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The Man Who Stole the Freedom Train

New World A-Coming

The Man Who Stole the Freedom Train

Feb 22 1949






CAST:

ANNOUNCER

GOVERNOR

MAYOR

MIKE

VOICE 1

VOICE 2

COMMENTATOR

ED

SALLY

TOM, the Man Who Stole the Freedom Train

HESTER, the professor's wife

ALBERT, the professor

STUDENT

WOMAN

SARDOVSKY, the violinist

HOSTESS

FBI AGENT

BUTLER

JUDGE

CORSEY, the prosecutor

MIERSON, the psychiatrist

ROGERS, the academic

COP


Station WMCA, February 22, 1949, 9:30-10 P.M.

Directed by LAWRENCE MENKIN

Written by ERIC ARTHUR








ANNCR: WMCA and its sponsoring committee of public service organizations invites you to listen to the nation-wide prize winning radio series: "NEW WORLD A'COMING".


(MUSIC: ....THEME UP AND UNDER)


ANNCR: "New World A'Coming"....dramatizing the stories of men and events affecting the lives of all minorities in our democracy. Tonight, we present

"THE MAN WHO STOLE THE FREEDOM TRAIN," by Eric Arthur.


(MUSIC: ....UP AND OUT)


SOUND: AD LIB FROM CROWD IN B.G...."Wonder where it is? What's keeping it? Wonder what the delay is, etc."


GOVERNOR: (NERVOUSLY) The people are beginning to get restless, George. How late is that train going to be?


MAYOR: (TRYING TO PLACATE HIM) I can't understand it, Governor Morrison. If there'd been an accident or a delay we'd have gotten a wire.


GOVERNOR: (GRUMBLING) We've been waiting over an hour. The Freedom Train's been running on schedule all over the country....but it's got to be late in Creston. (CROWD NOISE REGISTERS) Well, why don't you do something? You're the mayor of this town.


MAYOR: What can I do. The band's played "Stars and Stripes Forever" three times. I can't ask them to play again.


GOVERNOR: This is an awful thing to happen in an election year. Do you realize how this will make the party look?


MAYOR: (IDEA) Let's go see if we can find out something at the telegraph office. Over this way, Governor ....


SOUND: (STEPS ON GRAVEL)


SOUND: (DOOR OPEN....SHUT....B.G. AD LIB OUT....FEW STEPS ON WOOD)


MAYOR: Well, Mike....any news yet?


MIKE: (NOTHING EXCITES HIM) Not a thing, Mayor. I checked with Glenfield. They said the Freedom Train left there 6:42 this morning.


GOVERNOR: How about the State Police? Did you check with them?


MIKE: Yes sir. They got patrols coverin' the whole track area from Glenfield to Creston. Not a sign of her anywhere.


GOVERNOR: Well, something must have happened. A train just doesn't vanish in thin air!


SOUND: (TELEGRAPH KEY STARTS CLICKING)


MIKE: Somethin's comin' in now. (INTERPRETS SLOWLY AS MESSAGE COMES IN) Attention....Creston Station. Operator of switch control tower ten miles south of Glenfield just reported Freedom Train stopped nearby on siding for repairs at about 7:l5 A.M. Says he saw strange looking man climb into cab of engine. When last observed, train was heading up northwest trunk from Glenfield.


GOVERNOR: (IRATELY) Northwest trunk! But Creston's southeast of Glenfield!


MAYOR: (GROANING) They switched her off on the wrong track! Of all the stupid, idiotic....


GOVERNOR: Wait a minute--that fellow the switchman saw climbing into the engine....I wonder--(DECISIVELY) George--get on that phone--tell State Police Headquarters to notify all sub-stations--


MAYOR: All right, Governor....


GOVERNOR: And call the F.B.I. We've got to get that train back to Creston and get it back fast! I knew the opposition party had it in for me but I didn't think they'd go this far!


(MUSIC: ....WASH OVER AND HOLD BEHIND FOR MONTAGE)


SOUND: (TELETYPE UNDER)


VOICE 1: (LIGHT FILTER) State Police....be on look-out for Freedom Train. Last seen headed on Northwest trunkline between Glenfield and Creston.


