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The Golden Face

Romance

The Golden Face

Nov 12 1955



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

NARRATOR

ALAN TINDLE

CONCIERGE

CAROL HONOKAA

BOB KENDALL




MUSIC: DRUM ROLL


ANNOUNCER: Now, from Hollywood, ROMANCE!


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: ROMANCE -- transcribed stories of love and adventure, of excitement and derring-do, of conflict and human emotion. This week, a story of Hawaii as Stacy Harris and Lillian Buyeff star in William Froug's unusual romance "The Golden Face."


MUSIC: TENDER INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR-- 


NARRATOR: This is the story of a boy and a girl, of how they met, and of what happened to each of them because of their meeting. It's a simple story, without violence or melodrama, yet its meaning is clear. It began in that most exotic of locales, the Hawaiian Islands; more specifically, the city of Honolulu on the island of Oahu. 


SOUND: BUSY HOTEL LOBBY BACKGROUND ... FRONT DESK CALL BELL RINGS A FEW TIMES


CONCIERGE: (CALLS) Boy?! 


SOUND: BELLHOP'S STEPS APPROACH


CONCIERGE: Take Mr. and Mrs. Snodgrass to Room Two-Eleven. 


SOUND: CONCIERGE GIVES KEY TO BELLHOP WHO PICKS UP LUGGAGE AND HURRIES AWAY


CONCIERGE: (TO ALAN) Yes, sir? 


ALAN: Uh, do you have a single room?


CONCIERGE: I believe we're filled up. How long would you need it?


ALAN: All the weekend. Uh, tonight, Saturday, and Sunday.


CONCIERGE: I see. Well, let me check.


ALAN: Thanks. 


CONCIERGE: (SLIGHTLY OFF) Have you tried the Halekulani? Or perhaps the Royal Hawaiian? 


ALAN: No, I haven't.


CONCIERGE: Let me see now--


ALAN: Just anything at all, huh? 


CONCIERGE: Mm hm. Ah! You are in luck, lieutenant. A single checked out less than an hour ago. (CLOSER AGAIN) That's Three-Twelve. That'll be ten dollars a day. 


ALAN: All right, that'll be fine. 


SOUND: SCRIBBLE OF PEN ON PAPER BEHIND--


CONCIERGE: This is our biggest season, you know. Waikiki manager just phoned, said they were sending their people down to Honolulu. Not much of a vacation staying there, I don't imagine. Well, here you are. If you'll sign right here. 


ALAN: Right.


SOUND: SCRIBBLE OF PEN ON PAPER, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


CONCIERGE: Now your address, lieutenant. 


ALAN: U.S.S. Claremont.


CONCIERGE: Good. 


SOUND: CALL BELL RINGS


CONCIERGE: (CALLS) Boy?! Show the lieutenant Room Three-Twelve.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: Not unlike the old days, this new Hawaii. During the war there had been hotel lobbies jammed with uniforms. Now the same lobbies, newly redecorated, were crowded with straw-hatted tourists wearing brightly colored leis and even gaudier sports shirts. But it was the same Luana Hotel on Waikiki Beach and the young lieutenant felt good to be a part of the holiday excitement. In his room, he unpacked his canvas bag and looked out onto the huge banyan tree in the courtyard.


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP ... CAROL'S VOICE ON FILTER


ALAN: Yes?


CAROL: Bob?


ALAN: This is Lieutenant Tindle.


CAROL: Bob, it doesn't sound like you. Do you have a cold?


ALAN: (CHUCKLE) As a matter of fact, I don't. I feel wonderful. 


CAROL: Bob, is this really you? 


ALAN: Who is this? 


CAROL: Is Lieutenant Kendall there? 


ALAN: Oh, my name is Tindle, T-I-N-D-L-E.


CAROL: Oh, I - I'm sorry. Is Bob Kendall there? 


ALAN: No, I'm afraid he isn't.


CAROL: Well, thank you.


ALAN: Oh, no, wait! Don't hang up! 


