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The Final Problem

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

The Final Problem

Dec 21 1954



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

SHERLOCK HOLMES

DR. WATSON

PROF. MORIARTY

STATION GUARD (1 line)




SOUND: A HANSOM CAB HURRIES BY


ANNOUNCER: "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes"!


MUSIC: THEME ... SOLO VIOLIN ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: We present the original stories of the late Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, dramatized anew with Sir John Gielgud as Sherlock Holmes, Sir Ralph Richardson as Dr. Watson and today, Orson Welles as Professor Moriarty.


MUSIC: SOLO VIOLIN ... UP TO FILL A PAUSE ... THEN BEHIND WATSON--


WATSON: It is with a heavy heart that I come before you with the last adventure of my friend Sherlock Holmes that I shall be able to relate. I have tried in my humble way to chronicle some of our exploits together, to demonstrate the singular gifts of that most remarkable of men. 


MUSIC: VIOLIN GENTLY OUT


WATSON: It lies with me now to tell you what occurred between Holmes and his archenemy Professor Moriarty when at last they came face to face.


MORIARTY: (ECHO, LOW, OMINOUS) Mr. Sherlock Holmes, your efforts on the side of law and order have seriously inconvenienced me. The situation between us is becoming an impossible one, Mr. Holmes. It simply cannot go on. One or the other of us must die. Must die, Mr. Holmes. 


WATSON: It was in the spring of 1891. You will remember perhaps that after my marriage and return to private practice, Holmes and I had drifted apart a little. I followed the newspaper reports of his cases, of course, and called on him quite often at the old rooms in Baker Street. Even so, however, many weeks would sometimes elapse between our meetings. And so it was with some surprise, one April evening, that I looked up and saw him standing before me in my study. 


HOLMES: (WEARY) Good evening, Watson.


WATSON: Ah! Good evening, Holmes. 


HOLMES: Have you a cigarette for me? 


WATSON: Holmes, it-- Great heavens, man; how ill you look.


HOLMES: Oh, I daresay I've been using myself up rather too freely of late, old friend. You've no objection if I close your window shutters.


SOUND: WINDOW SLIDES SHUT


WATSON: (PUZZLED) No. Of course not. 


SOUND: SECOND WINDOW SHUTS


WATSON: Here -- you're not afraid of anything, are you? 


HOLMES: Well, to tell you the truth, I am rather. 


WATSON: That's not like you, Holmes. What is it? 


HOLMES: Air-guns.


WATSON: Air-guns? What on earth do you mean?


HOLMES: There's a new and deadly type of air-gun, Watson, which has been specially designed by an old acquaintance of ours.


WATSON: Who--? What, Professor Moriarty? It could only be he from your tone. 


HOLMES: The same. A match; give me a match, will you, my dear fellow? 


WATSON: Yes, of course.


SOUND: WATSON RUMMAGES FOR A MATCH


HOLMES: Oh, thank you.


SOUND: MATCH STRIKES


HOLMES: Is Mrs. Watson at home?


WATSON: Oh, no. She's on a visit to an aunt. We're quite alone.


HOLMES: Oh, good. Good, good -- that makes it easier for me to propose that you should come away with me for a few days.


WATSON: Oh, delighted. (CHUCKLE) But where? 


HOLMES: Oh, the continent -- somewhere abroad.


WATSON: What? Abroad? 


HOLMES: Is that whiskey in the decanter there?


WATSON: Yes.


SOUND: HOLMES FIXES DRINK


WATSON: Now look here, Holmes, what's all this about? There's something more serious in your manner than-- 


HOLMES: (INTERRUPTS) You never did quite believe in the iniquities of Moriarty, did you, Watson? You've said so more than once.


WATSON: (CHUCKLES) I thought you exaggerated a bit. After all, Professor Moriarty's a respectable figure in public life. 


HOLMES: Just so, and that's the very genius of the man. Even you, Watson, knowing me as you do, can't quite believe me when I tell you that he corrupts all London with his evil influence.


WATSON: Oh, I can't quite believe that.


HOLMES: Oh, of course, to the world, he's still the professor -- a great mathematician. He's respectable. 


WATSON: But what real proof have you that he's anything else? 


HOLMES: None. 


WATSON: Well--


HOLMES: At least, not until this last month. And even now the chain isn't quite complete. But three days more and I shall have him, Watson. Three days more, if I live to see them. 


