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The 39 Steps

Studio One

The 39 Steps

Mar 23 1948 



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

HOST


RICHARD HANNAY, Canadian; good-humored

ANNABELLA, Continental; exotic, mysterious

PAMELA, English; prim and uptight

MR. MEMORY

HOBBS, smooth-talking henchman


At the Music Hall

SINGER, female

COMPÈRE

WOMAN

1ST MAN

2ND MAN

3RD MAN

4TH MAN

OLD MAN

and a CROWD


En Route to Alt-na-Shellach

MILKMAN, working class Londoner

SALESMAN, middle class Londoner

CONDUCTOR

OFFICER

1ST POLICE

2ND POLICE

CROFTER, an old, greedy, irascible, closed-minded Scot

ANNIE, the crofter's young repressed wife from Glasgow


In and Around Alt-na-Shellach

PROFESSOR, English; very smooth

SHERIFF, Scottish

INSPECTOR, Scottish

DRIVER

WIFE, of innkeeper; Scottish

INNKEEPER, Scottish


In London

COMMISSIONER, at Scotland Yard

2ND SINGER, female

2ND COMPÈRE

HENRY, of the police

2ND CONDUCTOR

and another CROWD




ANNOUNCER: Tonight, Mr. Glenn Ford stars in "The 39 Steps" from Studio One at CBS. 


MUSIC: MAJESTIC FANFARE ... THEN IN BG


HANNAY: (SAVAGELY OMINOUS) You're a woman, and you're defenseless, and you're alone on the desolate moor in the dark, handcuffed to a murderer who'd stop at nothing to get you off his hands. If that's the situation you enjoy, my lovely, have it and welcome! 


MUSIC: UP FOR THEME ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: We invite you to STUDIO ONE, radio's celebrated playhouse of dramatic entertainment, featuring the world's great stories, novels, and plays -- in special versions for listening. And now to introduce tonight's great story, here is the director of STUDIO ONE, Fletcher Markle. 


HOST: Tonight we present you with a tall and shamelessly exciting story by that wizard among authors of mystery adventure, the late John Buchan. With "The 39 Steps," we offer you spies and secrets and high doings in England and Scotland. Romantic interests aren't going to be neglected either: there are at least two mysterious ladies to be heard from, whose charm is equaled only by the trouble in which they get themselves and a certain young man involved. In our story, that young man is a personable Canadian named Richard Hannay, and tonight we have with us in Studio One another personable and very talented Canadian to bring Richard Hannay to life for you -- Mr. Glenn Ford. With Mr. Ford you'll be hearing Cathleen Cordell as Pamela, Mercedes McCambridge as Annabella, and Miriam Wolfe as Annie -- with Everett Sloane and John Stanley contributing the largest share of many villainies. "The 39 Steps" by John Buchan. Please to begin.


MUSIC: EXCITING, FOREBODING INTRODUCTION ... CHANGES TO ACCOMPANIMENT OF WOMAN SINGER WHO WARBLES A MUSIC HALL DITTY, IN BG


SOUND: MUSIC HALL AUDIENCE BUSTLES AND MURMURS


HANNAY: (FRIENDLY) Is this seat taken? 


ANNABELLA: (UNEASY) No. No, I don't think so.


HANNAY: Well, would you mind moving your coat? 


ANNABELLA: Oh, I'm sorry. 


HANNAY: That's quite all right. 


ANNABELLA: (BEAT) There you are.


HANNAY: Thanks.


MUSIC: SONG ENDS


SOUND: CROWD CHEERS AND APPLAUDS ... THEN MURMURS IN BG


HANNAY: Ah, she was rather good, wasn't she?


ANNABELLA: (DISTRACTED) I beg your pardon?


HANNAY: I said she was rather good.


ANNABELLA: Oh, yes. She was.


HANNAY: Was that the first turn? 


ANNABELLA: No, no -- that must have been the third or fourth.


HANNAY: I understand that this is the best music hall in London.


ANNABELLA: Yes, it is. Haven't you ever been here before? 


HANNAY: No, I just arrived from Canada a few days ago.


ANNABELLA: Oh.


MUSIC: ORCHESTRA PLAYS DRUM ROLL AND MR. MEMORY'S FANFARE


HANNAY: You know, I don't usually like music hall entertainment--


ANNABELLA: (INTERRUPTS, A LITTLE ANXIOUS) Would you please be quiet? I want to hear the next act.


HANNAY: Oh, I beg your pardon.


SOUND: THE VOICES OF THE COMPÈRE AND MR. MEMORY ARE HEARD FROM THE STAGE ... OTHER VOICES ARE SCATTERED THROUGH THE AUDIENCE, WITH HANNAY AND ANNABELLA CLOSEST TO THE MIKE


COMPÈRE: Ladies and gentlemen, with your kind attention and permission, I have the honor of presenting to you one of the most remarkable men in the world. Every day he commits to memory fifty new facts -- and remembers every one of them! Facts from history, facts from geography, facts from newspapers, from scientific books -- millions and millions of them! Think of the strain involved by his prodigious feat!


WOMAN: (HECKLING) His feet ain't half as big as yours, cully!


SOUND: CROWD LAUGHS AND JEERS


COMPÈRE: (ANNOYED) I'm referring to his feats of memory.


WOMAN: (JEERINGLY) Ohhhhhhh.


COMPÈRE: But test him, ladies and gentlemen. Ask him your questions and he'll answer, fully and freely. Mr. Memory!


SOUND: CROWD CHEERS AND APPLAUDS


MEMORY: Thank you. Thank you. A question, please. Ladies first.


WOMAN: Where's me old man been since last Saturday?


1ST MAN: On the booze!


2ND MAN: Out with a good looker!


SOUND: CROWD LAUGHS


MEMORY: Um, a serious question, please.


3RD MAN: What won the Derby in Nineteen Twenty-One?!


MEMORY: (MECHANICALLY) Mr. Jack Jool's Humorist with Steve Donoghue up. Won by a length; odds six to one. Second and third: Craig-an-Eran and Lemonora. Am I right, sir?


3RD MAN: Right!


4TH MAN: Who was the last British heavyweight champion of the world?


WOMAN: Henry the Eighth!


1ST MAN: My old woman!


SOUND: CROWD LAUGHS


MEMORY: (MECHANICALLY) It was Bob Fitzsimmons. He defeated Jim Corbett, heavyweight champion of America at Carson City, Nevada, in October, Eighteen Ninety-Seven. He was then thirty-four years of age. Am I right, sir?


4TH MAN: Right!


SOUND: CROWD REACTS FAVORABLY BEHIND HANNAY--


HANNAY: (TO ANNABELLA) You know, I think I'm going to ask him a question. 


ANNABELLA: (AMUSED) Why tell me about it?


MEMORY: Another question, please.


HANNAY: (UP, TO MEMORY) How far is Winnipeg from Montreal?!


MEMORY: (GRACIOUS) Ah! A gentleman from Canada. You are welcome here, sir. 


SOUND: CROWD APPLAUDS AND MURMURS, POLITE AND WARM


MEMORY: (MECHANICALLY) Winnipeg, the third city of Canada and capital of the province of Manitoba. Distance from Montreal: one thousand four hundred and twenty-four miles. Am I right, sir?


HANNAY: Quite right.


SOUND: LOUD GUNSHOT! ... SCREAMS! ... CROWD PANICS, MURMURS, RUNS, ET CETERA ... IN BG


ANNABELLA: (AGITATED) Get up! I've got to get out of here!


HANNAY: Come on, I'll help you.


ANNABELLA: Please, please, I've got to get out. 


HANNAY: Well, take my hand.


ANNABELLA: Will you get out of my way? 


HANNAY: (INSISTS) Take my hand and let me clear the way for you.


ANNABELLA: Thank you.


HANNAY: (RAPIDLY, TO CROWD) Out of the way. Coming through. Give us room! Coming through! Lady coming through! (BEAT, TO ANNABELLA) There's the door.


ANNABELLA: Hurry! Hurry, please!


HANNAY: Coming through!


OLD MAN: Hey, who do you think you're shoving, you?


HANNAY: There's a lady coming through.


SOUND: HANNAY AND ANNABELLA REACH THE STREET ... CROWD DISPERSES ... CITY TRAFFIC BACKGROUND


HANNAY: There we are.


ANNABELLA: (RELIEVED) Thank you. Thank you very much.


HANNAY: Don't mention it. I wanted to get out myself. 


ANNABELLA: (BEAT, A LITTLE DESPERATE) May I come home with you? 


HANNAY: What? What? (LIGHTLY) Did my ears deceive me or did you say, "May I come home with you?"?


ANNABELLA: Yes, please.


HANNAY: It sounds like a very excellent idea, but what is the idea? 


ANNABELLA: Don't ask questions; just take me home. I'll tell you when we get there.


SOUND: BUS PULLS UP


HANNAY: Well, if that's what you want. Come on, there's a bus. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: KEY IN LOCK ... APARTMENT DOOR UNLOCKS AND OPENS


HANNAY: Well, here you are. I'll turn on the light. 


ANNABELLA: (QUICKLY) Not yet! 


HANNAY: Why? What's the matter? 


ANNABELLA: Here. Let me turn this chair.


SOUND: HEAVY CHAIR TURNED AROUND


ANNABELLA: Now-- You can turn on the light.


SOUND: CLICK! OF LIGHT SWITCH


HANNAY: What's this all about?


SOUND: APARTMENT DOOR CLOSES 


ANNABELLA: Would you mind turning that mirror, face to the wall?


HANNAY: Afraid somebody outside might see you? 


ANNABELLA: Exactly.


HANNAY: (CHUCKLES) Oh, now, you know, I haven't that bad a reputation. 


ANNABELLA: I'm not worried about your reputation. Please! 


HANNAY: Well-- (CHUCKLES) All right, all right. You know, you don't have to go out looking for adventure. No, you carry it with you, like a child playing alone. Oh, by the way, my name is Hannay. Am I allowed to know yours? 


ANNABELLA: (BEAT, UNCONVINCING) Smith. 


HANNAY: Hm? Oh. (UNCONVINCED) Yes, all right. Here, I'll take your coat.


ANNABELLA: Thank you. (BEAT) Do you want to know more about me? What do you think I do for a living? 


HANNAY: Actress?


ANNABELLA: Not in the way you mean.


HANNAY: Hmm. Chorus? 


ANNABELLA: (MILDLY OFFENDED) Er, no. 