CAROL: I beg your pardon? 


ALAN: (TRIES TO HIDE HIS EAGERNESS) Look, I - I don't know the man you're looking for, but, well, maybe I can help you find him. Is he in the Navy? 


CAROL: Yes.


ALAN: Shore duty? 


CAROL: No. No, he's aboard the Fairlane. 


ALAN: Well, that's a destroyer, isn't it?


CAROL: Yes, the DD-Seventeen- Ninety-Eight.


ALAN: I think I may have seen it out at Pearl. It could be there now. Look, let me help you. Where are you? 


CAROL: In the lobby. 


ALAN: On the house phones, next to the cashier's window? 


CAROL: Yes. 


ALAN: (WITH ENTHUSIASM) Don't move, I'll be right down. 


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: He knew why he was impelled to rush out of his room and down to the lobby as though his life depended on it. The lonely, almost pleading voice on the telephone sounded like a beginning for his weekend shore leave. And when he found the house phones and the girl who was standing beside them, he was sure.


MUSIC: UP FOR A ROMANTIC PAUSE TO CONVEY THEIR MUTUAL ATTRACTION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: She was small and graceful, her light summer dress clinging to her gentle figure. Her raven hair was neatly trimmed about a face tanned almost golden in color. Her brown eyes were wide and slanted slightly at the corners, and her nose, thin at the bridge, curved up into full nostrils. To him, she seemed to glow with the freshness of an island breeze. He didn't know who this exotic creature was or what she was -- and he didn't care.


SOUND: BUSY HOTEL LOBBY BACKGROUND


ALAN: Hello. My name's Alan Tindle. 


CAROL: (ENTRANCED) Ohhh-- 


ALAN: (LIGHTLY) I hope you like what you're staring at as much as I like what I'm staring at. 


CAROL: (RECOVERS) I'm sorry, lieutenant. I should've left, but I - I thought I owed you an explanation. 


ALAN: Well, not here, huh? In the bar? We can have a cool drink with pineapple in it, or - or anything in it, and then you can explain-- 


CAROL: Really, I have to leave now. I shouldn't have bothered you this way. The switchboard operator misunderstood me. (BEAT, SHYLY) It isn't what you might think. 


ALAN: (CHUCKLES) I'm not thinking anything right now except that-- Well, you're very beautiful and I'd like to kiss that switchboard operator. 


CAROL: (AMUSED) Thank you. Well, lieutenant--


ALAN: No, now wait. Please. One drink, no more, and no passes. You let me help you find Kendall if I can. If I can't, you've only wasted thirty minutes of your life and -- (WITH FEELING) -- lady, you've given me a lovely day. 


CAROL: (BEAT) You really mean that, don't you? 


ALAN: Yes, I do, very much. 


CAROL: All right, Lieutenant. 


ALAN: (GENTLY INSISTS) Alan.


CAROL: Alan.


ALAN: I don't know your name.


CAROL: It's Carol. Carol Honokaa.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: They found a table in the bar overlooking the beach and the blue Pacific. Outside their window, a thousand people sprawled on the sand and native boys glided into shore, their surfboards cutting smoothly across the long, rolling breakers. They glanced at each other, and their eyes held and then moved quickly away. 


SOUND: BAR BACKGROUND ... ICE CUBES RATTLE IN GLASSES, ET CETERA


CAROL: Aloha. That can mean hello or goodbye. 


ALAN: Well, I'll drink to that if it means hello.


CAROL: (BEAT) Why are you staring at me? 


ALAN: Oh, I am? I'm sorry. Well, you're - you're smiling now, and a while ago you seemed sad. What caused the change, Carol? 


CAROL: Oh, out there: the sun; the sea; those people on the beach. You know, the world's a very happy place if you look at the right things. 


ALAN: Oh, I understand exactly. Especially right now.


CAROL: (CHUCKLES) You embarrass me.


ALAN: (LIGHTLY) I don't mean to. It's just that I'd like to know more about you. Unless you think I might be intruding--?