SOUND: (TELETYPE UP AND FADE UNDER)


VOICE 2: (HEAVY FILTER) Police of all neighboring states--check all railroad sidings for Freedom Train and watch out for man about medium height with white

hair....believed to have kidnapped engineer and stolen train.


SOUND: (TELETYPE UP AND FADE INTO CLICK OF TELEGRAPH KEY BEHIND RADIO COMMENTATOR)


COMMENTAT: Flash! Here's the latest bulletin on the sensational Freedom Train theft! The train personnel and the complement of guards carried aboard were not on the train at the time of the theft because it was undergoing repairs at a siding near Glenfield. As of tonight there is still no news as to its whereabouts. The FBI has been alerted in the greatest search in the Department's history. The big question in everybody's mind tonight is....where is the Freedom Train?


SOUND: (SNEAK UNDER TRAIN SOUND WITH ECHO EFFECT....UP FULL TO ESTABLISH AND FADE OUT)


SOUND: (BRING IN CRICKETS CHIRPING IN B.G.)


ED: This looks like a nice spot for a picnic, Sally. The tree'll shade us from the sun....


SALLY: (BREATHING DEEPLY) Oh, Ed....look at that lovely brook. Isn't it beautiful? I think it's wonderful of Big Bill to take us out like this.


ED: (SIGHS) They tell me he's been running these picnics every election day for the past ten years.


(MUSIC: ...SNEAK B.G.--GHOSTLY BELL TONES)


SALLY: Look, Ed....that white-haired man over there....isn't he distinguished looking.


ED: Sure is--


TOM: (FADING) Mind if I join you folks?


ED: Not a bit. Sit down. Sally spread that blanket a little more.


TOM: (MIDDLE-AGED, QUIET) Thanks....don't mind if I do.


ED: I'm Ed Borden and this is my wife, Sally.


TOM: Pleased to meet you.


SALLY: Are you from Middleboro, Mr....uh....?


TOM: My friends call me Tom. No, I'm not from Middleboro....


ED: Oh....then I guess you've never been on one of Big Bill's picnics.


TOM: I haven't. But I've heard of them.


SALLY: Isn't it wonderful? I mean for a man with so many important things to do to take time out from his work and throw a grand picnic like this. Especially since we've not lived in Middleboro very long.


TOM: Well now....I don't know....Big Bill is your town councilman, and head of your Social Club, isn't he?


ED: Right....


TOM: And every year he holds this picnic on election day. Right?


ED: Yes....


TOM: Doesn't that mean anything to you?


ED: (PUZZLED) No....


TOM: Mrs. Bordon, what time did these picnic trucks leave Middleboro this morning?


SALLY: I guess it was about eight o'clock.


TOM: And what time did the polls open for voting?


ED: Nine....


TOM: That means nobody attending this picnic has voted today. And the chances are you won't get back to town until long after the polls are closed.


ED: Say....that's right....they said it'd be an all day outing.


TOM: Hasn't it struck you as being odd that Big Bill's invited only the more recent residents of Middleboro on this picnic? People eligible to vote but whose vote he isn't sure of? By keeping you away from the polls he's insured against opposition votes.


ED: Of course....if you look at it that way....


TOM: It's the only way to look at it. Everybody who came on this picnic today is being deprived of his right to vote.


SALLY: That's true, Ed.


ED: Yeah--Funny, I never thought--Say, we really got taken for a ride, didn't we?


TOM: What are you going to do about it?


ED: (FIRMLY) I know what we're going to do. We're going back to town and vote....and it won't be for Big Bill's party, I can tell you that! (SHOUTING) Listen, everybody....I've got something important to tell you....It's about this here picnic. We must've been a bunch of thick-headed saps not to have seen through this thing before....! (FADING) Why, it's plain as the nose on your face!


