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The Elopement

A Day in the Life of Dennis Day 

The Elopement

Feb 12 1949



CAST:

ANNOUNCER, Verne Smith

2ND ANNCR 

3RD ANNCR (1 line)

SINGER (1 line)

NBC ANNCR (1 line)


DENNIS DAY, tenor; not too bright 

MILDRED, Dennis' girlfriend

MOTHER, Mildred's imperious mother

FATHER, Mildred's henpecked father

CLERK, bored, working class tough guy

MAYOR




ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, Dennis Day! 


MUSIC: HARP GLISSANDO ... THEN INTO THEME ("EVERY SONG THAT I SING, I'LL SING TO YOU" BY AL RINKER, DENNIS DAY & FLOYD HUDDLESTON) ... ORCHESTRA ACCOMPANIES DENNIS--


DENNIS: (SINGS)

Every song that I sing, I'll sing to you

And I hope I can bring you a smile or two--


MUSIC: CONTINUES IN BG


ANNOUNCER: Dennis Day is brought to you by Palmolive Soap and Palmolive Shave Creams: Palmolive Soap, your beauty hope, and Palmolive Shave Creams for a smoother, more comfortable way to shave.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: THE DENNIS DAY SHOW -- with Barbara Eiler, Bea Benaderet, Dink Trout, Charles Dant and the Orchestra, and yours truly, Verne Smith -- is written by Frank Galen and stars ours popular young singer in "A Day in the Life of Dennis Day." 


MUSIC: ORCHESTRA PLAYS SONG INTRO ... THEN IN BG, ACCOMPANIES DENNIS--


ANNOUNCER: Here's Dennis to sing the new hit tune "Look Up." 


DENNIS: (SINGS)

Look up, look up, when everything's lookin' down. 

Whenever you're low, let everything go. Come out of that gloomy frown. 


Look up, look up, whenever those clouds are gray. 

It's gonna be fun whenever that sun starts chasin' those clouds away.


There's no room for Old Man Gloom, so shake him. You're bound to take him.

Just try a smile or two, but whatever you do


Look up, look up, don't ever give up the fight. 

When everything's wrong, it's never too long till everything turns out right! 

So whatever you do, look up. 


(INSTRUMENTAL INTERLUDE)


Look up, look up, don't ever give up the fight. 

When everything's wrong, it's never too long 

Till everything turns out right! So whatever you do, look up! 


MUSIC: SONG ENDS ... UP AND OUT


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: Three men out of every four get more comfortable, actually smoother shaves the Palmolive Brushless Shave Cream way. 


2ND ANNCR: Yes, three men out of every four get more comfortable, actually smoother shaves the Palmolive Brushless Shave Cream way. 


ANNOUNCER: This is not just a promise, not just a claim. Twelve hundred ninety-seven men tried the new, different Palmolive Brushless way to shave -- and no matter how they shaved before, seventy-nine percent found beards easier to cut; seventy-five percent got less razor pull; sixty-nine percent closer shaves; eighty-two percent smoother-feeling skin.


2ND ANNCR: And three men out of every four got more comfortable, actually smoother shaves. 


ANNOUNCER: But you be the judge. Try the new Palmolive Brushless way to shave. Just do this: Wash your face with soap and water. Rinse. Soak your face thoroughly again and apply Palmolive Brushless Shave Cream, smoothing it upward into your beard to get the full benefit of Palmolive Brushless Shave Cream's beard conditioning effect. Then shave.


2ND ANNCR: That's all. But remember: Palmolive Brushless Shave Cream offers you proof that three men out of every four get more comfortable, actually smoother shaves the Palmolive Brushless Shave Cream way.


MUSIC: TAG


ANNOUNCER: Well, today is Lincoln's Birthday, and the day after tomorrow is St. Valentine's Day. Ironic, isn't it? Only two days after the birthday of the man who freed so many men from slavery, comes the day that has led to the enslavement of so many men. ... But to the young in heart the romantic little billets-doux of St. Valentine's Day, with their tender declarations of love, remain a glorious tradition. And since they cost money, we find our young hero, Dennis Day, in the front room of the Anderson house busily making his own as his girlfriend Mildred enters. 


