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The Man Who Heard Everything

Theatre Five

The Man Who Heard Everything

Feb 24 1965



CAST:

ANNOUNCER


SAM HEALY, who heard everything

WIFE, Mrs. Healy

ATTENDANT, at subway; working class New Yorker

MISS PERKINS, secretary

HASKINS, the boss

ROGERS, of the U. S. government


Bits:

WOMAN (1 line)

YOUNG MAN (1 line)

GIRL (1 line)

OLD MAN (1 line)

MISS PRESCOTT, Rogers' secretary (2 lines)

SOUTHERN BELLE (1 line)

BACHELOR (1 line)

LITTLE KID (1 line)

HOSTESS (2 lines)

HUNGRY GUY (2 lines)

NASTY WOMAN (1 line)

UNHAPPY WOMAN (1 line)

CREEPY GUY (1 line)

SARCASTIC MAN (1 line)

RUDE WOMAN (1 line)

SAD OLD LADY (1 line)

DUMB GIRL (1 line)

OPERATOR (3 lines)

SON (2 lines)

DAUGHTER (3 lines)

BROKER (2 lines)

LOVER (1 line)

GRANDDAUGHTER (1 line)

and VOICES


NOTE: When the characters are heard thinking, their voices are filtered.





SAM: (ANXIOUS) Hurry; I'm late as it is!


WIFE: (UNRUFFLED) Well, get your coat on; I'm almost finished.


SAM: If I'm late once more, I'll lose my job.


WIFE: All I have to do is put your lunch in a paper bag.


SAM: Well, maybe if you started making the sandwiches a little earlier in the morning--


WIFE: Well, if we'd gotten up when the alarm went off-- Hey! Give me a kiss before you go.


SAM: Oh, all right.


WIFE: (THINKS) "And get out of here. Harold's due at ten."


SAM: Who's Harold?


WIFE: (AMUSED) Wha-a-at?


SAM: I thought I heard you say, "Harold's due at ten."


WIFE: Harold? Well, who's Harold? I don't know any Harold. (THINKS) "How can he know about Harold?"


SAM: There. You did it again.


WIFE: Did what? Sam, what's gotten into you this morning? I didn't say anything about Harold. We don't even know a Harold. (BEAT) Sam, why are you looking at me like that? (NO ANSWER) Sam, answer me. (NO RESPONSE) Sam?


MUSIC: THEME


ANNOUNCER: THEATRE FIVE presents "The Man Who Heard Everything."


MUSIC: THEME ... UP AND OUT 


[COMMERCIAL BREAK] 


MUSIC: FIRST ACT INTRODUCTION


SOUND: NEW YORK CITY SUBWAY STATION BACKGROUND


ATTENDANT: (IN A BAD MOOD) All right, all right. What are ya tryin' to pull?


SAM: Pull? I'm not trying to pull anything.


ATTENDANT: You know I can't change no five dollar bill.


SAM: What's the matter? Don't you have any change?


ATTENDANT: No. (THINKS) "At least, not where you're concerned, wise guy."


SAM: (POINTS) I think if you look in there you'll find plenty of change. And I'm not a wise guy.


ATTENDANT: Well, think again, 'cause I ain't got no change for no five.


SAM: Either change this bill for me or I'll take your badge number and report you to the Transit Authority.


ATTENDANT: (THINKS) "Who does this clown think he is? He ain't gonna report me to no Transit Authority."


SAM: Oh, yes, I will. And I'm not a clown, either. Now, hurry up and give me my change. The train's coming.


ATTENDANT: (MYSTIFIED) Hey, what do you do -- read minds or somethin'?


SAM: Just give me my change, and hurry!


SOUND: SAM'S STEPS INTO SUBWAY


SAM: (TO HIMSELF) I did it. I did it! I could hear everything he was thinking. 


SOUND: TRAIN PULLS TO A STOP ... PASSENGERS BOARD


SAM: (TO HIMSELF) Look at all these people crowding in, thicker than sardines. They stand jammed together without saying anything, like cattle. 


SOUND: TRAIN STARTS ... CONTINUES IN BG


SAM: (TO HIMSELF) But they aren't quiet. They're thinking. It seems like I can almost hear 'em.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, MURMUR OF PASSENGERS' THOUGHTS FADES IN ... THEN IN BG


SAM: (TO HIMSELF) If I can concentrate on one, I can hear what he's thinking. That woman over there with the green hat and the shopping bag.