HANNAY: Sorry. Out for adventure? 


ANNABELLA: That's right.


HANNAY: That's interesting.


SOUND: PHONE RINGS


ANNABELLA: (NERVOUS) Don't answer that telephone.


HANNAY: Why not?


ANNABELLA: Because I think it's for me.


HANNAY: Well-- Now, listen, now--


SOUND: PHONE RINGS


ANNABELLA: Please don't answer it.


HANNAY: All right. I'll string along. 


SOUND: PHONE RINGS TWICE, THEN STOPS


ANNABELLA: (BEAT, SLOWLY) I guess I owe you an explanation. 


HANNAY: Well, I was hoping we'd get around to that. I suppose your name isn't really Smith.


ANNABELLA: It depends on where I am. You may call me Annabella. 


HANNAY: Oh. Annabella Smith, eh? A clergyman's daughter, I suppose. Hey, what makes you so nervous? Bothered by the shot in the theater? 


ANNABELLA: That shot - was fired at me. There were two men in that theater who wanted to kill me.


HANNAY: Oh, now, you really should be more careful about choosing your gentleman friends.


ANNABELLA: No, no, you don't understand.


HANNAY: Well, you don't make it very easy for me, now, do you? A beautiful and mysterious woman pursued by gunmen? Sounds like a spy story. 


ANNABELLA: (BEAT) That's exactly what it is.


HANNAY: You're a spy? 


ANNABELLA: I prefer the word "agent." 


HANNAY: For what country?


ANNABELLA: For any country that pays me. 


HANNAY: I suppose you've come here to dig up some great big state secret, eh?


ANNABELLA: No. As a matter of fact, I'm here to save a secret from being dug up. A very important secret of this country. Not because I love England, but because it will pay me better that way.


HANNAY: (DRY) Thank you, on behalf of the British Empire. 


ANNABELLA: No, this is serious. A very clever agent of "a certain foreign power" is on the point of obtaining a secret vital to your air ministry. I tracked two of his men to that music hall. Unfortunately, they recognized me. That's why they're after me now. 


HANNAY: (SKEPTICAL) Have you ever heard of a thing called, uh, persecution mania?


ANNABELLA: You don't believe me? 


HANNAY: Frankly, I don't. 


ANNABELLA: Go and look down into the street, then.


HANNAY: What?


ANNABELLA: Go to the window; look down into the street. You will probably see two men lounging around opposite the entrance to this building. 


HANNAY: Well-- All right, I'll take a look. (MOVING OFF) Might as well give you a chance to prove your preposterous theory. (BEAT, OFF) Oh. You win. 


ANNABELLA: They're there? 


HANNAY: (RETURNS) Yes. They're there. 


ANNABELLA: (DISAPPOINTED) I'd hoped I'd shaken them off. (BEAT, REACHES A DECISION) I'm going to tell you something which isn't very healthy for you to know. But now that they've followed me here, you're in this just as much as I am.


HANNAY: How do you mean? 


ANNABELLA: Have you ever heard of the Thirty-Nine Steps? 


HANNAY: What's that, a pub?


ANNABELLA: Never mind. The important thing is that a state secret will be taken from this country unless I stop those men.


HANNAY: Well, why don't you phone the police or something?


ANNABELLA: Because they wouldn't believe me any more than you did. And if they did, how long do you think it would take them to get going? Oh, no, these men act quickly. And you don't know how clever their chief is. He's clever -- and ruthless.


HANNAY: Well, who is he? What's his name?


ANNABELLA: He has a dozen names and he can look like a hundred people. But there's one thing he can't disguise. Part of his little finger on the left hand is missing. And if ever you should meet such a man, be very careful, my friend. 


HANNAY: I'll remember. Meanwhile, what are you going to do? 


ANNABELLA: May I stay here?


HANNAY: Well, you're welcome to my bed here. I'll catch a nap on the couch. 


ANNABELLA: Thank you. 


HANNAY: Now, see here. I'm going to lock you in the bedroom. 


ANNABELLA: No, there's no need of that. 


HANNAY: (INSISTS) Oh, yes. After all, if your story is true, your safety is pretty important to England. I'm going to lock you in the bedroom. Then if those men force their way into the apartment, they'll have to deal with me and they won't be able to get you.


ANNABELLA: (REASSURED, WEARY) Thank you, Mr. Hannay. And I'm very tired. Do you think it would be all right if I went to the bedroom now?


HANNAY: (CAUTIOUS) Don't get up. Stay in that chair till I switch off the lights. 


ANNABELLA: (CHUCKLES, AMUSED) Well, you've certainly changed since you came in here, Mr. Hannay.


MUSIC: GRIMLY FOREBODING ... FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


HANNAY: (SNORES)


ANNABELLA: (TERRIFIED, FROM BEHIND DOOR) Help! Help me!


SOUND: ANNABELLA POUNDS DESPERATELY ON THE BEDROOM DOOR ... CONTINUES IN BG


HANNAY: (STARTLED AWAKE) What's that?


ANNABELLA: (BEHIND DOOR) Help! Help! (MOANS, IN BG)


MUSIC: GENTLY OUT BEHIND--


HANNAY: (PUZZLED, TO HIMSELF) Annabella? (REALIZES) Annabella! (CALLS) I'm - I'm coming!


SOUND: HANNAY RISES AND RUNS TO THE BEDROOM DOOR ... ANNABELLA STOPS POUNDING AS HANNAY UNLOCKS AND OPENS DOOR


ANNABELLA: (WEAK, DYING) Mr. Hannay? 


HANNAY: Annabella--?


ANNABELLA: Mr. Hannay--?


HANNAY: You're hurt. Here, let me help you to the bed.


ANNABELLA: No. There's no time. Just hold me. They - they came in by the window. They couldn't open the door to get to you. (GASPS) But you're next.


HANNAY: Now, see here, stop talking; you're too weak to talk. 


ANNABELLA: (WITH DIFFICULTY) No, no -- listen. Hold me. I must tell you. Man in Scotland. In Alt-na-Shellach-- Alt-na-Shellach-- Go to him and tell him--


HANNAY: Who is he? What's his name? 


ANNABELLA: His--


HANNAY: His name? His name, Annabella? 


ANNABELLA: His name-- (DYING BREATHS) 


SOUND: PHONE RINGS TWICE ... RECEIVER UP ... HOBBS' VOICE ON FILTER


HANNAY: Hello? 


HOBBS: Mr. Hannay? 


HANNAY: Yes. 


HOBBS: Is Annabella dead?


HANNAY: Who is this? 


HOBBS: Never mind. Is Annabella dead?


HANNAY: Yes. You did your work well. But you won't get away with it.


HOBBS: Have you called the police?


HANNAY: You and I both know that the police would only arrest me. 


HOBBS: (CHUCKLES) Yes. But I'd advise you to call them. If you come out without the police, we will kill you, Hannay.


SOUND: PHONE DISCONNECTS (HANNAY'S PERSPECTIVE)


MUSIC: BRIDGE ... VERY GRIM, THEN SEGUES TO BRIGHT AND CHEERFUL TO INDICATE EARLY MORNING


SOUND: CLATTER OF MILK BOTTLES AS MILKMAN ENTERS BUILDING THROUGH LOBBY DOOR ... DOOR SHUTS ... CLATTERING BOTTLES AND MILKMAN'S STEPS IN


HANNAY: (WHISPERS) Hey!


SOUND: BOTTLES AND STEPS STOP


MILKMAN: (SURPRISED) Oh. Who's that?


SOUND: BOTTLES AND STEPS TO HANNAY


HANNAY: You the milkman?


MILKMAN: I am. Well, you're up bright and early for such a fine gentleman.


HANNAY: Could you use a pound note?


MILKMAN: What's the catch? 


HANNAY: Well, I want to borrow your cap and coat. I want to dress myself up like a milkman.


MILKMAN: What's the big idea?


HANNAY: Well, I want to make a getaway.


MILKMAN: Ah! To a bunk?


HANNAY: Er, yes, yes. 


MILKMAN: Aw, say, what have you been up to?


HANNAY: Well, I - I'll have to trust you. There's been a murder committed on the first floor.


MILKMAN: By you? 


HANNAY: No, no. Did you see two men hanging around across the street? 


MILKMAN: Yes. 


HANNAY: They committed the murder.


MILKMAN: (AMUSED, SKEPTICAL) Oh ho, I see. Now I suppose they're waitin' there as good as gold for a copper to come and arrest 'em.


HANNAY: This is quite true. They're spies. They've murdered a woman in my flat and now they're waiting for me.


MILKMAN: Oh, come off it! Funny jokes at five in the morning? 


HANNAY: (HELPLESSLY) But-- Well-- (STRUGGLES TO MAKE UP A STORY) All right. All right, I'll tell you the truth. Are you married? 


MILKMAN: Yes, but don't rub it in.


HANNAY: Well, I'm - I'm not married. I'm, um-- I'm a bachelor. 


MILKMAN: (DRY) Well, congratulations.


HANNAY: Yeah. There's a woman living here on the first floor.


MILKMAN: Is there now?


HANNAY: Er, yes, yes. I paid her a call last night and I've been wanting to go home since midnight.


MILKMAN: Well, what's preventing you?


HANNAY: Those men. They're her, uh, brothers. Now do you see? 


MILKMAN: (CHUCKLES) Cor, why didn't you tell me before, old fellow? I only wanted to be told. Tryin' to kid me with a lot of talk about murders and spies--


SOUND: MILKMAN SETS DOWN BOTTLES, REMOVES COAT AND CAP


MILKMAN: Here, put this on. And put on my little hat. There you are. 


HANNAY: Here, take the pound. 


MILKMAN: Oh, thank you, Guv'nor. Here's my bottles. (SOUND: CLATTER OF BOTTLES) Just leave my pony and cart around the corner. So long, old sport. 


HANNAY: Thanks again.


MILKMAN: Righto.


SOUND: HANNAY'S STEPS AND BOTTLES TO LOBBY DOOR, WHICH OPENS ... EARLY MORNING TRAFFIC BACKGROUND


HANNAY: (WHISTLES CHEERFULLY)


SOUND: HANNAY'S STEPS AND BOTTLES TO HORSE AND CART ... HANNAY CLIMBS ABOARD


HANNAY: (CLICKS TONGUE) Giddyup. 


