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The Man from Venus

Romance

The Man from Venus

Sep 15 1956



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

LOUISE BARWICK, smart and kindly young widow

BOBBY, her energetic son; age ten

HENRY FULLER, cagey, a bit of a jerk

VICKY, the dog, who barks

SCOUT, from Venus; formal English

FREDDY, the pig, who grunts

APPLEBY, a genuinely nice guy; Midwestern accent




MUSIC: TYMPANI ROLL


ANNOUNCER: Now, from Hollywood -- ROMANCE!


MUSIC: THEME ... FADES OUT BEHIND--


ANNOUNCER: ROMANCE -- transcribed stories of love and adventure, of comedy and crisis, of conflict and human emotion. Today, the story of an interplanetary survey of New Mexico. It is written by Charles B. Smith and stars Virginia Gregg in "The Man from Venus."


MUSIC: FOR AN INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND LOUISE--


LOUISE: (NARRATES) On the day that an astronomer in Cleveland laughed that the Earth and Venus were only twenty-six million miles apart -- that was the day I decided to marry again. Bobby and I were livin' in New Mexico on the small ranch his father had left us. Why I decided to stay on there alone, I'll never know -- 'cept that it was a wonderful place for a growin' boy. Our nearest neighbor, Henry Fuller, lived over a mile away and our only contact with civilization, besides the party line, was the highway we could see from the house. Well, the mornin' it happened, Bobby'd gotten up before the chickens. Henry Fuller was goin' into El Paso for the day and he was takin' Bobby with him.


SOUND: DOOR SLAMS ... BOBBY'S HURRIED STEPS IN


BOBBY: (EXCITED) Mom! Uncle Henry's here!


LOUISE: Uncle Henry?


BOBBY: Yeah, ma! Last time he was over, he asked me to call him that from now on. (MOVING OFF) I gotta get my hat!


SOUND: BOBBY'S HURRIED STEPS AWAY


LOUISE: (CALLS AFTER HIM) If you don't stop rushin' around, you'll be worn out before you get back here.


BOBBY: (OFF) Okay!


VICKY: (WOOF! WOOF WOOF!)


LOUISE: (ADMONISHES) Vicky!


VICKY: (WOOF! WOOF!)


LOUISE: Vicky, ya stop barkin', ya hear?


VICKY: (WOOF! WOOF!)


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, HENRY'S STEPS APPROACH ... FRONT DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS ... HENRY'S STEPS IN


HENRY: Mornin', Louise.


LOUISE: Mornin', Henry. Come on in and I'll give ya some breakfast.


HENRY: Ain't got time for nothin' 'cept coffee. Bobby ready?


LOUISE: Mm hm. Since five this mornin'.


HENRY: (CHUCKLES) Me, too. Yes, sir, I've been lookin' forward to this day like a bull looks forward to spring.


LOUISE: (QUIET ADMONISHMENT) Henry!


HENRY: Oh, I forgot. Widdow Barwick don't like them kind of jokes.


LOUISE: And stop callin' me the Widder Barwick. It makes me feel like I'm ninety years old.


HENRY: Well, ya ain't gettin' any younger. 'Sides, everybody in the county's called you that for a couple o' years now. 'Course, you know what you can do to make 'em stop.


LOUISE: (UNHAPPY) I know. (POLITE) Now, you sit down an' I'll get your coffee.


SOUND: CHAIR SCRAPES AS HENRY SITS


LOUISE: You want me to pack a lunch for you?


HENRY: No, I'm goin' to eat in the café. 


SOUND: LOUISE BRINGS COFFEE AND SITS AT TABLE DURING FOLLOWING--


HENRY: Say, Louise, er, I've been doin' a good deal of thinkin' here the past couple o' days.


LOUISE: Oh?


HENRY: 'Bout this here ranch of yours, and about your boy. You know, you gotta think of his future, right along with the future of this old scrub you're stuck with.