WATSON: You can't seriously suppose that your life's in danger, Holmes?


HOLMES: No? 


WATSON: Ho! You always loved to be melodramatic.


HOLMES: Melodramatic? Listen, Watson, this morning -- this very morning -- in those old rooms of ours in Baker Street, I saw him face to face. I spoke to him. 


WATSON: Moriarty? 


HOLMES: Your distinguished professor. Within him, a criminal strain of the most diabolical kind. That great white dome of a forehead, those hooded eyes, and the white face pushed forward, oscillating from side to side like a snake's. 


WATSON: Oh, of course, if you believe the old heresy of physiognomy-- 


HOLMES: (INTERRUPTS, DISMISSIVE) It isn't only that; of course not. I worked for years to follow a thousand different threads and every one of them has led to Moriarty. He's the Napoleon of crime, Watson, the secret organizer of almost everything evil that goes undetected in this great city of ours. There he sits motionless, like a spider in the center of its web, a web with a thousand strands and he controls them, every one. But slowly -- very slowly -- my own secret plans to expose him have borne fruit. Every day my net is drawing tighter and he knows it, Watson. He knows the danger he's in and that was why today he came to see me. I was playing my violin, as you know I often do when I want to think, and suddenly there he was: standing in the doorway, with his white face swaying in an evil way, peering at me with his hooded eyes.


MUSIC: SOLO VIOLIN ... THEN ABRUPTLY OUT


MORIARTY: Good morning. 


HOLMES: Professor Moriarty! Good morning to you.


MORIARTY: Mr. Sherlock Holmes, I believe. How very charmingly you play. 


HOLMES: How kind of you to say so.


MORIARTY: (CHUCKLES)


HOLMES: Won't you be seated, Professor Moriarty? I can spare you just five minutes. 


MORIARTY: That's singularly good of you; thank you, I will sit down. 


SOUND: MORIARTY SITS


MORIARTY: May I say something personal, Mr. Holmes? 


HOLMES: Certainly.


MORIARTY: I'm surprised to discover that you have rather less cranial development than one might have expected.


HOLMES: Whereas you, on the contrary, have rather more than I had imagined, Professor. You will recollect, I am sure, however, that Beethoven's outdid us both. 


MORIARTY: (CHUCKLES)


HOLMES: However, our personal characteristics are hardly relevant to the present situation. What have you really got to say to me? 


MORIARTY: Er, well, perhaps -- I only suggest it, of course -- perhaps it is a dangerous habit to finger loaded firearms in the pocket of one's dressing-gown, Mr. Holmes. 


HOLMES: Ah, evidently, you share that dangerous habit, Professor. I see that you keep your hand in the pocket of your morning coat.


MORIARTY: (CHUCKLES)


HOLMES: Supposing we lay our pistols -- and our cards -- on the table.


MORIARTY: By all means. I was about to suggest it myself.


SOUND: THEIR PISTOLS LAID ON TABLE


MORIARTY: Ah! I see you favor the Mauser type, Mr. Holmes, and without a silencer. You must permit me to present you some time with one of these small devices of my own design. They're quite convenient in avoiding unpleasant noise, you know.


HOLMES: How very kind of you, Professor. You must ask the hangman to deliver it to me as your last request.


MORIARTY: You evidently don't know me, Mr. Holmes.


HOLMES: On the contrary, I think I know you better than you know yourself. (QUICKLY) I wouldn't take up your gun again, Professor. I've already got you covered with mine.


MORIARTY: So I perceive, but I assure you it was only to give a harmless demonstration. 


HOLMES: Of the silencer?


MORIARTY: Of my own small accomplishments as a marksman, Mr. Holmes. I've read in those accounts of Dr. Watson, that somewhat bovine,--


HOLMES: I beg your pardon!


MORIARTY: --no doubt amiable friend of yours, that those marks on the wall there are made from your indoor revolver practice.


HOLMES: Quite so. The initials there -- V.R. -- Victoria Regina, God save Her Majesty. 


MORIARTY: Now that I see them, it seems perhaps they're not quite as symmetrical as they might be. One side of the V is a little short, I think. Permit me to correct the slip!


SOUND: SILENCED GUNSHOT! 


HOLMES: Admirable, Professor Moriarty. You were perfectly right, of course: that little mistake has now been rectified. I would like, however, if I may, to improve upon it. Your bullet mark is perhaps a shade smaller than my own. (TAKING AIM) Permit me.