MILDRED: Oh, hi, Dennis. What are you doing--? (PLEASANTLY SURPRISED) Oh, my goodness, a valentine. 


DENNIS: Aw, gee, you weren't supposed to see it till you got it in the mail. 


MILDRED: Oh, but it's beautiful, Dennis. And so fancy. Where'd you get all that gorgeous lace? 


DENNIS: Well, it isn't exactly lace, Mildred. Your father gave me a pair of his old shorts. ... 


MILDRED: Oh, I see. Well, it's really very pretty. 


DENNIS: Oh, sure, and a little bit different, too. After all, how many girls get a valentine with Elastex Tops? ...


MILDRED: That's true. (CONCERNED) Are you--? Well, are you sending valentines to any other girls? Like Miss Baker, for instance?


DENNIS: Oh, gosh, no. That old spinster? 


MILDRED: Well, she has quite a crush on you, you know. She even named her cocker spaniel after you.


DENNIS: I know, and is it embarrassing! I've even stopped going into Olsen's grocery store on account of the way Mr. Olsen stares at me. 


MILDRED: Oh? Why should he stare at you?


DENNIS: Three times a week, Miss Baker calls him and tells him to send over a can of Strongheart for Dennis Day. ... 


MILDRED: Oh, my goodness.


DENNIS: Ah, but, Mildred, I wouldn't send anyone else a valentine anyway -- 'cause you're my one and only. 


MILDRED: Oh, Dennis, am I really? 


DENNIS: You know you are. Didn't I give you the secret handshake of the Captain Midnight Masked Marvel Club? ...


MILDRED: Yes. But, gee, this Valentine's Day makes four years we've been going steady. Don't you think it's time we talked about getting married? 


DENNIS: Married? But, Mildred, I haven't got a cent. 


MILDRED: Oh, does that really matter so much? All two people ever need is their love for each other.


DENNIS: No, Mildred, I made up my mind I wouldn't get married until I could give my wife expensive dresses, silk lingerie, and a mink coat -- all the things I never had. ...


MILDRED: But, Dennis, all I want is you. 


DENNIS: Well, you must have more ambition than that. ...


MILDRED: All right, I'll ask you. Will you marry me?


DENNIS: Well, yes. Are you really proposing to me? 


MILDRED: Why, of course. 


DENNIS: Well, shouldn't you be on your knee? ... 


MILDRED: Never mind. Will you marry me? Answer me.


DENNIS: Well, yes. 


MILDRED: Good.


DENNIS: Now how about a cooling-off period of, say, about five years? ... 


MILDRED: Oh, no -- we're gonna set the date as soon as we talk to my mother. 


DENNIS: Your mother? Does she have to know?


MILDRED: Well, naturally.


DENNIS: But couldn't we wait and tell her a little later -- say, after we had a child or two? ... 


MILDRED: Dennis, don't be silly. You've got to ask her for my hand. 


DENNIS: I know, but I got a feeling I'm gonna get hers. ... 


MILDRED: Nonsense. Now, come on, and don't forget, you're supposed to do the talking.


DENNIS: Oh, my gosh.


SOUND: DOOR OPENS

 

MILDRED: Oh, hi, Mother.


MOTHER: Oh, hello, Mildred; Dennis. 


MILDRED: Go ahead, Dennis. 


DENNIS: Yeah. I, er-- I wanted to talk to you about a little problem, Mrs. Anderson. Do you think that when two people are in love they should get married?


MOTHER: Why, I haven't any idea. It all depends on who the two people are. 


DENNIS: Well, say they're boy and a girl. ...


MOTHER: (DRY) Yes, they make the best married couples, all right. ... But, er, what's your point, if any? 


MILDRED: Well, it's this, Mother: Dennis and I love each other, we respect each other, and we want to get married. 


DENNIS: (HELPFULLY) Also to each other. ... 


MOTHER: (OUTRAGED) You mean you and this - this Dennis Day here? Mildred, you don't know what you're saying! 


MILDRED: Oh, yes, I do, Mother. I think Dennis is the sweetest boy in the whole world. 


DENNIS: That goes for me, too. ...


MOTHER: Maybe you are, but can you support a wife? Believe me, children, when bills come in the door, love flies out the window. 


DENNIS: Ah, not in our case. We won't be able to afford a place with windows for years. ... 