SOUND: (TRAIN EFFECT ON ECHO UP AND OVER FOR BRIDGE....FADE UNDER)


SOUND: (TELETYPE BEHIND)


VOICE: Man answering description of Freedom Train thief last seen in vicinity of Middleboro. Train itself observed later, speeding northward towards Raynorsville. Police communicate with FBI if contact is made.


SOUND: (TELETYPE FADE OUT AND COVER WITH TRAIN UP BRIEFLY AND OUT)


SOUND: (DOOR OPEN....CLOSE....BACK)


HESTER: That you, Albert?


ALBERT: (MIDDLE-AGED PROFESSOR) (BACK) Yes, Hester....


HESTER: (GOOD-NATUREDLY) It's about time. I was beginning to think they'd made you president of the University. How was the meeting?


ALBERT: (COMING ON) (SUBDUED....REFLECTIVE) We had quite a session.


HESTER: Did you ask them about your sabbatical leave?


ALBERT: Yes....they've no objection. I can have my year off any time now.


HESTER: That's wonderful, Albert. I've been dreaming of this trip. Mexico....South America. (SIGHS GRATEFULLY) Oh, it's good of you to take your poor old sister along.


ALBERT: Hester....they've asked me to withdraw my book from circulation.


HESTER: Your book?


ALBERT: Yes....the one on educational reform that I had published privately. Unless I agree to withdraw it they've hinted I don't have to come back here after my leave.


HESTER: (LAUGHING) Well....don't worry about it Albert. It's simple enough to withdraw the book. Perhaps in a few years, they'll change their minds.


ALBERT: I don't intend to withdraw the book, Hester.


HESTER: Albert....you can't mean to let this ruin your whole career. If you're discharged for refusing to withdraw an attack on the school system you'll be blacklisted by every university in the country.


ALBERT: I'd hate to believe that, but it would only prove my case that our educational system needs a lot of reforming.


HESTER: I won't let you do it. You've prestige here....security....


ALBERT: (IRONICALLY) So have the plants in Professor Gordon's hothouses. Is that what you want to turn me into, Hester? (MOCK LECTURE) The Albert Morley shrub....found in certain halls of academic learning. This species is very prolific and thrives on weeds, dead philosophies and old hatreds. (PAUSE) No Hester, I don't fancy myself vegetating....not even on this beautiful campus.


HESTER: But Albert....


SOUND: (CROWD NOISE OUTSIDE)


HESTER: What's that?


SOUND: (BRICK CRASHING THROUGH WINDOW)


ALBERT: Go upstairs, Hester. I'll see what's the matter.


HESTER: (FADING) There's a crowd of students in front of the house. They're throwing stones!


ALBERT: Let me handle this.


HESTER: (WORRIED) I'll call the police!


ALBERT: Please, Hester, go upstairs.


HESTER: (FADING) All right....but do be careful.


SOUND: (STEPS TO DOOR....DOOR OPEN)


SOUND: (CROWD NOISE IN LOUDER)


STUDENT: (BACK) There he is....come on out Professor....and let us teach you something.


ALBERT: (STERNLY) See here....what's this all about?


(MUSIC: ....BELL TONES SNEAK)


TOM: (IN CLOSE) You'd better go back in the house, Professor.


ALBERT: (STARTLED) Huh?


TOM: They're in an ugly mood.


SOUND: (ANOTHER GLASS CRASH)


ALBERT: Yes....I see what you mean.


SOUND: (DOOR OPEN....CLOSE....CROWD NOISES MUFFLED)


TOM: I hope you don't mind my coming in with you. It doesn't seem like a time for etiquette.


ALBERT: (A TRIFLE NERVOUS) No, it doesn't.


TOM: I don't think they mean to do you any physical harm, Professor. But it's better not to take chances.


ALBERT: But what do they want?


TOM: Your last book has had a larger circulation than you imagined. It's a dangerous business attacking a country's institutions.


ALBERT: But my book was written to try to help the students!


TOM: I'm afraid they don't see it that way. To them you're breaking up the sacred idols of caste and creed their fathers built up.


ALBERT: (PUZZLED) You--you're not one of the teachers here....


