milburn." (REALIZES) No. No! 


SOUND: DRAWER SHUTS ... CAROL'S STEPS TO PHONE ... RECEIVER UP ... DIALS FOR OPERATOR


CAROL: (LOW, URGENT) Police headquarters. Hurry, please. --- Hello? Inspector Burgess, please. --- Inspector Burgess? --- Oh. This is Carol Richman. When will he be back? --- I'm at Mr. Marlow's apartment. Please send someone right away. Anyone. It's two--


SOUND: BEDROOM DOOR OPENS


JACK: (OFF) Carol? Come here.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


CAROL: (HIDING FEAR) I - I thought you were going to sleep, Jack. 


JACK: (EERILY CALM) The light. I turned it out. It - it hurts my eyes. It chokes me. Sit down beside me, Carol. 


CAROL: (AGREES, HIDING RELUCTANCE) Yes. 


JACK: Who were you phoning to? 


CAROL: Inspector Burgess. 


JACK: Oh. Oh, my head's bursting. It's on fire. Give me your hand. Oh, it's so cool. It feels so good. (BEAT) Would you mind taking off my tie, Carol? It's - it's so tight.


CAROL: (NERVOUSLY) Your - your tie? 


JACK: Yes. (BEAT) Oh, thanks. No. No, don't move. Let me have it. I like the feel of the tie in my hands. 


CAROL: It's quiet here, isn't it? (LOW) So quiet. 


JACK: Yes. Far away from everything. That's unique in a city. I hate cities. Noise and dirt and confusion. And the people in them. They hate me because I'm different from them. I don't belong here. Neither do you. Oh, it isn't fair for someone like you to have to suffer.


CAROL: What are you trying to tell me, Jack? 


JACK: Please, let me talk. You'll understand. You're intelligent, Carol. You should be so happy. Ah, if only you'd never come to New York; never met Scott. The world's full of men like him. You can buy nice stupid people for a dime a dozen.


CAROL: Jack! Let go of my hand!


JACK: Why, Carol? 


CAROL: I - I think I hear someone. Out in the hall. 


JACK: Burgess? No, don't go, Carol. If it's Burgess, he'll knock. But it's no one, Carol. You see, when we stopped on the road, I didn't telephone Burgess. I only pretended to. 


CAROL: Please let me go! My hand! You're hurting my hand! 


JACK: You know -- don't you, Carol? I shouldn't have kept your purse in my drawer. It's the purse you left in Cliff Milburn's room.


CAROL: I don't know what you're talking about. 


JACK: She was sitting next to me, too. Marcella. Just like you are. Only she wasn't frightened. Nothing ever frightened Marcella. I said, "You'd better hurry, the boat leaves in an hour." And then she told me in that cold voice of hers that she never had any intention of going with me. She was amusing herself. I was in love with Marcella. For the first time in my life, I was in love. Ah, but I was always naïve about women. She laughed at me. She kept on laughing until I couldn't allow her to laugh any more. I had to stop her. 


CAROL: Jack -- that tie. What are you--? No.


JACK: Afterward, I knew they'd arrest me. I couldn't let them do that. When you're born with my gifts, you can't let anything stand in your way. I followed Scott later. I saw him with Ann Terry. And then somehow she slipped away from me. So I had to bribe the others. (CHUCKLES) It was unbelievably easy. 


CAROL: You don't know what you're saying. You were on a boat that night. 


JACK: No, I went aboard the boat, but I left before it sailed. I flew to Havana, caught the boat there, and then I telephoned you. (CHUCKLES) Burgess never thought of that. I was too intelligent for Burgess. 


CAROL: How could you? Scott -- your best friend.


JACK: Oh, I'm fond of Scott. But what's his life compared to mine? A mediocre engineer, working in sewers, drain pipes, faucets. What's any life compared to mine? Even yours.


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... INCREASINGLY INTENSE


CAROL: That won't help you. You know that, don't you? After me, there'll be others. You'll have to go on killing. On and on, until they catch you. I won't be the last! There'll be others after me! 


JACK: Oh, no. No, there won't, Carol. You'll be the last. 


CAROL: You can't help yourself! Because you're not sane!


JACK: Stop it! Stop it, I say!


