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Strangers on a Train

The Lux Radio Theatre

Strangers on a Train

Dec 03 1951



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

HOST

LIBBY COLLINS, Hollywood reporter

AILEEN STANLEY JR., intermission guest


GUY HAINES

BRUNO ANTONY

MIRIAM, Guy's shrewish wife

OPERATOR (1 line)

ANNE MORTON, Guy's loving girlfriend

FATHER, Bruno's stern father

MOTHER, Bruno's silly, indulgent mother

SENATOR MORTON, Anne's dignified father

BARBARA, Anne's irrepressible younger sister

TURLEY, police captain

PROFESSOR (4 lines)

BESSIE, maid (3 lines)

JUDGE (3 lines)

MRS. CUNNINGHAM, giggly society matron

HENNESSEY, easygoing detective

HAMMOND, zealous detective 

VOICE (1 line)

VENDOR, fast-talking, gregarious (3 lines)

OLD MAN

ADAMS, police sergeant (4 lines)

MANAGER, of amusement park (2 lines)

EMPLOYEE, of amusement park (1 line)

MAC, police

MINISTER (1 line)

and various CROWDS


NOTE: Lux aired another version of this play on April 12, 1954. This transcript (of a 1951 rehearsal recording, not the actual broadcast) contains material from the '54 version in brackets.




ANNOUNCER: Lux presents Hollywood!


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: Lever Brothers Company, the makers of Lux Toilet Soap, bring you "The Lux Radio Theatre," starring Ray Milland, Ruth Roman, and Frank Lovejoy in "Strangers on a Train." Ladies and gentlemen, your producer, Mr. William Keighley.


MUSIC: THEME ... UP AND OUT


HOST: Greetings from Hollywood, ladies and gentlemen. Travel by train, ship, or plane usually puts us in the mood to be kind to strangers. A question which would ordinarily receive a courteous but unencouraging answer is almost welcomed when we find ourselves in strange surroundings without the security of friendly conversation. It's a commendable custom, but at times may lead to unexpected and terrifying complications -- as our stars tonight are about to portray. Ray Milland and Frank Lovejoy, who are the strangers on a train, and Ruth Roman who recreates her starring role. Not only was this Warner Brothers picture directed by that noted master of suspense, Alfred Hitchcock, but one of the major roles was played by his daughter, Patricia Hitchcock, and we're happy that Patricia could appear tonight in her original part in "Strangers on a Train." I'm sure there are no strangers in our audience to the improving qualities of Lux Toilet Soap as a beauty care, because Lux facials are the daily companions of lovely ladies who know they can depend on Lux Soap for the complexion care that leaves their skin lovelier. Here is "Strangers on a Train," starring Ray Milland as Guy Haines, Ruth Roman as Anne Morton, and Frank Lovejoy as Bruno Antony, with Patricia Hitchcock as Barbara. 


MUSIC: FOREBODING INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND HOST--


HOST: A few moments ago, a northbound train left Washington, D. C. Among the passengers settling down in the club car are two young men.


SOUND: MOVING TRAIN INTERIOR BACKGROUND 


BRUNO: I beg your pardon.


GUY: (LOOKS UP FROM READING) Hmm? Oh. 


BRUNO: I hate to interrupt your reading, but aren't you Guy Haines? 


GUY: That's right. 


BRUNO: I'm quite a tennis fan. I saw your match last season in South Orange against Faraday.


GUY: (MODESTLY) Well, that was one of my lucky days. 


BRUNO: I certainly admire people who do things. By the way, my name is Antony; Bruno Antony.


GUY: (POLITE, BUT UNENCOURAGING) How do you do? 


BRUNO: (EXHALES) Well, I guess you want to get back to your book. You go ahead and read.


GUY: Thanks.


BRUNO: (BEAT) You know, it must be pretty exciting to be so important.


GUY: Oh, a tennis player isn't so important. 


BRUNO: Oh, but people who do things are important. Now, me, I - I never seem to do anything. I suppose you're going to Southampton for the doubles, hm? 


GUY: You certainly read the sport page, don't you? 


BRUNO: I wish I could be there to watch you, but I've got to be back in Washington tomorrow. Cigarette? 


GUY: No, not now, thanks. 


BRUNO: Uh, you don't happen to have a match? 


GUY: Here.


BRUNO: (SURPRISED) Oh - oh, a lighter. Thank you. (LIGHTS CIGARETTE, THEN--) Oh, my, that's elegant. It's engraved, too. (READS) "From A to G." (TO GUY) I bet I can guess who A is. Anne -- Anne Morton. 


GUY: Now, wait a minute-- 


BRUNO: Oh, it's simple. See, sometimes I turn the sports page and look at the society section. Pictures, too. She's very beautiful, Senator Morton's daughter.


GUY: You're quite a reader, Mr. Antony. 


BRUNO: Yes, I am. You ask me anything, I've got the answer. Even about people I don't even know. Like, uh-- Like who would like to marry whom when his wife gets a divorce. 


GUY: (SHARP) Maybe you read too much.


BRUNO: (CONTRITE) Well, there I go again. I meet somebody I like and admire, and I - I say the wrong thing. 


GUY: Oh, forget it. I guess I'm just a little jittery.


BRUNO: Oh, well, there's a cure for that. (CALLS) Uh, waiter? Scotch and plain water, please. A pair -- doubles. (CHUCKLES, TO GUY) That's the only kind of doubles I play.


GUY: I'm afraid you'll have to drink both of 'em.


BRUNO: And I can do it. (CHANGES SUBJECT) Uh, when's the wedding? 


GUY: What? 


BRUNO: Oh, you and Anne Morton -- the wedding. It was in the papers. 


GUY: Well, it shouldn't have been, unless they've legalized bigamy. 


BRUNO: Ah. It's wonderful, you know, having your company all the way to New York. 


GUY: As a matter of fact, I'm getting off at Metcalf. 


BRUNO: Metcalf? Who'd want to stop at Metcalf?


GUY: It's my hometown.


BRUNO: Oh! Oh, I get it. A little chat with your wife about the divorce. Well, here's luck, Mr. Haines. Drink up, then we'll have lunch sent to my compartment.


GUY: Thanks very much, but I think I'll go to the dining car.


BRUNO: Oh, that's filled up. There's no seats for about twenty minutes. 


GUY: Well, how about lunch in my compartment? 


BRUNO: Oh, I wouldn't think of that. Come along, Mr. Haines. (MOVING OFF) You know, this is a real pleasure.


SOUND: TRAIN BACKGROUND UP AND DOWN FOR TRANSITION ... CONTINUES IN BG ... LUNCH EFFECTS (UTENSILS, DISHES, GLASSES, ET CETERA) IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


BRUNO: And all told, I went to three different colleges. I got kicked out each time -- drinking and gambling. Not like you, huh, Guy? (CHUCKLES) All right, so I'm a bum.


GUY: Who said you were?


BRUNO: Well, my father. He hates me. With all the money he's got, he thinks I ought to punch a time clock somewhere and work my way up selling paint or something. 


GUY: Well, I think possibly he's--


BRUNO: (WITH AN EDGE) I hate him, too. I tell you, I get so sore at him sometimes, I - I want to kill him. 


GUY: You know, I don't think you know what you want. 


BRUNO: Well, I want to do something - and everything. You know, I've got a theory you should do everything before you die. Have you ever driven a car blindfolded at a hundred and fifty miles an hour? 


GUY: (AMUSED) No, not lately.


BRUNO: Well, I did. Flew a jet plane, too. Man, what a thrill! Almost blew the sawdust out of my head. 


GUY: Say, what are you trying to prove? 


BRUNO: Well, I'm not like you, Guy. You're lucky. You're smart. First of all, you're a wonderful tennis player. On top of that, you've got a swell job -- assistant to a United States senator. And on top of that, you're going to marry the boss's daughter. Makes a nice shortcut to a career, doesn't it? 


GUY: (DEFENSIVE) Marrying the senator's daughter's got nothing to do with it. 


BRUNO: All right, take it easy, Guy. I'm your friend, remember? I like you. I'd do anything for you. 


GUY: Look, we'll be stopping soon and I've got to change trains.


BRUNO: Oh, yes, that's right -- Metcalf. What did you say her name was? Your wife's? 


GUY: Miriam. 


BRUNO: (THOUGHTFUL) Miriam. I suppose she played around a lot, huh? 


GUY: (SHARP) Skip it, Bruno. 


BRUNO: Okay. (BEAT) Say, want to hear one of my ideas for a perfect murder? 


GUY: (LIGHTLY) Murder? Look, I may be old-fashioned, but I thought it was still against the law.


BRUNO: Well, what's a life or two? Some people are better off dead. Someone like - your wife and my father, for instance. Now, let's say that you'd like to get rid of your wife.


GUY: (CHUCKLES) You know, you've got quite a sense of humor, Bruno.


BRUNO: No, no. No, no. No, seriously. Let's say that you had a very good reason to want her dead, but you'd be afraid to kill her and you know why? You'd be caught. What would trip you up? The motive. Now, here's my idea-- 


GUY: (UNINTERESTED, WANTS TO GO) I'm afraid I don't have time to listen.