WOMAN: (THINKS, UNHAPPILY) "I don't know why I get stuck with everything. She didn't like, she shoulda taken it back to the store, exchanged it herself. Been this way ever since we were children."


SAM: (TO HIMSELF) That young man over there -- the one without a hat.


YOUNG MAN: (THINKS, QUIET DESPERATION) "How do I get stuck here every morning? I never intended it to turn out this way. I'm a poet. I always was. My soul will die if I don't quit riding these subways. That's it; I'll quit my job. The baby's old enough now. My wife can go to work again."


SAM: (TO HIMSELF) And that pretty girl over there. I wonder what she's thinking.

 

GIRL: (THINKS, DIZZILY) "If she comes in just one more morning and pulls the sheets off me like that-- Pow! Right in the mouth! That's a lousy way to wake a person up. I gotta get out of the house, that's all -- even if it takes gettin' married. That's what I'll do! Get married. But who? Harry? No, he's a creep. And Mike hasn't got any money. And, anyways, I like Sylvester. But he's only got one thing on his mind. I'm too tired to think about it. I could go to sleep standin' up -- but I can't 'cause o' this creep behind me."


SAM: (TO HIMSELF) That old man over there with his hat pulled down over his eyes. Wonder if he's asleep.


OLD MAN: (THINKS, SHREWDLY) "Now, let's see. If I sell my three hundred shares of telephone stock and invest in this new space stock, I should realize a profit of three thousand dollars before anybody knows they're not gonna get the missile contract."


SAM: (TO HIMSELF, WITH RELISH) I can do it. I can do it. I can tell the way anybody's thinking just by looking at them. I don't know how I can, but I can. From now on, I can do anything I want.


SOUND: RUMBLE OF TRAIN ON TRACKS ... UP BRIEFLY, THEN CROSSFADES TO OFFICE BACKGROUND (TYPEWRITERS, ET CETERA)


MISS PERKINS: Good morning, Mr. Healy. You're late this morning.


SAM: (LIGHTLY) Am I?


MISS PERKINS: Why, yes, it's almost eleven o'clock.


SAM: Oh, is it? I hadn't noticed.


MISS PERKINS: Mr. Haskins has been looking all over for you.


SAM: Has he? Well, if you bump into him again, tell him he can find me in my accustomed place -- seated on the bench behind my desk, my oar in both hands.


MISS PERKINS: (THINKS) "What's gotten into Old Frump-Face this morning?"


SAM: Don't you worry about Old Frump-Face, my dear. I'd just watch out for myself if I were you.


MISS PERKINS: What?


SAM: There's more passion that bubbles beneath this wrinkled exterior than are dreamed of in your diaries, Miss Horatio.


MISS PERKINS: Why, Mr. Healy, I--


SOUND: INTERCOM BUZZES ... CLICK! OF SWITCH


HASKINS: (FILTER) Miss Perkins? 


MISS PERKINS: Yes?


HASKINS: (FILTER) Is that Healy I see out there?


MISS PERKINS: Yes, Mr. Haskins.


HASKINS: (FILTER) Send him into my office right away.


MISS PERKINS: Yes, sir. (TO SAM) Mr. Healy--?


SAM: I heard. Tell him I'll be in as soon as I can make it.


MISS PERKINS: Wha--? But, Mr. Healy--


SAM: Now, you heard me.


MISS PERKINS: (THINKS) "He's gone right out of his mind."


SAM: No, I haven't gone out of my mind. People around here are only going to wish that I had.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


HASKINS: Just what is the meaning of all this, Healy?


SAM: The meaning of what, Mr. Haskins?


HASKINS: Coming to work at a quarter to eleven.


SAM: Oh, is it quarter to eleven already?


HASKINS: Well, it's more like a quarter past twelve right now. It's taken you a full twenty minutes to get to my office. Where were you?


SAM: Reading the paper.


HASKINS: Reading the paper?


SAM: Yes. I was going to come right over, but I noticed the headlines of the paper on my desk and it occurred to me that I hadn't really sat down and enjoyed the paper in the morning for a long time. So I just did it.


HASKINS: (THINKS) "This man needs the fear of God thrown into him." (SPEAKS) Well?