SOUND: HORSE AND CART CLIP-CLOP DOWN STREET, BOTTLES RATTLING ... THEN BEHIND--


HANNAY: (SIGHS IN RELIEF)


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


HANNAY: (TO TICKET SELLER) A first-class ticket to Aberdeen, Scotland, please. 


MUSIC: UP FOR BRIEF TRANSITION ... OUT WITH--


SOUND: TRAIN WHISTLE! ... RUMBLE OF TRAIN ON TRACK, HEARD FROM TRAIN INTERIOR ... COMPARTMENT DOOR SLIDES OPEN


HANNAY: How do you do? 


SALESMAN: (GLAD TO HAVE COMPANY) Well! Good day, sir.


SOUND: COMPARTMENT DOOR SLIDES SHUT BEHIND--


HANNAY: The conductor tells me this is my compartment. Is there room?


SALESMAN: Of course! Sit down. 


HANNAY: Thank you. 


SOUND: HANNAY SITS ... RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER


SALESMAN: Er, are you a traveling man?


HANNAY: No, no. 


SALESMAN: I am. I travel in women's underwear. You interested?


HANNAY: Ohhh, always.


SALESMAN: (CHUCKLES) Yes. I've got a new corset I'm selling this trip. The Stream-Line! You know, I could never understand how people put up with the old-fashioned sorts. All bones and no bends. But mine! (CHUCKLES) Put a pretty girl inside of mine, sir, and she needn't be ashamed anywhere. 


HANNAY: (POLITELY UNINTERESTED) Uh huh, yeah. 


SALESMAN: Er, I say, I must be boring you. (BEAT) Yes. Yes, I guess I'll look at the paper.


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER


HANNAY: No. No, you're not boring me. 


SALESMAN: (READING PAPER) Mmm. (CLICKS TONGUE WITH DISAPPROVAL) Hm! I say! There's been another woman murdered in a West End flat. 


HANNAY: What? 


SALESMAN: Woman -- murdered -- in a West End flat. (READS) "At Portland Mansions in Portland Place." Oh, yes, I know where that is. Er-- (READS) "A well-dressed woman of about thirty -- with a knife in her back." (CLICKS TONGUE, READS) "The tenant, Richard Hannay, is missing." Ha! Missing! (CHUCKLES) He did it, all right. 


HANNAY: (A LITTLE DEFENSIVE) What do the police say?


SALESMAN: Huh, the police theory is that, er-- (SHOCK, INDIGNATION) Huh?! Well! If that isn't the blasted limit!


HANNAY: (TENSE) What is? 


SALESMAN: Is there no honesty in this world at all? Now, look here, sir. Look at this advertisement. Now I ask you! (READS, WITH OUTRAGE) "The new Body-Line rubber panty corset -- on sale today at MacPherson Brothers -- seventeen and ninepence"! Why - why, they're underselling us! 


HANNAY: Uh, do the police say who did it? 


SALESMAN: (READS) "Brassiere to match, four and elevenpence"!


HANNAY: Yes. Yes, that's too bad. But what about that murder you were telling me about?


SOUND: TRAIN SLOWS DOWN, IN BG


SALESMAN: Blast the murder, sir. I've got to look through this paper at all the other ads. Now, let me see now-- Here, what is this--?


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER


HANNAY: Where could I get a paper?


SALESMAN: (IMPATIENT) Well, we're coming into a station. Why don't you get off and buy one?


HANNAY: Yes, I'll do that. Pardon me.


SOUND: HANNAY RISES, SLIDES OPEN THE COMPARTMENT DOOR, AND STEPS INTO CORRIDOR AS TRAIN COMES TO A STOP


HANNAY: Oh, pardon me, conductor, but have I time--?


CONDUCTOR: What is it, sir?


HANNAY: I was wondering if I have time to--


OFFICER: (INTERRUPTS, APPROACHES) Conductor? Conductor? 


SOUND: OFFICER'S STEPS APPROACH


CONDUCTOR: Yes, sir? 


OFFICER: I'm from the police. As soon as the train starts again, I'll want to search every compartment.


CONDUCTOR: Oh? 


OFFICER: Yes, we're after a man named Richard Hannay -- a West End murder.


CONDUCTOR: Right, sir. 


SOUND: TRAIN STARTS ... PICKS UP SPEED, IN BG


CONDUCTOR: (TURNS TO HANNAY) Now, what was it you wanted, sir?


HANNAY: Oh, never mind. The train's starting; it's too late now. 


SOUND: HANNAY'S STEPS TO A NEARBY COMPARTMENT ... 2ND COMPARTMENT DOOR SLIDES OPEN


PAMELA: (STARTLED) Oh!


HANNAY: Oh, pardon me. May - may I come in? 


PAMELA: (CHILLY) Well, I'm sure there are other compartments not in use. 


HANNAY: Well, I'm afraid I'll have to make use of this one -- and you.


SOUND: COMPARTMENT DOOR SLIDES SHUT


PAMELA: (AFFRONTED) I beg your pardon?


HANNAY: (LOW, QUICK) Look, I'm desperate. The police are looking for me, but I'm innocent. When they come into this compartment, you take your cue from me. You do exactly as I want you to. 


PAMELA: I shall hand you over; that's what I shall do. 


HANNAY: You do and I'll-- (THREATENING) Well, you'll die one second later.


SOUND: KNOCK ON DOOR


HANNAY: (FEIGNS AMOROUSNESS) Darling-- Darling, of course I love you. Of course I love you, darling! Kiss me, darling--


SOUND: COMPARTMENT DOOR SLIDES OPEN 


PAMELA: (MURMURS RESISTANCE, MUFFLED BY HANNAY'S KISS)


OFFICER: (STARTLED) Oh! (AMUSED) Guess there's no murderer in here. 


SOUND: COMPARTMENT DOOR SLIDES SHUT


PAMELA: (OUTRAGED) You--! You--!


HANNAY: I - I'm terribly sorry. I'm sorry, I had to do it. Now look here, my name is Hannay. They're after me, but I swear I'm innocent, and you've got to help me. I've got to keep free for the next few days. 


SOUND: PAMELA SLAPS HANNAY'S FACE


HANNAY: I-- All right, I don't blame you for slapping me, but please listen.


PAMELA: You're despicable!


HANNAY: You've got to let me stay here. It isn't just for my sake.


SOUND: COMPARTMENT DOOR SLIDES OPEN 


OFFICER: Er, beg pardon, you two--


HANNAY: What is it, officer? 


OFFICER: I'm sorry to disturb you again, but have either of you seen a man come by here in the past few minutes?


PAMELA: (PLEASED, TRIUMPHANT) This is the man you want, I think. 


OFFICER: What?


HANNAY: She's joking.


OFFICER: But when I looked in just a moment ago-- 


PAMELA: He barged his way in here and forced me to kiss him. Told me his name is Hannay.


OFFICER: Oh? 


SOUND: COMPARTMENT DOOR SLIDES SHUT 


OFFICER: Is your name Hannay?


HANNAY: No. 


PAMELA: It is. He just told me so! He said he's wanted for murder. 


HANNAY: (WITH DISGUST) I told you I was innocent, too, didn't I? Why do you leave that out? 


OFFICER: Your name is Hannay, then? 


HANNAY: (BITTER) Of course it is. 


OFFICER: You're under arrest, Mr. Hannay, and it's my duty to warn you that anything you say may be used against you.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: TRAIN WHISTLE! ... RUMBLE OF TRAIN ON TRACK, HEARD FROM TRAIN INTERIOR ... THEN IN BG


HANNAY: Oh, officer? May I smoke?


OFFICER: Go ahead. 


HANNAY: Want one? 


OFFICER: No, thanks. 


SOUND: MATCH STRIKES


HANNAY: You know I'm innocent.


OFFICER: I don't know anything of the sort. 


HANNAY: No? Well, you seem to trust me. 


OFFICER: Do I?


HANNAY: Yes. Yes, you haven't handcuffed me. 


OFFICER: If I handcuffed you, then I'd be handcuffed, too, and I hate handcuffs. 


HANNAY: Oh. Well, that's quite understandable.


OFFICER: You couldn't do anything anyway. The door's locked.


HANNAY: Oh, that's quite true. 


OFFICER: What did you kill her for?


HANNAY: I didn't kill her. 


OFFICER: Oh, come off it. This ain't official; I'm just curious. 


HANNAY: Why do you think I killed her? 


OFFICER: Oh-- Well-- Because you were in love with her.


HANNAY: Oh, that's a strange reason for killing a girl. 


OFFICER: Or maybe she was in love with you and you couldn't get rid of her.


HANNAY: (PLAYS ALONG, MAKING UP A STORY, LIGHTLY AT FIRST, THEN INCREASINGLY MELODRAMATIC) That's it. That's it! 


OFFICER: Ah! I thought so. 


HANNAY: Yes! Yes, she was always - always pestering me. Wanted me to kiss her all the time, tell her I loved her -- you know how it is. 


OFFICER: Oh, I know. 


HANNAY: Yeah, well, I-- You know, I couldn't even eat a meal in peace. I couldn't take her to the theater unless we sat way in the back row. You know, really, she-- She was always getting me to take her to the zoo. Now, do you realize how many lonely places there are at the zoo where a woman can trap a man? 


OFFICER: You don't mean it?


HANNAY: Yes. Fact is, I remember the night I murdered her, it was-- Well, I'll tell you. That was just the last straw. 


OFFICER: What happened?


HANNAY: She came to my apartment. I - I didn't expect her, you understand. 


OFFICER: Yeah.


HANNAY: I wanted to be alone with my chess set, but she came in, and when I heard what she wanted, I couldn't stand it any more. Everything went red before me! I was blind! I was blind with rage! 


OFFICER: Good heavens, what did she want? 


HANNAY: (ABRUPTLY FLAT PUNCHLINE) She wanted me to take her to the zoo again. ...


OFFICER: See here, are you trying to pull my leg? 


HANNAY: (SNAPPISH) Of course I am. I told you I didn't murder her. 


OFFICER: (EXHALES) I give up.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, TRAINS SLOWS DOWN ... CONTINUES IN BG


HANNAY: Oh, are - are we coming to a station? 


OFFICER: Oh, no. Just slowing down for the bridge.


HANNAY: Huh? Oh. Sure you won't join me in a cigarette? 


OFFICER: Oh, I may as well.


HANNAY: Here you are.


OFFICER: Oh, thanks.