SOUND: LOUD GUNSHOT! 


MORIARTY: (BEAT, QUIETLY DISMAYED) Admirable, Mr. Holmes. 


HOLMES: Yes, precisely above your own mark, Professor -- the exact spot, I think. (QUICKLY) No, no, pray don't look alarmed! My good landlady is quite accustomed to that noise. We shall not be disturbed. 


MORIARTY: I am very glad of it, for what I have to say is not without importance, Mr. Holmes. Shall we stop our fencing and begin? 


HOLMES: By all means, if you will permit me first to correct one statement that you made just now.


MORIARTY: Well, sir? 


HOLMES: With reference to my friend Dr. Watson. I am afraid I can hardly permit the adjective "bovine."


MORIARTY: (AMUSED) Oh.


HOLMES: In his accounts of my humble exploits, he's been good enough to exaggerate my own achievements and has always been unduly modest about his own. He is a most upright and honorable gentleman, Professor, and very close to my heart. You may say what you will about me, but I can allow no derogatory words about him.


MORIARTY: Very well, Mr. Holmes. I apologize. We who are about to die salute him. (CHUCKLES) At least, you do.


HOLMES: You're very certain, aren't you, Professor Moriarty, that it is I who am going to die?


MORIARTY: There's no other course -- unless you listen to reason. The situation between us, Mr. Holmes, is becoming an impossible one. It simply cannot go on. 


HOLMES: It won't, I assure you. These past few months I have been working to put an end to it all at the earliest possible moment. 


MORIARTY: And you have very nearly undone the careful endeavor of a lifetime, sir -- or at least have seriously threatened it.


HOLMES: (QUICKLY) No, no, no -- don't move your pistol again. 


MORIARTY: I'm only taking out by memorandum-book. 


HOLMES: I beg your pardon. 


SOUND: MORIARTY FLIPS PAGES OF BOOK BEHIND--


MORIARTY: I find it recorded here that you crossed my path on the fourth of January, Holmes. On the twenty-third you incommoded me. By the middle of February I was seriously inconvenienced by you. At the end of March I was absolutely hampered. 


SOUND: BOOK CLOSED


MORIARTY: And now at the close of April I find myself placed in such a position, through your continual persecution, that I'm in positive danger of losing my liberty.


HOLMES: That was certainly the end I had in view. 


MORIARTY: Then you must drop it, Mr. Holmes. You really must, you know.


HOLMES: Not till after Monday, Professor. You know as well as I do that you've made a slip -- one single tiny slip. For years I've been aware of you, Moriarty, at the center of your organization: forgeries, murder cases, robberies. A thousand crimes were planned by you, a hundred agents carried them out. Your subordinates were caught sometimes, but you never were. And yet, you know, you made that slip -- that single tiny slip. And you know as well as I do that it will destroy you. In three more days my evidence will be complete. I shall have you exposed, brought to trial, condemned -- and hanged. And you can do nothing whatever to prevent it. My will is inflexible.


MORIARTY: And so is mine. Three days, do you say? Then before they're out, the end will come. One or the other of us must die, sir.


HOLMES: Quite so. The five minutes is up, Professor, and I must really ask you to excuse me. In the pleasure of our conversation, I'm afraid that I've neglected business of importance elsewhere.


MORIARTY: Very well then. Seems a pity, Mr. Holmes, but I've done what I could. I admit that it's been an intellectual pleasure to me to see the way in which you grappled with this affair, but I tell you solemnly, Sherlock Holmes, that if you are clever enough to bring destruction on me, you may rest assured that I shall do as much to you. 


HOLMES: You have paid me several compliments during this interview, Professor. Let me pay you one in return when I say that if I were assured of the former eventuality, I would most cheerfully accept the latter. 


MORIARTY: I can promise you the one, but not the other. Good day, Mr. Holmes. 


HOLMES: Oh, your pistol, Professor. You may need it before Monday.


MORIARTY: Thank you.


HOLMES: Good day, Professor. 


MORIARTY: I think "goodbye" is the word, Mr. Sherlock Holmes. Goodbye.


MUSIC: TENSE CURTAIN FOR SCENE ... THEN SOLO VIOLIN FOR BRIDGE


HOLMES: And so it was, you see, Watson, that singular interview with the greatest criminal of all time.


WATSON: And his with the greatest detective. 