MOTHER: Dennis, listen to me. It's not that I'm mean or hardhearted, but I love my daughter and I want to see her happy -- and I know she couldn't be married to a man who couldn't provide for her properly.


MILDRED: Oh, but we could manage, Mother. After we get married, I could find a job. 


DENNIS: (DISAPPOINTED) Gee, and leave me home all alone? ... 


MOTHER: You hear, Mildred? This is the father you'd like to force on my grandchildren? 


MILDRED: But, Mother--


MOTHER: Not another word, Mildred. When this boy is earning enough to support a wife, come to me again -- and I promise you, I'll put the bridal veil on your old gray head myself. ... But until then, the answer is no, and that's final.


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES AS MOTHER EXITS


MILDRED: Oh, golly, Dennis, isn't that awful?


DENNIS: Yeah. Well, back to our old arrangement of holding hands illegally, I guess. ... 


MILDRED: Oh, it's just heartbreaking. Now it might be years before we--


SOUND: DOOR OPENS


DENNIS: Oh, hello, Mr. Anderson.


FATHER: Good morning, children. ... My gracious, what are you two so downhearted for?


MILDRED: Oh, we're so miserable, Daddy. Mother just refused Dennis permission to marry me.


FATHER: Oh, so that's it. Well, don't you let it worry you. 


[... dialogue missing ...]


MILDRED: I don't mean that, silly. I mean rush off to a Justice of the Peace. 


FATHER: And I know just the fella, about five miles out of town. All you need is two dollars and your birth certificate. 


MILDRED: Oh, mine's right upstairs.


DENNIS: And I guess I could get mine easily enough down at the Hall of Records.


MILDRED: Oh, golly, Dennis, get down there as fast as you can -- and when you come back, I'll have my things packed and we're off to that Justice of the Peace! 


DENNIS: Okay. But before we take this step, Mildred -- a step that will change our whole lives -- I - I think there's something you should know.


MILDRED: Why, Dennis -- what?


FATHER: It's okay, son -- I'll lend you the two dollars.


DENNIS: That's it. ...


MUSIC: BRIDGE ... WITH A WRY "WEDDING MARCH" QUOTE


CLERK: (QUIET) All right, next please. 


DENNIS: Uh, pardon me, sir, is this the place where you get birth certificates? 


CLERK: Say, buddy -- read that sign at my elbow there. What's it say? 


DENNIS: It says, "Birth certificates obtained here." 


CLERK: (LOUD) Good boy! ... Now just tell me which words are botherin' ya; I'll be glad to explain 'em. ... 


DENNIS: No, I guess this is the place. I'd like a copy of a birth certificate. The name is Dennis Day. 


CLERK: Day, huh? Just a second, let's see. (CHECKS FILE) "Daly, Dalton--" Here we are -- "Dennis Day." Yeah. "Born September 12th, 1926," right? "Died February 2nd, 1949." ... 


DENNIS: Pardon me, what was that last item? 


CLERK: Died February 2nd, 1949. Isn't that right? 


DENNIS: Oh, I doubt it. Offhand I don't remember what I did that day, but I'm sure it wasn't anything like that. ... 


CLERK: How's that again?


DENNIS: You see, I'm Dennis Day.


CLERK: Yeah? Well, don't tell me about it. Go see a representative of Forest Lawn. ...


DENNIS: But I'm - I'm alive, honest I am! Here, watch -- I'll breathe for ya. (BREATHES) ...


CLERK: Look, mister, I don't know what you're talkin' about, but I got a death certificate for Dennis Day and death certificates never lie.


DENNIS: But I tell you, I'm Dennis Day!


CLERK: Born September 12th, 1926?! 


DENNIS: Yeah. 


CLERK: Father's name, Patrick; mother's, Molly?! 


DENNIS: Yeah, yeah, that's right. 


CLERK: (QUIET) Lie down, bud. ... 


DENNIS: But I'm alive, I tell ya! 


CLERK: You're gonna argue with the city records? You - are - dead! ...


DENNIS: But look at me. Do I look like I'm dead? 


CLERK: Well, they made some great strides in embalmin' the past few years. ... 


DENNIS: Aw, please, be reasonable, mister.