LOUISE: (MILDLY DEFENSIVE) I know it better than anybody else, Henry.


HENRY: Boy growin' wild as Bobby needs a man around to show him the rights and the wrongs. Same as you need a man to advise you on the value of your property.


LOUISE: (MILDLY EXASPERATED) I know what it's worth, Henry.


HENRY: Yeah, I reckon you do -- now. But if I was to buy that acreage on the south of you, it'd sure drop.


LOUISE: You wouldn't do that.


HENRY: Oh, no, no, of course not. 'Sides, if I did, I'd buy your place soon as you set the date. Give ya a fair price, too.


LOUISE: (INDIGNANT) Henry Fuller, you can't blackmail me!


HENRY: Blackmail? I ain't doin' that! All I'm tryin' to do is to get ya to marry me!


LOUISE: I told you last week and I tell ya now, when I'm ready to marry again, I'll let ya know!


HENRY: All right, Louise. Ain't no need to go gettin' on your high horse. 


SOUND: HENRY PICKS UP COFFEE CUP AND SETS IT DOWN QUICKLY


HENRY: Say, this is hot! I'll pour it in my saucer to cool it.


SOUND: HENRY POURS COFFEE IN SAUCER AS DOOR OPENS AND BOBBY RUSHES IN


BOBBY: (EAGER) Uncle Henry!


HENRY: Yeah, boy?


BOBBY: I'm all ready.


HENRY: (SLY) Well, now, boy, I reckon I got bad news for you.


BOBBY: What?


HENRY: (DEADPAN) We ain't goin'.


BOBBY: (CRESTFALLEN) Ain't goin'?


HENRY: Nope. (BEAT, CHUCKLES, THEN LAUGHS)


BOBBY: (REALIZES HE'S BEING TEASED) Ohhhh.


LOUISE: (UNHAPPY) Ohhh, now, Henry. Why do you want to go teasin' him like that?


HENRY: (JOVIAL, TO BOBBY) Boy, you sure fell for that one. Yes, sir! Couldn't resist doin' it neither, the way you're dressed up like a dude, new hat and all.


BOBBY: Ain't it pretty? We picked it out of the mail order catalog.


HENRY: Yeah? What'd it cost you, boy?


BOBBY: (WITH PRIDE) Three dollars and a half.


HENRY: Seen you comin'. Could have bought a bag of chicken feed for that.


LOUISE: Here's a list of things I want you to get me. Henry, I'll pay ya when you get back.


HENRY: Eh, it's up to you. (BROADLY HINTING) But you know, you really don't have to give me any money at all. You know that.


LOUISE: (DRY) And I know what it'd cost me if I didn't.


HENRY: (REMONSTRATES) Ohhhh, now--


LOUISE: Besides, you're doin' enough for us, havin' your hired man over here every week.


HENRY: Well, gotta keep an eye on you, don't I?


LOUISE: (GLUM) You do.


SOUND: HENRY RISES


HENRY: (TO BOBBY) Well, boy, let's be at it.


BOBBY: Yes, sir. Bye, mom!


SOUND: HENRY AND BOBBY'S STEPS AWAY


MUSIC: FOR THE SCOUT'S ARRIVAL ... OMINOUS, OTHERWORLDLY ... THEN BEHIND LOUISE--


LOUISE: (NARRATES) After they'd gone, I finished up the breakfast dishes and then started to make the beds -- when I saw him. He was walkin' in from the highway -- tall, straight like a soldier. And he was wearin' a suit somethin' like one I'd seen on a high-altitude flyer in a picture magazine. It covered his whole body, and he had a large glass bowl over his head. He didn't look dangerous, but you never can tell, so I started for the phone, and then I remembered: we weren't too far from White Sands; he could be a flyer who'd had an accident and was comin' here to call the airfield. I was still wonderin' what to do when Vicky started after him.