SAM: Well, what?


HASKINS: You haven't given me any explanation as to where you were this morning at nine o'clock. You are aware that we begin work at this office at nine?!


SAM: Oh, yes, sir.


HASKINS: Well?


SAM: Well, what?


HASKINS: Well, where were you?!


SAM: Oh, that. I, er-- I was out walking.


HASKINS: Out what?


SAM: Out walking and listening to people talk.


HASKINS: That's your only excuse? You were listening to people talk?


SAM: It wasn't an excuse, sir; it was the reason.


HASKINS: (THINKS) "I can't actually fire him. He's too valuable to the operation to let go."


SAM: Did you realize, sir, that at ten o'clock outside this office frequently the sun can be found shining?


HASKINS: I'm aware of that, Healy. Are you aware that you haven't been in this office at nine o'clock sharp one morning this week?


SAM: Yes, I am, sir, and I regret it deeply.


HASKINS: (THINKS) "That's better." (SPEAKS) Fortunately, I'm willing to overlook it.


SAM: Oh, don't do that.


HASKINS: What?


SAM: Well, um-- I think I ought to be fired.


HASKINS: Fired? (THINKS) "I can't do that. What will Mr. Gately say? He already thinks my employee relationships are very bad." (SPEAKS) Well, now, Sam, firing a man is a little severe. Perhaps we can talk this over.


SAM: No, no, no, I think it's gotten beyond that. After all, I have been late every day this week.


HASKINS: On the contrary, Sam. I was thinking maybe the reason your interest has been lagging lately is because your salary hasn't been what it ought to be. Confidentially, I've been thinking of a little raise for you.


SAM: Oh, a raise! How much?


HASKINS: Well, let's see. (THINKS) "He should have ten, but he'll settle for five. I'll try two-fifty and see what he says." (SPEAKS) How does, uh, two-fifty sound to you?


SAM: Sounds more like five.


HASKINS: All right, by George, since you insist--


SAM: Plus ten; that would be fifteen dollars.


HASKINS: Fifteen dollars? What makes you think I'm gonna give you or anybody else a fifteen-dollar raise?


SAM: Because I know something about you that nobody else knows.


HASKINS: What? What do you know? You know nothing.


SAM: Don't I?


HASKINS: (THINKS) "He can't know about the Thorenson account."


SAM: Just let me mention two words: "Thorenson account."


HASKINS: How can you know that?!


SAM: Well, let's just say, I know.


HASKINS: (THINKS) "But how? I juggled those books myself. The true books are in my safe at home."


SAM: Or would you prefer to have me suggest to Mr. Gately that we go over the "true books" for that account, which are hidden in your safe at home.


HASKINS: How do you know about my safe at home?


SAM: Well, let's just say that I know about a great many things you keep hidden from the world. But I've been easy on you up until now. Now -- about that raise. Do I get fifteen, or do we make it twenty?


HASKINS: No, no. Fifteen will be fine.


SAM: Good. Ah, from now on, forward my checks to my home. I doubt if I'll be in from now on.


HASKINS: Where are you going?


SAM: Out. Out -- to enjoy myself a little; to see a little of the world.


HASKINS: But I can't pay a man who isn't here!


SAM: Oh, I'm sure you'll think of a way. Good day, Mr. Haskins.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


ROGERS: (THINKS) "He has to be a fraud."


SAM: I am no fraud, I assure you, Mr. Rogers.


ROGERS: (TAKEN ABACK) Ah-- (EXHALES) You've done it again.


SAM: I can sit here and read your thoughts for as long as you like.


ROGERS: (SKEPTICAL) All right. I'll just think my next question. (THINKS) "What made you come to see us?"


SAM: Easy as pie. I said to myself, "Sam, you have got a rare talent here -- one that's worth a lot of money to the right party," so I-- Well, I thought to myself, "What is the biggest industry in the world? Steel? Stocks and bonds?" No, sir, I said to myself. The biggest industry in the world is the United States government. Why, they spend more money every year than all the rest put together. And they have more power. With them, I can do anything, have anything I want.


ROGERS: And to what possible use could we put you?