HOLMES: Oh, thank you, my dear fellow.


WATSON: But - but what are you going to do, Holmes? 


HOLMES: I told you, we leave for the continent. Moriarty's not the man to let the grass grow under his feet. Already one or two "accidents" have nearly befallen me today. 


WATSON: Upon my soul! 


HOLMES: Yes. The police are gathering all my evidence against him. Everything will be complete in three short days. Meanwhile I can only lie low. Are you able to leave your practice to come with me? 


WATSON: I have an accommodating neighbor.


HOLMES: Ah, dear Watson, I knew I could count on you. All right then. Now these are your instructions. Listen most carefully. 


WATSON: Instructions, Holmes? 


HOLMES: I assure you, they are most necessary. Tomorrow morning at eight forty-five you will take a hansom cab. 


WATSON: I'll arrange for one to call.


HOLMES: No, no, you really must obey me to the letter, Watson. You will leave the house alone tomorrow morning and take neither the first nor the second cab which presents itself at the rank.


WATSON: Very well, Holmes. 


HOLMES: Hand the address to the cabman written on a slip of paper and tell him not to throw it away.


WATSON: Then I'll drive, I take it, to Victoria Station? 


HOLMES: On the contrary. You drive to the Strand end of the Lowther Arcade. 


WATSON: I see. And then?


HOLMES: Have your fare ready, and the instant your cab stops, pay him and dash through the Arcade, timing yourself to reach the other side at exactly a quarter past nine.


WATSON: Yes, but my dear Holmes--


HOLMES: Listen, man. Listen carefully. It's vital. Our lives depend upon it. When you get there, you'll find a brougham standing close to the curb, driven by a fellow with a black cloak tipped with red. Say nothing; simply jump in, and he'll drive you to Victoria in time for the Continental Express. 


WATSON: And where shall I meet you, Holmes? 


HOLMES: The second coach from the front of the train, a first-class carriage reserved for us. Good night, Watson, and as you value our lives, don't forget a single word of my instructions.


WATSON: No, no, no, of course not, Holmes. 


HOLMES: Until we meet tomorrow then. 


WATSON: Until we meet.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


WATSON: I was infected myself with something of his own inner excitement and sense of menace. I took the hansom and then the brougham with its massive hooded driver. I said nothing to him, as I was instructed, and he never spoke to me. A moment later we were rattling to the station. There he left me and drove off without a further glance, his face still hidden. 


SOUND: STATION BACKGROUND


WATSON: There was no sign of Holmes and my heart sank miserably. I found our reserved carriage, but, through some confusion, a decrepit old Italian priest was sitting there. The moment came for departure, and still I waited by the window in a chill of fear.


HOLMES: (HEAVY ITALIAN ACCENT) Scus', signor. Prego--


WATSON: I'm sorry, padre, I don't speak Italian.


HOLMES: (NORMAL VOICE) Nor do I, Watson. 


SOUND: HIGH-PITCHED TRAIN WHISTLE BLOWS ... TRAIN STARTS ... THEN PULLS OUT OF STATION DURING FOLLOWING--


WATSON: (STARTLED, AMUSED) Oh, good heavens, Holmes! (LAUGHS)


HOLMES: (LOW) No, quiet. Quiet, man. This is no laughing matter, not yet anyway. There! See?


MORIARTY: (OFF, YELLS) Stop! Stop the train! 


HOLMES: It's Moriarty himself! 


WATSON: The tall man? He'll never do it.


MORIARTY: (OFF, YELLS) Stop the train, I say! 


STATION GUARD: (OFF, SHOUTS INCOMPREHENSIBLY) Hey! Who do you think you are? Get back there!


MORIARTY: (OFF, YELLS, OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE) Let me go, you fool! I'm warning you! Let me go!


SOUND: STATION FADES OUT AS TRAIN PICKS UP SPEED ... RUMBLE OF SPEEDING TRAIN FILLS PAUSE ... CONTINUES IN BG


HOLMES: Even the great Moriarty himself is helpless against the British railway system, Watson. Well, well -- it gives us an hour's respite at least. 


WATSON: But how - how did he know where we were? 


HOLMES: By watching you, I expect.


WATSON: But I did everything you told me-- (REALIZES) Wait, Holmes! The driver of the brougham. 


HOLMES: Well, what about him? 


WATSON: He was muffled. I didn't see his face. It must have been one of Moriarty's men. 