SOUND: VICKY THE DOG STARTS BARKING, CONTINUES BEHIND--


LOUISE: (STRUGGLES WITH DOG) Here! Vicky! Vicky, you stop it! Ohhhh--


SOUND: VICKY STOPS BARKING AND RUNS AWAY AS SCOUT'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH ON GRAVEL, THEN ONTO WOODEN PORCH ... SCOUT'S VOICE IS MUFFLED A LITTLE BY HIS HELMET


SCOUT: (PLEASANT) Your dog is far from courteous.


LOUISE: (GOOD-NATURED) Oh, I know. But whatever you did seems to work. He's never run from a stranger before. What'd you do?


SCOUT: I spoke to him.


LOUISE: (CHUCKLES) Well, when I speak to him, nothin' happens.


SCOUT: That is because you do not know his language. I do.


LOUISE: (DOESN'T KNOW WHAT TO SAY) Oh. Well, uh--


SCOUT: Would you mind if I removed my helmet? It is becoming quite heavy.


LOUISE: Oh, no, not at all. You just make yourself at home.


SCOUT: Thank you.


SOUND: SCOUT UNSCREWS GLASS HELMET AND REMOVES IT ... TAKES A FEW STEPS ... VOICE NO LONGER MUFFLED ... FARMYARD BACKGROUND (COWS MOO, ET CETERA)


SCOUT: Ah! There. That is much better.


LOUISE: Yeah, I imagine it would be. Would you like to use the phone now?


SCOUT: (BEAT) The telephone? What for?


LOUISE: Well, I thought you might want to call for help.


SCOUT: Help? Am I in danger?


LOUISE: Oh, no. I only thought you'd like to phone White Sands and let 'em know you're here.


SCOUT: (MUSES) White Sands? (REALIZES) Oh, yes -- the rocket testing laboratory. No, I have no desire to fall into the hands of those men.


LOUISE: But - aren't you from there?


SCOUT: From White Sands? Oh, my; no.


LOUISE: (CHUCKLES) Well, where are ya from? Dallas? Oklahoma City?


SCOUT: No, I come from much farther away.


LOUISE: Oh? Where's that?


SCOUT: (BEAT) The planet you Earthlings call Venus.


MUSIC: QUIRKY CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: We will return to ROMANCE in just a moment. 


A lot of those collegiate wallets are a good deal fatter than usual these days thanks to summertime jobs. And, as a result, quite a few young men and women are finding themselves tempted to forget about school this fall and keep on with the job. Finish college: learn more now, earn more later. 


And now for the second act of ROMANCE.


MUSIC: SECOND ACT INTRODUCTION ... OTHERWORLDLY ... THEN BEHIND LOUISE--


LOUISE: (NARRATES) If anyone had ever told me that I'd believe a man who walked up to my front door and announced he was from Venus, why, I'd 'a' thought he was crazy. That's just what happened. 'Course, at first, I tried to kid him out of it. Made out like I knew he was jokin' all along. But he was so sincere, so matter-of-fact, I couldn't help but take him seriously. Well, we stood there for a couple o' minutes. Then -- and I still don't know how it happened -- I heard myself invitin' him to come inside.


SOUND: FARMYARD BACKGROUND BRIEFLY IN AND OUT AS LOUISE AND SCOUT'S STEPS GO INTO HOUSE ... FRONT DOOR CLOSES


LOUISE: 'Course, you know, I wouldn't think of askin' you in if you were just an ordinary man, from around here.


SCOUT: Yes, I know.


LOUISE: I suppose I feel all right about it 'cause you're so special. Now, you - you just make yourself at home. Sit anywhere.


SCOUT: Thank you.


SOUND: SCOUT TAKES A FEW STEPS AND SITS


LOUISE: I've got some coffee on the stove, or I can make ya some lemonade. Which would you like?


SCOUT: These are liquid refreshments, are they not?


LOUISE: Yes.