SAM: Well, think, man. Why, the possibilities stagger the imagination. Just put me in the same room with a man, and I can look at him and tell you what he's thinking. Summit conferences, test ban negotiations, missile contract bids. I could tell you instantly what the opposition's objectives are before they make them known. Why, if nothing else, within five minutes, I can tell you if any man is a security risk or not. Conservatively speaking, I figure my cut, uh-- Oh, twenty thousand dollars a minute.


MISS PRESCOTT: (THINKS) "I wonder how much longer they're gonna be in there. I've got a date."


SAM: (SURPRISED) Hey, who was that?


ROGERS: Who was what?


SAM: I - I thought I heard a woman say something.


ROGERS: No, we're quite alone here.


SAM: Oh, mm hm.


ROGERS: And, uh, what do you expect by way of payment for your unusual talent?


SAM: Anything I want.


ROGERS: What?


SAM: Women. Cars. A private plane; money. Everything I want - when I want it.


ROGERS: (AMUSED) Hm! That could run into millions of dollars yearly.


SAM: Oh, I intend to be worth it.


ROGERS: Suppose we decided we couldn't afford you.


SAM: What? Oh. (COY) Well, I, uh-- I'm sure my services would be of value to -- the Russians?


ROGERS: (GRIM) I see. (THINKS) "We can't afford to let him slip through our fingers."


SAM: (LIGHTLY) No, you can't.


SOUND: INTERCOM BUZZES ... CLICK! OF SWITCH


ROGERS: Miss, uh, Prescott?


MISS PRESCOTT: (FILTER) Yes, Mr. Rogers?


SAM: (SURPRISED) It's her.


ROGERS: Who?


SAM: The girl whose voice I heard. (REALIZES, SLOWLY) Why, I read her thoughts through that wall. (PLEASED) Huh! My powers are increasing.


ROGERS: (UNHAPPY) Miss Prescott? Get me the Pentagon.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


[COMMERCIAL BREAK]


MUSIC: SECOND ACT INTRODUCTION


SOUND: CITY TRAFFIC BACKGROUND


ROGERS: Sam, where do you want to have lunch?


SAM: Oh, anywhere you say. I don't know Washington very well.


ROGERS: I know a good place down this way.


SAM: Oh, fine.


SOUND: THEIR FOOTSTEPS ON SIDEWALK ... THEN IN BG


ROGERS: I thought if we had lunch together we could save some time. From now on, of course, your time is going to be at a premium. The Pentagon has decided to put you on a crash training program.


SAM: Good.


ROGERS: We're going to put you in two intensive language training programs, Russian and Chinese.


SAM: Okay.


SOUTHERN BELLE: (THINKS) "--for the money, I can get it. And why not? He's got it and I deserve it."


ROGERS: We're not going to bother with any espionage training because, in your case, espionage won't be needed. It'll all be open and aboveboard.


SAM: Uh huh.


ROGERS: And then we'll train you as a stenographer.


BACHELOR: (THINKS) "Oh, no, that won't work. But what I'll do is invite her out to dinner first. Then, after dinner -- casually -- I'll, uh, invite her over to my place."


ROGERS: You see, Sam, the idea being that you sit in on the conference as a stenographer. But what you're really doing is taking down their thoughts in shorthand.


SAM: Uh huh, yes.


LITTLE KID: (THINKS) "If I ever see him do that again, I'll kill him! That's what I'll do! I'll take the biggest thing I can find--"


ROGERS: I say, Sam -- are you listening to me?


SAM: (DISTRACTED) What? Oh, yes, yes.


ROGERS: What's the matter? You seem preoccupied.


SAM: Oh, that. Well, it's, uh-- Well, it's just that I - I keep picking up thoughts of people passing by and it's-- Well, it's hard to concentrate.


ROGERS: Well, we won't have any trouble in here. This is the quietest restaurant in Washington. Right through here.


SOUND: THEIR STEPS THROUGH DOOR INTO RESTAURANT ... DINERS' VOICES MURMUR IN BG


HOSTESS: Can I help you, gentlemen? (THINKS) "Neither one looks like a big tipper."


ROGERS: Yes. A quiet table for two, please.


HOSTESS: This way, please. (THINKS) "I'll put them behind the planter; nobody wants that table."


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, THEIR STEPS TO TABLE ... CHAIRS SCRAPE AS SAM AND ROGERS SIT ... MURMURING VOICES GROW LOUDER AND LOUDER DURING FOLLOWING--


SAM: (INCREASINGLY AGITATED AS SCENE UNFOLDS) I thought you said this was a quiet place.