SOUND: MATCH STRIKES ... SCUFFLE, IN BG


OFFICER: Hey! Let go!


HANNAY: So long! 


OFFICER: Hey, don't jump out there! You'll get killed! Don't jump!


SOUND: CRASH! AS HANNAY JUMPS THROUGH GLASS WINDOW 


MUSIC: ACCENT AND BRIDGE


SOUND: FIVE STAGGERED RIFLE SHOTS FROM VARIOUS DISTANCES BY MORE THAN ONE POLICE OFFICER


1ST POLICE: Hold your fire, you fool.


2ND POLICE: (RELUCTANT) Right, sir.


1ST POLICE: He's under cover. This Hannay is a smart man. Probably crawling from one bush to another on the side of the hill.


2ND POLICE: Well, I was only trying to shoot without half-seeing him, sir. 


1ST POLICE: Well, don't do it. 


SOUND: A RIFLE SHOT, OFF


1ST POLICE: I wish those other fools would stop shooting, too. He's bound to come out in another place.


2ND POLICE: Oh, well, still and all, sir, I don't see anything--


SOUND: TWO FINAL RIFLE SHOTS, OFF


1ST POLICE: Just a moment. There he is. 


2ND POLICE: (EAGER) Where?


1ST POLICE: Wait a moment, don't shoot. You see? He's up on the brow of the hill. Out of rifle range. 


2ND POLICE: We'd best get after him.


1ST POLICE: No, no. Wait a moment. Look. You see? There, he's gone. Down the other side of the hill.


2ND POLICE: We'd best get after him, that's what I'd say.


1ST POLICE: No, no, no, wait. I have a better plan. We'd never catch him that way. He's got too big a lead and besides he'll go down the hill on the other side a lot faster than we can ever go up on this side. 


2ND POLICE: But what are we to do? 


1ST POLICE: (THOUGHTFUL) We're going to count on the fact that he's a human being. He'll get tired, and get hungry. He's been running around all day and he hasn't eaten since before he got on that train. He's going to have to sleep somewhere tonight. That's when we'll catch him! 


2ND POLICE: How, sir? 


1ST POLICE: You go round up the others. We're going to stop in at every farmhouse and every barn in the whole countryside tonight!


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: KNOCKING AT CROFTER'S FRONT DOOR, WHICH OPENS


CROFTER: Eh? 


HANNAY: Good day, sir. Could you direct me to Alt-na-Shellach? 


CROFTER: Aye. Straight along the road and 'cross the loch. 


HANNAY: Thank you.


CROFTER: Are ye lookin' for work? 


HANNAY: Uh, yes. Yes, I'm a chauffeur. 


CROFTER: You'll find no work in Alt-na-Shellach.


HANNAY: Oh? No big houses around here? 


CROFTER: Only Sir Andrew's and he won't be wantin' ye. He's had the same chauffeur for forty years.


HANNAY: Oh. I see. Uh, are there no newcomers around?


CROFTER: Aye. There's an Englishman, a kind of professor. 


HANNAY: Professor? 


CROFTER: Aye. He lives at Alt-na-Shellach.


HANNAY: Oh, thanks. I'll try that.


CROFTER: Ye'll no try tonight. It's fourteen miles.


HANNAY: Hmm. Well, uh, could you put me up for the night?


CROFTER: Free?


HANNAY: Oh, no, no. I'll pay.


CROFTER: Aye, then. Can ye eat the herring? 


HANNAY: (CHUCKLES) I could eat half a dozen right now. 


CROFTER: Can ye sleep in a box bed? 


HANNAY: I can try. 


CROFTER: Two-and-six. 


HANNAY: Take it now? 


CROFTER: Thank ye. Come in.


HANNAY: Thank you.


SOUND: THEIR STEPS INTO HOME ... FRONT DOOR CLOSES


CROFTER: (CALLS) Woman!


ANNIE: (OFF) Aye? What is it?


CROFTER: This gentleman will stay with us till the morning. Go make up the box bed. 


ANNIE: (OFF) Very well.


SOUND: ANNIE'S STEPS TO INNER DOOR, WHICH OPENS AND SHUTS AS SHE EXITS


HANNAY: Your daughter? 


CROFTER: (OFFENDED) My wife!


HANNAY: Oh.


CROFTER: Ye'd best go in wi' her and see your room. 


HANNAY: Yes, I'll do that, thank you.


SOUND: HANNAY'S STEPS TO INNER DOOR, WHICH OPENS AND SHUTS AS HE JOINS ANNIE


HANNAY: Hello. 


ANNIE: Hello. This is your bed. Could you sleep there, do you think?


HANNAY: You try and stop me. (CHUCKLES)


ANNIE: Ah, you be tired. 


HANNAY: Oh, I'll say I am. 


ANNIE: Won't you sit down please while I make up the bed? 


HANNAY: Thank you. (EXHALES)


SOUND: HANNAY SITS


HANNAY: You been in these parts long?


ANNIE: No, I'm from Glasgow. Do you ever see it?


HANNAY: No, no. 


ANNIE: Ah! You should see Sauchiehall Street with all its fine shops and Argyle Street on Saturday night -- with the trams, and the lights, and - and the cinema palaces, and the crowds. (CHUCKLES, WITH A SIGH) Aye, and it's Saturday night tonight. 


HANNAY: Like to be there?


ANNIE: Aye.


HANNAY: You certainly don't get all those things out here. 


ANNIE: (CHUCKLES) No.


HANNAY: Do you always miss them? Hm? Or just on Saturday nights? 


ANNIE: I-- (EXHALES SELF-CONSCIOUSLY) I dinna like to say. 


HANNAY: Well now, I've never been to Glasgow, but I've been in Edinburgh, Montreal, and London. I'll tell you all about London at supper.


ANNIE: (WORRIED) Oh, my husband would not approve of that, I doubt.


HANNAY: Why not? 


ANNIE: Oh, he says it's best not to think of such places and all the wickedness that goes on there. 


HANNAY: Then why not listen now? What do you want to know? 


ANNIE: Well, is it true that all the ladies paint their toenails? 


HANNAY: (CHUCKLES) Some of them. 


ANNIE: And the London ladies look beautiful? 


HANNAY: Oh, they do. Yes, they do. Oh, but they wouldn't -- if you were beside them.


ANNIE: (WORRIED) You ought not to say that. 


CROFTER: (ABRUPTLY IN) What ought he not to say?!


ANNIE: (STARTLED) Oh!


HANNAY: I was just saying to your wife that I prefer living in the town rather than the country. 


CROFTER: (SIMPLY) Eh, God made the country. (SHARP, TO ANNIE) Go, woman! Get supper for us.


MUSIC: MELANCHOLY BRIDGE


SOUND: SUPPER TABLE BACKGROUND ... UTENSILS, DISHES, ET CETERA ... BRIEFLY


ANNIE: More pudding, sir? 


HANNAY: No, thank you. I'm-- Oh, I've been extremely well fed. (CHUCKLES) 


ANNIE: (PLEASED) Oh, thank you.


CROFTER: You want to look at the weekly paper? It just came today. 


HANNAY: Yes, I'd like to very much, thank you. 


CROFTER: Ye best look at it right away. I'll want it when I come back. I'm going to water the cattle. 


SOUND: CROFTER'S STEPS TO FRONT DOOR, WHICH OPENS BEHIND--


CROFTER: (CALLS) Woman! Get the dishes done. You hear?


ANNIE: Aye, John.


SOUND: DOOR SHUTS AS CROFTER EXITS ... RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER


HANNAY: Wouldn't you care to look at the paper? 


ANNIE: Oh, no, thank ye. I read it this afternoon. 


HANNAY: (GENTLY) Indeed? I'm surprised. Does your husband allow you to read the paper? 


ANNIE: (EXHALES SELF-CONSCIOUSLY) I-- I'd best clear the table. 


SOUND: SUPPER TABLE CLEARED ... THEN BRIEFLY BEHIND--


ANNIE: You have not told me your name, sir.


HANNAY: Oh, Hann-- (CATCHES HIMSELF) Hammond.


ANNIE: It would not be Hannay, would it? 


HANNAY: What made you think that? 


ANNIE: You're greatly interested in that murder in London. You - you looked almost greedy reading about it. And - and you fit the description of the murderer. 


HANNAY: What makes you think that he's a murderer? What makes you think that he's guilty?


ANNIE: Is he not? 


HANNAY: No.


ANNIE: I want to believe that. 


HANNAY: It's true.


ANNIE: (EXHALES) The poor man. Everybody chasing him now. Everybody against him. If he did not commit the murder--


HANNAY: He didn't. 


ANNIE: He needs a friend.


HANNAY: Yes. Yes, he needs someone who knows what it is to be friendless. Someone who has warm human sympathy because she has suffered herself -- because she has needed warmth and sympathy herself. 


ANNIE: I know too well what you mean, Mr. Hannay. 


HANNAY: Hammond.


ANNIE: Excuse me -- Hammond. 


HANNAY: This man they're looking for. You know, I imagine the police are combing the Scottish moors for him. I imagine they're knocking on the door of every house and asking the people if they've seen this man. 


ANNIE: Aye, it would be lucky for him if someone misdirected them.


HANNAY: Yes. Someone who has sympathy. 


ANNIE: Someone who has received sympathy from him.


MUSIC: WARM AND TENDER BRIDGE 


CROFTER: (YAWNS, DISAPPROVING) We're a full fifteen minutes late to bed tonight. 


ANNIE: We are that. 


CROFTER: Yeah, we've earned twice the money that beggar paid us -- him eatin', readin' our paper, and keepin' us up. 


ANNIE: Oh, he was no bother, John. 


CROFTER: Was he now? You took a fine fancy to that live buck, woman.


ANNIE: No, John--


CROFTER: Yes, woman. I know when you're thinkin' sinful thoughts -- and I know a sinful man when I lay my eyes on him!


ANNIE: Please, John -- what you're sayin' isn't true. 


CROFTER: Are you coming to bed now?!


ANNIE: In a minute. 


CROFTER: Why d'ye keep watchin' out the window? 


ANNIE: Oh -- no reason. 


CROFTER: Just thinkin' yer sinful thoughts, eh?!


ANNIE: No, John. 


CROFTER: Well, then blow out the candle! Come to bed!


ANNIE: Aye, John.


MUSIC: BRIDGE ... THEN TENSE, IN BG


ANNIE: Mr. Hannay? Mr. Hannay, wake up! 