SCOUT: Thank you, Mrs. Barwick, but I must avoid all liquids while I am away from home.


LOUISE: Oh, I guess it is best. A change of water never did agree with anyone. Say, where'd you learn to speak our language so well?


SCOUT: In school.


LOUISE: You mean they teach English in the schools on Venus?


SCOUT: Only at the school for interplanetary scouts.


LOUISE: Is that what you are? A scout?


SCOUT: Yes, this is my first trip to your planet.


LOUISE: How do you like it?


SCOUT: (LIGHTLY) All right for a visit, but I would not want to live here. The people are barbarians.


LOUISE: (REMONSTRATES GENTLY) Oh, now, please--


SCOUT: Barbarians. This is the unanimous opinion of the men in my graduating class.


LOUISE: Well, what ever gave you that impression?


SCOUT: Last lunar period, twenty-four scouts -- exactly like myself -- were set down on Earth to approach and speak to people as I have with you. Of that twenty-four, seven were called press agents in four different languages, ten were believed to be actors working in science fiction films, four were thought to have lost on something called a quiz program, and my best friend had a door slammed on his foot and the words "Don't want any!" shouted into his face.


LOUISE: Oh, dear. People just don't have faith in anything any more.


SCOUT: Not all people, Mrs. Barwick. Only the people on Earth.


LOUISE: Well, I'm glad to hear that. I sure wish my son was here to see you, but he's gone to El Paso for the day.


SCOUT: Yes, I know.


LOUISE: He'll be back around eight. Why don't you stay for supper?


SCOUT: I am sorry, but I have much work to do and my time is limited.


LOUISE: Oh, that's too bad. He'll sure wish he'd stayed home.


SCOUT: It was my wish that you be alone this morning.


LOUISE: Oh? Why, for goodness sake?


SCOUT: So that I might question you.


LOUISE: Question me? About what?


SCOUT: About the life of an Earth woman. Your hopes, fears, desires--


LOUISE: Oh, you mean like a survey? Well, I don't know. I've never been one for talkin' about myself.


SCOUT: I know, but I can be very persuasive. Relax, Mrs. Barwick. Look at me. Now, then--


LOUISE: Oh, I'm-- I feel kinda dizzy. 

 

SCOUT: That will pass in a moment.


LOUISE: Well, I-- I guess I'm no different from any other widow. I'd like to get married. Guess I will soon.


SCOUT: Marry? Oh, yes! I remember now. Marriage -- the ceremony spoken by an elder which gives a male and female permission to mate.


LOUISE: Well, I suppose you could put it that way.


SCOUT: We tried it out some time ago. Asked for volunteers from two of our universities to see if it would possibly work in our social system.


LOUISE: What happened?


SCOUT: Miserable failure. None of the students could understand why they had to selfishly spend their lives loving just one person when there are so many others eager to share their love. But let us get back to you, Mrs. Barwick. When did you first desire to leave your parental home?


MUSIC: FOR PASSAGE OF TIME ... IN AND BEHIND LOUISE--


LOUISE: (NARRATES, MILDLY SURPRISED) I answered him! I answered every question he asked me, no matter how intimate. And he kept at it all morning long, even while I did the chores. At the hog trough, he wanted to know about the boys I dated in school. At the chicken coops, about my father. At the corral, he asked me about my husband. All kinds of questions, and I kept answerin'! That's what I never could understand -- why I ever answered him. Then, in the barn, after he'd finished on Henry Fuller, he stopped.


SOUND: BARNYARD BACKGROUND (ANIMALS MOVE ABOUT AND MAKE NOISE) ... FREDDY THE PIG GRUNTS UNHAPPILY, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


LOUISE: Here's your corn, Freddy. (TO SCOUT) Freddy's one of our pets.


SCOUT: He is cursing you.


LOUISE: Cursing me? Why?


SCOUT: Because he does not like corn, and yet you feed it to him every day.