ROGERS: It is, Sam.


SAM: The noise in here is so loud I can hardly think.


ROGERS: (PUZZLED) I don't hear anything.


HUNGRY GUY: (THINKS) "What shall I have?"


NASTY WOMAN: (THINKS) "That's the silliest waitress I ever saw."


HUNGRY GUY: (THINKS) "Fish. That's what I'll have. Fish!


UNHAPPY WOMAN: (THINKS) "Roast is overdone."


SAM: Where did all the people come from?


ROGERS: What people? There can't be more than ten people in this room.


CREEPY GUY: (THINKS) "Wonder what she does after work?"


SAM: Why do they all have to talk at once?


ROGERS: Who?


SAM: The people -- in this room. They're shouting at me!


SARCASTIC MAN: (THINKS) "Why doesn't somebody call a cop?!"


RUDE WOMAN: (THINKS) "Out of the way, ya bum!"


SAD OLD LADY: (THINKS) "Henry could have got me anything for my birthday."


DUMB GIRL: (THINKS) "Who likes to eat fish anyway?! Nobody's that cold!"


SAM: I can't stand it any more.


SOUND: CHAIR SCRAPES AS SAM JUMPS TO HIS FEET ... SAM'S STEPS, IN BG


ROGERS: Sam, what's the matter?


SAM: I gotta get out of here.


ROGERS: Sam, come back!


SAM: It's driving me crazy. I gotta get out of here!


ROGERS: Sam, come back here!


MUSIC: FOR BEING OVERWHELMED BY VOICES ... BRIDGE


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... SAM AWAKES AND FUMBLES FOR RECEIVER ... RECEIVER UP


SAM: (EXHALES, INTO PHONE) Hello?


ROGERS: (FILTER) Sam? Sam, can you hear me?


SAM: Hmm?


ROGERS: (FILTER) Sam, can you hear me?


SAM: (MOANS) Where am I? It's so dark.


ROGERS: (FILTER) Now, don't be frightened, Sam. You're all right.


SAM: Where am I? 


ROGERS: (FILTER) Listen to me, carefully, Sam. You're at the bottom of a missile silo in Wyoming.


SAM: Wha-a-a-t?


ROGERS: (FILTER) I said you're at the bottom of an abandoned missile silo in Wyoming. We had to put you out there for your own safety.


SAM: But - but why?


ROGERS: (FILTER) Don't you remember?


SAM: No. No, I don't. No, wait a minute, I - I seem to remember something about - about pain. And my ears.


ROGERS: (FILTER) That's right. You began to get ultra-sensitive. Your ears seemed to hear everything -- not only the thoughts of the people in the room around you and the next room, but thoughts and noises from people as much as a mile away.


SAM: Oh, yeah. Now I remember.


ROGERS: (FILTER) For a while we thought we had it licked when we put you in that lead-lined room at the Pentagon. But after a while, you started reading through that.


SAM: Yeah. Now I remember. The pain -- the excruciating pain.


ROGERS: (FILTER) It happens every time somebody comes near you. So we had you moved to an abandoned missile site in Wyoming. There's not another human being within a hundred miles. The only contact you have with the outside world is this telephone line.


SAM: What'll happen to me?


ROGERS: (FILTER) Well, we're working on that. You see, when people think, their minds give off minute quantities of radio energy. You're able to read their thoughts due to a sensitivity that you've developed, which picks up these radio messages. The only trouble is that you're not able to select the number of these radio messages, the distance at which you will receive them, or the volume.


SAM: And - the pain?


ROGERS: (FILTER) Well, the pain comes from the overstimulation of your auditory nerve. It's as if you were receiving radio broadcasts from all the stations in the world at once, at full blast.


SAM: But how long are ya gonna leave me here?


ROGERS: (FILTER) Only as long as it takes to figure out a way to protect you from all these radio emissions.


SAM: Or control the sensitivity.


ROGERS: (FILTER) We're working on that. 


SAM: What if you can't control it? What happens if it gets worse and worse?


ROGERS: (FILTER) Now, Sam -- don't worry about that. We've got the top scientific talent in Washington working around the clock on this. You're very valuable to us.