HOLMES: My dear Watson, it was nothing of the sort. It was my brother Mycroft, shaken for once out of his armchair at the Diogenes Club.


WATSON: Good heavens. The thing is serious then? 


HOLMES: Of course. But at least we have an hour, and I can use it to take off this disguise and think things over.


WATSON: But we've escaped him altogether, surely, since the train connects with the boat. 


HOLMES: My dear fellow, you evidently don't realize even now that Moriarty is an opponent on practically the same intellectual plane as myself. Do you really imagine that, if I were the pursuer, I would permit myself to be baffled by so slight an obstacle as an express train? 


WATSON: What'll he do then?


HOLMES: What I should do: engage a special.


WATSON: But it'd be late even then-- 


HOLMES: By no means. We stop at Canterbury, don't forget. And then there's always a delay of a quarter of an hour when the train gets to Dover.


WATSON: Ah! So you'd almost think we were the criminals, to be chased like this. Do you mean that he'll catch us after all then? 


HOLMES: I hope not. We shan't be there, Watson. 


WATSON: Look - look here, Holmes. I - I hate to grumble after all this time, but, really, I do think you ought to tell me what you mean. 


HOLMES: Heaven bless you for a stout and faithful friend, Watson. I'm sorry. It's only that--


WATSON: (BEAT) Well?


HOLMES: Well, I don't want to expose you to danger, too. That's why I'm being so mysterious. It's very simple, really. We shall just get out at Canterbury. 


WATSON: Indeed? And not go on the continent after all, I suppose. 


HOLMES: Oh, yes, we must do that. We've no choice but to hide away until after Monday when the evidence will have been completed. You've not seen the papers this morning, I suppose.


WATSON: Oh, really, Holmes, what time do you think I've had for that? 


HOLMES: (CHUCKLES) One must try to make time for everything, Watson. You really should have read about Baker Street. 


WATSON: Hm? What? Baker Street?


HOLMES: Yes, they set fire to our rooms last night. Mrs. Hudson was away from home, fortunately, and no one was hurt, I'm glad to say. They thought I was there, of course.


WATSON: Upon my soul! The thing's intolerable, Holmes! 


HOLMES: Yes, only till Monday, Watson, and by then we'll be in Switzerland. We'll make a cross-country journey from Canterbury and take the other boat from Newhaven to Dieppe. Unless, of course--


WATSON: What?


HOLMES: --our friend the professor deduces what I would deduce and gets off at Canterbury himself. Ha! That would truly be a coup de maître. 


WATSON: He surely never would.


HOLMES: Well, I rather doubt it. There are limits even to his intelligence. No, no, I think we're safe enough, old friend. And now there's time for a pipe, I fancy. Won't you join me, Watson?


SOUND: TRAIN WHISTLE ... RUMBLE OF SPEEDING TRAIN UP AND OUT


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND WATSON--


WATSON: And thus it befell. As we hid behind a pile of luggage at Canterbury, we saw the single carriage of the special go thundering past us. And so we made our way across country and at last reached Switzerland. It seemed we had eluded him.


MUSIC: UP AND THEN OUT BEHIND--


WATSON: To fill in every detail of the final scene is hardly possible, since there was no witness to it. Yet, from a certain source that I cannot yet divulge, I do know something of that last encounter. We wandered at our will through the lovely Valley of the Rhone and made our way, by way of Interlaken, to the little township of Meiringen among the Alps. The fatal Monday came and went -- and yet I was still aware of a strange febrile excitement in my companion. He was at times feverishly on the alert, then sinking into reverie, and would smile strangely to himself.


I went with him, on that last day of all, on a visit to the Falls of Reichenbach, forever hallowed and yet cursed in my memory. It's a fearful place, indeed, with the torrent plunging far below into a tremendous abyss, a chasm lined by coal-black glistening rock. High above, a pathway's been cut in the cliff face to afford a better view, but it ends abruptly in midair and the traveler has to return as he came. We stood there giddily marveling at the great spectacle -- and, on the instant, came a message for me by a village lad to say that an English lady back at the hotel was seriously ill and needed my immediate attention. I turned to go. I looked back, and I saw Holmes leaning against a rock with his arms folded, gazing down at the rush of the waters. It was the last that I saw of him.


SOUND: WATERFALL BACKGROUND ... FADES IN DURING ABOVE ... MORIARTY'S STEP ON THE PATHWAY


HOLMES: Is that you, Watson?! Back already?! (PAUSE, WITH QUIET SATISFACTION) Well! Moriarty. 


