Microphone Plays‎ > ‎

Stage Door

Romance

Stage Door

Jul 18 1944





CAST:

ANNOUNCER

HOST, Arnold Moss

1ST GIRL (2 lines)

2ND GIRL (1 line)

2ND ANNCR (2 lines)

CBS ANNCR (1 line)


TERRY RANDALL, artsy actress

JEAN MAITLAND, ambitious actress

KAY HAMILTON, suicidal actress

DAVID KINGSLEY, talent scout; professional

MRS. ORCUTT, elderly boardinghouse owner

STAGE MANAGER (2 lines)

1ST WOMAN (2 lines)

2ND WOMAN (2 lines)

3RD WOMAN (2 lines)

4TH WOMAN (1 line)

ADOLF GRETZL, accented movie producer





ANNOUNCER: Colgate Tooth Powder's THEATRE OF ROMANCE presents "Stage Door."


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: Yes, tonight and every Tuesday night, Colgate Tooth Powder brings you THE THEATRE OF ROMANCE, featuring each week your favorite stories and plays especially adapted for radio. And here is your host for the evening, Arnold Moss, to tell you about this evening's presentation, "Stage Door."


HOST: Good evening and welcome to Colgate Tooth Powder's THEATRE OF ROMANCE. Romance isn't always a girl and a boy holding hands in the moonlight -- Cinderella and the prince, Romeo and Juliet. Romance is sometimes the story of a girl who wants to be those people. Romance is such a girl as greasepaint and applause and a spotlight. "Stage Door" is the story of a boardinghouse full of girls like that, and we're gonna tell you what happened to three of them -- Terry Randall, Jean Maitland, and Kay Hamilton, who share a room in Mrs. Orcutt's theatrical boardinghouse. The girls are in their room now at the close of a long weary day spent pounding the pavements.


MUSIC: OUT


KAY: Any luck today, Terry?


TERRY: No, Kay. I think I banged on twenty producers' doors, but opportunity was always out to lunch. This searching for a part gets a little frightening sometimes, doesn't it? I've been to every office in town this week and it's always the same answer -- no casting or you're not the type. I've been getting that for a year now. You'd think in all that time, I'd be the type for something, wouldn't you?


JEAN: Yeah, me, too. Why do we put up with it?


TERRY: We put up with it because there's something inside of us that won't let us quit; some belief. Some fire, if you like the word better. If I had the chance, I'd show you acting you wouldn't forget in a long time. If I had the chance, I'd be thunder and lightning and - and tenderness and beauty--


JEAN: I don't care so much whether I'm thunder and lightning. I just want some money. I want a mink coat and a swimming pool and a Cadillac and a Dalmatian--


KAY AND TERRY: (LAUGH)


TERRY: (LIGHTLY) Shame on you.


JEAN: What would you be in the theater if you had the chance, Kay?


KAY: I'd be anything. I'd take any part, no matter how small. It's the thing I've wanted all my life. It means more to me than anything in the world, even my own life. You're discouraged, Terry, because you've been trying for a year. I've been trying for five. But one day I'll step out upon a stage and it'll be my hour! And people will laugh and cry with me, and all this struggle will seem worthwhile, too.


TERRY: I understand, Kay. We'll get that hour, you and I, because we'll starve and work until we do. And when our names go up in lights, our hearts will go right with 'em. We'll have arrived!


JEAN: (LIGHTLY) I take it you intend to struggle on, sore feet and sore producers notwithstanding.


TERRY: (CHUCKLES) That's right.


JEAN: Oh, it doesn't seem right. There ought to be some easier way to earn a mink coat. 


TERRY: (MOVING OFF) Oh, well. Let's eat.


JEAN: (BEAT, CONCERNED) Kay? What'll you do if all this "wonder" doesn't come to pass?


KAY: (QUIETLY) I don't know exactly what I'll do, Jean. But I think I'll want to die.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


DAVID: Miss Maitland?


JEAN: Yes?


DAVID: My name is David Kingsley.


JEAN: (SURPRISED) David Kingsley?! (QUICKLY) I'm dreaming. This couldn't be happening, not to me.


DAVID: Mr. Stephens of our office made a screen test of you a few weeks ago, which we sent out to the coast.


JEAN: Uh huh?


DAVID: Well, they liked it.


JEAN: They did?


DAVID: They'd like you to go out there as soon as possible.


JEAN: (WHISPERS, OVERCOME) Gee.