HANNAY: (WAKES) What? What is it? What is it?


ANNIE: A car's comin'. That'll be the police. You'd best be going.


HANNAY: Oh, thank you, thank you. 


ANNIE: Hurry up and don't let them catch you.


HANNAY: I'm ready, I'm ready, I slept in my clothes. I'll never forget you for doing this. Now which way do I go?


ANNIE: Wait, I'll show you.


MUSIC: UP FOR ACCENT AND OUT WITH--


SOUND: INNER DOOR OPENS


CROFTER: Hey! Makin' love behind my back!


ANNIE: John!

 

CROFTER: I might have known. Get out, woman! 


HANNAY: Just a minute--


CROFTER: Yes, and you, sir! Get out of my house!


ANNIE: (TO HANNAY) Aye! Go, go!


HANNAY: And leave you like this? 


ANNIE: It's your chance at liberty. 


CROFTER: Get out, both o' you! 


HANNAY: You don't understand. Now look here, you're all wrong about this. She was trying to help me.


CROFTER: Aye, to bring shame and disgrace upon the house! 


HANNAY: She was trying to help me escape from the police.


CROFTER: The police? 


HANNAY: Yes, the police. They're after me for murder. 


CROFTER: What?


SOUND: KNOCKING AT FRONT DOOR, OFF ... THEN INTERMITTENTLY IN BG


HANNAY: Now they're here. She only came to warn me. I - I told her about it this evening. Don't let them in, please. Say that I'm not here. I'll make it worth your while.


CROFTER: How much?


HANNAY: Five pounds. 


CROFTER: You've got that much?


HANNAY: Yes, yes.


CROFTER: Give it to me.


HANNAY: After they're gone. 


CROFTER: Give it to me now or I'll turn you over to them.


SOUND: KNOCKING OUT


HANNAY: (RELUCTANT) All right, here it is.


CROFTER: All right. Get back into the bed. (TO ANNIE) Shut him in, woman. Hide him! 


SOUND: INNER DOOR CLOSES AS CROFTER EXITS


ANNIE: (LOW, TENSE) Do not get into bed. I do not trust him.


HANNAY: But he took the money. 


ANNIE: Aye, he could not resist it. Here, let's open the window and listen. Ssh!


SOUND: WINDOW UNLATCHES AND OPENS ... VOICES OF CROFTER AND POLICE SLIGHTLY OFF


2ND POLICE: --the Portland Place murder.


CROFTER: Eh, how should I know aught of a murder? 


1ST POLICE: You didn't see anybody go by here?


CROFTER: Well, now -- I might or I might not. Is there a reward?


2ND POLICE: [?] -- yes.


CROFTER: How much is it?


1ST POLICE: A hundred pounds.


CROFTER: Eh, that's little enough for catchin' a murderer.


ANNIE: (OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE; LOW, TO HANNAY) I was right. He's askin' if there's a reward for you if ye get catched. 


HANNAY: Oh, blast him. 


ANNIE: He'll argue a bit before he lets 'em in. Now's your time.


HANNAY: All right, show me the way.


SOUND: WINDOW CLOSED


ANNIE: Here-- (REALIZES) Oh, your jacket's terrible light-colored. I'm afraid they'll see ye. Here, ye'd best take this black one.


HANNAY: Is this your husband's coat?


ANNIE: Aye, his best Sunday coat. But never mind. They mustn't see you.


HANNAY: (CONCERNED) But what will happen to you? 


ANNIE: Well, I - I'll say I couldn't stop you.


HANNAY: He'll not ill-treat you? 


ANNIE: Oh, he'll pray at me now; no more. 


SOUND: REAR DOOR OPENS


ANNIE: Go now. 


HANNAY: What's your name?


ANNIE: Annie. 


HANNAY: Goodbye, Annie. Bless you all the days of your life for this.


MUSIC: WISTFUL BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG


SOUND: BARKING PACK OF BLOODHOUNDS, THEN IN BG


2ND POLICE: The dogs'll get him, sir. They've got his scent.


1ST POLICE: Yes, I know, but they're going to lose it. This Hannay is no fool. He'll go into the loch. Then what good would the dogs be?


2ND POLICE: That farmer said Hannay was inquiring about the professor at Alt-na-Shellach. 


1ST POLICE: Well, if we lose him, we'll go straight to the professor's cottage. 


MUSIC: UP FOR BRIDGE


SOUND: SHIVERING, OUT-OF-BREATH HANNAY KNOCKS URGENTLY ON COTTAGE DOOR


HANNAY: (MURMURS, TO HIMSELF) Hurry. Hurry, hurry. Oh, please hurry.


SOUND: COTTAGE DOOR OPENS


HANNAY: (SHIVERS, BREATHES HARD)


PROF: How do you do? 


HANNAY: (CATCHES HIS BREATH) You're the professor? 


PROF: Yes. 


HANNAY: Let me in, quick. (CONTINUES TO SHIVER AND BREATHE HARD, IN BG)


PROF: (BEAT, WARY) I don't believe I will. Who are you?


HANNAY: You wouldn't know my name, but I come from Annabella Smith.


PROF: Oh. (BEAT) Come in.


HANNAY: Thank you. 


SOUND: HANNAY'S STEPS IN ... COTTAGE DOOR CLOSES


PROF: Have a chair. 


HANNAY: Thank you. 


SOUND: HANNAY SITS


PROF: Well, sir. What about our mutual friend Annabella Smith? 


HANNAY: She's been murdered.


PROF: Murdered? I'm so sorry, but then in our line of work-- (BEAT) Tell me about it. 


HANNAY: Haven't you read--? The Portland Mansions affair? 


PROF: So that was Annabella. And the man? 


HANNAY: I was the man.


SOUND: DOORBELL RINGS TWICE


PROF: Excuse me, there's someone at the door -- someone not so impetuous as to pound as you did. I suggest that you sit quietly in the far corner so that you'll not be seen from the door.


SOUND: HANNAY'S STEPS TO CHAIR ... HE SITS, QUIETLY SHIVERING AND BREATHING HARD IN FOREGROUND WHILE PROF ANSWERS DOOR IN BG


PROF: (OFF) Ready? 


HANNAY: Yes. 


SOUND: DOOR OPENS, OFF


PROF: Gentlemen? 


2ND POLICE: We're the police. Have you seen any strangers about this morning? 


PROF: This morning? No.


2ND POLICE: You haven't seen any suspicious-looking parties? 


PROF: No. 


2ND POLICE: No one called at the house? 


PROF: No.


2ND POLICE: No one looking for a job? 


PROF: No one at all.


HANNAY: (MURMURS TO HIMSELF, IMPATIENT) Oh, get rid of them, get rid of them. (CONTINUES SHIVERING IN BG)


2ND POLICE: Very good, sir. We're looking for a murderer. We thought he might come here. Mentioned your place; said he might look for a job here. 


PROF: Then if it's a very wise murderer, he won't come near my house. I'll let you know if he does.


2ND POLICE: Thank you, sir. 


PROF: Good day. 


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES ... PROF'S STEPS TO HANNAY


PROF: Well, Mr. Hannay-- I suppose I can call you by your right name now. I think the police will bother you no longer. 


HANNAY: I - I want to thank you very much, sir. 


PROF: Not at all. Now tell me more about Annabella. Why did she send you to me? 


HANNAY: I wasn't even sure it was you. I just knew that it was somebody in Alt-na-Shellach. She was coming here about some air ministry secret. She said it would be smuggled out of the country unless we could see someone in Alt-na-Shellach first. Some foreign agent is going to take the secret out of the country unless we can stop him.


PROF: Did she tell you what the foreign agent looked like?


HANNAY: No. No, no, she-- (REALIZES) Oh, yes, yes! There was one thing. Part of his little finger's missing.


PROF: Which one? 


HANNAY: (UNCERTAIN) Oh, I-- She-- I believe she said it was his right hand.


PROF: Are you sure it isn't the left hand? 


HANNAY: No, I'm not sure. Why do you ask? 


PROF: Because it is the left hand. (SHARPLY) You see? 


HANNAY: (BEAT, STUNNED) You? 


PROF: Yes, Mr. Hannay. I - I'm afraid I've been guilty of leading you down the garden path. Or is it up? I never can remember. 


HANNAY: Why didn't you turn me over to the police? 


PROF: Because you would tell your story. They wouldn't believe it, I suppose, but they might check it. They might -- they just might -- find that you were telling the truth. That would be - very embarrassing to me. 


HANNAY: What are you going to do with me? 


PROF: (LIGHTLY) That's just the point. What am I going to do with you? Heh! You're an engaging fellow, Mr. Hannay. I'd hate to hurt you, but-- You see, I'm just about to convey some very vital information out of the country.


HANNAY: Then Annabella was right.


PROF: Oh, yes. Annabella was an excellent secret agent. I often tried to get her to work with me, but she wanted too much money. (CHUCKLES) Well, that's neither here nor there. The question is still what am I going to do with you? And I'm afraid I know the answer.


HANNAY: All right, let's have it. 


PROF: (SLOWLY) I don't think this revolver could be traced to me. 


HANNAY: (REALIZES) You're going to shoot me. 


PROF: I'm afraid there's no alternative, Mr. Hannay. 


HANNAY: (WITH EFFORT, LUNGING AT PROF) All right--


PROF: (TENSE) Don't move!


SOUND: GUNSHOT! ... HANNAY'S BODY THUDS TO FLOOR


PROF: (EXHALES SLOWLY, DRY, TO HIMSELF) What a pity. He was such a young man. 


MUSIC: FIRST ACT CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: From STUDIO ONE, radio's celebrated playhouse of dramatic entertainment, you are hearing Glenn Ford starring in "The 39 Steps," a version for listening by Robert Cenedella of the John Buchan novel. 


MUSIC: BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: STUDIO ONE will resume after the customary pause for station identification. This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.


MUSIC: UP TO FILL PAUSE FOR STATION IDENTIFICATION ... THEN SECOND ACT OVERTURE ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: From STUDIO ONE, we continue tonight's full hour of dramatic entertainment. Mr. Glenn Ford stars in Fletcher Markle's production of "The 39 Steps."


MUSIC: UP FOR ACCENT ... THEN GRIMLY IN BG


CROFTER: Woman! I can not find my hymnbook! 


ANNIE: Your hymnbook? Well, where did you leave it? 


CROFTER: In the breast pocket of my overcoat. It was hangin' here. 