LOUISE: But corn's good for him.


SCOUT: He hates it.


LOUISE: But look at him.


SCOUT: He is eating the corn because he has no choice except to go hungry. (BEAT) Like you, Mrs. Barwick.


LOUISE: What?


SCOUT: You are marrying that man, Henry Fuller. But you do not love him.


LOUISE: (BEAT, SADLY) No. (BEAT) Really, I - I can't understand why I'm tellin' you all these things.


SCOUT: Why marry Henry, Mrs. Barwick?


LOUISE: I told ya. Bobby needs a father and I-- I'm gettin' tired of runnin' this place by myself.


SCOUT: Would it be difficult for you to find another man? One you could love?


LOUISE: Yes! Very.


SCOUT: Why?


LOUISE: Well, because in the first place, I can't ever get away from this ranch, and in the second, Henry's the only one who's come over here courtin' me.


SCOUT: Then you are exactly like the pig. It is not a question of choice; you are taking what is available.


LOUISE: (VERY MILD) Oh, you be careful now. I don't like to be talked to that way.


SCOUT: If it were possible for you to select a husband, what kind of man would you choose?


LOUISE: (THOUGHTFUL, WITH LONGING) Ohhhh -- a romantic person. A man who'd like to travel and would make me sell the ranch and move to the city with him and-- It'd be good if he was a widower with a small child, so he'd understand about Bobby.


SCOUT: You are not concerned with physical attractiveness?


LOUISE: Yes! I'd like him to be taller than I am and nice-lookin', have a good steady job, and be about my age.


SCOUT: I am sure that would not be too difficult an order to fill.


LOUISE: (DRY) I'm sure you've never tried fillin' it. (SERIOUS) Besides, I left out the most important item of all.


SCOUT: Which is?


LOUISE: He must love me very much -- right from the first.


SCOUT: (BEAT) Perhaps it can be arranged for you to meet such a person.


LOUISE: (CHUCKLES) Oh, no, I'd be embarrassed to death.


SCOUT: But why?


LOUISE: Well, because a man with those qualifications could have almost any woman he wanted. He wouldn't be happy with an old secondhand model like me. He'd take one look and run.


SCOUT: Not if you met under the proper circumstances.


LOUISE: And what are those?


SCOUT: A place and a time where you and this man would have the opportunity to become well-acquainted before anyone or anything interrupted you.


LOUISE: (SKEPTICAL) Well, it's nice thinkin' about it. But it'll never happen.


SCOUT: I thought you still had faith.


LOUISE: I do. But not about myself.


SCOUT: Perhaps you should have. 


SOUND: SCOUT TAKES A STEP OR TWO


SCOUT: Well, Mrs. Barwick, it is time for me to go.


LOUISE: Oh, couldn't you stay till Bobby gets back?


SCOUT: No, my work here is completed.


LOUISE: Well, he'll probably get just as excited listenin' to me tell about ya.


SCOUT: Take my advice. Do not tell anyone about me.


LOUISE: Why not?


SCOUT: They will not believe you. They will laugh and make you very unhappy. 


SOUND: SCOUT TURNS TO GO, THEN STOPS, AND TURNS BACK TO LOUISE


SCOUT: Oh, what are those specifications again?


LOUISE: What? For a husband, you mean? Taller than I am, live in the city, a widower with a child, and have a good job. And love me very much.


SCOUT: I shall see what I can do.


MUSIC: FOR THE SCOUT'S DEPARTURE ... OMINOUS, OTHERWORLDLY ... THEN BEHIND LOUISE--


LOUISE: (NARRATES) I watched him go out toward the highway and then I went on into the house. When I looked again, he was gone. It was about quarter to eight when I heard Henry's car turn into our road. I walked out to meet them.


VICKY: (BARKS, THEN IN BG)


SOUND: HENRY'S CAR PULLS TO A STOP


LOUISE: Vicky! Here, now, you stop that barkin'.