CLERK: Now, look -- all I know is what it says in the records. If you are Dennis Day, you're dead


DENNIS: But, mister--


CLERK: Hey, will you stop? You were hit by a beer truck on the corner of Third and Elm on February 2nd and killed! Now beat it. I have enough trouble with live people without botherin' with your type. ... 


DENNIS: (DISMAYED, TO HIMSELF) Oh, my gosh. What Mrs. Anderson always said about me from the neck up has come true all over. ...


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS


MILDRED: Oh, hi, Dennis! Did you pick up your birth certificate?


DENNIS: Mildred, I'm afraid we'll have to call off our marriage.


MILDRED: But, Dennis, why?


DENNIS: Well, in the first place, according to the records, you might find me a little cold. ... 


MILDRED: What?


DENNIS: And in the second place, how would it look going on a honeymoon with my own widow? ...


MILDRED: What on Earth are you talking about? 


DENNIS: Our marriage. It just won't work, that's all. Imagine hearing the Justice of Peace saying, "I now pronounce you stiff and wife." ... 


MILDRED: Dennis, are you feeling all right?


DENNIS: Oh, sure. Wonderful -- considering the condition I'm in. ... 


MILDRED: What condition are you in? 


DENNIS: I'm dead. ... 


MILDRED: You're what?


DENNIS: It's true, Mildred. My corpus has the delicti-ed. [PRONOUNCED "dee-LICK-tide"] ... 


MILDRED: (ADMONISHES) Dennis Day! 


DENNIS: (QUIETLY MELODRAMATIC) I was so young, Mildred. Why did I have to go? Why? ... 


MILDRED: Dennis, will you please calm down and explain what this is all about? 


DENNIS: According to the City Hall records, I died a couple of weeks ago. I was hit by a beer truck at the corner of Third and Elm.


MILDRED: (EXHALES SHARPLY) But that's ridiculous. You're not dead.


DENNIS: You don't think so? ...


MILDRED: Well, you hear me talking to you, don't you? And feel me touching you? 


DENNIS: Yeah. Gee, you must be dead, too. ... 


MILDRED: Neither of us are. They've made some sort of mistake in the records and we're going down there and get it straightened out -- if we have to see the mayor himself.


DENNIS: We are?


MILDRED: Well, of course we are. 


DENNIS: Okay, but I was just thinking. This is quite a choice to have to make.


MILDRED: Choice? 


DENNIS: Well, sure. Change the records and marry you, or leave them as they are and never have to pay any income tax. ... All right, I'm going; don't push, don't push. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE


MILDRED: Thank you very much for seeing us, Mr. Mayor.


MAYOR: Well, I'm a very busy man, but my secretary said it was an emergency. Now just what seems to be the trouble? 


DENNIS: Well, Your Honor, I'm alive and healthy, and everybody's trying to tell me I'm dead.


MAYOR: My, my. Same thing that Harry Truman has just been through, huh? ... 


MILDRED: Oh, no, sir. We mean really dead.


MAYOR: You mean actually deceased? 


DENNIS: Sure. I died February 2nd. 


MAYOR: You did? 


DENNIS: Yes, sir. 


MAYOR: (STERN) Do you realize you're violating a city ordinance? ... Should have been buried a week ago! ... 


DENNIS: No, no. Actually I'm alive, but your records show I was standing on the corner of Third and Elm when all of a sudden a truck full of beer hit me.


MAYOR: Are you sure it didn't and you had your mouth open? ... 


DENNIS: Oh, no, sir.


MILDRED: It's just according to your records that he's dead, Mr. Mayor, and - and something's got to be done about it. 


DENNIS: Well, sure, Your Honor. Gosh, if I claim to be dead now, when I really do die, who will believe me? ...


MAYOR: By George, you've got something there, my boy. And I can't wait till you get it out of here. ...


MILDRED: It's nothing to joke about, Mr. Mayor.


DENNIS: No. Here I am actually alive and legally dead. There must be some way out of this mess. 


MAYOR: Well, I can think of one. I'll pay for the gun, if you like. ...


DENNIS: Oh, no, that's too drastic. 


MAYOR: Very well, I'll look into the case immediately. You, er, said your name was Day, I believe? 


DENNIS: Yes, sir. Dennis Day.


