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Shadow of a Doubt

The Lux Radio Theatre

Shadow of a Doubt

Jan 03 1944



CAST:

ANNOUNCER, John Milton Kennedy

HOST, Cecil B. DeMille

SALLY

JEAN BARTEL, Miss America of 1943

2ND ANNCR

TWO WOMEN, who sing


UNCLE CHARLIE

CHARLOTTE, his teenage niece

EMMY, Charlotte's mother, Mrs. Newton

JOE, Charlotte's father, Mr. Newton

ANN, Charlotte's younger sister

ROGER, Charlotte's younger brother

JACK GRAHAM, the "journalist"

FRED SAUNDERS, the "photographer" (4 lines)

1ST DETECTIVE (4 lines)

2ND DETECTIVE (3 lines)

MRS. MARTIN, the sympathetic landlady

MRS. HENDERSON, the no-nonsense telegrapher (4 lines)

PORTER (3 lines)

MR. GREENE, bank president

MRS. POTTER, the silly, flirty widow

MISS CORCORAN, the irritated librarian (3 lines)

WAITRESS (2 lines)

2ND PORTER (1 line)





ANNOUNCER: Lux presents Hollywood!


MUSIC: LUX THEME ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: The Lux Radio Theatre brings you William Powell and Teresa Wright in "Shadow of a Doubt," and as our special guest, Miss America of 1943. Ladies and gentlemen, your producer, Mr. Cecil B. DeMille. 


MUSIC: THEME ... UP AND OUT


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: Greetings from Hollywood, ladies and gentlemen. There are connoisseurs of paintings, of wines, of furniture, and of all the other fine arts, but none quite so violent in their opinions as the connoisseurs of mystery stories, and tonight we offer these discriminating critics a collector's item: a piece known to the whodunit fraternity as a "Hitchcock" -- so-called because the director, Alfred Hitchcock, is a master of suspense, and the Universal picture "Shadow of a Doubt" is one of his triumphs. Tonight we bring it to you with William Powell and Teresa Wright in the starring roles. 


We borrowed Bill from the cast of "Heavenly Body," the new Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture. Bill made "The Thin Man" famous and became one of the screens most versatile sleuths, but this evening, instead of a detective, he-- Well, just wait. Those who saw Teresa Wright on the screen as Mrs. Lou Gehrig, and in tonight's play, know how fine a performance they may expect from her. Just the fact that she plays a girl named Charlie is a hint of the surprises to come. 


And speaking of surprises, I imagine it would be a very unpleasant one if you dropped into a store to buy a few cakes of Lux Toilet Soap and were charged three or four hundred dollars. I have a newspaper clipping here sent in by a listener. The paper quotes a missionary in China who says that, over there, one cake of Lux may cost as much as one hundred and twenty dollars in Chinese money. Here we take those little comforts of life for granted, but this newspaper should make all of us appreciate buying Lux Toilet Soap for just a few cents. Now the footlights brighten and the curtain rises on "Shadow of a Doubt," starring William Powell as Uncle Charlie and Teresa Wright as Charlotte.


MUSIC: BRIEF INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG


1ST DETECTIVE: Well? Did you get any dope on him? 


2ND DETECTIVE: Yeah. He's living in a rooming house, One-Oh-Four East Street, just outside of Newark. 


1ST DETECTIVE: What name is he using?


2ND DETECTIVE: Spencer. The landlady says he's been there a week.


1ST DETECTIVE: Did you ask to see him?


2ND DETECTIVE: No, he wasn't in.


1ST DETECTIVE: Okay, we'll try it this afternoon. 


MUSIC: UP FOR ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND HOST--


HOST: One-Oh-Four East Street, just outside of Newark, is a mean-looking wooden frame building and a mean-looking street. Upstairs in a shabby, cheerless room, a man lies across the iron bedstead. He's fully dressed; his hands clasped behind his head. Through half-closed eyes he gazes steadily at the cracked ceiling above him. Then, hearing a step in the hall, his eyes close and his face becomes an expressionless mask.


SOUND: GENTLE TAPPING AT DOOR ... THEN AGAIN ... DOOR OPENS 


MRS. MARTIN: Mr. Spencer? (A LITTLE LOUDER) Mr. Spencer?


CHARLIE: Yes?


MRS. MARTIN: Mr. Spencer, I hate to bother you, but I thought you'd like to know there were two men here askin' for you. They were sorry you wasn't in. I said you wasn't. 


CHARLIE: Did they, er, say they'd be back?


MRS. MARTIN: They didn't say exactly. Maybe I shoulda let 'em in. Only you said not to disturb ya and I--


CHARLIE: Yes. Thank you, Mrs. Martin. 


MRS. MARTIN: You look kind of tired to me. I think maybe you need a real rest, that's what I think. 


CHARLIE: (AMUSED) Yes. I could stand a rest. 


MRS. MARTIN: Those friends of yours told me not to say they'd called. Wanted to surprise ya. But I thought you'd like to know. 


CHARLIE: Of course. And if they come back, you may show them up. 


MRS. MARTIN: Yes.