VICKY: (STOPS BARKING)


BOBBY: (OFF) Hi, mom!


LOUISE: Hi, Bobby! You have fun?


HENRY: (OFF) Yeah, you're darn tootin' we did!


SOUND: CAR DOORS ... STEPS ON GRAVEL TO LOUISE


HENRY: Had us a real wing-ding, didn't we, boy?


BOBBY: Yes, sir! Sure did!


LOUISE: Y'had your supper?


HENRY: Yep. Et on the road.


LOUISE: Well, come on inside.


SOUND: THEIR STEPS ONTO PORCH, THROUGH DOOR, AND INTO HOUSE, IN BG


LOUISE: Bobby, I want you to go straight to bed; it's way past your bedtime.


BOBBY: Okay, I'm tired anyhow.


LOUISE: Well, what all did you do?


BOBBY: (MOVING OFF) I'll tell ya about it when you come to kiss me goodnight, ma!


LOUISE: (CALLS AFTER HIM) All right, you go get yourself ready for bed.


SOUND: LOUISE'S STEPS TO HENRY


LOUISE: Bobby behaved himself?


HENRY: Oh, fine. He's a mighty good boy. Sure is a pity he's got to be brought--


LOUISE: (INTERRUPTS, WEARILY) Not now -- please, Henry. I've had a big day myself.


HENRY: Oh? What happened? Cow get sick? Some of the stock get fever?


LOUISE: No. Nothin' like that.


HENRY: What was it?


LOUISE: Well-- A man from Venus was here today.


HENRY: (BEAT) Man from where?


LOUISE: Venus. The planet Venus, Henry.


HENRY: The planet?


LOUISE: That's right.


HENRY: A man from there--? From that other planet was here?


LOUISE: Right in this room, talkin' to me, as big as you are.


HENRY: (CHUCKLES) Oh, now, Louise--


LOUISE: It's the truth, Henry! I'm not joking.


HENRY: (CHUCKLES) Don't give me that. Why, a man from Venus-- (CRACKS UP WITH LAUGHTER)


LOUISE: But it's true! He was here! Believe me, it's true!


HENRY: (LAUGHS HEARTILY) If he come from another planet, how'd he get here?


LOUISE: In a spaceship.


HENRY: Did you see it?


LOUISE: No. But I know that's what he come in.


HENRY: Yeah, how do you know?


LOUISE: Because he told me.


HENRY: Oh, Louise--!


LOUISE: And he knew things about me! He knew my name before I told him.


HENRY: (DISMISSIVE) Yeah, got it off the mailbox.


LOUISE: (EXHALES) He told me you wouldn't believe me.


HENRY: Yeah, that was a safe guess. But if he was from Venus, what'd he come to see an old widow woman like you fer?


LOUISE: To ask me some questions.


HENRY: About what?


LOUISE: About my life. It was all for his survey.


HENRY: His what?


LOUISE: Survey! He and some other scouts are makin' a survey of the women of Earth.


HENRY: (CHUCKLES) Oh, ho, Louise. You poor old widow woman. Somebody sure made a fool out of you today.


LOUISE: (LOW, SERIOUS) Henry, get out of here.


HENRY: What?


LOUISE: (DELIBERATE) I'm never gonna marry you, Henry. I never want to see you again.


HENRY: Now, wait just a minute, woman! I've got money tied up in you. It costs me two dollars every week for my hired hand to come over here and--


LOUISE: (ANGRY) I'm sick of hearin' about your money! And the way you're always thinkin' you can buy me! I'm tired of your crude jokes and your dirty manners. Now you get out!


HENRY: You're gonna be sorry about this.


LOUISE: Not me, Mr. Henry Fuller.


HENRY: (SMUG, CRUEL) Yeah, I was gonna keep this a secret. Figured on tellin' you when we got married. But now I'm gonna enjoy this. I bought that south acreage today. I've got your little scrub surrounded. Which means your property's worth about a third of what it was before. (MOVING OFF) Now we'll see who comes crawlin' to who!