BRUNO: (IGNORES HIM) Oh, it's so simple, too. Two fellows meet -- accidentally, like you and me here on the train. No connection between them at all. They never even saw each other before. But now each one has somebody that he'd like to get rid of. So they, er-- They swap murders. 


GUY: Swap murders?


BRUNO: Each fellow does the other fellow's murder. There's nothing to connect them. Each one has murdered a total stranger. Like, you do my murder and I do yours.


GUY: We're coming into my station. 


BRUNO: For example, your wife and my father. Criss-cross. 


GUY: What? 


BRUNO: (CHUCKLES) Yes, we do talk the same language, don't we? 


GUY: Thanks for the lunch, Bruno. 


BRUNO: I'm glad you enjoyed it. Think my theory's okay, huh, Guy? You like it? 


GUY: (CHUCKLES, HUMORS HIM) Sure. Sure. Got some great ideas. (MOVING OFF) Nice meeting you. 


BRUNO: Good luck at Southampton, Guy. (TO HIMSELF) You bet I got some great i-- (SUDDENLY CALLS) Oh, Guy! Your lighter! You forgot your cigarette lighter! (NO RESPONSE; EXAMINES LIGHTER, THOUGHTFUL, TO HIMSELF) Huh. "From A to G." I'll send it to him sometime. Yes, I must send it to him sometime. 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... THEN UP FOR TRANSITION


SOUND: PARK BACKGROUND (BIRDS CHIRP, ET CETERA)


MIRIAM: I hope you don't mind meeting in the park, Guy.


GUY: (RELUCTANTLY POLITE) No, Miriam. No, this is fine. 


MIRIAM: I couldn't very well meet you in the store, could I? I arranged to take my lunch hour later.


GUY: You're looking well, Miriam. 


MIRIAM: So are you. You got a nice tan playing tennis with all your rich friends.


GUY: When can we see your lawyer? 


MIRIAM: What's your hurry, Guy? 


[GUY: My hurry? You're the one who's in a hurry, aren't you?


MIRIAM: When you wouldn't give me the divorce right away, I sort of hoped it was because you were a little bit jealous.


GUY: I got over being jealous a long time ago, Miriam.]


MIRIAM: You know, I think you're handsomer than ever.


GUY: You know, I think it's pretty late to start flirting with a discarded husband. Now, let's see your lawyer and get this over with.


MIRIAM: Did you bring the money? Lawyers are expensive. 


GUY: It's in this envelope. Here. 


MIRIAM: Thanks. You know, if I'd have known that you'd start doing so well, I wouldn't have run out on you. 


GUY: What are you trying to say, Miriam? 


MIRIAM: I got a big surprise for you. I'm not getting a divorce.


GUY: (UPSET) But it's what you've wanted! That's all you've been harping about for more than a year.


MIRIAM: It's a woman's privilege to change her mind. Now I can buy some pretty clothes. I wouldn't want you to be ashamed of me in Washington.


GUY: What's that supposed to mean? 


MIRIAM: Don't look so mad, Guy. You always smile when you have your picture taken for the newspapers. Especially when Anne Morton's hanging on your arm.


GUY: Let's not talk about Anne Morton. 


MIRIAM: Well, you can throw all your little dreams about her right in the ashcan. It'd make a real pretty story, wouldn't it? The senator's daughter all involved with a married man.


GUY: What's happened, Miriam? Your boyfriend run out on you?


MIRIAM: No man runs out on me, Guy, not even you.


GUY: Just get one thing straight. I never want to see or hear of you again. 


MIRIAM: I could be very pathetic in a courtroom, Guy -- the poor deserted little wife. Better think it over, honey. 


GUY: I'm warning you, Miriam. Either we go ahead with the divorce or I'll--


MIRIAM: (INTERRUPTS) I wish I had time to listen to you, Guy, but I've got to get back to work. I'll see ya in Washington in two weeks.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: PHONE HOOK JIGGLES ... OPERATOR'S AND ANNE'S VOICES ON FILTER


GUY: Hello? Hello, operator? 


OPERATOR: I have your party now, sir. Go ahead, please. 


ANNE: Hello? Guy, is that you? 


GUY: Anne? Hello, darling.


ANNE: Where are you? 


GUY: I'm in Metcalf. 


ANNE: Oh. Then you've seen Miriam. Guy, did - did everything go all right? 


GUY: (MISERABLE) No. Everything went all wrong. She doesn't want the divorce. 


ANNE: Guy, it's - it's unbelievable. I mean, after all these months. But what did she say?


GUY: (SHARPLY) Does it make any difference what she said?! (CONTRITE) Oh, I - I'm sorry, Anne. It's just that I feel so--


ANNE: Yes, darling. I know how you feel. But you sound so savage, Guy. 


GUY: I'd like to break her neck. I'd like to break her foul, useless little neck!


ANNE: Oh, there's no use talking like that, dear. 


GUY: I know. I suppose I'd try to see her again, but I've got to get to Southampton. My train will be here in a moment.


ANNE: Then write me. Please write me. 


GUY: Sure, I'll write on the train.


ANNE: And don't worry, darling. We've waited this long. We can wait a little longer. 


GUY: (WARMLY) I don't know what I'd do without you. 


ANNE: I love you, Guy.


GUY: Well, I've got to rush, dear. My train's coming.


ANNE: I'll see you on Thursday? 


GUY: Yeah, sure.


ANNE: Good luck, darling.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP ... GUY'S VOICE ON FILTER


GUY: Hello? 


BRUNO: Guy, this is Bruno. How are ya, Guy? 


GUY: Who? Who'd you say this was? 


BRUNO: Bruno! Bruno Antony. Don't you remember? On the train. 


GUY: Oh. Oh, yes. 


BRUNO: I would have called you sooner, but the operator had a little trouble finding you in Southampton.


GUY: Look, would you mind telling me why you're phoning?


BRUNO: How're the matches going, Guy? 


GUY: I don't play until the morning. 


BRUNO: Oh. (CHANGES SUBJECT) Now, Guy, about your visit in Metcalf. Are you getting a divorce? 


GUY: Oh, now wait a minute, Bruno-- 


BRUNO: She won't give it to you, right? Miriam won't give you a divorce? 


GUY: No. 


BRUNO: She double-crossed you. You gonna see her again? 


GUY: Now look, Bruno, why don't you just--?


BRUNO: Well, I told you I liked you, Guy. I'm your friend. You should never forget that. You just leave Miriam to me. 


GUY: What are you talking about?


BRUNO: You'll find out, Guy. Just be patient, that's all. You just be patient.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


FATHER: (APPROACHES, STERN) I don't care what Bruno's doing. I said I wanted to talk to him. 


BRUNO: Well, if you're talking about me, father, I had to call a friend of mine long distance.


MOTHER: Really, Charles. Must you always take this tone with Bruno? 


BRUNO: Oh, it's all right, mother. I'm used to his tone by now. 


FATHER: You can wipe that injured look off your face right now. You were out last night, weren't you?


BRUNO: Well, I'm a big boy, father. I go out at night all the time.


FATHER: You had another accident. You hit another car. 


MOTHER: Charles, really--


FATHER: Now it's hit-and-run driving. And you knew about it all the time. 


MOTHER: But, dear, it was a parked car. No one was in it. 


FATHER: Why don't you tell that to the police? 


MOTHER: (WORRIED) Well, they - they won't do anything to Bruno? (WEEPS, IN BG)


FATHER: This was the last time, Eunice. So help me, I'll never lift a finger for him again. 


BRUNO: (SOOTHING) It's all right, mother. Now, now, now, dear. You know I can't stand to see you crying. (BEAT) There anything else you want to say to me, father? 


FATHER: (SEETHING) Yes. Get out of my sight. Get out of my sight before I-- 


BRUNO: I'll be back tomorrow, mother. 


MOTHER: (STOPS WEEPING) Bruno, where are you going? 


BRUNO: Oh, just a little trip, mother. (MOVING OFF) It's something for a friend of mine. 


MOTHER: Oh, you just don't understand him, Charles. You just don't understand him.


FATHER: (TROUBLED) What's he going to do next? Tell me, what's he going to do next? 


MOTHER: Why, nothing. Nothing at all.


FATHER: He's not normal. If it's the last thing I do, I'm going to have that boy taken care of. If necessary, put under restraint. 


MOTHER: I'll never permit it. Never! Never! 


FATHER: It can't go on, Eunice. Things like this just can't go on.


MUSIC: TRANSITION 


SOUND: NOCTURNAL BACKGROUND (CRICKETS CHIRP) ... GUY'S STEPS ON SIDEWALK, OUT BEHIND--


BRUNO: (OFF) Guy! Over here, Guy! (BEAT, AS GUY APPROACHES AND STOPS; CLOSER) Well, hello. 


GUY: (PUZZLED) Bruno? 


BRUNO: That's right, Guy. How are you? 