SAM: And in the meantime?


ROGERS: (FILTER) In the meantime, just sit tight. Those missile centers are stocked with enough survival rations to keep you alive for months. Even--


SAM: Years, if necessary, hm?


ROGERS: (FILTER) I didn't say that. Now, Sam, we should have you out of there in a couple of weeks. A month, at the most. In the meantime, just relax.


SAM: How do I turn the lights on?


ROGERS: (FILTER) Well, they'll go on in an hour. They're programmed to put you on a day-and-night schedule, just like on the Earth's surface. Now, don't forget, if you need anything, just call me. This is a direct line to my phone in Washington. Okay?


SAM: Okay.


ROGERS: (FILTER) All right, I'm hanging up now, Sam. Remember -- if you need anything, just give us a ring.


SAM: Okay. Bye.


SOUND: PHONE DISCONNECTS ... RECEIVER DOWN


SAM: (SARCASTIC) Thanks, buddy. Thanks for all the help. (DISCOURAGED, TO HIMSELF) Now, what do I do till the lights go on? Can't even look for food.


OPERATOR: (FILTER) Operator. Operator.


SAM: What's that? Oh, I must have forgotten to hang the phone up.


OPERATOR: (FILTER) Operator. 


SAM: (SURPRISED) No, it's in the cradle.


OPERATOR: (FILTER) What's your dial, please?


SAM: Oh, that can't be.


SON: (FILTER) I dialed my mother in San Fransisco.


SAM: They're comin' in over the phone!


DAUGHTER: (FILTER) Dad? I bet you didn't expect to hear from me!


SAM: (QUIET HORROR) Oh, no.


BROKER: (FILTER) Sell three hundred shares.


LOVER: (FILTER) Come home, Paul.


SOUND: RECEIVER UP ... CRADLE RATTLED ... PHONE RINGS (CALLER'S PERSPECTIVE) IN BG


SAM: (INCREASINGLY AGITATED) Hello? Hello, Operator?


SOUND: FLOOD OF OVERLAPPING FILTERED VOICES CHATTERING NOISILY AND INDECIPHERABLY ... SLOWLY BUILDS TO A CLIMAX, IN BG


BROKER: (FILTER) What happened to that order?


SAM: Operator, help!


SOUND: PHONE CONNECTS (CALLER'S PERSPECTIVE)


ROGERS: (FILTER) Hello, er, Sam?


DAUGHTER: (FILTER) It's raining up here. Is it raining down there?


SAM: (TO HIMSELF) Tear the phone out of the wall; that's what I'll do!


ROGERS: (FILTER) Sam, is that you?


SOUND: PHONE TORN OUT OF WALL


GRANDDAUGHTER: (FILTER) Hello, Grandma!


SAM: Oh, no! They're comin' in over the wire! The little stub of wire! What am I gonna do?


ROGERS: (FILTER) We've been disconnected. Hello, Sam?! Sam, hello?!


DAUGHTER: (FILTER) --my new dress--


ROGERS: (FILTER) Hello, Sam?! 


SON: (FILTER) That's what I told her!


ROGERS: (FILTER) Hello, Sam?! 


SAM: (GROANS) No! No! No! Please! God help me! Please! Nooooo!


SOUND: VOICES REACH A LOUD CHAOTIC CLIMAX ... TOPPED BY--


MUSIC: CURTAIN AND OUT ... THEN TRANSITION TO THEME ... THEN THEME IN BG


ANNOUNCER: THEATRE FIVE has presented "The Man Who Heard Everything" -- written by George Bamber, produced and directed by Warren Somerville. In the cast: Norman Rose, Mary Jane Higby, Ralph Bell, Evelyn Juster, and John Gibson. Audio engineers: Neal Pulz and Marty Folia. Sound technician: Ed Blainey. Script editor: Jack C. Wilson. Original music by Alexander Vlas-Daczenco. Orchestra under the direction of Glenn Osser. Executive producer for THEATRE FIVE: Mr. Lee Bowman. We invite your comments. Write to THEATRE FIVE, New York, Twenty-Three, New York. That's THEATRE FIVE, New York, Twenty-Three, New York. This is Fred Foy speaking.


MUSIC: THEME ... UP AND OUT 


ANNOUNCER: This has been an ABC Radio Network production.


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