DAVID: Will you go?


JEAN: Will I go?! I'll go tonight!


TERRY: (APPROACHES) Jean, have you seen--?


JEAN: Uh-- Terry! Come here! I'd like you to meet Mr. Kingsley of Globe Pictures. This is my roommate, Miss Randall.


DAVID: How do you do, Miss Randall?


JEAN: I'm going to Hollywood, Terry. Passed my test. They want me.


TERRY: Oh, Jean, I'm so glad. That's wonderful.


JEAN: Don't you think Terry could have a test, too, Mr. Kingsley? She's an awfully good actress. Did you see "Cyclone"? Did you see "The Eldest Son"?


DAVID: Why, yes, I think I could arrange that. (TO TERRY) You be at my office at nine in the morning and I'll fix it up for you, Miss Randall.


TERRY: Oh, thanks very much and please don't think I'm not grateful, but I - I don't really want a screen test. And there's no use taking up your time.


JEAN: Terry, don't be a fool! That's money coming in every week. It's clothes to wear, nice clothes! It's the end of tramping the streets and wearing your knuckles out banging on closed doors! It's success, Terry. Just try! Take the test!


DAVID: Why don't you take it and then see how you feel if it turns out well?


JEAN: Terry, please!


TERRY: (EXHALES, CHUCKLES) Well, all right, I'll take it, but I warn you, I like pounding on doors, even though I do gripe about it. I like it because, inside me, I believe that one day, one of them is going to open.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


TERRY: (EXCITED) Kay?! Kay, where are you?! Kay?! 


KAY: Here I am, Terry. What are you so excited about?


TERRY: Kay, I - I - I got a part! I got a part!


KAY: Oh, Terry, how wonderful! What happened?


TERRY: Well, I - I was up in Mr. Berger's office--


KAY: (AMAZED) Mr. Berger?


TERRY: Well, you know I've been standing outside his office all week, when suddenly he opened the door and I said, "Now, look here. You're a producer and I'm an actress. What right have you to barricade yourself behind closed doors and not see me? And hundreds like me! Why, the greatest actresses in the world might be coming up your stairs and you'd never even know it!"


KAY: Terry! What did he say?


TERRY: He said, "Are you the greatest actress in the world?" And I said, "Maybe."


KAY: And you got the job?


TERRY: Yes!


KAY: (THRILLED) Oh!


TERRY: And when I walked out on Broadway again, it seemed the most glamorous street in all the world. Those beautiful Nedick orange stands! And that lovely traffic at Broadway and Forty-fifth!


KAY: (CHUCKLES)


TERRY: And those darling bums spitting on the sidewalk.


MRS. ORCUTT: Terry dear, there's a Mr. Kingsley downstairs waiting to see you.


TERRY: Mr. Kingsley?


MRS. ORCUTT: Mm hm.


TERRY: Oh. All right, Mrs. Orcutt. Thank you.


SOUND: DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES ... TERRY'S FOOTSTEPS DOWN STAIRS


DAVID: Hello, there. I just stopped by on a chance. Are you busy this evening?


TERRY: (EXHALES, PUZZLED) Well, no. No, I'm not. Why?


DAVID: (LIGHTLY) Could I interest you in dinner with a hardworking talent man? (CHUCKLES) Strictly unprofessionally, of course.


TERRY: (BEAT, WARMLY) I'd love it.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


TERRY: Funny, I never thought you were the kind of man who'd like walking in Central Park at night.


DAVID: (AMUSED) What kind of a man did you think I was?


TERRY: Oh, the man-about-town kind. You know, bright lights and smoke-filled nightclubs; smart, sophisticated people.


DAVID: Would you like that kind of a man?


TERRY: No. But I think I'm in the minority there. Most girls would.


DAVID: Let's sit down on that bench there.


TERRY: All right. (PAUSE AS THEY SIT) Oh, look at that Fifty-ninth Street skyline. It's like a fairy-tale castle rising out of the dark, isn't it?


DAVID: Yes, from here it is. (BEAT) What kind of a man do you like, Terry?


TERRY: (BEAT, EXHALES) I don't know exactly. But I think a man who likes simple homely things, basically. Kind of man my father is. One who likes armchairs and good books and a pipe in the evening. Country roads and meadows and lakes and gardens. And yet likes cities, too. Kind of a man that can get a thrill out of Broadway. And of course he - he must be a man who'd love me very much.