ANNIE: Oh, John, I - I'm afraid I gave your coat to that gentleman who was stayin' here that night.


CROFTER: That murderer?! 


SOUND: CROFTER SLAPS ANNIE VERY HARD


ANNIE: (CRIES OUT IN PAIN)


CROFTER: Ya little fool!


SOUND: ANOTHER SLAP!


ANNIE: (CRIES OUT IN PAIN)


MUSIC: UP FOR ACCENT ... THEN OUT


HANNAY: Cigarette cases, yes, sheriff, but I've never seen it happen to a hymnbook before. 


SHERIFF: (AFFABLE) I've never encountered such a peculiar set of events in all my years as sheriff of Alt-na-Shellach.


HANNAY: Well, that's not surprising, you know. 


SHERIFF: The bullet this professor fired stuck in the hymnbook, eh? 


HANNAY: Yes.


SHERIFF: (LIGHTLY) Well, I'm not surprised, Mr. Hannay. Some of these hymns are terrible hard to get through. ... I've stuck at them myself before now.


HANNAY: "Hymns That Have Helped Me," eh?


SHERIFF: (CHUCKLES) That's a good one, Mr. Hannay; that's fine. And to think that I've had drinks with that professor, accepted his hospitality. Well, it's a lesson to us all. And how did you escape? 


HANNAY: Well, of course, he thought I was dead and while I was still unconscious he dragged me into the dressing room. When I came to, I got out of the window and came here. Now, sheriff, I don't want to hurry you or anything, but oughtn't you to be taking some sort of action? This is serious, you know. 


SHERIFF: I know.


HANNAY: Well, I mean, if it weren't, I'd never put myself in your hands with a murder charge hanging over me.


SHERIFF: (REASSURING) Never heed the murder, Mr. Hannay. I don't doubt you'll be able to convince Scotland Yard of your innocence, as you've convinced me. I have sent for someone at the police station next door to come and take your statement down.


HANNAY: (RELIEVED) Thank you. 


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR OPENS


INSPECTOR: Were you wishin' to see me, sheriff? 


SHERIFF: (ANNOYED) Yes, indeed I was. Do you think I enjoy playing for time with a murderer? 


HANNAY: Murderer? 


SHERIFF: (GRIM) Certainly. Hannay, you're under arrest on charge of willful murder of a woman unknown in Portland Mansions, London, Tuesday last. Inspector, take him over to the county jail.


INSPECTOR: Aye. 


HANNAY: But, sheriff, you heard my story. You believed it! 


INSPECTOR: Come along now.


HANNAY: It's true, every word of it! 


SHERIFF: Hannay, we're not so daft in Scotland as smart Londoners may think. Do you think I believed your cock-and-bull story about the professor? Why, he's my best friend.


HANNAY: But if the professor didn't shoot me, where did that bullet come from?


SHERIFF: That's easy. From one of your pursuers on the moor. Isn't that so, inspector? 


INSPECTOR: Aye, that's so, sir. I had a shot at him myself.


HANNAY: I demand that you allow me to telephone the High Commissioner for Canada.


SHERIFF: A trunk call? For a murderer? Too expensive.


INSPECTOR: Come along, come along.


HANNAY: Take your hands off me!


SHERIFF: Hey! Stop him!


SOUND: CRASH! AS HANNAY JUMPS THROUGH GLASS WINDOW


SHERIFF: Oh, the idiot! Out the window! After him!


MUSIC: TURBULENT BRIDGE


SOUND: HANNAY'S RUNNING FOOTSTEPS TO CAR ... CAR DOOR OPENS, HANNAY CLIMBS IN


HANNAY: Excuse me. 


PAMELA: (STARTLED EXCLAMATION)


SOUND: CAR DOOR CLOSES BEHIND--


PAMELA: Who are you? Get out of this car. 


HANNAY: (RECOGNIZES HER, DISMAYED) Oh, don't tell me it's you again -- that stupid girl on the train. 


PAMELA: (RECOGNIZES HIM) Hannay the murderer! 


HANNAY: Listen, listen -- they're after me again. You've got to believe me this time. I didn't do it. Now you get that through your head, can't you? I didn't do it. And unless I'm kept from the police, a vital secret of this country will be smuggled to a foreign power. Now start this car and drive me to safety.


PAMELA: I will not. 


HANNAY: All right then, I will. Now let me get in that driver's seat.


PAMELA: No! 


SOUND: BRIEF SCUFFLE, IN BG


HANNAY: Move over. Move over!


PAMELA: (CALLS) Help! Help! Help! Help!


HOBBS: (APPROACHES) What is it, miss?


PAMELA: This man, he's a murderer. This is Richard Hannay.


HOBBS: Oho! Hannay! Raise your hands. 


HANNAY: (TO PAMELA) Oh, you little fool. I suppose you think you've been clever. 


PAMELA: (TO HOBBS) Are you an officer?


HOBBS: Yes, ma'am. 


PAMELA: Well, will you please tell your prisoner not to insult me? 


HANNAY: You try and stop me. 


HOBBS: That's enough, Hannay. You come along with me. 


HANNAY: (DESPERATE, TO PAMELA) Couldn't you realize that I was speaking the truth in that railway carriage and just now? 


PAMELA: I prefer not to talk to you.


HANNAY: All right, all right, but in all frankness, will you put a call through to the High Commissioner for Canada in London and tell him that an enormously important secret--?


HOBBS: (INTERRUPTS, CHUCKLES) That will do now, Hannay.


HANNAY: (INSISTS, TO PAMELA) --an enormously important secret is being taken out of this country by a foreign agent. Has that penetrated? 


PAMELA: (UNAMUSED) Right to the funny bone. 


HANNAY: Haven't you any sense at all? Put that call through and refer them to me. Will you do this? 


PAMELA: No. Good night. 


HOBBS: Beg pardon, miss, but I'd like you to come, too. 


PAMELA: Whatever for?


HOBBS: To identify the prisoner formally. I'll take you both to the police station in my car. Then I'll drive you back here, miss. 


PAMELA: Oh, well, all right, if it's absolutely necessary, let's get it over with.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: RUNNING AUTO INTERIOR


PAMELA: Isn't that the police station on the corner? You're running past it. Officer, tell the driver. 


HOBBS: The driver knows where he's going. 


DRIVER: We're not exactly going to the police station, miss. 


PAMELA: Well, then where are we going? 


HOBBS: Inverary.


PAMELA: Inverary?


HOBBS: Yes, this man is to be questioned by the Sheriff Principal.


PAMELA: Well, how far is it to Inverary?


HANNAY: Forty miles.


HOBBS: Keep quiet, Hannay.


HANNAY: (NOT SORRY) I'm sorry. 


PAMELA: Isn't the man going the wrong way? Surely Inverary's to the left.


HOBBS: There's a bridge fallen down on that road, miss.


HANNAY: You say you're a policeman? Might I see your badge? 


HOBBS: You shut your mouth.


HANNAY: No, I won't. I want to make a bet with you. I'll bet you haven't got a badge. And I'll lay you one hundred to one that the man you're taking us to has the top joint of his little finger missing. What about it? 


HOBBS: (QUIETLY SAVAGE) You shut your mouth.


HANNAY: Ha! I win. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE ... THEN BEHIND PROF--


PROF: (INTO PHONE) Hello? -- Yes, this is the professor. -- Yes. -- You say Hobbs has him? Good. You're sure? You saw him taken yourself? -- Fine. -- With a girl?! Oh, dear me, that's too bad. -- Why? Well, you great booby, simply because I don't too much mind killing Hannay again, so to speak. But I shall regret very much disposing of an innocent girl.


MUSIC: UP FOR ACCENT ... THEN OUT BEHIND--


SOUND: RUNNING AUTO INTERIOR


HANNAY: Go ahead. Tell the young lady who your boss really is.


HOBBS: You shut your mouth.


PAMELA: Yes, I wish he would, too. And, officer, if he doesn't, I hope you'll gag him.


HANNAY: Oh-- (LAUGHS)


PAMELA: I think he's off his head.


HANNAY: (AMUSED) All right, all right.


SOUND: CAR SUDDENLY BRAKES TO A STOP ... BLEATING OF SHEEP, IN BG


DRIVER: Oh, blast it.


HOBBS: What are we stopping for, driver? 


DRIVER: It's a flock of sheep. They're all over the road.


HOBBS: (LOOKING) Ohhh, yes, we'd never get through them.


PAMELA: Well, can't we go back the other way? 


HOBBS: No, I told you, the bridge is down.


DRIVER: We'll have to get out and scare them off the road.


HOBBS: There are too many of them. I'll help you.


DRIVER: What about Hannay? 


HANNAY: (JOLLY) Oh, don't mind me. 


HOBBS: I'll fix Hannay. (TO PAMELA) Miss, how'd you like to be a special constable? 


PAMELA: (PUZZLED) Well, I-- What do you mean? 


HOBBS: Handcuffs.


SOUND: RATTLE! AND CLICK! OF HANDCUFFS IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING----


PAMELA: Don't put those things on me. What are you doing?!


HOBBS: Come on, Hannay -- hold out your wrist.


HANNAY: Well, I suppose I must. 


PAMELA: No! No!


HOBBS: Ah! There we are.


PAMELA: (EXHALES WITH DISMAY)


HOBBS: Now, miss, as long as you stay, he stays.


SOUND: HOBBS OPENS CAR DOOR, CLIMBS OUT


HOBBS: (TO DRIVER) Come on, Bratthew.


DRIVER: Yes, sir.


SOUND: CAR DOOR SHUTS ... DRIVER'S DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS ... HOBBS AND DRIVER WALK OFF TOWARD THE BLEATING SHEEP


HANNAY: Well, how do you like being handcuffed to me? 


PAMELA: I'll thank you not to talk to me.


HANNAY: (LOW, INTENSE) You don't think I intend to stay here, do you? 


PAMELA: Well, you can't get away as long as we're handcuffed. 


HANNAY: Oh, no? (GRUNTS WITH EFFORT AS HE INSTANTLY CLASPS HAND OVER PAMELA'S MOUTH) 


PAMELA: (STARTLED EXCLAMATION, MUFFLED ... THEN PANICKED, MUFFLED MURMURING, IN BG)


HANNAY: (LOW, WITH EFFORT) All right, I'm gonna keep my hand over your mouth, and you may as well not struggle. We're going to run for it.