CAROL: Oh, no, no. I don't know why, but suddenly I want to tell you about myself. Everyone wants to be understood, really, but I especially want you to understand. Does that sound foolish? 


ALAN: No. No, it doesn't. Have you always lived in the islands? 


CAROL: I was born in Hawaii, not two miles from this hotel. A real islander; that's pretty rare these days. 


ALAN: Honokaa -- is that a Hawaiian name? 


CAROL: My father was pure Hawaiian. He was descended from King Kamehameha.


ALAN: (MOCK IMPRESSED) Mmm.


CAROL: (CHUCKLES) Unfortunately, he married an Irish waitress from Boston, which somewhat diluted the royal line. (CHUCKLES)


ALAN: (CHUCKLES) Your parents still living, Carol? 


CAROL: My father lives on the other side of Oahu. He hates this side. Thinks the Americans have destroyed his country. 


ALAN: (CHUCKLES SCOFFINGLY) What do you think? 


CAROL: (SIMPLY) Well, I'm an American. (CHANGES TONE, UPBEAT) Let me tell you about my mother! There was a girl. Vivacious, redheaded, terrible-tempered -- a wonderful character. 


ALAN: She's not living?


CAROL: (CASUALLY) I don't know. She ran off with a sailor when I was seven.


ALAN: (UNSURE WHAT TO SAY) Oh-- 


CAROL: Well, you're not going to feel sorry for me, are you? Aw, don't do that, Alan. Pity's a terrible thing. Self-pity's even worse. We'll have another drink and -- then I must go. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: They had another drink, and he listened as the beautiful girl told him about herself and her father. She was twenty-eight years old, she lived in an apartment in Honolulu, she had a responsible job as a buyer in a department store, and she made good money -- a successful young woman by any standards -- and he found himself becoming involved in what she said, and what she thought. 


SOUND: BAR BACKGROUND 


CAROL: And I got the job because I knew what sort of "native" goods the tourists liked. Of course, most of it's made in San Francisco. (CHUCKLES, RUEFUL) Don't most of us live by a label? 


ALAN: Oh, I don't know. That depends on the individual, I think. 


CAROL: (UNHAPPY) Not when you carry the label in your face, in the color of your skin. 


ALAN: Hey, you told me self-pity was a terrible thing.


CAROL: (EXHALES) I'm sorry, Alan, you're right.


ALAN: Carol, I don't think you have anything to be ashamed of, not ever. 


CAROL: You sure?


ALAN: (YES) Mmm. 


CAROL: (BEAT) Alan, you didn't come downstairs to the lobby to help me find another man, did you? 


ALAN: No, I suppose not. 


CAROL: Why did you come? 


ALAN: Oh, I don't know. A voice -- lonely, interesting. Maybe I thought you might have been someone to-- Well, spend a sailor's weekend with. 


CAROL: (BEAT) Do you still think so?


ALAN: No. Not that way. (BEAT) How about you? You sorry I lied to you? 


CAROL: No. No, it's been a wonderful afternoon. A happy time. (SUDDENLY INTENSE) I mean that, Alan; I want you to always know it. 


ALAN: (AMUSED) You sound like you're saying goodbye for keeps. 


CAROL: I am.


ALAN: Oh, no, now that - that's absurd. We're just getting to know each other and-- 


CAROL: And we like each other, don't we? Please, Alan -- let's leave it that way. Please. 


ALAN: Carol, does this have something to do with Bob Kendall? 


CAROL: (QUICKLY) You see, if we don't let it stand for what it is, a happy afternoon can be ruined.


ALAN: All right. All right, we'll forget Kendall or whatever his name is. He doesn't matter to me if he doesn't matter to you. Past is past and future is future. (BEAT, LIGHTLY) Oh, please, Carol, I'm trying.


CAROL: (EXHALES, AMUSED) The trouble with you is you're so convincing! 