TOM: No--I was visiting at the University. I saw the crowd heading this way and I followed them. Mobs always fascinated me.


ALBERT: (TRYING TO FATHOM IT) They've used my text-books here for years....Why should they suddenly decide....


TOM: The human mind has a very convenient memory, Professor. It retains only what it wants to. Only what serves its purpose. Right now the purpose is to make you withdraw that book.


ALBERT: But to smash my windows--and shout like a street corner mob--(SIGHS) I thought I knew my students--but I never figured on anything like this.


TOM: In every human being lies a capacity for intense good or intense evil. Which springs to the front at a given time is not always something a teacher can control.


ALBERT: (GRIMLY) If there were any doubt about my leaving that book in circulation--this settles it.


TOM: That's the way to talk professor. They may suppress your books now--as fast as you can get them into print. And you may find yourself not wanted in a good many places. But there will always be enough people who will listen to you--enough to give us hope, anyway.


ALBERT: (PAUSE) The crowd's beginning to break up....


TOM: They're losing their enthusiasm. Perhaps you've been a better teacher than you thought. (PAUSE) Well....I've got to be leaving now. I have another appointment.


ALBERT: But....I don't even know your name?


TOM: If anybody asks you, tell them Tom was here. (FADING) Goodbye, Professor....


SOUND: (DOOR OPEN....CLOSE....BACK)


SOUND: (TRAIN EFFECT ON ECHO IN AND UP....THEN FADE UNDER)


SOUND: (TELETYPE UNDER)


VOICE 2: (HEAVY FILTER) Man believed to be Freedom Train thief involved in disturbance on Raynor University Campus. Train observed later heading south from Raynorsville towards city. FBI agents closing in.


SOUND: (TELETYPE FADE OUT....COVER WITH TRAIN UP BRIEFLY AND OUT)


(MUSIC: ....SOLO VIOLIN PLAYING CLOSE OF BACH'S AIR FOR G STRING)


SOUND: (SCATTERED BUT VIGOROUS APPLAUSE THEN MURMUR OF VOICES)


WOMAN: (FADE IN) That was beautiful, Mr. Sardovsky. I'm sure all of Mrs. Harrington's guests were delighted with your playing.


SARDOVSKY: (REFINED CONTINENTAL) Thank you, Madame, you are most kind.


WOMAN: I've always heard people say that a violin can talk. Now I know what they mean.


SARDOVSKY: If my violin spoke it was because Bach had something to say.


HOSTESS: (SLIGHTLY BACK) Listen, everybody....


SOUND: (AD LIB QUIETS DOWN)


HOSTESS: (BACK) Henry has an excellent idea to finish off the evening. He suggested we all go up to the Country Club. Would you all like that?


SOUND: (MURMURS OF APPROVAL FROM CROWD)


HOSTESS: (BACK) Good....now let's see. Henry and I can take five in our car. Peter's station wagon holds at least seven. Yes, I'm sure we'll be able to find room for everyone.


SOUND: (SMALL TALK IN B.G.)


(MUSIC: ....BELL TONES SNEAK)


TOM: Mr. Sardovsky....


SARDOVSKY: Eh?--You surprised me--I didn't see you.


TOM: Have you ever been to a country club, Mr. Sardovsky?


SARDOVSKY: No, I am afraid I have not. Where I come from a club was a weapon. And when you went away for a trip somewhere....your destination was likely to be Dachau or Belsen or Buchenwald.


WOMAN: I....I'm sure you must have suffered terribly. (CHANGING SUBJECT NERVOUSLY) Uh....you can come in our car, Mr. Sardovsky. (SUDDENLY) Oh, dear....


TOM: Anything the matter?


WOMAN: No....uh....will you excuse me. (FADING) I must talk to Emily a moment....


SARDOVSKY: A very strange woman....she looked at me so peculiarly just now.


TOM: Before the evening's over you'll probably learn something about this country that you may not have known before.


SARDOVSKY: But I do not understand. Did I say something wrong?