GUY: What are you doing here? And at this time of night? 


BRUNO: I was waiting for you to get back to Washington. I thought of meeting you at the station, but then I figured this might be better here in front of your apartment. 


GUY: (ANNOYED) Now look, it's one o'clock in the morning and I'm--


BRUNO: You don't seem very pleased to see me. 


GUY: Would you mind telling me what this is all about? 


BRUNO: Oh, I, er-- I just come back from Metcalf, Guy. I brought you a little present. See? It's a pair of glasses. You didn't tell me that Miriam wore glasses. 


GUY: You've seen Miriam?


BRUNO: Oh, it was very quick, Guy. She wasn't hurt in any way. It was all over in no time.


GUY: What are you trying to tell me? 


BRUNO: Heh! I knew you'd be surprised. Nothing for us to worry about, either. Nobody saw me. Only Miriam. I was very careful, Guy. Even when I dropped your cigarette lighter, I went right back and picked it up.


GUY: Cigarette light--? Why, you maniac! 


BRUNO: But, Guy, we planned it on the train together. You wanted it, you remember? Where you going? 


GUY: Where do you think I'm going? I don't believe you, but I'm going to call the police just the same. 


BRUNO: Oh, you can't, Guy. We'd both be arrested for murder. You're just as much in it as I am. We planned it together. Criss-cross. 


GUY: Why, you crazy fool. Do you think you can get away with that? 


BRUNO: Oh, come now, Guy, why should I go to Metcalf to kill a total stranger, unless it was part of a plan and you were in on it? You're the one who benefits, Guy. I didn't even know the girl. If you go to the police now, you'll just be turning yourself in as an accessory, you see? You had the motive.


GUY: Why, you crazy fool! I--


BRUNO: Ah, you must be tired. I - I know I am. (LIGHTLY) I've had a strenuous evening. (MORE SERIOUS) I've gotta talk to you about my father. I've done my part, now you'll do yours. [I've got the plans of the house here, all drawn up. Now, as soon as you--]


GUY: (SAVAGE) Shut up! 


BRUNO: We have to arrange things.


GUY: Get away from me before I [give you the same thing you gave Miriam]-- 


BRUNO: (SOOTHING) Oh, Guy, you're not yourself. Now, when you think things over, you'll see that I'm right. Tomorrow we can talk-- 


GUY: I don't know you. I never saw you before! I never want to see you again! 


BRUNO: Your lighter, Guy. The one that Anne gave you? You left it on the train. Don't you even miss it? 


GUY: Give it to me, Bruno. Give me that lighter. 


BRUNO: I don't have it, Guy. That is, I don't have it with me. (CHUCKLES) Well, as I said, we can arrange everything tomorrow.


MUSIC: TROUBLED ... SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... THEN UP FOR TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP


GUY: (INTO PHONE) Hello? -- Anne? Oh, I'm sorry, darling, but I just got in. -- Of course I'm all right. But you sound upset. Anything wrong? -- All right, darling. Yes, I'll come over right away. 


MUSIC: UP FOR TRANSITION


ANNE: Thanks for coming over, darling. 


GUY: Anne! Anne, what is it? You're trembling. 


ANNE: I wonder if you know how much I love you. Come along, Guy. Father and Barbara, they - they're waiting in the library. 


SOUND: SCENE FADES OUT ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... SCENE FADES IN


SENATOR: I thought we might be alone, Guy, but Anne insisted and so did Barbara.


BARBARA: Now, really, daddy. If I'm going to be Guy's sister-in-law, the least I can do is stay--


SENATOR: (INTERRUPTS) Is sit down and keep quiet. Guy, we - we wouldn't have called you at this hour if it weren't important. It - it's about your wife. 


GUY: Miriam? What about her, sir? 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... UNEASY, IN BG


SENATOR: I'm sorry to be the one to tell you. She's - been killed, Guy. Murdered. 


BARBARA: The police have been trying to locate you everywhere. 


SENATOR: You're to call headquarters in Metcalf. 


GUY: (LOW, REALIZES) Miriam? Murdered! 


ANNE: Tonight about nine o'clock, she - she was strangled.


MUSIC: UP FOR CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: In a few moments we'll return with Act II of "Strangers on a Train," but now here's our Hollywood reporter, Libby Collins, with the Lux Movie News of the Week.


LIBBY: The big news here, John, is the premiere of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's Technicolor production of "Quo Vadis." 'Most every celebrity in Hollywood was there. 


ANNOUNCER: All Hollywood is still talking about it.


LIBBY: And everyone thought Robert Taylor was magnificent as Marcus, the pagan Roman warrior. His love scenes with Deborah Kerr, playing Lygia, the gentle Christian hostage, provide some of the most compelling drama ever seen on the screen.


ANNOUNCER: And Leo Genn as Petronius turns in a terrific performance.


LIBBY: Every moment of "Quo Vadis" is really epic drama: the chariot races at the Coliseum, the spectacular burning of Rome, the martyred Christians that the mad tyrant Nero orders thrown to the lions. 


ANNOUNCER: I understand that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer built an entire city outside of Rome for the picture. 


LIBBY: And spent two years filming it. 


ANNOUNCER: Lovely Deborah Kerr's costumes are certainly gorgeous -- just right for her exciting kind of beauty. Her milk-white skin against her copper-colored hair is something.


LIBBY: Well, John, Deborah Kerr's complexion is something special. It's truly Lux lovely. 


ANNOUNCER: Yes, when you see a lovely complexion like hers, you realize why screen stars are devoted to the gentle protecting care of Lux Toilet Soap. 


LIBBY: They know it's easy to be Lux lovely, John. Daily Lux beauty facials do wonders for the skin, really make it softer and smoother. 


ANNOUNCER: Lux Soap has Active Lather that ensures gentle, thorough cleansing. 


LIBBY: Yes, you simply cream the rich lather well in, rinse with warm water, and follow with a cold splash. Then pat dry with a soft towel. This simple care does wonders. Leaves skin fresh as a flower.


ANNOUNCER: Yes, there's a reason why Lux is Hollywood's own beauty soap. If you haven't tried it, why not start your Active Lather facials tomorrow? Be Lux lovely, like nine out of ten screen stars who use fragrant, white Lux Toilet Soap. Now our producer, Mr. William Keighley. 


HOST: Act II of "Strangers on a Train," starring Ray Milland as Guy Haines, Frank Lovejoy as Bruno Antony, and Ruth Roman as Anne Morton.


MUSIC: INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND HOST--


HOST: Twenty minutes ago on a street corner, Guy Haines listened to Bruno Antony tell an incredible story of how he had murdered guy's wife. And now in Senator Morton's home, Guy learns that Bruno's fantastic report is completely true.


SENATOR: It happened in an amusement park, Guy. Some sort of Lovers' Lane, I believe. Terrible.


ANNE: Apparently she'd gone there with some other people. Two of the young men found her. It - it was done by someone else. 


BARBARA: They don't even have a suspect, Guy -- except you, probably.


SENATOR: Barbara, I wish you'd keep quiet.


BARBARA: But the police will say that Guy wanted Miriam out of the way so he could marry Anne. 


GUY: She's right, senator.


BARBARA: But if you have an alibi, you have nothing to worry about. 


ANNE: You can tell them where you were at about nine o'clock tonight? 


GUY: Well, I was on my way here. I was on the train.


SENATOR: Well, there you are. 


BARBARA: Who saw you? Did you speak to anyone? You need a witness.


GUY: Why, yes. Yes, I did speak to someone. He was the only other passenger in the club car.


ANNE: Someone you know? 


GUY: No. No, he said his name was Collyer or Collins or something. Said he was a professor at Delaware Tech. He'd been drinking.


SENATOR: Drinking? 


GUY: Yeah, he'd been to some meeting, had a couple of drinks. 


ANNE: But he was on the train. He saw you. Then everything's all right.


BARBARA: You'll still have to answer some questions.


SENATOR: It's a dreadful business. Dreadful. Poor unfortunate girl. 


BARBARA: (DISAGREES) Miriam was rotten.


SENATOR: She was a human being.


ANNE: Father, it's getting late and Guy looks so tired. 


SENATOR: Of course.


BARBARA: (TO GUY AND ANNE) Well, you two -- now you can be married right away. Think of it! You're free.


SENATOR: (MOVING OFF) You won't forget to phone the Metcalf police, Guy. Captain Turley.


GUY: Yes, sir. Good night, senator. Good night, Barbara. 


BARBARA: (MOVING OFF) I still think it would be wonderful to have a man love you so much he'd kill for you. 


ANNE: You know, I kept saying over and over again I was being silly, Guy, but there was one horrible moment tonight when the news came through, I - I kept remembering what you said on the phone from Metcalf, after you'd seen her. 


GUY: That I could break her neck?


ANNE: No, no -- don't even say it. Forget you ever said it. And there was something even more terrifying than the murder itself. The horrible thought that if you had anything to do with it, we'd--


GUY: (ASTONISHED) Anything to do with it? 