SOUND: HANNAY OPENS CAR DOOR ... BLEATING SHEEP AND PAMELA'S MUFFLED MURMURS FILL A BRIEF PAUSE AS HANNAY AND PAMELA CLIMB OUT OF CAR


HANNAY: (LOW) All right, let's go. Come on -- run. Run! 


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: NOCTURNAL BACKGROUND (CRICKETS CHIRP, ET CETERA) ... HANNAY AND PAMELA'S STEPS TRUDGE ON ROAD


HANNAY: (EXHALES IN RELIEF) I think we got away all right.


PAMELA: What chance have you got tied to me? 


HANNAY: Oh, keep that question for your husband. 


PAMELA: You know, those policemen will get you as soon as it's daylight. 


HANNAY: They're not policemen.


PAMELA: Oh? And where did you find that out? 


HANNAY: Well, you found it out yourself. I wouldn't have known that was the wrong road. They were taking us to their boss, and heaven help you or me if they ever catch either of us again. 


PAMELA: Still sticking to your penny novelette spy story. 


HANNAY: (HOPELESSLY) Oh, no. There are twenty million women on this island and I've got to be handcuffed to you. (POINTED) Now look here, I'm telling you the truth. I told it to you once on the train and again this evening. Now I'm telling you for the third time. There's a dangerous conspiracy against England and we are the only people who can stop it. 


PAMELA: Please don't tell me that stupid lie ever again.


HANNAY: All right, all right. Look, I'm just a plain common murderer who stabbed an innocent defenseless woman in the back not four days ago. Now, how do you like that story? (OMINOUS) I don't know how innocent you may be, but you're a woman, and you're defenseless, and you're alone on a desolate moor in the dark, handcuffed to a murderer who'd stop at nothing to get you off his hands. Now, if that's the situation you prefer, my lovely, have it, and welcome. 


PAMELA: I'm not afraid of you. 


HANNAY: (SLY) For all you know, I may murder one woman a week. ... (GRIM) So listen to a bit of advice: from now on, do every single thing I tell you to do and you do it quick. 


PAMELA: You big bully. 


HANNAY: (LIGHTLY) You know, I like your pluck, but I don't like you much. (GRIM AGAIN) Come on, there's an inn.


PAMELA: Well, what of it? 


HANNAY: We're going in there.


PAMELA: Well, what for? 


HANNAY: That's my business.


PAMELA: But we're handcuffed! 


HANNAY: Come on, shut up, will you? Now remember what I said. You back me up in every single thing I say or do. Now has that penetrated your pretty head? 


PAMELA: (RESIGNED) Only just. 


HANNAY: All right. Come on now, pull yourself together. Put your hand in my pocket. 


PAMELA: (MURMURS RESISTANCE)


HANNAY: (INSISTS) Come on, put it here so they won't see the handcuffs. Come on.


SOUND: THEIR STEPS THROUGH INN DOOR, WHICH OPENS AND CLOSES, CAUSING A BELL TO RING ... NOCTURNAL BACKGROUND OUT


HANNAY: Hello? Hello?


SOUND: WIFE'S STEPS IN


WIFE: (APPROACHES, SURPRISED) Oh! Come in, mums. Come in, sir. My, my -- the young lady's terrible wet. 


HANNAY: (LIGHTLY) Well, we had an accident with our car a few miles back.


WIFE: Oh, then you'll be wanting to stay the night?


HANNAY: Ah, yes.


WIFE: We've just the one room left, with the one bed in it. But you'll not mind that. 


HANNAY: (WITH GOOD HUMOR) Oh, no -- no, no, no. Quite the reverse.


WIFE: You're man and wife, I suppose.


HANNAY: Oh, yes, yes. (POINTED, TO PAMELA) Aren't we, dear? 


PAMELA: (UNCONVINCING) Yes.


WIFE: (OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE, CALLS) James?! 


INNKEEPER: (OFF) Eh? Aye, I'm comin'.


WIFE: James, here's a young couple wants to register.


INNKEEPER: (APPROACHES) Aye, aye. Well, here's the book. 


WIFE: (MOVING OFF) I'll 'way up and light the fire for you. 


INNKEEPER: (TO HANNAY) Will you sign the book, sir?


HANNAY: Hm? Oh, uh, innkeeper? 


INNKEEPER: Aye, sir? 


HANNAY: Could you get us a large whiskey and soda, and a few sandwiches? 


PAMELA: And a glass of milk, please.


HANNAY: Oh, yes, yes -- a glass of milk.


INNKEEPER: (MOVING OFF) Aye, sir. I'll do that while you're signin' the book.


HANNAY: (LOW, TO PAMELA) Good. We got rid of him. I can't write with my left hand, my dear. You take the pen. Come on, go on, take it. The sooner you get used to writing your new name, the better.


PAMELA: (UNHAPPY) Oh, really. 


SOUND: SCRIBBLE! OF PEN ON BOOK BEHIND--


HANNAY: (DICTATES DELIBERATELY AS SHE WRITES) "Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hopkinson, The Hollyhocks, Hammersmith."


MUSIC: BRIDGE


PAMELA: I tell you, I can't stand this any longer. I'm going downstairs to tell the whole story. 


HANNAY: Do you think you can drag me with you?


PAMELA: (FRUSTRATED) Ohhh--- 


HANNAY: Do you want me to hang for a murder I never committed? 


PAMELA: Well, so long as they hang you, I really don't care whether you did it or not! 


SOUND: KNOCKING AT DOOR


WIFE: (BEHIND DOOR) Can I come in, sir?


HANNAY: Come in, come in!


SOUND: ROOM DOOR OPENS


HANNAY: (AWKWARD) Oh. Yes, we were, er-- We were just getting warm here before the fire. 


WIFE: I can see that. I thought you might like this hot water bottle for your bed. 


HANNAY: Oh, thank you. Thank you very much. (AFFECTIONATE, TO PAMELA) You'd like a hot water bottle, wouldn't you, my sweet? 


PAMELA: (DRY) Yes, darling.


HANNAY: (CHUCKLES)


WIFE: Well, good night. 


PAMELA: (DESPERATE) Oh, I say, please don't go! 


WIFE: Why not? Is there anything wrong? 


PAMELA: You've got to help me.


WIFE: What's the matter?


HANNAY: (INTERRUPTS QUICKLY) Well, she wants to tell you something, that's all. (STAMMERS) Now, we, uh-- We're, uh-- (LOW, CONFIDENTIAL) We're a runaway couple. 


WIFE: (LAUGHS) Oh, I knew it all the time! You're so much in love. Ha! I could see it. Are they after ye? 


HANNAY: Yes, yes. But you won't give us away, will you? 


WIFE: Of course not! A good night to you both. (MOVING OFF) Ye'll no' be disturbed.


SOUND: ROOM DOOR CLOSES AS WIFE EXITS


HANNAY: (GRIM, TO PAMELA) You try anything like that again and you'll get hurt. 


PAMELA: All right, you won; don't rub it in. Look, can't we get these handcuffs off?


HANNAY: (MORE FRIENDLY) I want to very much -- in the morning.


PAMELA: Well, why not now?


HANNAY: Because I'm sleepy.


PAMELA: Well, I'm not. 


HANNAY: Well, if we got these handcuffs off, I'd have to stay up all night watching you. 


PAMELA: Hmm. Would that be so terrible? 


HANNAY: No. No, I like watching you. If only I weren't so sleepy. Come along. Come along, I'm going to bed.


SOUND: HANNAY AND PAMELA MOVE TO BED AND GET SETTLED, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


PAMELA: Well, it's going to be a little difficult, isn't it?


HANNAY: No, I don't think so. I'll stretch out and--


PAMELA: Well, I'm going to sit up.


HANNAY: Well, you'll have to sit on the side of the bed. Come along. Come on here, we'll both be comfortable.


PAMELA: Oh, you're really most inconsiderate.


SOUND: HANNAY SETTLES HEAD INTO PILLOW


HANNAY: (YAWNS EXTRAVAGANTLY, MURMURS SLEEPILY ... THEN:) What are you doing with that hairpin? 


PAMELA: Well, I've heard that you can unlock handcuffs with a hairpin.


HANNAY: You're welcome to try.


PAMELA: Don't let me disturb you. Go right off to sleep.


HANNAY: Good night.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: INN DOOR OPENS, BELL RINGS


HOBBS: Hello?


WIFE: (OFF) Aye? I'm comin'. 


SOUND: INN DOOR CLOSES


WIFE: (ON MIKE) What is it? 


HOBBS: Er, this is a hotel? 


WIFE: Aye. 


DRIVER: I suppose you get a few old people this time of the year.


WIFE: Aye. 


HOBBS: You didn't happen to have anyone tonight, did you? 


WIFE: Aye. 


HOBBS: They weren't by any chance a young couple, were they? 


WIFE: Them? Ho ho! Two old maids, they was -- and stale, too. 


HOBBS: (DISAPPOINTED) Oh. Could we have a couple of whiskeys and soda?


WIFE: Aye, I'll fetch it from the back room. 


HOBBS: Have you got a public telephone?


WIFE: (MOVING OFF) Right there -- behind ye. 


HOBBS: Thank you.


SOUND: RECEIVER UP ... COIN IN SLOT


HOBBS: (INTO PHONE) Alt-na-Shellach, five-three-two. 


DRIVER: Queer place, this. 


HOBBS: (AGREES) Mmm. (INTO PHONE) Hello? Hello, Professor Jordan? -- No, it hasn't gone well. The girl handed him over to us, thinking we were detectives. We had to take her as well, because he told her everything. They got away. -- Yes. Yes, I see. I see. -- You're going where? -- Well, good luck, professor. -- Goodbye.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


DRIVER: What now?


HOBBS: The professor's going to clear out. It's too dangerous with Hannay on the loose. He's warning the whole Thirty-Nine Steps. 


DRIVER: Will he be able to get the secret out of England? 


HOBBS: Yes. He's picking up our friend at the London Palladium tomorrow. Everything's going to be all right.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


HANNAY: (WAKES, YAWNS, STRETCHES) Pamela? Pam--? (BEAT, REALIZES) Good lord, she's gone. 


PAMELA: (CHUCKLES, OFF) I haven't gone. I'm over here by the fireplace. 


HANNAY: (MYSTIFIED) What's the idea? How did we get out of these handcuffs? 


PAMELA: Well, I told you I'd open them with my hairpin.


HANNAY: Why didn't you run away? 