LOUISE: (SAVAGE) Get out!


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, HENRY'S STEPS TO DOOR, WHICH OPENS AND SLAMS SHUT AS HE EXITS 


BOBBY: (OFF, WORRIED) Mom?


LOUISE: (REGAINS HER COMPOSURE, WEARILY) Yes, Bobby, I'm comin'.


SOUND: LOUISE'S STEPS TO BOBBY


BOBBY: You and Uncle Henry didn't have a fight, did ya?


LOUISE: No, no. Just a little disagreement.


BOBBY: Oh.


LOUISE: Ya brush your teeth?


BOBBY: Uh huh. See?


LOUISE: Yeah, all right. 


SOUND: LOUISE TAKES A STEP AND SITS ON EDGE OF BED


LOUISE: Now, then, you tell me about your trip.


BOBBY: Well, Uncle Henry let me go to a movie while he took care of his business.


LOUISE: Well, that was nice. What was the movie about?


BOBBY: Well, it was about another world where everybody rides around in a rocketship and shoots at each other with ray guns.


LOUISE: Hmm. Science fiction picture, huh?


BOBBY: I guess so. And they had some people on the stage, too.


LOUISE: Oh?


BOBBY: Yeah, it was the first time that movie ever'd been shown anywhere. And all these people were onstage -- except the main one.


LOUISE: Well, where was he?


BOBBY: Nobody knew. They said he was supposed to come in dressed all up in his spacesuit, like a man from Venus, but the truck his rocketship was on must have broken down or somethin' 'cause he never did show up.


LOUISE: (A LITTLE SHAKEN) Bobby, did - did they say where he was comin' from?


BOBBY: Yeah, right from Hollywood. That truck with the man in the spacesuit must have passed right by here, mom. Maybe if you'd been out on the porch, you would have seen him.


LOUISE: (QUIETLY UNHAPPY) Yes, maybe. (BEAT) Yes, maybe I would have.


SOUND: LOUISE RISES FROM BED


LOUISE: Well, you, uh-- You go to sleep now, Bobby.


BOBBY: Okay.


SOUND: BOBBY SNUGGLES INTO BED


BOBBY: Good night, mom.


LOUISE: 'Night.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, LOUISE'S STEPS THROUGH BEDROOM DOOR, WHICH CLOSES ... HER STEPS CONTINUE IN BG


LOUISE: (CRESTFALLEN, TO HERSELF) An actor. A very good actor. (BEAT, TEARFUL) Oh, you fool.


VICKY: (BARKS, FROM OUTSIDE ... CONTINUES IN BG)


SOUND: LOUISE'S QUICK STEPS TO FRONT DOOR, WHICH OPENS ... NOCTURNAL BACKGROUND (CRICKETS, ET CETERA)


LOUISE: Vicky! Here, Vicky, stop it!


APPLEBY: (OFF) Hello!


VICKY: (STOPS BARKING)


SOUND: APPLEBY'S STEPS APPROACH ON GRAVEL


LOUISE: Wha--? Who's there?!


APPLEBY: (SLIGHTLY OFF) Uh, my name's Appleby.


SOUND: APPLEBY'S STEPS ONTO PORCH


APPLEBY: (APOLOGETIC) I've - I've had some car trouble. Wonder if I can use your phone.


LOUISE: Why, yes. Come in.


APPLEBY: Thank you.


SOUND: THEIR STEPS INTO HOUSE ... NOCTURNAL BACKGROUND OUT AS FRONT DOOR SHUTS BEHIND--


LOUISE: The phone's right over there. Do you know how to operate one like that?


APPLEBY: Well, frankly, no. I'm afraid I've lived in the city too long.


LOUISE: Well, then I'll do it for ya. What's the matter with your car?