CAROL: You're mad! Mad


JACK: You'll never say that again. Never! Never!


CAROL: Oh, please-- Please!


BURGESS: (BEHIND DOOR) Marlow! Marlow, open the door!


SOUND: KNOCKING ON DOOR 


CAROL: (CALLS) Burgess! Burgess! Jack--! (SCREAMS)


JACK: (LAUGHS MANIACALLY) They can't take me! They'll never take me!


SOUND: JACK'S RUNNING FOOTSTEPS TO WINDOWPANE WHICH IS SMASHED ... DOOR UNLOCKS AND OPENS 


CAROL: (TEARFULLY) Burgess! Burgess! (WEEPS) 


MUSIC: UP AND OUT 


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE


BURGESS: Feeling better? 


CAROL: Yes. I'm all right now. How did you get here? Why am I alive? 


BURGESS: What kind of a cop do you think I am, Carol?


CAROL: What? 


BURGESS: I didn't go to Newark. That was a stall. After what happened to Cliff Milburn, I've been closer to you than a brother. Hill and I have been out there in the hall, waiting. 


CAROL: You - you knew about Jack? 


BURGESS: No, I didn't know. It was just one of those things. I didn't suspect him, but, then again, I guess I didn't trust him either. I'd like to talk to him. Too late for that, though. The window he jumped out of was twelve stories above the ground. 


CAROL: And Scott? What about Scott? 


BURGESS: Yeah, I guess I've kind of forgotten about Scott these last few minutes. Hope Marlow won't mind if I use his phone. I've got to call long distance. Scott's as good as free right now. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE 


SCOTT: (IN A GOOD MOOD) Morning, Carol. 


CAROL: Good morning, Scott. How do you like the new office? 


SCOTT: Wonderful, but I can't stay. I'm seeing Kemper about the chemical plant. 


CAROL: Can't stay? 


SCOTT: Uh uh.


CAROL: Oh. When will you be back? 


SCOTT: Might take all day. I can't tell. If I'm not back by six, don't wait. 


CAROL: Your first day back and--? 


SCOTT: By the way, I left instructions on the Dictaphone. Very important. Take care of 'em for me, won't you? (MOVING OFF) So long, Carol.


SOUND: NEW OFFICE DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES AS SCOTT EXITS


CAROL: (TO HERSELF) Hm! I like that! Carol, old girl, you're really slipping. Dictaphone, huh? Oh, well, let's get to work. 


SOUND: DICTAPHONE SWITCHED ON 


SCOTT: (FILTER) Hello, Carol. Better call Mason and Follows and make an appointment for tomorrow. 


CAROL: Sure, sure, sure.


SCOTT: (FILTER) Renew my membership to the architect's association.


CAROL: Did that yesterday.


SCOTT: (FILTER) And this afternoon go out and look for an apartment. 


CAROL: Oh?


SCOTT: (FILTER) The best we can afford.


CAROL: Huh?


SCOTT: (FILTER) Ah-ah-ah-ah, don't hang up. You know, you're having dinner with me tonight. 


CAROL: I am? 


SCOTT: (FILTER) And tomorrow night. And the next night. And then every night. (THE DICTAPHONE RECORD SKIPS!) --every night. --every night. --every night.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: It's no mystery that we all liked "The Phantom Lady" and here are three good reasons why -- Brian Aherne, Ella Raines, and Alan Curtis. I believe murder is a little out of your usual line, Brian.


AHERNE: Well, you know, I was getting a little fed up playing those heroes, C. B. Murder makes a nice holiday.


RAINES: Alan takes his the other way.


CURTIS: Yes, I've played villains so long that kids run when they see me in the street. ... 


RAINES: (CHUCKLES)


CURTIS: Now here I am, playing a nice guy for a change.


HOST: Well, then I guess we've made everybody happy, including the audience. By the way, Brian, that's a substantial coat of tan you're wearing.


AHERNE: Ah, I came up from my ranch on the desert for rehearsals, C. B. By the way, do you think it'd be all right for me to say that the large crop of vegetables I'm raising down there is of the very highest quality or, uh, would you consider that free advertising?


CURTIS: Just send C. B. a large basket of tomatoes and it won't be free.