ANNE: --we'd have to be separated, perhaps forever. I - I couldn't stand that, Guy. I couldn't bear it.


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... SAD, IN BG


GUY: Anne! Anne, you don't think that I--?


ANNE: Oh, no, darling. No, of course not. Just hold me, Guy. Just hold me.


MUSIC: UP FOR TRANSITION


TURLEY: I'm Captain Turley, Mr. Haines. It's good of you to come down here so quickly. 


GUY: Well, I'm just as anxious as you are, captain.


TURLEY: Well, we've managed to locate the gentleman you spoke with on the train. Well, professor? This is Mr. Haines.


PROFESSOR: Well, I - I can't tell you how foolish I feel, captain. I - I really don't remember meeting this gentleman. 


GUY: You don't remember? But you - you--


TURLEY: Just a moment, Mr. Haines. 


PROFESSOR: Unfortunately, I remember very little of my trip. You see, we - we had a little celebration. I'm not a drinking man and-- Well, just one or two drinks and I--


GUY: But we were sitting opposite each other. You were going over some speech you made about calculus, mathematics, or something.


PROFESSOR: (EXHALES) I'm very sorry, Mr. Haines. Heh! I certainly must have been celebrating. 


TURLEY: If you'll wait outside, professor. 


PROFESSOR: (MOVING OFF) Yes. Yes, of course.


GUY: Is it so important whether he remembers me or not? Surely the important thing is that I've been able to name a man who was on the train with me. Now, you've been able to find him. Isn't that proof of where I was last night? 


TURLEY: Yes, I'd say you were in the clear, but, er, there is a little more checking I'd like to do. 


GUY: But if I'm in the clear--!


TURLEY: Take it easy, Mr. Haines. You're free to go back to Washington right now. 


GUY: Thank you, captain. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION


ANNE: Then the police verified his alibi, father, and said he could go. Isn't that about it, dear? 


GUY: Except that when an alibi is full of scotch, it casts a little doubt.


BARBARA: Then the professor was boiled. 


GUY: He didn't remember me [at all, Barbara.


ANNE: But you knew he was on the train. Wasn't that enough to prove that's where you were?


GUY: I wish I knew. For sure, I mean.


SENATOR: Oh, everything's all right, Anne.] The police are just being thorough. What's your next move, Guy? 


GUY: Well, whatever it is, the police will know about it. Take a look out the window. My guardian angel. 


BARBARA: (A BIT THRILLED) Why - why, Guy, you're being tailed! 


GUY: That's Detective Leslie Hennessey. He works sixteen hours a day. Someone named Hammond takes over for the next eight. As a matter of fact, Hennessey seems like a pretty nice fella.


SENATOR: For your own peace of mind, Guy, perhaps-- Well, perhaps if you worked here at the house for the next few days-- Well, it would be less embarrassing for you.


GUY: It would be less embarrassing for you, sir, if I resigned as your assistant.


ANNE: That's ridiculous.


SENATOR: Of course it is.


BARBARA: Besides, don't you have to play in the tennis tournament? 


GUY: I'm withdrawing [from that, Barbara].


SENATOR: But wouldn't it look awkward if you suddenly canceled all your plans? 


ANNE: Father's right, Guy. You've got to go on as though nothing had happened.


BARBARA: (DRY) Escorted by Mr. Hennessey. 


BESSIE: (APPROACHES) I beg your pardon.


ANNE: What is it, Bessie? 


BESSIE: Telephone for Mr. Haines, miss. They say it's urgent.


ANNE: Oh, you can take it right there, Guy.


GUY: Huh? Oh. Oh, yeah. 


SOUND: RECEIVER UP ... BRUNO'S VOICE ON FILTER


GUY: (INTO PHONE) Hello? 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... UNEASY, IN BG


BRUNO: Hello, Guy? This is Bruno. I was hoping you'd call me before I had--


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN ABRUPTLY


ANNE: What's the matter?


GUY: Must have been some mistake. Wasn't for me.


MUSIC: UP FOR TRANSITION


SOUND: ART GALLERY CROWD MURMURS, THEN IN BG


ANNE: I'm learning more and more things about you, Guy. I never dreamed you were so interested in painting.


GUY: Well, I feel a very warm attachment for this art gallery. For the first time all week we've actually been alone for an hour.


ANNE: (CHUCKLES) By the way, where's Hennessey? 


GUY: Waiting out front.


ANNE: Hadn't we better be leaving? 


GUY: I suppose so. I wonder if we'll ever--


BRUNO: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Uh, Guy? Have a minute, Guy? 


GUY: (TO ANNE) Come on, we'll find Hennessey and get a cab. 


ANNE: But that man. He - he's calling you, Guy. 


GUY: Oh. Excuse me, dear. I'll see what he wants.


SOUND: CROWD NOISE UP TO FILL A PAUSE AS GUY CROSSES TO BRUNO, WHERE THEY SPEAK IN LOW VOICES


BRUNO: Sorry to have to follow you here, Guy. 


GUY: Will you stop pestering me?


BRUNO: You never even answered my note. 


GUY: For the last time, Bruno--! 


BRUNO: You're spoiling everything. You're making me come out in the open. Why didn't you call me? My father's leaving for Florida next week. There's not much time. 


GUY: There's a detective outside. He'll see us together.


BRUNO: Isn't that Anne Morton that you're with? (CHUCKLES) Slight improvement over Miriam, hey, Guy? 


GUY: (MOVING OFF) I'm telling you to stay away from me.


SOUND: CROWD NOISE UP TO FILL A PAUSE AS GUY CROSSES BACK TO ANNE


ANNE: Who is he, Guy? 


GUY: Oh, just some tennis fan. Never saw him before. 


ANNE: That's funny.


GUY: Funny? 


ANNE: I mean, I saw him yesterday.


GUY: Where? 


ANNE: He was at the tennis club watching you practice.


GUY: Oh. 


ANNE: He was sitting with Mr. and Mrs. Darville. He must be very amusing; he had them in stitches most of the time. 


GUY: Who are the Darvilles? 


ANNE: Oh, he's connected with the French Embassy. You'll meet them tomorrow night, darling. They'll be at the party. 


GUY: Oh, yeah. Yes, the party. Anne, do you really think I should be there? 


ANNE: But I thought we settled that, dear. Of course you should be there. (BEAT, PUZZLED) He's watching us, Guy -- that man.


GUY: Come along, dear. Let's go home.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... CHANGES TO SMOOTH PARTY ORCHESTRA, CONTINUES IN BG


SOUND: PARTY CROWD BACKGROUND ... LAUGHS, CHATTER, ET CETERA


SENATOR: Who is he, Barbara? That young Frenchman with the Darvilles? 


BARBARA: Oh, he's not French, daddy. They just introduced me to him. His name's Antony; Bruno Antony. Doesn't he look interesting? 


SENATOR: Why is he looking at you? 


BARBARA: (HUSHED) Daddy, not so loud. He's coming over here. (UP, TO BRUNO) Oh! Oh, this is my father, Mr. Antony. 


BRUNO: Well, I'm delighted to meet you, senator. 


SENATOR: Oh, how do you do? 


BRUNO: Oh, it's a wonderful party, sir. You know, sometime I'd like to talk to you about my idea for harnessing the life force. It'll make atomic power look like the horse and buggy. 


SENATOR: Well, I'm sure-- 


BRUNO: I'm already developing my faculty for seeing millions of miles. Senator, can you imagine being able to smell a flower on the planet Mars? I'd like to have lunch with you someday soon, sir, and tell you more about it. (MOVING OFF) I'll see you later, won't I?


SENATOR: (STAMMERS, TROUBLED) That - that'll be fine. Later, yes. (BEAT, TO BARBARA) I still don't remember inviting that young man. 


BARBARA: I told you, daddy. The Darvilles just brought him along. 


SENATOR: Er, just a minute, Barbara. Where are your glasses? 


BARBARA: Why-- My glasses? 


SENATOR: You're supposed to wear glasses, Barbara. 


BARBARA: Oh, but, daddy -- even at parties? 


SENATOR: Not another word. Get your glasses and put them on.


SOUND &

MUSIC: PARTY CROWD AND ORCHESTRA UP TO FILL A PAUSE FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


ANNE: What are you concerned about, Guy? If the Darvilles brought him-- Well, what difference does it make? 


GUY: He shouldn't be here.


ANNE: But you said you don't even know him.


GUY: Well, I - I just don't like his looks. I don't like the way he's been staring at Barbara.


ANNE: Well, I'm not so sure I blame him. Barbara's very cute, especially when she wears glasses. Besides, he seems to be talking to Judge Donahue right now. 


GUY: Judge Donahue? 


ANNE: Oh, now come on, let's go to dinner.


SOUND &

MUSIC: PARTY CROWD AND ORCHESTRA UP TO FILL A PAUSE FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


BRUNO: There's something else that I want to ask you, Judge Donahue. After you've sentenced a man to the chair, isn't it difficult to go out and eat your dinner after that?