MUSIC: ROMANTIC ... SNEAKS IN


DAVID: I think I know a man like that, Terry.


TERRY: (BEAT) Do you, David? Do you?


DAVID: Yes, I - may tell you about him sometime. Well, it's getting late. We'd better start for home.


TERRY: Oh, David, I forgot! Can you imagine that? I've been with you all evening and forgot to tell you. A few hours ago it was the most important thing in the world. David, I've got a part! I'm going to be in a play! Can you imagine forgetting that?


DAVID: (BEAT, LOVINGLY) I can imagine forgetting everything tonight.


MUSIC: UP, FOR A BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN MELANCHOLY IN BG


STAGE MGR: I'm sorry, kids. The show's closin'.


TERRY: But you can't close! You can't! We - we've only had four performances! We haven't had a chance!


STAGE MGR: Sorry, Terry. That's show business.


MUSIC: UP, FOR A BRIDGE


TERRY: Kay, I - I just can't believe it. It just won't sink in somehow. Four performances and then-- Then nothing. Oh, it's frightening. You work and work and pray and fight and - and then you get a chance and - and overnight it-- (EXHALES, QUIETLY) Blows up in your face.


KAY: (COMFORTING) I know, I know.


TERRY: (BEAT) Well, there's no use crying about spilt milk, I guess. Come on, let's get out and have a time for ourselves.


KAY: Terry, I can't take any more money from you.


TERRY: Why not? They have to pay me two weeks' salary for this flop. Eighty dollars. We're fixed for two weeks. One of us'll get a job.


KAY: No, you paid my rent last month.


TERRY: Oh, now don't be stuffy. I happened to be the one who was working.


KAY: (BEAT) Maybe I'll never get a job. Maybe I'm just not a very good actress.


TERRY: Hey, stop that talk. You're a wonderful actress.


KAY: Oh, Terry, sometimes I don't know what to do. I've got to go ahead; I can't go back. There isn't anything to go back to.


TERRY: (CAREFULLY) It's, um-- It's your husband, isn't it?


KAY: I didn't know you knew I was married.


TERRY: It was just a shot in the dark.


KAY: I ran away from him twice before. But I had to go back. You see, I got hungry. Both times, he just waited. He's waiting now. But this time I won't go back! If I did, I might kill him! Because he's not human. I can't think of him as human any more.


TERRY: And to think I was moaning about my troubles. (UPBEAT) Come on, honey. Let's go out and have a hamburger.


KAY: Terry, I just can't! I - I just can't accept any more. I have to make my own way or stop trying. (TEARFUL) You can understand that, can't you, Terry?


TERRY: (BEAT) Yes, I - guess I can, Kay.


KAY: (SOBS)


TERRY: But I don't like to leave you alone.


KAY: I'd like to be alone. I think maybe I need to be alone tonight.


TERRY: (BEAT) All right, Kay. All right.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION


MRS. ORCUTT: Kay, I'd like to speak to you just a minute.


KAY: Oh, I-- Well, I'm a little busy, Mrs. Orcutt. I'm - working on something.


MRS. ORCUTT: It won't take me but a moment. I just want to, um-- Well, you know how reluctant I always am to speak to you on this subject. I try to be as easy as I can with the girls, but, after all, I have my bills to pay, too.


KAY: I know.


MRS. ORCUTT: Now, each month, you're so late in paying and, taking everything into consideration, I was going to suggest another theatrical club that I happen to know about where the rates are a little less than mine. I'll give you the address. You might just stop in and take a look at it.


KAY: Mrs. Orcutt--


MRS. ORCUTT: Now, now, now, we mustn't be upset about this. I'll just write the address down for you.


KAY: It won't be necessary, Mrs. Orcutt. I won't need the address.


MRS. ORCUTT: But, my dear--


KAY: It won't be necessary, I tell you. (BEAT) I'm making other plans.


MUSIC: BRIEF OMINOUS TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


TERRY: (OFF) Kay?! Kay, are you home?! (NO ANSWER, CLOSER) Kay?! (TO HERSELF) Oh, where is that confounded light switch?


SOUND: CLICK! OF SWITCH


TERRY: Kay? (NO ANSWER) Honey, are you asleep? (BEAT, BLOODCURDLING SCREAM) KAY!!!


MUSIC: UP, FOR AN ACCENT/TRANSITION ... THEN OUT


TERRY: (SOBS, TEARFUL) I just walked in and there she was, dead. (WEEPS IN BG)


MRS. ORCUTT: I don't understand where she got that amount of poison, Mr. Kingsley. Oh, I wish I'd never taken her in. I knew there was something strange about that girl. She was different from the rest of the girls.