CHARLIE: You know, it's a funny thing. Very funny thing. Up to now those two friends of mine have never seen me. Every time they've called, I've been out -- even at other places. (CHUCKLES) Isn't that odd, Mrs. Martin? 


MRS. MARTIN: (NOT SURE WHAT TO SAY) Well, yes, it is odd. 


CHARLIE: Well, now I'll have to meet them, I suppose. (EXHALES) I might even go to meet them. And, then again, I may not. Not yet. 


MRS. MARTIN: Well, you just go ahead with your nap. 


CHARLIE: Yes, thank you. 


MRS. MARTIN: (MOVING OFF) If you want anything, you just call.


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES 


MUSIC: TENSE ... FOR AN INTERIOR MONOLOGUE ... IN BG


CHARLIE: (WHISPERS TENSELY TO HIMSELF) What do they know? The can't know anything. They're just bluffing. They haven't got a thing on me. Not a thing! 


MUSIC: UP FOR ACCENT ... THEN IN BG


SOUND: KNOCKING AT DOOR 


MRS. MARTIN: (BEHIND DOOR) Mr. Spencer? 


SOUND: KNOCKS AGAIN


MRS. MARTIN: (BEHIND DOOR) Mr. Spencer? 


SOUND: DOOR OPENS


MRS. MARTIN: Mr. Spencer, they're here again. They're here-- (STARTLED) Why, he's gone. (BEAT, DISBELIEF) Well, for lamb's sakes. He's gone!


MUSIC: UP FOR ACCENT AND TRANSITION ... THEN SHARPLY OUT


CHARLIE: (INTO PHONE) Hello? Hello, Western Union? -- I'm in a pay station; I want to send a telegram. -- Yes, I've got change. It's to Mrs. Joseph Newton, Santa Rosa, California. Here's the message. Ready? "Homesick for you all - stop. Coming to stay a while - stop. Arrive Thursday. Love to everybody, and a kiss for little Charlie, from her Uncle Charlie." -- Yeah, that's the signature: Uncle Charlie. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION 


SOUND: PHONE RINGS TWICE ... RECEIVER UP


ANN: (INTO PHONE) Hello, the Newton residence. -- A telegram? Well, who's it for, Mrs. Henderson? -- Well, mother isn't home yet, so maybe she'd better call you back. Goodbye. 


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN ... FRONT DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES AS JOE ENTERS


JOE: Hello, Ann. Where's your mother? 


ANN: Oh, good evening, father. She's out. 


JOE: Out? Where? 


ANN: Well, I really don't know, father.


JOE: Well, how 'bout a kiss? 


ANN: Of course, father. 


JOE: (AS HE'S KISSED) That's the girl. Say, you better not read in here, Ann; the light's bad.


ANN: Well, I've gotta finish this book before dinner. 


JOE: And ruin your eyes? Where's Roger?


ANN: Out.


JOE: How 'bout Charlotte? 


ANN: Upstairs in her room -- thinking. 


SOUND: FATHER'S STEPS UP STAIRS, IN BG


JOE: Thinking? What's she thinking about?


ANN: I'm afraid you'll have to ask Charlotte, father.


JOE: All right, you know what I meant. 


SOUND: FATHER'S STEPS REACH TOP OF STAIRS ... THEN TO CHARLOTTE'S DOOR, IN BG


JOE: (CALLS) Charlotte? (NO ANSWER) Charlotte?! (NO ANSWER, TO HIMSELF) Why doesn't she answer? 


SOUND: CHARLOTTE'S DOOR OPENS


JOE: (GENTLY) Charlotte? 


CHARLOTTE: (GLUM) Who is it? 


JOE: It's me; who do you suppose? 


CHARLOTTE: Come in, papa. 


JOE: What's the matter? Don't you feel well?


CHARLOTTE: Oh, I'm perfectly well. I've just been thinking for hours -- and I've come to the conclusion that I give up. I simply give up


JOE: (QUIETLY AMUSED) What are you going to give up? 


CHARLOTTE: Have you ever stopped to think that a family should be the most wonderful thing in the world? And that this family's just gone to pieces? 


JOE: We have? 


CHARLOTTE: Of course, we have. We just sort of go along and nothing happens. We eat and sleep and that's about all. We don't even have any real conversations. We just talk. 


JOE: And work.


CHARLOTTE: Yes, poor mother, she works like a dog -- just like a dog!


JOE: That's what I came up to ask. Where is she?


CHARLOTTE: She's out. But when she comes back, it'll be the same thing. Dinner, then dishes, then bed. I don't see how she stands it. 


JOE: What were you thinking we can do about it? 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, nothing, I suppose. I guess we'll just have to wait for a miracle or something. 


EMMY: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Yoo-hoo! Joe!


JOE: Oh, here she is. (CALLS) I'm in Charlotte's room, Emmy! 


EMMY: (APPROACHES, CONCERNED) For heaven's sake, you lying down, Charlotte? What's the matter? Joe, what's the matter? 