MAYOR: Oh, yes, yes. The name comes back to me now. Your death certificate was filed on February 2nd, the day before our last city election. And believe me, your vote came in mighty handy. ... 


DENNIS: Huh?


MAYOR: Oh, nothing, nothing -- just reminiscing. Suppose you have a seat in the anteroom, my boy. I'll get right to work on your case. 


DENNIS: Oh, thank you, Your Honor.


MILDRED: Yes, thanks, Mr. Mayor. I'll run home and wait for you, Dennis. 


DENNIS: Okay, Mildred. And if they don't find out I'm alive-- Well, just remember we all have to go sometime. ...


MUSIC: BRIDGE 


MOTHER: My gracious, do you realize it's almost six, Herbert? Where can Dennis and Mildred be? They're never home this late. 


FATHER: (WITH A TWINKLE) Oh, we'll probably be hearing from them soon, Passion Puss. ...


MOTHER: (SUSPICIOUS) Herbert?


FATHER: Huh? 


MOTHER: I can tell from your expression you think you've put something over on me. 


FATHER: Me, Poopsie-girl? 


MOTHER: Yes, you. The last time you looked like this was when I forced you to take that medicine to build you up -- and it turned out to be sixty percent alcohol. ... 


FATHER: Well, I guess it can't do any harm to tell you, dear. Dennis and Mildred are probably married by now. 


MOTHER: (HORRIFIED) Married?! Did you say married?!


FATHER: (YES) Mm hm. They eloped. 


MOTHER: (HYSTERICAL) What?! Why, they can't do that. I'll stop them! I'll have them jailed! I'll-- I--


FATHER: Careful, lover. You know what happens when you get excited in a new corset. Something's sure to give. ... 


MOTHER: But my own daughter! Deliberately disobeying me like that! How could she run off and--?!


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS


MILDRED: (WEARY AND A LITTLE SAD) Hi, Mother; Daddy. 


MOTHER: Mildred, where is he?! Where is that husband of yours?! 


MILDRED: Oh, we're not married, Mother. Dennis ran into a snag down at the Hall of Records. 


MOTHER: Thank heavens. To think you could plan such a thing! Especially when you know it's what I did -- and you have an example of what I wound up with right in front of you! ...


MILDRED: But, Mother, I-- 


MOTHER: (INTERRUPTS, QUIETLY STERN) Not another word out of you. Get up to your room this minute. 


MILDRED: Mother, all I--


MOTHER: (INTERRUPTS) I said go up to your room and don't you stir from it.


MILDRED: (RELUCTANT OBEDIENCE) Yes, Mother. 


SOUND: INNER DOOR CLOSES AS MILDRED EXITS


MOTHER: (QUIETLY FURIOUS) If I had my hands on that Dennis Day now, I'd take him apart. I'd find out what fills all that space between his sinus and his skull. ... Where did Mildred say he was? 


FATHER: The Hall of Records. 


MOTHER: Give me that phone.


SOUND: RECEIVER UP ... PHONE DIALED BEHIND--


FATHER: Poopsie, now don't say anything rash, will you? No, I couldn't bear seeing you only on visiting days. 


MOTHER: Don't be silly. I'm just going to tell him if he ever comes near this house again, I'll-- (INTO PHONE) Hello? Hall of Records? I'm trying to locate a boy named Dennis Day. Do you have--? (PAUSE, SHAKEN) Huh? He what? (PAUSE) But - but-- But he can't be. (PAUSE) Huh? A beer truck? ... (SORROWFUL EXCLAMATION) You're sure? (PAUSE, TEARFUL) Yes, sir. Thank you.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN 


MOTHER: (GASPS, SOBS, TEARFUL) Herbert!


FATHER: Poopsie, what is it? 


MOTHER: It's Dennis. He was hit by a beer truck! 


FATHER: Good heavens, you don't mean that he--?


MOTHER: (TEARFULLY MELODRAMATIC) Yes. That poor little boy! He probably threw himself underneath it. And it's all my fault! Ohhhh, why didn't that beer truck run over me instead of him?!


FATHER: (ALSO TEARFUL) Yes, you probably wouldn't have even been hurt! ...


MOTHER: Oh, I can't bear the thought of telling Mildred. And when I think of the things I've said about him! I used to call him dopey. He wasn't really dopey.