MORIARTY: (LOW, OMINOUS) Well, Sherlock Holmes. You see, I found you after all. And alone. 


HOLMES: Alone -- as, indeed, you must be, too, now that your confederates are all under lock and key; I heard from Scotland Yard. 


MORIARTY: I escaped. I was too clever for them, Holmes. 


HOLMES: I don't doubt it. But I'm afraid your occupation's gone, Professor, with your organization destroyed. Unless you care to return to your mathematics. 


MORIARTY: It was not my intention. I have another, more immediate, intention, Sherlock Holmes. Are you prepared? 


HOLMES: Well, before we discuss that, perhaps you'll extend me one small courtesy, Professor. 


MORIARTY: Most certainly. What is it? 


HOLMES: My friend Watson, Professor. No doubt, he will be somewhat concerned. Er, may I just take a moment to scribble a note to him? 


MORIARTY: Certainly. We can fix the paper beneath my Alpine-stock there, so that it does not blow away. Pray take as long as you wish.


HOLMES: That's very good of you. Please, don't stop talking, Professor. I mastered long ago the art of writing and conversing at the same time.


MORIARTY: Thank you. You know, of course, that the message to [?] Dr. Watson was a false one. 


HOLMES: Oh, yes, of course, I knew it at once. And that it could only come from one source.


MORIARTY: And yet you let him go? 


HOLMES: Yes, Professor, I let him go. I am not without some affection for him. I do not wish to put his life in danger, too. Besides--


MORIARTY: Besides? 


HOLMES: (CHUCKLE) I have looked forward for a long time to this final duel between us. 


MORIARTY: I believe it, Holmes. You're a very remarkable man. In many ways. Many, many ways, sir. I'm proud to have known you. 


HOLMES: Oh, and I you, Professor. There -- my letter's done then. Perhaps you'll be kind enough to place it as you suggested.


MORIARTY: Right.


HOLMES: Now -- how shall it be, Moriarty? 


MORIARTY: I did not bring a pistol, Holmes. 


HOLMES: Thank you. Your courtesy puts me to shame, Professor. (BEAT) Here is my pistol. It goes into the Falls.


MORIARTY: Hand to hand? 


HOLMES: Yes. Goodbye, Professor Moriarty. 


MORIARTY: Goodbye, Sherlock Holmes.


SOUND: WATERFALL BACKGROUND ... UP BIG TO FILL PAUSE ... THEN OUT WITH--


MUSIC: BRIDGE


WATSON: The end. The end. When I returned to that broken pathway, it was only too clear what had happened. It needed no great application of Holmes' own methods of deduction. Two sets of footsteps to the verge, and none returning. Locked in each other's arms as they fought, they had gone down to the abyss. Only the letter, the last greeting from my friend and comrade. "My dear, dear Watson," he wrote--


HOLMES: My dear, dear Watson, I scribble this through the courtesy of Professor Moriarty who awaits my convenience for the final discussion of those eternal questions which lie before us. There can be but one outcome -- although I fear that it is at a  cost which will give pain to my friends, and especially, my dear Watson, to you. I think, however, that I may go so far as to say that I have not lived entirely in vain. Pray tell Inspector Patterson that the papers which he needs for a full conviction of the Moriarty gang are in pigeonhole M. Before leaving England I made every disposition of my property and handed it over to my brother Mycroft. Pray give my affectionate greetings to Mrs. Watson and remember me as I used to be in our old days at Baker Street, pacing to and fro with my violin--


MUSIC: SOLO VIOLIN ... SNEAKS IN ... THEN IN BG


HOLMES: --and driving you to a point of sad distraction with that theme that you still were good enough to say you loved. Believe me to be, my very dear good fellow, yours most sincerely, Sherlock Holmes. 


WATSON: "--yours most sincerely, Sherlock Holmes." And so he perished, whom I shall ever regard as the best and wisest man that I have ever known.


MUSIC: SOLO VIOLIN ... UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes," based on the original stories of the late Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, dramatized anew by John Keir Cross, stars Sir John Gielgud as Sherlock Holmes, Sir Ralph Richardson as Dr. Watson, and today, Orson Welles as Professor Moriarty. Produced by Harry Alan Towers.


MUSIC: SOLO VIOLIN ... UNTIL END

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