TERRY: (EXPLODES) No, Mrs. Orcutt! She wasn't. She wasn't a bit different! She was just a girl without a job like all the rest of us! It might have been any one of us--


DAVID: Terry-- Terry, stop crying. Listen to me.


TERRY: Oh, David, I - I can't stop crying.


DAVID: Terry, I don't think you should stay here any longer. They want you out in Hollywood; they thought your test was terrific. I think you ought to go out, Terry.


TERRY: No. No, I'm going to stay here. It is my fight, David. I - I loved Kay. She was the finest friend anyone could have. The theater did this to her. The theater beat her and starved her and finally killed her. Well, I'm going to exact payment for that somehow! I'm in this for both of us now and I'm going to stick it out if it takes fifty years! I'm going to stick it out until my name goes up in lights and then people clap when I come on the stage. It's conquer or be conquered. And I'm going to conquer, David. I'm going to conquer.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


HOST: The curtain has fallen on our first act. And now here's Del Sharbutt with a few words.


ANNOUNCER: Something exciting happens in your mouth every time you brush your teeth with Colgate Tooth Powder. Yes, something exciting because Colgate Tooth Powder stops unpleasing breath that originates in the mouth -- stops it instantly in seven cases out of ten. Scientific tests prove this to be true. Then, too, Colgate Tooth Powder does a real job of cleansing. With amazing speed and effectiveness, its gentle polishing agent removes dull dingy surface film from your teeth and reveals all their natural luster. So don't take a chance with romance. Use Colgate Tooth Powder night and morning, and before every date. Begin tonight, won't you? Get Colgate Tooth Powder. Remember that name -- Colgate Tooth Powder.


MUSIC: THEME ... FOR TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND HOST--


HOST: We return now to the second act of "Stage Door."


MRS. ORCUTT: Terry dear, have you seen Jean's picture yet? She's simply wonderful.


TERRY: (WEARILY) Yes, Mrs. Orcutt, I saw it. (EXHALES)


MRS. ORCUTT: Well, you don't seem very enthused.


TERRY: I'm a little tired, Mrs. Orcutt. Working in a blouse department of a store can be a little wearing, you know.


MRS. ORCUTT: Well, dear, it pays your bills.


TERRY: (MOCKS HERSELF, ARCHLY) "That blouse, madam, is the loveliest thing for three ninety-five I've ever seen. Don't you think you should take it a teensy bit larger, madam?" (IRONIC, FLAT) What inspiring dialogue.


MRS. ORCUTT: Well, you could have gone to Hollywood. Look at Jean. They say Jean's going to be starred in her second picture. Think of that.


TERRY: (DRY) How can I forget it?


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER BEHIND--


MRS. ORCUTT: Terry, look at this picture of Jean on the front page. You see? (READS) "Lovely Jean Maitland, popular screen star, alights at Newark Airport."


TERRY: (POLITELY) Hmm, that's a nice picture.


MRS. ORCUTT: Ohhhhhh, and see here? Says she's coming back to New York to do a play. Oh, isn't that exciting?! She's going to star on Broadway.


TERRY: Yes, that's swell. That's a wonderful break. Well, I have to get to bed. Seven-thirty comes pretty early in the morning.


MUSIC: BRIDGE ... THEN, IN BG, FOR A RAPID JOB SEARCH MONTAGE 


SOUND: TERRY'S FOOTSTEPS IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


MUSIC: FOR TRAMPING THE STREETS ... THEN IN BG 


TERRY: I'd like to see Mr. Hoffman, please.


1ST WOMAN: Sorry, Mr. Hoffman isn't casting any plays just now.


MUSIC: FOR TRAMPING TO THE NEXT OFFICE ... THEN IN BG 


TERRY: I'd like to talk to Miss Lamb about the Robertson show.


2ND WOMAN: Sorry, that's all cast.


MUSIC: FOR TRAMPING TO THE NEXT OFFICE ... THEN IN BG 


TERRY: Is Mr. Frank Hogue in? I'd like to read for his new show.


3RD WOMAN: Sorry, there's nothing for your type just now.


MUSIC: FOR TRAMPING TWICE AS FAR TO THE NEXT OFFICE ... THEN IN BG, BUILDING TO AN INTENSE CLIMAX--


TERRY: If I could just see Mr. Berger--


1ST WOMAN: Sorry.