APPLEBY: I wish I knew. I just bought it a couple of weeks ago. Had it all checked over yesterday, too. It's been running like a top till I got right in front of your place and then it stopped deader'n a doornail.


LOUISE: Hm!


APPLEBY: The motor won't even turn over.


LOUISE: That's strange.


APPLEBY: Yes, it sure is.


LOUISE: Well, I'll call Bill Stout at the Corners; he's about the nearest mechanic around here.


SOUND: RECEIVER UP ... LOUISE CRANKS PHONE BY HAND


BOBBY: (OFF) Mom?


LOUISE: You go back to sleep, Bobby.


APPLEBY: Does your husband know anything about cars?


LOUISE: I'm a widow.


APPLEBY: Oh. (BEAT, CHUCKLES, LIGHTLY) Sure hope I can get on my way tonight.


LOUISE: How far you goin'?


APPLEBY: Home. Kansas City.


LOUISE: Oh, you're a long way from it. (SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN AND UP, CRANKS PHONE AGAIN)


APPLEBY: I usually am. I travel for my company.


LOUISE: Mm, do you like it?


APPLEBY: Oh, sure; who wouldn't? (BEAT) What's the matter? Doesn't she answer?


LOUISE: No.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN AND UP


APPLEBY: Your phone must be out of order.


LOUISE: I'll try again.


SOUND: CRANKS PHONE AGAIN


APPLEBY: Er, how old is your little boy?


LOUISE: Ten.


APPLEBY: I've got one just a year older.


LOUISE: Oh?


APPLEBY: Yeah. Sure are fun. But they're tough to raise when you're left alone with them, aren't they?


LOUISE: Yes. (BEAT, REALIZES) Are you, uh--? Are you a widower?


APPLEBY: Mm hm. My wife died seven years ago.


LOUISE: Oh.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


LOUISE: Well, I - I guess it is out of order.


APPLEBY: (EXHALES) Ah, it's just my luck. How far's the next town?


LOUISE: Ohhh, a good twenty miles.


APPLEBY: Well, you just point the direction and I'll start walking. I want to get some sleep sometime tonight and I can't sleep in a car.


LOUISE: No, tall people never can. Uh, before you go -- I've got some coffee on the stove. Wouldn't you like a cup?


APPLEBY: Well, I guess I could use it, all right.


LOUISE: And how about a nice thick piece of apple pie with some cheese on top?


APPLEBY: Oh, now, please, wait a minute -- I don't want you going to any trouble.


LOUISE: (INSISTS) Oh, I'm not, Mr. Appleby.


APPLEBY: (AMUSED) Well, it looks like you are.


LOUISE: No, really, I-- I'm just keepin' faith with a friend.


MUSIC: FOR THE PASSAGE OF TIME ... IN AND BEHIND LOUISE--


LOUISE: (NARRATES) It was true what the man from Venus, or wherever, said about two people meetin' under the proper circumstances. Mr. Appleby had his cup of coffee -- and another, and another -- and finally he forgot all about his car. (BEAT, CONTENTED) We were married a few weeks later and we moved -- like I always wanted to -- to the city.


MUSIC: QUIRKY CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: ROMANCE is produced and directed in Hollywood by Antony Ellis. Today's story was written by Charles B. Smith and starred Virginia Gregg in "The Man from Venus." Featured in our cast were Richard Beals, Bill James, Charles Seel, Hans Conried, and Parley Baer. Musical supervision by Jerry Goldsmith. This is Roy Rowan inviting you to hear ROMANCE transcribed next week at this same time.


MUSIC: THEME ... TILL END


ANNOUNCER: A million people not bothering to vote because they think one little vote couldn't count and America would really be in trouble. So a reminder now that your country can't use that one vote, which does count, next November unless you register according to the laws of your state or city. Make sure you're registered and then, next November, see you at the polls as millions and millions of Americans prove once again that "One Little Vote Does Count." 


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