JUDGE: (ANNOYED) Really, young man. When a murderer has been convicted, he must be sentenced. When he's sentenced to death, he must be executed. 


BRUNO: Ohhh. Quite impersonal, isn't it?


JUDGE: Besides, it doesn't happen every day. 


BRUNO: Yeah, so few murderers are caught. 


JUDGE: (MOVING OFF) If you don't mind, I believe I'm being paged.


MRS. C: Well, Mr. Antony, you seem very interested in the subject of murder.


BRUNO: Well, no more than anyone else, madam. No more than you, for instance.


MRS. C: Me? (LAUGHS) Oh, no, I'm not interested in murder.


BRUNO: Oh, come now. Everyone's interested. Surely you're not going to tell me there hasn't been a time that you didn't want to dispose of someone? 


MRS. C: (LAUGHS) Good heavens, no. (LAUGHS) 


BRUNO: You mean to tell me there wasn't a tiny moment when you were made very angry?


MRS. C: Well, I-- 


BRUNO: What did you say? 


MRS. C: (SQUIRMS, LAUGHS) 


BRUNO: Well, there you are, you see? There you are. Now you've decided to commit a murder. How would you plan to do it, er--? Oh, I didn't get your name.


MRS. C: Er, Mrs. Cunningham.


BRUNO: Well, Mrs. Cunningham -- how will you do it?


MRS. C: (PLAYING ALONG) Well, I suppose I'd have to get a gun from somewhere.


BRUNO: Oh, no, Mrs. Cunningham. "Bang bang bang" all over the place, and blood everywhere? [Oh, no.


MRS. C: Well, um, how about a little poison?


BRUNO: Poison? Yes, yes, that's better, Mrs. Cunningham. But poison could take anywhere from ten to twelve weeks.


MRS. C: Oh.


BRUNO: That is, if you wanted to be careful.


MRS. C: Yes.


BRUNO: If poor Mr. Cunningham is going to die from natural causes.


MRS. C: (HIGHLY AMUSED) Ohhhh. (CHUCKLES)] Well, what's your idea, Mr. Antony? 


BRUNO: Well, I have the best way and the best tools.


MRS. C: Yes? 


BRUNO: My two hands. Simple, silent -- and it's quick.


MRS. C: Why, of course!


BRUNO: (CHUCKLES)


MRS. C: (CHUCKLES, FLIRTY) Ohhhh, you must be very strong, Mr. Antony. (CHUCKLES)


BRUNO: Now let me show you what I mean. You don't mind if I borrow your neck for a moment, do you? 


MRS. C: (GIGGLES) That's so silly! (MORE SERIOUS) Very well. Go ahead.


BRUNO: (DRAWS CLOSE) Now you-- Now watch what I'm doing. 


MRS. C: Uh huh. 


BRUNO: And when I nod my head, you just try to cry out. 


MRS. C: Yes? 


BRUNO: And I'll bet you won't be able to make a sound. 


MRS. C: (CHUCKLES) I'm ready.


BRUNO: (BEAT) All right now. (DELIBERATELY) Just wait till I nod my head.


MUSIC: QUICKLY IN, THEN BUILDS EXPECTANTLY, PUNCTUATED BY--


BESSIE: (BLOODCURDLING SCREAM)


MUSIC: UP TO A BIG CLIMAX ... THEN A SUBSIDING ACCENT, THEN OUT


SOUND: PARTY CROWD MURMURS, PUZZLED AND CURIOUS ... THEN IN BG


ANNE: She'll be all right, father. Mrs. Anderson's with her, and Judge Donahue. They're up in the bedroom. 


SENATOR: (AT A LOSS) But Mrs. Cunningham--? What happened? How could he have choked her? 


ANNE: Well, I - I don't know for sure. Mrs. Anderson thinks they were playing some - some sort of game. Then when Bessie screamed, he - he fainted.


SENATOR: Where is he, Anne? Where's Antony? 


ANNE: Guy took him into the study.


SENATOR: Then tell Guy to get him out of here as soon as he can. This is a nice item for the gossips. (MOVING OFF) Well, I better get back to the guests.


BARBARA: (APPROACHES, DISTRESSED, SHAKEN) Anne! Oh, Anne! 


ANNE: Barbara, what's the matter? 


BARBARA: It was awful. I saw him. What was he trying to do her? 


ANNE: You saw him? 


BARBARA: I was standing in the doorway. His hands were on her throat, but he kept staring at me. Anne, he was strangling me


ANNE: What do you mean?


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... UNEASY, IN BG


BARBARA: He went into sort of a trance. Oh, it was horrible! He thought he was murdering me. But - but why, Anne? Why me


ANNE: Don't be silly, dear. You're upset, that's all. Now go find father. 


MUSIC: UP FOR TRANSITION


BRUNO: (GROGGY) What happened, Guy? I fainted, didn't I? (EXHALES) Started getting so dizzy.


GUY: You mad, crazy maniac. You ought to be locked up. Will you get out of here now and let me alone? 


BRUNO: But, Guy, I like you. 


GUY: (EXHALES, EXASPERATED)


BRUNO: Now we've got to talk about my father. You promised to-- 


SOUND: GUY SMACKS BRUNO IN THE FACE


BRUNO: (INHALES SLOWLY) You shouldn't have done that, Guy. You shouldn't have hit me. 


GUY: Maybe that'll knock a little sense into you. Do you have a car here? 


BRUNO: (RESIGNED) Yes, it's outside. It's down the block.


GUY: Come on, we'll go out the back way. 


SOUND: SCENE FADES OUT ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE .. SCENE FADES IN ... NOCTURNAL BACKGROUND (CRICKETS CHIRP, ET CETERA) ... SCREEN DOOR OPENS ... ANNE'S STEPS TO GUY BEHIND--


ANNE: (DETERMINED) Guy? Did he leave?


GUY: (STARTLED) Anne? 


ANNE: I didn't mean to startle you, dear. He has left? 


GUY: Yes. Anne, why'd you come out here? 


ANNE: I had to talk to you. Yesterday at the art gallery, that wasn't the first time you met Bruno, was it? 


GUY: What makes you say that? 


ANNE: I don't know. Guy? What did Miriam look like? 


GUY: (PUZZLED) But I - I've told you. 


ANNE: I want you to tell me again. 


GUY: Well, she - she was dark, not too tall, sort of pretty.


ANNE: What else?


GUY: What else is there? 


ANNE: She wore glasses, didn't she? 


GUY: Yes.


ANNE: Barbara wears glasses, too, and Barbara looks something like Miriam, doesn't she? Doesn't she? 


GUY: (UNCONVINCING) No. No, no, not at all. 


ANNE: (UNHAPPY) How did you get him to do it, Guy? 


GUY: (STUNNED) Get him to do it? 


ANNE: He killed Miriam, didn't he? Tell me. Didn't he? 


GUY: (CONCEDES, WITH RELIEF) Yes. Yes, he's a maniac. I met him on the train going to Metcalf. He had some crazy scheme about exchanging murders: if I do his murder, he'd do mine. 


ANNE: What do you mean, your murder? 


GUY: Well, he'd read about me in the papers. He knew about Miriam, and about you. 


ANNE: You must have known he was talking nonsense. 


GUY: But he wasn't. [Of course I didn't give it another thought.] And now a lunatic wants me to kill his father. 


ANNE: It's too fantastic. You've known about Miriam all this time? 


GUY: Yes. [Since the first night. He showed me her glasses.]


ANNE: Why don't you call the police?


GUY: And have them say what you did? "How did you get him to do it?" [And Bruno would say, "We planned it together."


ANNE: (ANXIOUS) We'd better get back before Hennessey starts looking for you. 


GUY: Now do you see, Anne? This is why I didn't want you to know anything about it. I wanted to protect all of you -- Barbara and your father. Now that you know, you're acting guilty, too.]


ANNE: If we could only talk to father or - or someone about it.


GUY: It's no good, Anne. I can't drag anyone else into this. 


ANNE: Guy, what are we going to do? 


GUY: I don't know. I don't know.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


SOUND: RECEIVER UP ... PHONE DIALED


GUY: (INTO PHONE) Bruno? Bruno, this is Guy. I've decided to do what you want about your father. -- Yes, I want to get it over with. -- Detective? Oh, don't worry about Hennessey. There's a way out across the roof here to the next apartment. Does anyone know you've come home? -- Then you'd better go out again and stay out until after daylight. I'll be there in forty minutes.


MUSIC: UP FOR CURTAIN 


HOST: Before we return with Act III of "Strangers on a Train," I'm going to introduce my guest for tonight. She's very special. A blue-eyed blonde who's to be congratulated on playing the leading role in the very first picture she's made. And when I tell you her name, you'll know she sings, she dances like a dream. Here she is -- Miss Aileen Stanley Jr. 


AILEEN: Named for my aunt, Aileen Stanley who starred in so many Broadway musical comedies. I only hope that--


HOST: That you'll live up to the Aileen Stanley name? 


AILEEN: (CHUCKLES MODESTLY)


HOST: You've certainly made a fine start.