TERRY: All I'm asking is a chance!


2ND WOMAN: Sorry.


TERRY: I know I could play the part!


3RD WOMAN: Sorry.


TERRY: (DESPERATE) At least let me try the part! It isn't fair just to say no! It isn't fair!


1ST WOMAN: Sorry.


TERRY: (HYSTERICAL) Oh, I wish I were dead! I wish I were dead!


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


JEAN: (QUIETLY) Well, Terry?


TERRY: (QUIETLY) Well, Jean?


JEAN: It's been a long time.


TERRY: Not so long. But you've really gone places in it. 


JEAN: This part they have for me; it's a wonderful part, Terry. (BEAT, REALIZES) It'd be a wonderful part for you.


TERRY: Yes. But things like that don't happen to me.


JEAN: Well, maybe they will now. Maybe your luck will change. If ever anyone deserved a break, it's you, Terry.


TERRY: Thanks, Jean. I'll keep working for it, anyhow.


JEAN: (AN INSPIRATION) Look. I'm going to try and sell Mr. Gretzl and David on letting you do the part in this play they bought for me.


TERRY: Jean, you're crazy.


JEAN: No, I'm not. It's your part. It would make you a star. And it's nothing to me. Well, anyway, it would never mean to me what it will to you.


TERRY: Don't do it, Jean. Play it and make the most of it. (EXHALES, WARMLY) I'll always love you for the thought, though.


JEAN: Uh huh. I'm going to see that Mr. Gretzl hears you if it's the last thing I ever do.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


DAVID: Terry, this is Mr. Adolf Gretzl.


GRETZL: Miss Randall, I am a man of few words. I have here a part. Miss Maitland says she is not well enough to play it and both she and David insist that you are the one to play it. That I want to see. You will please read some lines for me.


TERRY: (UNCERTAIN) Uh-- Uh, now? You mean without reading the show?


GRETZL: What's so difficult about that? We do that all the time in pictures. Here. Here, uh, read this speech here.


TERRY: Well, all right. Here goes.


MUSIC: ACCOMPANIES SPEECH IN BG


TERRY: (READS AND ACTS, NOT POORLY, BUT NOT TOO WELL EITHER) "Look, boys. I haven't got any right to stand up here and tell you what to do. Only, maybe I have got a right, see? Because look-- I'm engaged to be married. You all know--" (FADES OUT)


MUSIC: UP, TO TOP THE SPEECH ... BRIEF TRANSITION FOR PASSAGE OF TIME


TERRY: (FADES IN, BAD ACTING) "Well, which would you rather do? Die quick fighting or starve to death slow? That's why I'm telling you to strike, strike, strike!" (BREAKS OFF, DISCOURAGED, TEARFUL) I - I can't read it like this, Mr. Gretzl. I can't do it. I - I have to study. It isn't fair.


GRETZL: (UNIMPRESSED) Eh, you must excuse me. I am a plain-speaking man. I don't want to hurt anybody's feelings, but in my opinion this young lady is not for me. Thank you for coming in and reading.


TERRY: (EXHALES HELPLESSLY) I'm sorry--


DAVID: (QUICKLY) What're you gonna do with that play, Mr. Gretzl?


GRETZL: Well, throw it away. I was only interested in it as a vehicle for Miss Maitland anyhow. I don't really want to put it on.


DAVID: Will you sell it to me?


GRETZL: (BEAT) For what price?


DAVID: For whatever you paid for it.


GRETZL: For her?


DAVID: For her.


GRETZL: You are crazy.


DAVID: (FRIENDLY) No, you are. You'll see after you read her notices.


GRETZL: (MOVING OFF) Well, I'm goin' right out and have Becker draw up a contract immediately before you change your mind. 


SOUND: GRETZL'S FOOTSTEPS TO DOOR WHICH OPENS AND CLOSES AS HE EXITS


TERRY: (BEAT, OVERCOME) Oh, David-- David darling, you can't do this just for me.


DAVID: Hold on a minute.


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... LIGHTLY ROMANTIC ... IN BG


DAVID: I'm not one of those boys who puts on a play just so that his girl can act in it. (BEAT, SLOWLY) Uh, by the way, you are my girl, aren't you?


TERRY: (BEAT) I'd like to be.


DAVID: (CHUCKLES) I guess it was time I got around to asking that. I thought about it a good many times, but I thought you didn't want anything on your mind but the theater.