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: They stretched a happy afternoon into a happy dinner, and a happy evening; nothing serious, a kind of unspoken pact between them: they danced, they laughed, they talked about the Navy, Hawaii, hopes, defeats -- the kind of things two people who like each other talk about. Then they made plans for Saturday. At her insistence, about midnight, he saw her to a cab in front of the hotel and sent her back to Honolulu.


MUSIC: UP FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: It was almost ten o'clock the next morning when he was awakened by the telephone beside his bed. It was the operator phoning to say she was sending up two messages, and they arrived a few minutes later. They were both for Lieutenant Bob Kendall. Then there was a knock at the door.


SOUND: KNOCK AT THE DOOR ... BEAT ... DOOR OPENS


ALAN: Yeah?


BOB: (FRIENDLY) Hi! My name is Kendall. Understand they sent a couple of messages up here by mistake. 


ALAN: Oh -- yeah, they did. Come on in. Come on in, won't you?


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES


BOB: Gee, I hate to bother you this way. 


ALAN: S'okay. I'm Alan Tindle. 


BOB: Oh! Well, they sound alike.


ALAN: Yeah. 


BOB: I checked out yesterday afternoon. I guess they could have gotten balled up. 


ALAN: Happens all the time. I was about to order up breakfast. Would you care to join me? 


BOB: Sorry, I got a heavy date waitin' down in the lobby. 


ALAN: Oh?


BOB: Uh huh. Flight nurse. Met her last night. Did you go to the dance at the officer's club? 


ALAN: No. No, I didn't. 


BOB: Great liberty town. 


ALAN: Yeah, I know. (MOVING OFF) Oh, your messages; I almost forgot. 


SOUND: PAPER RUSTLES, OFF


ALAN: (RETURNS) Here you are. I'm sorry I read them before I realized they weren't for me.


BOB: Ah, probably aren't important anyway.


ALAN: One's from a girl named Carol Honokaa; says she'll be here at three o'clock. Of course, that's from yesterday.


BOB: (LAUGHS) Oh, that dame? Man!


ALAN: Oh, really?


BOB: And how! Plenty of action! And strictly available. If you want her phone number--


ALAN: No. No, thanks. Just wondered.


BOB: Beautiful doll. Only, if you call her-- 


ALAN: Yeah? 


BOB: She'll take you on a merry-go-round you won't forget! Well, thanks a lot. 


SOUND: DOOR OPENS


BOB: See you around! 


ALAN: Yeah. 


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES AS BOB EXITS


ALAN: (UNHAPPY, TO HIMSELF) Yeah, see you around.


MUSIC: FIRST ACT CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: We'll return to ROMANCE in just a moment.


Later today on CBS Radio's KATHY GODFREY SHOW, that man-about-instruments and popular recording personality Bobby Sherwood is among Kathy's guests. Vocalist Betty Madigan and Columbia Record artist Peter Hanley are also on hand for today's fun. Today and every Saturday on most of these stations THE KATHY GODFREY SHOW is your "Open Sesame" to weekend pleasure. Don't miss it. And keep in touch with all our weekend news and entertainment at the Stars' Address.


And now for the second act of ROMANCE.


MUSIC: SECOND ACT INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: What would it have been like if he had never met Bob Kendall? All Saturday morning the young lieutenant wondered that. But he had met him, and he could no longer think of Carol Honokaa the same way. Still beautiful, yes; still desirable; still many, many things. But no longer the same. Their date was for three o'clock -- for swimming.


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP ... CAROL'S VOICE ON FILTER


ALAN: Hello? 


CAROL: Alan, this is Carol. 


ALAN: (UNENTHUSIASTIC) Oh, hi, Carol.


CAROL: I'm here in the lobby; I brought my suit. Shall I change up there? 


ALAN: Yeah, sure, sure, that'll be fine. 


CAROL: Alan, are you all right? 


ALAN: Yeah, sure. Come on up, I've been waiting for you. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: For a moment, he'd been tempted to hang up the phone, but then he reconsidered. There were only two days and one evening left to be shore leave. If this beautiful exotic creature was out for fun, then maybe he'd been right the first time: maybe this was a way to spend his weekend.