AILEEN: Well, I have Warner Brothers to thank for the opportunity, and for casting me opposite a star like Gordon MacRae. 


HOST: We'll all be watching for you, Aileen. Aren't you sorry you won't be in New York on Thursday for the world premiere of Warner Brothers' new musical?


AILEEN: Oh, you mean, uh-- (SINGS) "I'll See You in My Dreams"? 


HOST: That's it. That song is the title of their new picture portraying the story of the famous songwriter Gus Kahn. The cast has Danny Thomas playing Kahn; Frank Lovejoy is his collaborator Walter Donaldson; and Doris Day, as his wife Grace Kahn, sings his wonderful songs: "Making Whoopee," "Pretty Baby," "Nobody's Sweetheart." 


AILEEN: And there's something more to make "I'll See You in my Dreams" a picture to watch for. That's Patrice Wymore's dancing. Patrice is lovely as the dancing star of a Ziegfeld musical that features Kahn songs.


HOST: Patrice Wymore is always someone to see. She has that fresh Lux lovely look.


AILEEN: Mm, yes, she's a Lux girl, all right. In fact, Patrice tells me that after a day of strenuous dancing rehearsals, she really appreciates her Lux beauty bath, and I certainly agree. It's the most refreshing pickup I know. 


ANNOUNCER: Yes, a daily Lux beauty bath is Hollywood's way to all-over loveliness. Lux's Active Lather makes your daily bath a real beauty bath. It leaves skin so soft and smooth. The delicate Lux fragrance really clings, makes you sure of skin that's sweet. Thank you, Aileen Stanley Jr., for coming here tonight. Now here's a suggestion for lovely women everywhere. Tomorrow, get this generous satin-smooth bath cake. You'll delight in the creamy rich lather, abundant even in hardest water. It leaves your skin really fresh; Lux lovely all over. Nine out of ten screen stars use fragrant, white Lux Toilet Soap. We pause now for station identification. This is the CBS Radio Network. 


MUSIC: FILLS PAUSE FOR STATION IDENTIFICATION


HOST: The curtain rises on Act III of "Strangers on a Train," starring Ray Milland as Guy Haines, Ruth Roman as Anne Morton, and Frank Lovejoy as Bruno Antony.


MUSIC: GRIM INTRODUCTION ... THEN TENSE, IN BG--


HOST: To Guy Haines, there is only one way out. Now, in the quiet of the night, Guy has entered the Antony home. With the key and the map of the house that Bruno sent him, Guy has no trouble finding Mr. Antony's bedroom.


SOUND: GUY'S STEPS TO BEDROOM DOOR, WHICH OPENS


GUY: (LOW, URGENT) Mr. Antony? Mr. Antony? Don't be alarmed. I - I must talk to you about your son. About Bruno, Mr. Antony.


BRUNO: (OFF, LIGHTLY) Wouldn't you feel more at home with the light on, Guy? 


MUSIC: UP AND SHARPLY OUT


GUY: (SURPRISED) Bruno? 


BRUNO: (CLOSER) My father isn't home. I was about to tell you that over the phone, but you made such a sudden decision. I wondered why. 


GUY: Well, I - I thought your father'd be interested to know he has a lunatic son.


BRUNO: Then you have no intention of going ahead with our little arrangement? 


GUY: I never had. Bruno, look. You're terribly sick. I don't know much about these things, but why don't you go where you can get some kind of treatment? Not only for your own sake, but you can't go on causing more and more--


BRUNO: (INTERRUPTS) I don't like to be double-crossed, Guy. I have a murder on my conscience. I killed your wife. But it's not just my murder. It's yours, too, isn't it? 


GUY: I guess it's no use trying to talk to you, Bruno. I'll leave. 


BRUNO: Yes, that man from the police who's supposed to be watching you. You mustn't let him get suspicious, Guy. 


GUY: You can put that gun away, Bruno.


BRUNO: Oh, don't worry. I'm not going to shoot you, Guy. Might disturb my mother. (CHUCKLES) I'm a very clever fellow. I'll think of something much better than that. Good night, Guy. 


[MUSIC: SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... THEN UP FOR TRANSITION


HAMMOND: (UPSET) Where did he go, Hennessey? Where did Haines go?


HENNESSEY: Now take it easy, Hammond. If I knew where he went, I wouldn't be waiting here for you to relieve me. I didn't even know he gave me the slip until I heard his phone ringing.


HAMMOND: Well?


HENNESSEY: Phone keeps ringing for ten minutes. Nobody sleeps that sound. So I woke up the janitor to let me in. No Haines.


HAMMOND: We'll probably hear of another dame murdered.


HENNESSEY: Well, I'll go back to the office and put in a call to Metcalf, Captain Turley. I think this calls for more questioning of Mr. Haines.


HAMMOND: Questioning?! Let's take him in!


HENNESSEY: Now look, you're a good cop, Hammond, but how many times do I gotta tell you? We don't have a thing on Haines. There's no evidence that he was even in Metcalf when his wife was killed.


HAMMOND: So we, er, just let him come back here and go to bed, huh?


HENNESSEY: That's right, Hammond. We just wait it out.]


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... THEN UP FOR FOREBODING TRANSITION ... THEN UNEASY, IN BG


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP ... ANNE'S VOICE ON FILTER


MOTHER: Hello? 


ANNE: Hello, I'd like to speak to Mrs. Antony, please -- Bruno Antony's mother. 


MOTHER: This is Bruno's mother. 


ANNE: I'm Anne Morton, Mrs. Antony. Senator Morton's daughter. 


MOTHER: Oh, Miss Morton, good morning. How nice of you to call. 


ANNE: I'd like to see you, Mrs. Antony, just as quickly as possible.


MOTHER: Why, that would be lovely. Do come over, do. 


ANNE: Thank you. I'll leave right away. 


MUSIC: UP FOR TRANSITION AND OUT


ANNE: (VERY SERIOUS) No one knows I've come here, Mrs. Antony, but I simply had to tell you.


MOTHER: (UNSERIOUS) Oh, Miss Morton, really. I know Bruno's been in some very awkward scrapes, but nothing so ridiculous as a murder.


ANNE: But you have to make him do something about this. Don't you see that just one word from him would get Guy out of a dreadful situation?


MOTHER: Well, but how can you take this seriously? It's just some practical joke, dear. Bruno's so terribly irresponsible. Oh, he gets into all sorts of escapades! 


ANNE: But you don't seem to understand. Your son's responsible for a woman's death.


MOTHER: (LOW) Did Bruno tell you this?


ANNE: Well, no, of course not. 


MOTHER: (DELIGHTED) Well! There you are! (CHUCKLES) Well now, it was very nice of you to call, Miss Morton. (MOVING OFF) Do come and see us again sometime, won't you?


BRUNO: (APPROACHES) I'm afraid mother wasn't very much help, was she? 


ANNE: If you don't mind, I think I better leave.


BRUNO: Mother hasn't been too well for some time. She's a little-- Well, how shall I say it? She's confused. (INHALES DEEPLY) You know, I'm very upset with Guy. He shouldn't have sent you. 


ANNE: Guy doesn't know I'm here, Mr. Antony. 


BRUNO: He's at the tennis club, isn't he? 


ANNE: He will be. 


BRUNO: Oh, yes, he's playing Reynolds this afternoon. It's a very important match. He must be very desperate to try to involve me


ANNE: Try to involve you? 


BRUNO: Well, I've been protecting Guy ever since he told me how much he hated his wife. Do you know, Miss Morton, that Guy tried to get me to go back to that amusement park some night after dark and look for his cigarette lighter?


ANNE: What's his cigarette lighter got to do with it?


BRUNO: Why, he dropped it there right after he-- Well, after that night. You see, all the police are waiting for is one piece of evidence to convict Guy for the murder. I can't tell you how worried I am.


ANNE: Please stop. 


BRUNO: Miss Morton, I do sympathize with you, but I just couldn't do what he asks. Why, that would make me an accessory.


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... THEN UP FOR TRANSITION 


SOUND: TENNIS CLUB BACKGROUND (GENTLE CROWD MURMUR, WHACK OF RACQUETS ON TENNIS BALLS, ET CETERA)


ANNE: Then I left his house and came straight here to the club, Guy. 


GUY: You shouldn't have gone there, darling.


ANNE: Well, Bruno told me if the police ever found your lighter there, that's all they'd need. Something to prove you were there when she was murdered.


GUY: Bruno has my lighter. 


ANNE: I know, you told me. 


GUY: That lie about my wanting him to get it back-- That means he's going back to Metcalf. Back to the amusement park. He's going to drop it there -- somewhere where they'll find it. 


ANNE: Oh, Guy, I wanted so to help, but I'm afraid all I did is make things worse. 


GUY: He said last night he'd think of something. Well, give him credit. He certainly has. 


ANNE: Well, you've got to get to Metcalf before he does. You haven't time to play. You better tell them now.


GUY: No. If I try to avoid this match, Hennessey's bound to get suspicious. I haven't been out of his sight all day. 