FATHER: No, indeed. He wasn't dopey. (STRUGGLES TO FIND RIGHT WORD) He was just-- Well, he was-- That is--


MOTHER: That's right! 


FATHER: (GIVES UP) Yeah. ...


MOTHER: He was only a little-- Well, I mean, sort of a trifle-- (BIG SOB, BLURTS IT OUT TEARFULLY) Oh, that poor dopey boy! ... I'll be right back, Herbert, I need my smelling salts, and then we'll tell Mildred together.


FATHER: Yes, dear. Meanwhile, I'll call the hospital and see if that's where they brought him.


MOTHER: All right.


SOUND: DURING FATHER'S LINE ABOVE, RECEIVER UP AND PHONE DIALED ... INNER DOOR CLOSES AS MOTHER EXITS


FATHER: (INTO PHONE) Hello? General Hospital? Did they bring in a boy named Dennis Day? --- Yeah, he was run over by a beer truck.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS


FATHER: (INTO PHONE) Well, he was about--


DENNIS: Oh, hi, Mr. Anderson.


FATHER: Oh, hello, Dennis; be with you in a minute. (INTO PHONE) He was about-- ... He was about twenty-two, dark hair and brown eyes, and his name was De-- (DOUBLE TAKE) Er-- Uhhh--


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


FATHER: (STUNNED) Dennis, is that really you? In the flesh? 


DENNIS: Oh, sure. And bones and everything. ... 


FATHER: But I thought you were--! I mean, down at the City Hall they said that--!


DENNIS: Oh, that was just a mistake in the records. It's all fixed now. It seems the beer truck ran over Miss Baker's cocker spaniel whose name was also Dennis Day. ... And they thought it was me, although we didn't look anything alike. ... 


FATHER: You mean to say they confused you and a dog? 


DENNIS: I don't particularly care for the way you put it, but that's what happened. ... 


FATHER: Oh, what a relief. And poor Poopsie's conscience has been bothering her so. (INSPIRED) Wait a minute! 


DENNIS: Huh?


FATHER: Oh, I hate myself when I get fascinating ideas like this. ... But Poopsie's been pretty mean to you. She should be taught a good lesson. 


DENNIS: You - you mean--?


FATHER: Yes, yes. Now quick -- I think I hear her coming. Hide behind that curtain and we'll hand her a little surprise. 


DENNIS: (MOVING OFF, HUSHED) Yeah.


SOUND: INNER DOOR OPENS AS MOTHER ENTERS


MOTHER: (MOURNFUL) Well? Did the hospital have any news, Herbert? 


FATHER: Er, no, dear. I don't know where they took him. Are you all right now? I mean, is it--? Is it still bothering you? 


MOTHER: No, I took it off. ...


FATHER: I don't mean that; I mean your conscience. Er, you don't think he might come back and haunt you, do you? 


MOTHER: Why, don't be fantastic! You know I don't believe in ghos--


DENNIS: (MOANS SPOOKILY) ...


MOTHER: What was that?


FATHER: What was what?


MOTHER: That voice. It-- (SCARED) Herbert! Look! There, in front of the curtain!


FATHER: Where? 


DENNIS: (GHOSTLY) He can't see me, Mrs. Anderson, and he can't hear what I'm saying either, can you, Mr. Anderson? 


FATHER: No, not a word. ... Poopsie dear, what is it? You look as though you're seeing a ghost. 


MOTHER: (UNNERVED) I-- I think I am!


DENNIS: (GHOSTLY) Yes, ma'am. Excuse my civilian clothes; they haven't issued me my sheet yet. ...


MOTHER: Oh, Dennis! Dennis, please forgive me! In spite of the way I treated you on Earth, I always loved you -- truly I did.


DENNIS: (GHOSTLY) Now she tells me. ... 


MOTHER: Dennis, are you--? Are you going to haunt me? 


DENNIS: (GHOSTLY) Yes. From the moment you get up in the morning until you go to sleep at night.


MOTHER: Oh, but - but that's terrifying!


DENNIS: (GHOSTLY) I know, but we ghosts can take it. ... 