SOUND: DOOR OPENS 


CAROL: Hi. 


ALAN: Hi.


CAROL: What a beautiful day. 


ALAN: Perfect day for a swim. Come on in. 


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES


CAROL: For a minute there on the telephone you had me worried.


ALAN: Oh? How's that?


CAROL: Well, you sounded so - so solemn. Not like you at all. 


ALAN: (CHUCKLES, LIGHTLY) Periodic depression -- nothing my neighborhood psychiatrist can't manage. 


CAROL: (CHUCKLES) Silly.


ALAN: Yeah, I am kinda silly, aren't I? 


CAROL: Yes, and I like you that way.


ALAN: Okay. Okay, it's a deal. Uh, you dress in here and I'll take the bathroom, huh? 


CAROL: All right. 


SOUND: BATHROOM DOOR CLOSES ... CAROL'S VOICE FROM BEHIND DOOR


CAROL: I hope you like my suit; I just bought it today. 


ALAN: Really? You know, bathing suits were made for girls like you. 


CAROL: Well, thank you, sir. 


ALAN: Hey, uh-- Funny thing, the hotel still thinks I'm Bob Kendall. They sent up a couple of his messages here this morning. He must be a busy guy: phone calls from beautiful girls, messages. (AWKWARD PAUSE) Uh, you go with him very long? 


CAROL: Not very long. (EXHALES WITH EFFORT) Gee, this is hard to get into. I don't know why they make them so small.


ALAN: (LIGHTLY) I'll be glad to come out and help.


CAROL: (CHUCKLES) No. No, thank you.


ALAN: (BEAT) You just say when, huh? 


CAROL: Oh, just a minute. (BEAT) There. You can come out now.


SOUND: BATHROOM DOOR OPENS ... CAROL'S VOICE BACK TO NORMAL


ALAN: (BEAT, QUICK QUIET WOLF WHISTLE)


CAROL: Do you like it?


ALAN: (EXHALES) I like the way you look in it. 


CAROL: (BEAT) Alan--?


ALAN: Hm? 


CAROL: (VERY SERIOUS) Before we go down to the beach, could we talk a minute? 


ALAN: Sure.


CAROL: You mentioned Bob Kendall. Alan, I don't want anything to - to ruin us, our friendship. 


ALAN: (DISMISSIVE) Ah, not on your life, honey. That guy's the furthest thing from my mind.


CAROL: Well, still, you did mention him. Maybe it'd be better if we did talk about it; get it out in the open and then - then we'd never have to think of him again.


ALAN: Carol, do you remember what I said yesterday? The past is past? (LIGHTLY) Now, if you make me start recounting my old girlfriends, we might never get down to the beach.


CAROL: (CHUCKLES) Do you really mean that?


ALAN: Of course I mean it. We're grown people; we've had good times and bad. Now, today is a day for sun and swimming and not worrying about anything. In short, this day is ours.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: And it was. They swam, they played tennis. He even tried to ride a surfboard and nearly broke his neck. It was a happy time. For moments, he would forget Bob Kendall and remember the girl he'd known yesterday. Then the thoughts would come back, and he would correct his perspective. That evening, they went dancing.


MUSIC: HAWAIIAN BAND PLAYS GENTLE DANCE TUNE ... THEN IN BG


ALAN: You know, I've waited thirty hours to hold you in my arms. Worth every minute of it.


CAROL: Are you that fond of dancing?


ALAN: (IRONIC) Are we dancing? I - I didn't realize.


CAROL: (CHUCKLES WARMLY AND AT LENGTH)


ALAN: Are you having fun?


CAROL: Oh, yes. And yet we hardly know each other; we just met yesterday. 


ALAN: Well, that doesn't really matter, does it, Carol? (NO ANSWER) Does it? 


CAROL: (SERIOUS) Let's sit down.


ALAN: (LIGHTLY) Just when I'm beginning to like Hawaiian music?