AHERNE: (CHUCKLES)


HOST: (CHUCKLES) Well, that'll fix everything. Since this is your first appearance in THE LUX RADIO THEATRE, Ella, we'll follow the usual custom and ask where you're from?


RAINES: I've just come from Florida.


CURTIS: You whisper that in California, Ella.


RAINES: (CHUCKLES) But it was my honeymoon, Alan. You see, I was married a year and a half ago and my husband, Kenneth Trout, is a captain in the Army Air Forces, so we had to postpone the honeymoon until he got back from China and India and a few places like that. We used to go to high school together. 


HOST: Where was that? In Florida?


RAINES: No, in Snoqualmie Falls, Washington.


HOST: Hmmm, I don't believe I've ever been there. But I like the name. Did you do any acting in Snoqualmie Falls?


RAINES: Well, yes, but in our backyard theater, all salaries were paid in bubble gum.


AHERNE: Well, then you're right at home. C. B. pays all salaries in soap. 


RAINES: Really?! ... What kind of soap?


HOST: Don't believe a word of it, Ella.


RAINES: Oh, but I'd be delighted, Mr. DeMille -- as long as it's Lux Soap. I've always used Lux as a complexion care.


HOST: Well, that's a lovely picture. It's a lovely picture that Lux has helped to make.


CURTIS: Did I hear that you're making a little trip next week, Mr. DeMille?


HOST: Yes. I'm going to Washington, Alan, to preview "The Story of Dr. Wassell," starring Gary Cooper.


RAINES: What's the next play here in THE LUX RADIO THEATRE going to be, Mr. DeMille?


HOST: Oh, it's an exciting drama of the Navy, Ella -- the Columbia picture, "Destroyer" -- and our stars will be Edward G. Robinson, Dennis O'Keefe, and Marguerite Chapman. This is the story of men who love their ships more than life itself, of the men who are proud to be called Destroyer Sailors. And, as a retired Navy veteran who can't stay away when things are happening, Eddie Robinson delivers one of his finest performances.


AHERNE: We'll look forward to it, C. B., and good luck with "The Story of Dr. Wassell." Good night.


RAINES: Good night.


CURTIS: Good night. 


HOST: Good night. Good night. 


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: That applause means you'll be with us again. 


MUSIC: LUX THEME ... THEN IN BG


HOST: Our sponsors, the makers of Lux Toilet Soap, join me in inviting you to be with us again next Monday night when THE LUX RADIO THEATRE presents Edward G. Robinson, Dennis O'Keefe, and Marguerite Chapman in "Destroyer." This is Cecil B. DeMille saying good night to you from Hollywood.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: Here's a special message from the government to American housewives. Don't throw away a single drop of waste kitchen fats, no matter how black or burnt. They're needed to make life-saving medicines for our soldiers. Pour waste fats in a tin can, take it to your meat dealer as soon as it's full, and he'll give you four cents and two extra red ration points for every pound you bring in. Don't put it off. The need is urgent.


Brian Aherne appeared through the courtesy of Columbia Pictures, producers of "Cover Girl." Ella Raines and Alan Curtis are currently starring with Franchot Tone in the Universal picture "Phantom Lady" which was directed by Robert Siodmak. Heard in tonight's play were John McIntire as Burgess, and Jeanette Nolan, Stanley Farrar, Duane Thompson, Eddie Emerson, Bea Benaderet, Charles Seel, Norman Field, Howard McNear, Dick Ryan, Ferdinand Munier, Eddie Marr, and Regina Wallace.


This program is broadcast to our fighting forces overseas through cooperation with the Armed Forces Radio Service.


Our music was directed by Louis Silvers. And this is your announcer, John M. Kennedy, reminding you to tune in again next Monday night to hear Edward G. Robinson, Dennis O'Keefe, and Marguerite Chapman in "Destroyer."


SOUND: APPLAUSE ... FADES OUT WITH--


MUSIC: THEME FADES OUT


2ND ANNCR: A brand new Spry, ladies! New Easy-Mix Spry cuts cake-mixing time by two-thirds. No creaming; no long, tiresome beating -- yet lighter, better-tasting cakes that stay fresh longer. New Easy-Mix Spry shortening is at your grocer's in the same handy jar. Grand for all baking and frying. Tomorrow, buy Spry.


This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.


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