PAMELA: (QUIETLY EXCITED) I did, but just as I was going, I discovered you were speaking the truth. So I decided to stick with you.


HANNAY: Well, may I ask what earthquake caused your brain to work at last? 


PAMELA: When I left the room and went out on the landing last night, those two men were downstairs and I heard them phoning.


HANNAY: What did they say?


PAMELA: A lot of stuff about the Thirty-Nine Steps. Somebody's going to warm them. How can you warn steps?


HANNAY: Go on. 


PAMELA: Well, somebody called "the professor" is taking the secret out of London. He's picking up someone at the London Palladium today.


HANNAY: The London Palladium? I don't know what a theater has to do with it, but come on, we're going to London!


MUSIC: BRIDGE


COMMISSIONER: (CALM) You're quite right, madam. It's true the air ministry has a new thing that quite a lot of people are interested in. 


PAMELA: (AGITATED) Well, then, please--! 


COMMISSIONER: But they're positive that no papers are missing about it that would be of any use at all to a spy. 


PAMELA: But I tell you I'm quite certain! There's a man leaving the country tonight with something.


COMMISSIONER: (SHRUGS) Since you telephoned from Scotland this morning we've made the most extensive inquiries.


PAMELA: (DISAPPOINTED) Well, it's obvious that I'm wasting my time here.


COMMISSIONER: Er, just a moment, please, miss. There is one thing you haven't told us. Where's Richard Hannay? 


PAMELA: (CAGEY) I haven't the faintest idea. 


COMMISSIONER: I see. Well, you're in the telephone book, aren't you?


PAMELA: Yes. 


COMMISSIONER: If anything crops up, we'll give you a ring.


PAMELA: Thank you. 


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR OPENS ... PAMELA'S STEPS AWAY


PAMELA: (OFF) Goodbye, commissioner.


COMMISSIONER: Goodbye.


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR CLOSES AS PAMELA EXITS


COMMISSIONER: Henry? Get a couple of men and follow that girl. She'll lead us to Hannay, all right. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE ... CHANGES TO ACCOMPANIMENT OF WOMAN SINGER WHO IS JUST FINISHING A CLASSY MUSIC HALL TUNE


SOUND: LONDON PALLADIUM CROWD CHEERS AND APPLAUDS AS SONG ENDS


PAMELA: (HUSHED) Hannay? Hannay?! Richard!


HANNAY: I'm glad you've come. Listen, the professor's in that box up there.


PAMELA: I've been to Scotland Yard. They refused to do anything. They say there are no papers missing.


MUSIC: MR. MEMORY'S FANFARE


HANNAY: I-- Wait a minute, listen! I've heard that tune before at the music hall-- Annabella--


2ND COMPÈRE: (FROM THE STAGE) Ladies and gentlemen, with your kind attention and permission, I have the honor of presenting to you one of the most remarkable men in the world. Every day he commits to memory fifty new facts -- and remembers every one of them. (CONTINUES INDECIPHERABLY BEHIND HANNAY AND PAMELA--)


HANNAY: The same little man-- (REALIZES) I've got it, I've got it! All the information is inside Mr. Memory's head!


PAMELA: I don't understand. 


HANNAY: Don't you see? The papers were borrowed, memorized by Mr. Memory, and then replaced.


PAMELA: (UNDERSTANDS, AGREES) Oh, yes!


MEMORY: (FROM THE STAGE, OVERLAPS WITH HENRY BELOW) Thank you! A question, please! Ladies first.


SOUND: MEMBERS OF THE CROWD START SHOUTING QUESTIONS, IN BG


HENRY: Mr. Hannay? Police. Come along.


HANNAY: Oh, the police? Well-- Well, listen. There's something you ought to know.


HENRY: Come quietly.


HANNAY: Oh, yes, but that man on the stage--


HENRY: (INTERRUPTS) Look here, old man -- you don't want to cause trouble and spoil other people's entertainment, do you? Now then, come quietly.


SOUND: QUESTIONS FROM CROWD CEASE BEHIND--


MEMORY: (TO CROWD) One at a time, please. One at a time. One question, please.


HANNAY: (TO HENRY) Now, wait a minute, officer. (UP, CALLS, A LITTLE DESPERATELY) Mr. Memory?! Mr. Memory! What are the Thirty-Nine Steps?! Come on, answer up! What are the Thirty-Nine Steps?!


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, CROWD MURMURS WITH QUIET CONFUSION ... THEN IN BG


MEMORY: (SHAKEN) The Thirty-Nine Steps? 


HANNAY: (SAVAGELY) Answer me! What are the Thirty-Nine Steps?! 


MEMORY: (MECHANICALLY) The Thirty-Nine Steps is the name of an organization of spies collecting information on behalf of the foreign office of--


SOUND: LOUD GUNSHOT! ... SCREAMS! ... CROWD PANICS, MURMURS, RUNS, ET CETERA ... IN BG


HANNAY: The professor! It was the professor fired that shot. Come on!


MUSIC: BRIDGE


MEMORY: (LABORED BREATHING, SLOWLY DYING, IN BG)


COMMISSIONER: All right, he's still conscious.


HENRY: We got the man who shot him, sir. 


COMMISSIONER: Good. All right, Mr. Hannay, what was it you wanted to ask him? 


HANNAY: (EVENLY) Mr. Memory, what was the secret formula the professor had you memorize? 


MEMORY: (WEAK, CONFUSED) Will it be all right me telling you, sir? 


HANNAY: (GENTLY) Yes. The professor sent me. I'm the man you're to tell it to. 


MEMORY: Big job to learn it. Biggest job I ever tackled. Don't want to throw it away.


HANNAY: It will be quite all right. 


MEMORY: (MECHANICALLY, BUT WITH DIFFICULTY, INCREASINGLY DELIRIOUS) The first feature of the new engine is its greatly increased ratio of compression, represented by R-one minus one over R to the power of gamma. Angle of forty-five degrees. Dimensions of cylinders as follows-- This device renders the engine completely silent. Am I right, sir?


HANNAY: Quite right, thank you. 


MEMORY: Thank you, sir. I'm glad-- (GASP, THEN DYING BREATH)


MUSIC: SOMBER BRIDGE


SOUND: TRAIN WHISTLE ... INTERIOR OF TRAIN AS IT RUMBLES DOWN TRACK ... THEN IN BG


2ND CONDUCTOR: Tickets! Tickets, please! 


PAMELA: Um-- Oh, I have it right here. Let's see. (BEAT) Here we are.


2ND CONDUCTOR: (EXAMINES TICKET) Hmm. Well, going to Scotland, eh?


PAMELA: Yes.


2ND CONDUCTOR: Holiday?


PAMELA: No.


2ND CONDUCTOR: Live there?


PAMELA: (LIGHTLY) Unfortunately.


2ND CONDUCTOR: Well, have a good trip, miss.


PAMELA: Thank you.


2ND CONDUCTOR: (MOVING OFF) The diner will be open in another hour.


PAMELA: (CALLS AFTER HIM) Oh, I don't believe I'll want any dinner.


HANNAY: (BEAT, IN CLOSE) Ticket, please. 


PAMELA: Well, I just gave my ticket-- (SURPRISED, PLEASED) Richard!


HANNAY: May I sit down?


PAMELA: Well, of course.


MUSIC: ROMANTIC ... SNEAKS IN--


PAMELA: What are you doing on this train?


HANNAY: I'm going back to Scotland.


PAMELA: Holiday? 


HANNAY: No. 


PAMELA: Well, you certainly don't live there.


HANNAY: No. 


PAMELA: (AMUSED DISBELIEF) Richard Hannay, we're not starting this all over again? They're not after you again? 


HANNAY: No. No, this time, I'm not being pursued.


PAMELA: Well, what then?


HANNAY: This time, I'm doing the pursuing. (LOVINGLY) Come here.


PAMELA: Oh, Richard! (MUFFLED MURMURS AS HE KISSES HER, THEN SHE EXHALES WITH A MOAN OF PLEASURE)


HANNAY: I think I'm going to like Scotland this time. (CHUCKLES)


MUSIC: UP FOR CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: From Studio One at CBS, you have just heard Mr. Glenn Ford starring in Fletcher Markle's production of "The 39 Steps" by John Buchan, another of the world's great stories from radio's celebrated playhouse of dramatic entertainment. Tonight's script was prepared by Robert Cenedella and the original musical score was composed by Lana Domian and conducted by Alexander Semmler. Now again -- Mr. Markle.


HOST: May a producer identify the principals in tonight's cast? In the foreground-- 


HANNAY: --Richard Hannay-- 


HOST: --was played of course by Mr. Ford, who is currently starred in Columbia Pictures' film comedy "The Mating of Millie." 


PAMELA: Pamela-- 


HOST: --was played by Cathleen Cordell. 


ANNABELLA: Annabella-- 


HOST: --was Mercedes McCambridge.


CROFTER: The crofter--


HOST: --was played by Everett Sloane. 


PROF: The professor-- 


HOST: --was John Stanley. 


ANNIE: Annie--


HOST: --was Miriam Wolfe.


MEMORY: Mr. Memory-- 


HOST: --was Hedley Rennie.


HOBBS: Mr. Hobbs--


HOST: --was played by Lauren Gilbert. Frantically active in the supporting cast were Robert Dryden, Neil Fitzgerald, John Merlin, Brainard Duffield, Alan Devitt, Ivor Francis, Mary Michael, and Louis Quinn. Music hall divertissements were performed by Miss Jean Tighe. Next week from Studio One, the return to our microphones of a great American novelist and a great American actor. They've been a very fortunate combination before on this series and we're sure they will be again. Our story is Sinclair Lewis's provocative portrait of a middle-class businessman whose name was Babbitt, and our star is the magnificent and quite irreplaceable Mr. Walter Huston. We hope you'll be with us. And now until next week -- until Walter Huston starring in "Babbitt" by Sinclair Lewis -- this is Fletcher Markle with a "good night" and "thank you" from all of us in Studio One.


MUSIC: CLOSING THEME ... THEN IN BG, UNTIL END


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: A program you won't want to miss. That's "Report Card," the next production of the famed CBS documentary unit. Tomorrow night over many of these stations from ten to eleven p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Columbia presents a one-hour inquiry into the state of our nation's schools. Be sure to hear "Report Card." 


This is Lee Vines, and this is CBS, where ninety-nine million people gather every week -- the Columbia Broadcasting System.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


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