MOTHER: No, please. Please forgive me. I shouldn't have refused to let you marry Mildred. Oh, if only I had it to do over again, I'd love you for my son-in-law! I'd gladly do anything--!


SOUND: INNER DOOR OPENS AS MILDRED ENTERS


MILDRED: Mother, I-- Oh, hello, Dennis.


DENNIS: Hello. 


MOTHER: Mildred? You can see him, too? 


MILDRED: What? Well, why shouldn't I be able to see him? He's standing right there. 


MOTHER: Yes, but he's-- (HER OLD IMPERIOUS SELF) Wait a minute! ... 


DENNIS: (NERVOUS) Boy, I'm beginning to wish I was. ...


MOTHER: (FURIOUS) So! A trick! You are alive! You're no more dead than usual! ... Why, you--! You--!


DENNIS: (QUICKLY) Wait, Mrs. Anderson! You really love me, remember? You just said yourself you wanted me for your son-in-law. 


MOTHER: I was under the influence of spirits. ... Come here, you. I'll teach you to elope with my daughter and play tricks on me! 


DENNIS: See me at the corner of Third and Elm; I'm off to look for a beer truck! ...


MUSIC: CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


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ANNOUNCER: Get Palmolive Soap right away to help win a lovelier complexion and try for your share of the one hundred thousand dollars in cash prizes.


MUSIC: ORCHESTRA PLAYS INTRO TO 1948 SONG "FAR AWAY PLACES" BY ALEX KRAMER AND JOAN WHITNEY ... THEN IN BG, ACCOMPANIES DENNIS--


2ND ANNCR: With the music of Charles Dant and the Orchestra, here's Dennis to sing the lovely ballad "Far Away Places." 


DENNIS: (SINGS)

Far away places with strange-soundin' names, far away over the sea.

Those far away places with the strange-soundin' names are callin', callin' me.


Goin' to China or maybe Siam, I want to see for myself

Those far away places I've been reading about in a book that I took from a shelf.


I start getting restless whenever I hear the whistle of a train.

I pray for the day I can get underway and look for those castles in Spain.


They call me a dreamer. Well, maybe I am, but I know that I'm burning to see

Those far away places with the strange-soundin' names callin', callin' me.


MUSIC: SONG ENDS


SOUND: APPLAUSE ... OUT BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


DENNIS: Goodnight, everybody!


ANNOUNCER: Next week, tune into another DENNIS DAY SHOW, brought to you by Palmolive Soap, your beauty hope, and Palmolive Shave Creams for a smoother, more comfortable way to shave.


MUSIC: THEME FILLS PAUSE ... THEN FADES OUT FOR--


3RD ANNCR: Tonight, show him how much lovelier your hair can look after a Lustre-Creme shampoo. Only Lustre-Creme brings you Kay Daumit's magic blend; glamorizes your hair as you wash it. Yes, tonight you can be a--


MUSIC: FOR JINGLE ... ACCOMPANIES SINGER--


SINGER: (TO TUNE OF VICTOR HERBERT'S "TOYLAND")

Dream Girl, Dream Girl,

Beautiful Lustre-Creme Girl.

You owe your crowning glory to--

A Lustre-Creme shampoo.


MUSIC: JINGLE ENDS ... ORCHESTRA PLAYS LIVELY TAG ... THEN OUT BEHIND--


ANNOUNCER: If you want to own your own home or business, send your children through college, or have financial security when you retire, keep this in mind: you can make your dreams come true by buying U. S. Savings Bonds, for when your bonds mature you'll get four dollars for every three you invest. So use the Payroll Savings Plan where you work or, if you're your own boss, use the Bond-a-Month plan where you bank. You'll find that automatic savings is sure savings. 


Listen again next week for Colgate's Hour of Fun: Judy Canova followed by Dennis Day. And for another great comedy program, hear BLONDIE next Wednesday evening over your favorite NBC station. And for a wonderful story and color photo of your favorite singing star, Dennis Day, get the current issue of Radio Stars and Television Magazine now on the newsstands. This is Verne Smith speaking. Goodnight!


SOUND: APPLAUSE 


MUSIC: FOR CLOSING 


SOUND &

MUSIC: FADES OUT QUICKLY


NBC ANNCR: This is NBC, the National Broadcasting Company.


MUSIC: NBC CHIMES

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