ANNE: Then I'll go. There's a train in an hour. 


GUY: (INSISTS) You'll stay right here. I'll try to give Hennessey the slip right after the match. 


ANNE: But, darling, that'll be too late.


GUY: Didn't Bruno say I wanted him to go there some night after dark? 


ANNE: Yes. 


GUY: Well, he won't expose himself in daylight. If I can finish off this match, I'll still have time. 


VOICE: (OFF) All ready, Guy! You go on in a few minutes. 


GUY: I'll be right out there. (LOW, TO ANNE) Now look, Anne, here's what you've gotta do. Get hold of Barbara and just as soon-- (FADES OUT BEHIND--)


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN DURING ABOVE ... THEN TOPS DIALOGUE FOR TRANSITION


SOUND: TENNIS MATCH BACKGROUND (BALLS BOUNCE AND GET SWATTED BY RACQUETS; CROWD REACTIONS; UMPIRE CALLS, ET CETERA)


[HENNESSEY: --one thing, Hammond, this Haines fella plays a pretty good game of tennis, huh?


HAMMOND: Now look, Hennessey, if Captain Turley says pick him up for questioning, let's pick him up.


HENNESSEY: Nah. Let's let him have his game first.


HAMMOND: If the boys hear about this, they'll send us orchids.


SOUND: CROWD REACTS AND APPLAUDS BRIEFLY AFTER A POINT]


BARBARA: (APPROACHES) Isn't he wonderful, Mr. Hennessey? 


HENNESSEY: Huh? Oh, uh, how are you, Barbara? Oh, uh, this here's Mr. Hammond. Mr. Hammond, this here's the senator's other daughter. 


HAMMOND: (UNENTHUSIASTIC) Hi.


BARBARA: Oh, yes, I've seen Mr. Hammond outside the house. He's a detective, too. You and he take turns, don't you? 


HENNESSEY: Yeah, somethin' like that.


BARBARA: But if he's your relief man, why would the two of you be here together? 


HENNESSEY: (CONDESCENDING) Look, you're a nice kid, Barbara. Now watch him hit the little ball and don't ask so many questions.


SOUND: TENNIS MATCH BACKGROUND UP FOR TRANSITION (DURING WHICH, THE CROWD APPLAUDS AND MURMURS APPRECIATIVELY AFTER A POINT) ... THEN THE MATCH CONTINUES IN BG


BARBARA: I've got it all arranged, Anne. The cab's outside waiting to take Guy to the station. I gave him ten dollars. 


ANNE: But what about those two detectives? 


BARBARA: They're still over there near the dressing rooms waiting for Guy to finish the match. Gosh, I've never seen Guy play so fast in my life. 


ANNE: Well, he's got to get on that train. Barbara, now once again, as soon as the match is over, Guy's going to run out through the clubhouse. Just do your best to delay those detectives from coming after him. All Guy will need is a few seconds. 


BARBARA: Oh, just leave it to me, Anne. Oh, I'm real good at getting in people's way.


MUSIC: FOR A CHASE ... TRANSITION AND OUT


SOUND: RAILROAD STATION BACKGROUND


HENNESSEY: Looks like we're out of luck, Hammond. Haines beat us to it by about two minutes. The guy says he bought a ticket to Metcalf. 


HAMMOND: Well, what are we waiting for? The train just pulled out. We can still have 'em flag it down before he-- 


HENNESSEY: Aw, relax. Let him go to Metcalf. We'll phone Captain Turley and let them take over at that end. 


HAMMOND: That nutty little dame.


HENNESSEY: Aw, Barbara's a nice kid. Maybe it was an accident. 


HAMMOND: Pushing you in the fish pond?


HENNESSEY: Just one thing that puzzles me. What's Haines big rush to get to Metcalf? What's he goin' back for? 


HAMMOND: Come on, Hennessey, let's phone Turley.


SOUND: SCENE FADES OUT ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... SCENE FADES IN ... AMUSEMENT PARK BACKGROUND (CALLIOPE MUSIC, MURMURING CROWD, ET CETERA)


VENDOR: Here ya are, folks! Here ya are! Get 'em while they're hot! They're fresh-roasted! They're jumbos! Peanuts, mister? 


BRUNO: (IMPATIENT) What time does it get dark around here?


VENDOR: (CHUCKLES) What's the hurry, Jack? (UP) Here ya are, folks! Those fresh-roasted peanuts! 


BRUNO: (ANNOYED) What time does it get dark, I said.


VENDOR: Well, hang around, bud. Hang around. You'll find out. (UP) Get 'em right here, folks! They're always hot! Roasted peanuts! (FADES OUT WITH--)


OLD MAN: (TO BRUNO) They're sure doing business down at this end of the park. 


BRUNO: Are they? 


OLD MAN: Oh, day and night. Ever since that girl got murdered. People want to see the scene of the crime. 


BRUNO: Ohhh. (INNOCENTLY) Uh, where did it happen? 


OLD MAN: Right over there. Them picnic grounds across the lagoon. Lovers' Lane. Yes, sir, they sure been cleanin' up. 


BRUNO: (DISDAINFUL) I don't think it's a very nice way to make money.


OLD MAN: Well, these folks gotta eat, too, ain't they? For a while the smoochers wouldn't go near the place. 


BRUNO: (EVEN MORE DISDAINFUL) I'm afraid I don't know what a smoocher is. 


OLD MAN: Okay, so I ain't educated. Wait a minute, mister. You got a match?


BRUNO: (TOO QUICKLY) No! 


OLD MAN: Well, you got a lighter. Keep foolin' with that lighter in your hand.


BRUNO: (FLUSTERED) No, it's just a-- (BEAT, GIVES HIM MONEY, MOVING OFF) Here, buy yourself a box of matches. 


OLD MAN: (UNIMPRESSED, TO HIMSELF) Hmph. Characters. Place is full of characters. 


SOUND: AMUSEMENT PARK BACKGROUND UP AND THEN FADES OUT ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... THEN FADE IN RAILROAD STATION BACKGROUND ... TURLEY'S VOICE ON FILTER


ADAMS: (INTO PHONE) Hello, this is Sergeant Adams. I'm phoning from the station. Put Captain Turley on the phone.


TURLEY: This is Turley.


ADAMS: Uh, Haines just got off the train, sir. He took a cab. He told the driver to take him to the amusement park.


TURLEY: All right, good. Pick up your men and go to the park. I'll take a group from here. We'll be waiting for him. That's all, Adams.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: AMUSEMENT PARK BACKGROUND


GUY: Hello, Bruno. I've been looking all over for you.


BRUNO: (APPROACHES) You shouldn't have come here, Guy. This could be very dangerous for you. 


GUY: It'd be more dangerous if I left you here alone, wouldn't it, Bruno? 


BRUNO: This is where it happened, Guy. This is really where it happened. They try to make people believe it happened near the concessions. They figure they'll make more money that way. 


GUY: I came after my cigarette lighter. I want that lighter, Bruno. 


BRUNO: Don't be foolish, Guy. You're just proving a theory for them. The murderer returning to the scene of his crime.


GUY: (SHARPLY) Give it to me! Give it to me before I--!


TURLEY: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Stand where you are, Haines! Stand where you are!


GUY: (CALLS) I've got the man you want right here! He's-- Stop him! Stop him! He'll get away! 


TURLEY: Don't make a move, Haines, or we'll shoot!


GUY: He's getting away! I can't let him get away! 


SOUND: POLICE FIRE THREE GUNSHOTS!


MUSIC: FOR A CHASE ... BRIEF TRANSITION


SOUND: AMUSEMENT PARK BACKGROUND


ADAMS: This way, Captain Turley! The roller coaster! They ran toward the roller coaster! 


TURLEY: All right, just watch your fire. There are too many people here. Keep those people back! 


SOUND: POLICE SHOUT ORDERS ("All right, back it up!") TO CROWD, WHICH MURMURS THEN SUBSIDES DURING FOLLOWING--


MAC: Captain Turley, this man here. He says Haines isn't the one we want. It's the other one; the one who ran! 


TURLEY: What do you mean it isn't Haines? 


OLD MAN: I remembered him. I seen him here that night when the girl was killed. Two young fellows was with her. And this one, he kept followin'. He kept lookin' at her. I remember real plain. 


TURLEY: You realize what you're saying? 


OLD MAN: I was talkin' to him before. I asked him for a match. It's the same one.


TURLEY: (UP BIG) All right, you men, surround the area!


ADAMS: Over here, captain! The roller coaster! They're under the roller coaster, under the track! 


TURLEY: Well, shut it off! Turn off that roller coaster! 


MANAGER: (APPROACHES) But it's out of order! It's closed down! (TO EMPLOYEE) Who turned it on?


EMPLOYEE: He did -- the one who was running away. Turned the switch and kept the keys.


TURLEY: That's one way of keeping us out of there.


MANAGER: But the track is being repaired! When those cars come down there, they'll scatter all over the place!


TURLEY: All right, find the main switch and turn it off! 