CAROL: (CHUCKLES) Now I know you need to sit down. Come on.


ALAN: All right. (TO OTHER DANCERS) 'Scuse us, please?


CAROL: Excuse me.


ALAN: Pardon me. (TO CAROL) Here, through here.


CAROL: (YES) Mm hm.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, THEIR STEPS OFF DANCE FLOOR ... THEY WALK TO TABLE


ALAN: Is it always this crowded? 


CAROL: At Waikiki? Oh, yes.


ALAN: (LIGHTLY) Haven't you got a nice little remote island somewhere where a fella can dance with his girl without dodging waiters? What kind of a South Sea island paradise is this?


CAROL: (CHUCKLE)


SOUND: CHAIRS SCRAPE AS THEY SIT


CAROL: Thank you. (LIGHTLY) Well, have you ever been to Hilo?


ALAN: Ah, no. 


CAROL: Oh, it's a sleepy little town. Lots of flowers. Even a live volcano. It's on Hawaii. 


ALAN: Nope. Tourists there, too. 


CAROL: Well, then I have just what you're looking for. Now Weliweli--


ALAN: (LAUGHS AT THE NAME)


CAROL: No, don't laugh, it's really a town. On Kauai. It has a lovely little bay, cane fields; rains almost every day. And no tourists.


ALAN: That part I like. 


CAROL: At least, almost. Or how about Kaueleau? Oh, it's a nice town. It's on the ocean, too. The island steamer makes it every week.


ALAN: Oh? Maybe we could fly down there.


CAROL: (BEAT, QUIET SURPRISE) What? 


ALAN: You know, spend a weekend.


CAROL: (BEAT) Alan, are you serious? 


ALAN: Of course I'm serious. It sounds ideal. 


CAROL: (UNEASY) Somehow, that - doesn't sound right. Not from you. 


ALAN: Why? Is there something different about me?


CAROL: I don't know. Yesterday you seemed different. Maybe I'm just imagining it, Alan. Yesterday, I believed you. Today, I - I'm not sure. 


ALAN: Well, I'm the same guy, Carol.


CAROL: (SERIOUS) But not the same toward me. Alan, yesterday afternoon, I wanted to say goodbye. I said we shouldn't spoil a happy time. I meant it then. I mean it now. 


ALAN: I'm not trying to spoil anything, Carol. Look, I got an idea. Let's get out of this noise and smoke. There's a full moon out there, so let's go for a swim, huh?


CAROL: Well, I - I don't know.


ALAN: Come on, it'll do us both good: fresh air, a chance to be by ourselves. Come on. Please. 


CAROL: (BEAT, UNENTHUSIASTIC) All right, Alan. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND NARRATOR--


NARRATOR: The moonlight flooded the beach. The surf was calm, glistening with phosphorus. It was quiet now, deserted. Only the two of them and the gently rolling sea. 


SOUND: SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... SPLASH OF TWO PEOPLE FROLICKING IN THE WATER ... THEN IN BG


CAROL: (MERRILY) Oh, Alan, isn't it wonderful?


ALAN: It's cold! 


CAROL: (LAUGHS) Fine naval officer you are! Frightened of a little cold water.


ALAN: Come on. Come on. Let's get out a while.


CAROL: (CHUCKLES)


SOUND: THEY SPLASH THROUGH WATER AND THEIR FOOTSTEPS RUN UP ONTO THE BEACH ... THEN QUIET LAP OF WATER IN BG, UNTIL MUSIC


CAROL: (EXHALES HAPPILY) It's wonderful. I could stay here forever.


ALAN: (SUDDENLY SERIOUS) Could you? 


CAROL: Uh huh.


ALAN: (MOVING IN CLOSE, HUNGRILY) With me? 


CAROL: (UNEASY) Alan-- 


ALAN: (QUIET HUNGER) Come here. 


SOUND: HE FORCES A KISS ... PAUSE FILLED BY QUIET LAP OF WATER


ALAN: (EXHALES, QUIETLY) I've wanted to do that for a long time.