TOM: No, it's just that the lady probably thought of something that your music made her forget for a while. Something that would make it very embarrassing for you to go along to the Country Club.


SARDOVSKY: But what?


TOM: Your name, Sardovsky.


SARDOVSKY: (INCREDULOUSLY) You mean....here in America, too? I do not believe it.


TOM: I'm afraid it's true.


SARDOVSKY: But you--you are the leaders of decency in the world....How could you Americans....


TOM: Unfortunately, Mr. Sardovsky, there are some Americans who feel that the rarefied air of a country club would be rendered impure if it were breathed by...."outsiders." So they erect barriers. Not visible barriers like the kind that held you at Dachau or Belsen. They're too refined for that. Their barriers are merely polite reminders to keep you in your place.


SARDOVSKY: (INTENSELY) But you must not let this happen here. Do you know where such things lead? I am not speaking for myself. It matters little whether Josef Sardovsky is permitted to go to a country club. But I tell you such things fester and grow like a cancer. The pattern is always the same. First you take away a man's right to go to a country club. Next, his children must find a different school. Little by little you reduce him to a point where he is ashamed to leave his house. History has showed us where this road leads. The rubber truncheon....the smashed jaw....


TOM: We don't use rubber truncheons here, Mr. Sardovsky. We're much more subtle. (LIKE A BARKER) Want your son to be a doctor? Well, now....let's see how the medical school quota looks. Got to keep up appearances. Want to buy that beautiful house near the park? Sorry....you see there's a little thing called restricted property covenants. Got to make sure the neighborhood's kept "exclusive." Sure, all men are created equal....but let's not kid ourselves, they don't look alike. For example, there's the color of your skin, friend. It's not the right color. Got to keep the status quo, you know. Yessir, this is a free democratic country and we're going to keep it that way. A fair chance for all--unless, of course, you happen to be one of those undesirable foreigners. (PAUSE) Beginning to understand, Mr. Sardovsky?


SARDOVSKY: (REFLECTIVE) Yes....Yes....(PHILOSOPHICALLY) Still, I suppose a man should be grateful merely for being allowed to live.


AGENT: (COMES ON) There he is....that's the fellow....the one with the white hair....


BUTLER: But you must be mistaken, sir. He's one of Mrs. Harrington's guests.


AGENT: I don't care who he is. He was traced here and he fits the description.


SARDOVSKY: (PUZZLED) Is anything wrong?


TOM: Are you talking about me?


AGENT: I sure am, Buddy. You certainly led us one merry chase.


HOSTESS: (COMING ON) Oh, there you are, Mr.... (CURIOUSLY) Uh....what's the matter, Wilson?


BUTLER: This gentleman is from the FBI, Madame.


HOSTESS: (SHOCKED) FBI?


AGENT: Sorry, Mrs. Harrington....but the Department wants one of your guests.


HOSTESS: But Mr. Sardovsky is....


TOM: They want me, Mrs. Harrington....


HOSTESS: Oh....but what on earth for?


AGENT: Nothing much. This fellow only stole the Freedom Train!


(MUSIC: ....UP BRIEFLY....FADE)


SOUND: (INTO COURT ROOM NOISES)


SOUND: (GAVEL AND NOISE SUBSIDES)


JUDGE: Before we proceed any further, does the defendant still refuse to accept counsel?


TOM: I am not entirely without experience in the law, Your Honor. I shall defend myself.


JUDGE: Very well. Mr. Corsey, will you proceed with the Government's case?


CORSEY: (PROSECUTOR) Thank you, Your Honor. Will the defendant please take the stand?


SOUND: (CROWD MURMUR)


CORSEY: (AFTER NOISE SUBSIDES) Would you tell the court your name please?


TOM: Thomas Jefferson.


SOUND: (SURPRISED CROWD REACTION....GAVEL RAPPING)


CORSEY: And when were you born?


TOM: The only birthday I wish to have recorded is the birthday of my country's liberties.


SOUND: (LOUD MURMUR FROM CROWD: GAVEL LOUDER)


JUDGE: The defendant will please answer the question.