SOUND: AMUSEMENT PARK BACKGROUND UP AND CROSSFADES TO ROLLER COASTER BACKGROUND ... GUY AND BRUNO ARE IN THE CENTER OF THE COASTER AS THE ROAR OF THE MOVING CARS GROWS LOUD AND SOFT CIRCLING THEM ... FROM OFF, THE CROWD MURMURS AND SHOUTS


BRUNO: (OFF) Stay where you are, Guy! Don't come any closer! 


GUY: Where'll you run to now, Bruno? They're all around here. The police, Bruno. 


BRUNO: (OFF) They won't get me! Not alive! I've got a gun.


GUY: That's not for you, Bruno. You're much too clever to use a gun. 


BRUNO: (OFF) I'll kill you and then I'll kill myself! I'll kill you first and then I'll-- [I'll climb to the top! I'll jump before they take me alive!


GUY: You're sick, Bruno! You belong in a hospital! They know about that! But tell them the truth! Tell them!


BRUNO: (OFF) You don't care about me! You don't care what they do to me!


GUY: Get down from there! The cars are coming!


BRUNO: (OFF) I won't come down! I'll jump before I--!


GUY: Bruno, the cars!]


SOUND: ROAR OF SPEEDING CARS SMASHING INTO BRUNO


BRUNO: (BLOODCURDLING SCREAM)


MUSIC: HUGE ACCENT AND OUT


SOUND: AMUSEMENT PARK BACKGROUND 


TURLEY: You better start talking, Haines. What's this all about? 


GUY: (SHAKEN) Well, he - he had my cigarette lighter. Came back here tonight to - to plant it. To pin the whole thing on me. 


TURLEY: Cigarette lighter, huh? 


GUY: Let me talk to him, please. 


TURLEY: All right, take it easy now. Over here. 


MAC: He's in a pretty bad way, captain.


GUY: Can't you lift that stuff off him? 


TURLEY: Well, we've done everything we can until the crane comes. 


BRUNO: (WEAKLY) Hello, Guy. Who is that with you?


GUY: This is Captain Turley, Bruno -- police.


BRUNO: Oh, they got you at last, huh, Guy? 


GUY: Tell him, Bruno. Tell him you have my lighter.


BRUNO: (ALL INNOCENCE) But I haven't got it, Guy. Must still be over there where you dropped it that night. 


TURLEY: He dropped it, huh? 


BRUNO: (DYING) Sorry, Guy. I want to help you, but I don't know what I can do. 


GUY: Captain Turley, may I go through his pockets? 


TURLEY: No, of course you can't. Besides, he says he hasn't got it. 


GUY: But if he dies before he--


MAC: There's no more "if." This man's dead, captain. 


GUY: His hand! He's got something in his hand. 


TURLEY: See what it is, Mac. 


MAC: (BEAT) It's a lighter, captain. A cigarette lighter.


TURLEY: Here, let me see that. (BEAT, READS) "From A to G." 


GUY: "From Anne to Guy." 


TURLEY: It looks like you were right, Haines. Well, I better keep this for a while. How about staying in town overnight? I imagine there's a lot you may want to tell me.


GUY: Yes, I imagine there is. Captain, may I use the telephone? 


TURLEY: Sure, go ahead. 


OLD MAN: There's one up near the entrance. Say, who was he, mister? That guy? 


GUY: His name was Bruno Antony. A very clever fellow. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


ANNE: (INTO PHONE, DEEPLY RELIEVED) Oh, yes, Guy. Yes, darling. [And thanks for phoning.] -- Well, of course I'll be there. I'll leave right away.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


ANNE: Father? Barbara? It was Guy! [He's safe!] He's safe and he's free! 


MUSIC: UP FOR TRANSITION 


SOUND: MOVING TRAIN INTERIOR BACKGROUND


ANNE: (PUZZLED) Guy? 


GUY: Yes, dear? 


ANNE: That man across the aisle. He - he keeps looking at you. 


GUY: Oh? 


ANNE: He's a minister. I - I didn't know you knew any ministers. 


MINISTER: (SLIGHTLY OFF) I beg your pardon, but aren't you Guy Haines? 


GUY: (UNEASY, BUT LIGHTLY) I'm sorry, sir, but when I was a very little boy, my mother warned me "never speak to strangers on a train."


MUSIC: CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: We want you to meet our stars in person and Mr. Keighley will tell you about next week's show. In the meantime here's a tip from lovely Maureen O'Hara. With her shining dark hair and flawless white skin, Maureen is a real Irish beauty. She says: "Yes indeed, I'm a Lux girl. I've found regular Lux care does wonders for my complexion. Makes it softer, smoother, really lovelier." Why don't you take Maureen O'Hara's advice? Here's all you do. Simply work Lux Soap's rich Active Lather well in. The lather's so creamy it agrees with delicate skin. Then rinse with warm water; splash of cold. Right away, your skin looks fresher, prettier. So try Hollywood's own beauty soap tomorrow. You'll find it's easy to be Lux lovely. Nine out of ten screen stars are Lux girls. Now here's Mr. Keighley with our stars. 


HOST: And we call them back for another bow: Ray Milland, Frank Lovejoy, and Ruth Roman.


SOUND: APPLAUSE 


HOST: Ray, what have you been doing since we worked together on our latest picture? 


MILLAND: Well, I liked it so well at Warner's that I've just finished a Cagney production there called "Bugles in the Afternoon." 


LOVEJOY: In the afternoon? I thought bugles were for early morning.


MILLAND: Well, Frank, the story's about the U. S. Cavalry's continual fights with the Indians, which caused a great deal of bugle blowing back in the Eighteen Seventies. 


HOST: How about you, Ruth? What part have the Warner Brothers cast you in recently? 


ROMAN: A rather unusual role. I get to play myself, and so does Frank Lovejoy. The picture's called "Starlift." 


HOST: Oh, of course -- based on the actual trips Hollywood stars make to the air base where the boys take off for Korea. 


LOVEJOY: Yes, that's right, and we play two of the stars who go to the base to entertain the boys.


ROMAN: They really should have called it the Lux starlift, Bill, because the actresses who go in the starlift are naturally Lux girls. 


MILLAND: Including yourself, of course. 


ROMAN: Certainly I'm a Lux girl. It's my favorite beauty care. 


HOST: You know, by a happy coincidence, Ray is just about to leave on a starlift of his own -- all the way to Alaska to entertain our troops for the holidays. 


MILLAND: Well, it was a privilege to do so, Bill. The only trouble is, what if they're expecting a Lux girl? Won't I be a bit of a disappointment? 


LOVEJOY: Well, you would be to me, Ray, but remember, the boys are starved for entertainment. They'll really appreciate you.


ROMAN: And speaking of entertainment, how about next week's show? 


HOST: Oh, it'll be great entertainment, Ruth, starring one of our most popular comedians, a fellow who also spends a great deal of his time entertaining the Armed Forces: Bob Hope. And as his co-star, glamorous Marilyn Maxwell. We will present them in the Paramount Picture laugh riot "The Lemon Drop Kid." 


MILLAND: I'd hate to miss that one, Bill. Goodnight.


ROMAN &

LOVEJOY: Goodnight.


HOST: Good night and don't talk to any strangers.


LIBBY: How would you like double the wear from every pair of stockings you own? Then take this tip from the people who make them. Always wash nylons in Lux. Yes, over ninety percent of the makers of stockings recommend Lux. Why? Because the Lux way makes stockings last twice as long. Strain tests prove it. No other soap -- no suds of any kind -- can make stockings last longer. And what's more, New Lux, enriched with color freshener, keeps colors clearer, makes stockings look sheerer than ever. It's the stocking care famous Hollywood screen stars insist on for their own glamorous nylons. Get a big box of New Lux with color freshener tomorrow. Give your stockings -- all your lovely washables -- that bright-as-new Lux look.


MUSIC: LUX THEME ... THEN BEHIND HOST--


HOST: Lever Brothers Company, the makers of Lux Toilet Soap join me in inviting you to be with us again next Monday evening when the Lux Radio Theatre presents Bob Hope and Marilyn Maxwell in "The Lemon Drop Kid." This is William Keighley saying goodnight to you from Hollywood.


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: Frank Lovejoy can soon be seen in the Milton Sperling production for Warner Brothers entitled, "Retreat Hell." Heard in our cast tonight were Patricia Hitchcock as Barbara, Ed Begley as Father, Martha Wentworth as Mother, and Jeanne Bates, Herb Butterfield, Norma Varden, Bill Conrad, Norman Field, Ted de Corsia, Wally Maher, Bill Johnstone, Olan Soulé, Ralph Moody, Eddie Marr, Margie Liszt, Brad Browne, and Alan Wood. Our play was adapted by S. H. Barnett and our music was directed by Rudy Schrager. This is your announcer, John Milton Kennedy, reminding you to join us again next Monday night to hear "The Lemon Drop Kid," starring Bob Hope and Marilyn Maxwell. This is the CBS Radio Network.


MUSIC: LUX THEME ... THEN FADES OUT

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