CAROL: (EXHALES) Oh, Alan-- 


SOUND: PAUSE AS HE FORCES ANOTHER KISS, SHE TRIES TO PULL AWAY


CAROL: (SHARP EXHALES) Alan-- Please, no. (TENSE) Alan--


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, SLIGHT STRUGGLE ... WHACK! SHE SLAPS HIM IN THE FACE


ALAN: (QUIETLY SHOCKED) What--? Why, you cheap little tramp.


CAROL: Alan, don't! 


ALAN: (EXPLODES ANGRILY) What right have you got to slap my face?! Just who do you think you are?! What's the matter? Aren't my kisses as good as Bob Kendall's or was there someone before him who was even better? Or someone before that?! 


CAROL: Alan, stop! 


ALAN: How many have there been, Carol, or have you lost count?


CAROL: (FURIOUS) Probably a great many less than there has been for you! Didn't you tell me there were so many, we wouldn't have time to swim if you told me about them? Then what gives you the right to pass judgment on me? Is there one standard for naval officers and another for women? Is that what you believe?


ALAN: I believe you set me up for a sucker and I fell for it. Look, I went for you in a big way and you made a fool out of me.


CAROL: Why? Because I wouldn't let you touch me?! Is that how I made a fool out of you? Did I hurt your manly pride that much? (BEAT, SLOWER, SOFTER) Listen to me, Alan. I want to tell you something. Yesterday I thought you were something - very, very special. You were lonely just as I was lonely -- and you were honest. And we talked about real things -- things important to both of us. And there was something I'd never felt before. Love. Do you understand the meaning of that word -- love? It's something people want and need. Something people search a lifetime for. I liked you right from the start. And the same things were happening to you, I know, but-- Then you changed. Suddenly, it wasn't real; it was cheap and dishonest. You made it cheap, Alan. Why? 


ALAN: (HELPLESSLY) I don't know.


CAROL: Because there'd been others for me as there had been for you? Couldn't you accept me as I am today, not as I was yesterday? Can't people change when they want to change? Alan, weren't you the one who said the past is past? Or was that a lie, too? 


ALAN: I don't know, Carol. I-- I don't know what I said. 


CAROL: Perhaps I remember because I believed you. (BEAT) Well, you've shown me something, Alan. You've shown me that I can't escape from myself. Maybe that's what I've been trying to do. Suddenly, you've made me stand still and face myself, almost for the first time. (BEAT, REALIZES) You know something? I'm not ashamed any more. I don't have to run. 


NARRATOR: And then the girl who was half-Hawaiian, half-Boston Irish -- and who was therefore neither one -- turned slowly and walked back toward the hotel. 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... IN BG


NARRATOR: She held her head high now. She had indeed changed. Her search for an identity was over. In rejecting the boy, she had rejected a part of herself. And she was proud. What of the young lieutenant? He sat quietly on the beach, looking out to sea. His pride had been hurt, but something more important: her words had reached him. And for himself, and all men, he felt ashamed.


MUSIC: NO BIG CURTAIN ... JUST QUIETLY UP AND GENTLY OUT


ANNOUNCER: ROMANCE is produced and directed by William Froug. "The Golden Face" was written by Mr. Froug and starred Stacy Harris and Lillian Buyeff. Others in the cast were Parley Baer and Byron Kane. This is Dan Cubberly, inviting you to hear ROMANCE transcribed next week at this same time.


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG, UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: Guess where Eve Arden, as OUR MISS BROOKS, finds herself on tomorrow night's show. Lovers' Lane, that's where. And with bashful Boynton, the biology teacher, the apple of her eager eye. Can Eve make time in Lovers' Lane or will this latest effort to help Cupid help her fail like all the others? We know, but won't say. Listen in for CBS Radio's OUR MISS BROOKS, starring Eve Arden, on most of these stations tomorrow night. 


Stay tuned now for GUNSMOKE, which follows immediately over most of these same stations. 


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