TERRY: David, I - I found out something about the theater. It isn't enough, all by itself. You get lonely for someone to come home to. Someone who understands.


DAVID: Darling. Oh, darling. (LONG PAUSE AS THEY PRESUMABLY KISS, FLUSTERED) Well, now. (EXHALES) Let's see, uh-- We'll have to go right on with the rehearsals, you know. I - I want this play to open as scheduled, so - if you'll meet me at eleven tomorrow, we'll see about the license. Er, you have a rehearsal at two at the Music Box, of course, and - and we'll have to fit the wedding in somehow on Sunday. (MOCK OFFICIOUS) Does that meet with your approval, Miss Randall?


TERRY: (MATCHES HIM) Yes, indeed, Mr. Kingsley. (MORE EMOTIONAL) Oh, David, I'm so happy, I - I could just die.


DAVID: (LIGHTLY) Don't you dare.


TERRY: This is just the ending for a real play, isn't it? Girl meets producer, girl marries producer -- plays lead in his show.


DAVID: Correction, Miss Randall. That isn't the ending. (WARMLY) That's only the beginning.


TERRY: (LOVINGLY) Oh, David darling. Darling--


MUSIC: UP, FOR CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: But Terry's right after all. It is the ending. And the final curtain has gone down on "Stage Door" by George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber. In just a moment, Arnold Moss will tell you about next week's play. First--


Tonight, this very evening, you can enjoy a breath that's sweet and a smile that dazzles. Because Colgate Tooth Powder not only removes dull film quickly and safely from your teeth, revealing all their natural brilliance, but at the same time it gives you a breath that's sweet and wholesome. And that's a fact, friends, for scientific tests have proved beyond question that Colgate Tooth Powder actually stops unpleasing breath that originates in the mouth -- stops it instantly in seven cases out of ten. And it's just that easy, too. Simply brush your teeth night and morning, and before every date with Colgate Tooth Powder. Remember that name -- Colgate Tooth Powder.


And now, Arnold Moss.


MUSIC: THEME ... SUBDUED, IN BG


HOST: Our play next week is Arthur Kober's delightful comedy, "Having Wonderful Time," the story of the city people who, imprisoned fifty weeks a year by stone and steel, go to summer camp for two weeks' vacation -- with pay. There, invoices and dictation are forgotten. Every girl becomes a Cinderella and every boy a Prince Charming and every day is Sunday. Until next Tuesday then, when Colgate Tooth Powder's THEATRE OF ROMANCE presents "Having Wonderful Time," this is your host, Arnold Moss, saying good night and wishing you love, happiness, and --- romance.


ANNOUNCER: In tonight's play, Terry was played by Joan Banks and David by Richard Kollmar. The radio adaptation was written by Jean Holloway, the music composed and conducted by Ben Ludlow, and the production was directed by Marx Loeb.


MUSIC: GENTLY OUT


1ST GIRL: What is the Fourteen-Day Palmolive Plan?


2ND GIRL: Yes, what is the Fourteen-Day Palmolive Plan?


2ND ANNCR: It's the biggest beauty news in years. Doctors tested this plan; proved it brought lovelier complexions to two out of three of all the women tested. Here it is.


1ST GIRL: Wash your face with Palmolive Soap. Then massage for a full sixty seconds with Palmolive's lovely soft lather. Then rinse. Do this three times a day.


2ND ANNCR: Easy to do, yet thirty-six doctors proved this Palmolive Plan brings a lovelier complexion to two out of three women. No matter what type of skin you have -- dry or oily -- the Fourteen-Day Palmolive Plan works. So get Palmolive. See what Palmolive can do for your skin in only fourteen days. 


ANNOUNCER: You can't fly a B-29 over Japan, you can't storm a fort in Italy, or blast a pillbox in Normandy. And yet right in your own kitchen you can help the lads who are fighting to end the war this year. How? By saving used kitchen fat. The kitchen fat you save and sell to Uncle Sam is desperately needed in scores of supplies, all the way from ammunition to zinc stearates, all the way from medicines to munitions, from fertilizers to foodstuffs. So save every single drop of used kitchen fat -- even the burned, blackened bacon grease. Your butcher pays you two precious red ration points, plus four cents, for every pound you turn in. If you want to drive a nail in Adolf Hitler's coffin, save your fat and turn it in. And do it plenty often.


CBS ANNCR: This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.



Comments