TOM: Very well....I was born April 13, 1743.


SOUND: (CROWD REACTION)


CORSEY: Then that would make you....two hundred and five years old. Is that correct?


TOM: It depends on your way of reckoning. I'm not aware that my age has anything to do with the case.


CORSEY: Do you admit, Mr. Jefferson, that you boarded the Freedom Train and took it over for your own purposes?


TOM: I do.


CORSEY: Tell me, Mr. Jefferson. Did you have any difficulty operating the Freedom Train? After all, it does take some technical knowledge to operate a Diesel engine.


TOM: I've always been mechanically inclined. But I must confess I've come across some political and social philosophies in this country that are infinitely more complex than a Diesel engine.


CORSEY: (COUGHS SELF-CONSCIOUSLY) Uh....tell me, Mr. Jefferson....where is your home?


TOM: That's a difficult question to answer. I come from Virginia....but I've traveled a good deal....on matters of state.


CORSEY: Oh, you're in the State Department? What's your position?


TOM: Well, right now it's a little vague. You see, everyone seems to claim me, but when it comes to putting my political philosophies into action, there is a remarkable inertia on the part of all concerned.


CORSEY: You speak of your political philosophies, Mr. Jefferson. Could you give us a brief summary of them?


TOM: Well, it might take a rather long time to go into the details. But it's pretty well summed up in a little paper I once wrote. I have a copy with me if you care to look at it.


SOUND: (RATTLING OF PAPER)


CORSEY: (AFTER PAUSE) You say you wrote this?


TOM: Yes....with a little help from some others....


CORSEY: (AFTER PAUSE) Your Honor....this is a copy of the Declaration of Independence.


SOUND: (CROWD MURMUR....GAVEL)


CORSEY: That will be all, Mr. Jefferson.


SOUND: (CROWD SUBSIDES)


CORSEY: Because of the peculiar nature of this case, Your Honor, we have had the defendant examined by a psychiatrist, and at this time we should like the court to hear his testimony.


JUDGE: You may call him.


CORSEY: Dr. Mierson....will you take the stand?


SOUND: (FEW STEPS)


CORSEY: Dr. Mierson....will you tell the court your conclusions based on your examination of the defendant?


MIERSON: From my examination, I would say the defendant shows symptoms of acute hallucinatory paranoia. The defendant is without doubt an unusually intelligent man. But his is an intelligence warped by an intense association with the past. Somewhere in his earlier years he has become absorbed in the life and times of Thomas Jefferson....absorbed to the point of actually fancying himself Jefferson. He even carries it to the point of developing the American statesman's tendencies and habits. For example, Jefferson was scientifically inclined, so the defendant develops a facility for mechanics. This identification is further aided by the defendant's remarkable physical resemblance to Jefferson. It is not unusual in cases of this type for the subject to divorce himself completely from the reality of his own era and fancy himself living again in the environment of his idol. Further, the patient may move swiftly from mere identifications to action, imagining himself a champion of the people, conjuring up various forms of hallucinatory abuses to justify his actions. (PAUSE) This type may be dangerous, especially where the identification has been carried to the point of such positive action as has been performed by the defendant.


CORSEY: Thank you, Dr. Mierson. You may step down.


TOM: If it please the court, I should like to say something.


JUDGE: You may speak.


TOM: I am accused of stealing a train bearing this country's precious documents. But I submit--it is not I who am the thief of the Freedom Train. The politicians who trick the people out of their votes, the misguided students who attack the very principles which would make them better citizens, the respected ladies and gentlemen of our society who contribute lavishly to charities, yet deny by their actions the fundamental principle of human charity--they are the real thieves of the Freedom Train!


SOUND: (CROWD REACTION)


JUDGE: Apparently, Mr. Jefferson, you don't have much faith in America.


TOM: On the contrary, Your Honor, it is because I do have faith in America that I cannot rest as long as a single tyranny exists in it.


JUDGE: But these abuses you speak of....Surely you understand they are the acts of a comparatively small group in our country.


TOM: Man's injustice to man is never a minority offense, Your Honor. Allow the minor evil to fester and it will infect the vast majority that is good. (PAUSE) In every government on earth is some trace of human weakness, some germ of corruption and degeneracy which cunning will discover and wickedness cultivate and improve. Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves, therefore, are its only safe depositories. And to render them safe, their minds must be kept free from the taint of hatred, unless it be to hate tyranny.


(MUSIC: ....INSPIRATIONAL)


CORSEY: (BOARD FADE IN) I hope you don't mind coming here to the jail, Dr. Rogers.


ROGERS: (ACADEMIC AUTHORITY) Not at all. I'm anxious to see him. I'm only sorry I wasn't able to make it for the trial.


CORSEY: Well, it's all over now. Judge Henderson, the Government alienist and myself decided it would be best to have him committed to an institution. (PAUSE) (SIGHS) It does seem a pity. There's no denying some of his statements had more than a little truth.


ROGERS: He still insists he's Thomas Jefferson?


CORSEY: Yes....since you're the foremost Jefferson authority in the country, I was curious to know what you thought of him.


ROGERS: I'll be glad to have a talk with him. From the newspaper accounts of the whole affair I gather he's thoroughly rational except for that one point of fancying himself Jefferson.


CORSEY: A rather serious point, you'll admit, Dr. Rogers. (PAUSE) Shall we go see him now? His cell's right down the corridor.


SOUND: (DOOR OPEN....STEPS ON CORRIDOR....HOLD THROUGH)


COP: Afternoon, Mr. Corsey....


CORSEY: Hello, Bates....


SOUND: (FOOTSTEPS REGISTER)


CORSEY: He's over there in Number 7.


SOUND: (STEPS OUT)


CORSEY: What the....!


ROGERS: Your prisoner doesn't seem to be in.


CORSEY: (CALLING) Bates! Bates!


COP: (COMING ON) Yes, Mr. Corsey....


CORSEY: Where's Number seven?


COP: Why, he was in there a few minutes ago. He asked for a pen and paper....I took it in to him myself.


CORSEY: Give me your keys.


SOUND: (KEYS RATTLING)


COP: Here they are....


CORSEY: He couldn't have gotten very far. Have an alarm sent out....put a complete description of him on the teletype....


COP: (FADING QUICKLY) Beats me how he could have gotten out....


SOUND: (STEPS RUNNING OFF)


SOUND: (KEY IN DOOR....CELL DOOR OPENING)


SOUND: (FEW STEPS INTO CELL)


ROGERS: (SLIGHTLY OFF) Your Mr. Jefferson was very considerate. He left a note....the ink is still wet on it....


CORSEY: What does it say?


ROGERS: (COMING ON) Listen to this, Mr. Corsey....(READS) "Enlighten the people generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like evil spirits at the dawn of day. I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of men." And it's signed Thomas Jefferson.


CORSEY: Doesn't surprise me any. I bet he could quote practically all of Jefferson's writings.


ROGERS: The thing that interests me is the signature.


CORSEY: Would you call this a good imitation of Jefferson's signature, Dr. Rogers?


ROGERS: Yes, I suppose I would--an amazingly authentic imitation. (PAUSE) As a matter of fact--I've studied hundreds of letters and documents signed in Jefferson's own handwriting. (SLIGHT LAUGH) I know it's a foolish thought--but--this signature doesn't seem like an imitation at all.


SOUND: (SNEAK IN ECHO TRAIN EFFECT AND BRING TO FULL PEAK)


ANNCR: You have been listening to "New World A'Coming," produced and directed by Lawrence Menkin, which tonight presented "THE MAN WHO STOLE THE FREEDOM TRAIN." Script was written by Eric Arthur. Music was conducted by William Taylor.


(MUSIC: ....THEME UP AND OUT)


ANNCR: (ON CUE) Next week at 9:30 PM "New World A'Coming" will present "Crooked Journey," the story of New York's famous Harlem House. "New World A'Coming" is a public service feature of America's Leading Independent Station.


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