JOE: Well, it seems--


CHARLOTTE: (INTERRUPTS, UNHAPPY) Oh, I've just become a nagging old maid. And you went downtown in that awful old hat you promised me you'd throw away! 


ROGER: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Mo-ther!


EMMY: (AMUSED) Oh, goodness! What on earth does it matter what hat I put on? 


ROGER: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Mo-ther! I'm ho-ome!


EMMY: (CALLS) Yes, Roger, I know! 


CHARLOTTE: (ANNOYED) I don't see why you let that child yell at you like that, mother. If he has something to say--


JOE: I'll take care of him. (MOVES OFF, CALLS) Roger, stop yelling like that! 


EMMY: (CONCERNED AGAIN) Charlotte dear, what is it? 


CHARLOTTE: (SUDDENLY INSPIRED) Mama--! Mama, I'm going downtown and send a telegram! 


EMMY: Why, Charlie, who do you know to send a telegram to? 


CHARLOTTE: I know just the person to come and save us! A wonderful person who'll come and shake us all up, so we'll be good and dignified and intelligent again. 


EMMY: Charlie, have you gone crazy? What do you mean "save us"? 


CHARLOTTE: All this time there's been the one real, right person to save us. Mama, what's Uncle Charlie's address? 


EMMY: Charlotte, you're not going to ask Uncle Charlie for money?


CHARLOTTE: No, no -- that wouldn't help us. I just want him to come. 


EMMY: Oh, but think of asking a busy man like that to come all this way for nothing.


CHARLOTTE: He'd come for me. I'm named after him. With each present, he sends me a special little message. Besides, we're the only relatives he has in the world. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: CLICKETY-CLACK OF TELEGRAPH KEY ... THEN IN BG


CHARLOTTE: Mrs. Henderson, I'd like to send a telegram.


MRS. H: Why, hello, Charlotte. I just called up your house. Telegram for your mother -- from your uncle, I think.


CHARLOTTE: My uncle? My uncle Charlie?! 


MRS. H: That's him. He's comin' to visit you. Arrives Thursday. 


CHARLOTTE: (GASP OF DELIGHT) Oh, Mrs. Henderson, do you believe in telepathy? 


MRS. H: I ought to, it's my business. 


CHARLOTTE: Oh-- ... Not telegraphy. Mental telepathy. Like, well, suppose you have a thought, and suppose the thought's about someone who's in tune with you, and then over thousands of miles that someone knows what you're thinking and he answers you. And it's all mental! 


MRS. H: I don't know what you're talking about. I send telegrams the normal way.


MUSIC: TRANSITION 


SOUND: TRAIN STATION BACKGROUND


JOE: There he is. Isn't that Uncle Charlie down there? (CALLS) Hey, Charles! 


CHARLOTTE: (DISMAYED) Papa! Papa, look, he's sick!


JOE: Huh? 


CHARLOTTE: Uncle Charlie must be sick. The porter's helping him off the train. (CALLS) Oh, Uncle Charlie! Uncle Charlie!


SOUND: STATION BACKGROUND TOPS CHARLOTTE ... FILLS PAUSE, THEN IN BG


PORTER: There ya are, sir. Feeling okay, sir? 


CHARLIE: (FEIGNS HOARSENESS & WEAKNESS) Yes. Yes, thank you. 


PORTER: Ain't been much of a trip for you, sir, lyin' sick in a made-up berth all the way. 


CHARLIE: You've been very kind. Here, this is for you. Thank you. 


PORTER: (IMPRESSED WITH BIG TIP) Why, thank you, sir. (MOVING OFF) Thank you


CHARLOTTE: (APPROACHES) Uncle Charlie! Oh, Uncle Charlie!


CHARLIE: (HEARTILY, NO LONGER HOARSE) Charlie! Well, Little Charlie, hello! 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, are you sick? Let me look at you. (REALIZES) You aren't sick, are you? 


CHARLIE: (HIGHLY AMUSED) What, me? Me sick? Well! Certainly not! 


CHARLOTTE: (PUZZLED) But I thought the porter was helping and-- Oh, Uncle Charlie, that was the funniest thing. 


CHARLIE: (LAUGHS IT OFF) Oh ho! (GOOD-NATURED AND FRIENDLY) Well, Little Charlie -- glad to see me, huh? 


CHARLOTTE: (VERY GLAD) Oh, yes, yes!


JOE: (APPROACHES) Hello, Charles.


CHARLIE: Well, Joe! Say, how are you? You haven't changed a bit.


JOE: How are you, Charles? You're lookin' great. 


ANN: Hello, Uncle Charlie. 


CHARLIE: And this is Ann. I'll bet you don't remember me, Ann. 


ANN: Well, I remember you, sort of. But you look different, sort of.


JOE: Where's Roger? Uh, Roger, come here. 


CHARLIE: Hello there, Roger. 


ROGER: Hello. 


JOE: Well, we better get started. Emma's got dinner almost ready. 


CHARLOTTE: I've got your suitcase, Uncle Charlie.


CHARLIE: Oh ho! Say now, wait. That looks pretty heavy for you.


CHARLOTTE: Oh, it's nothing. I love to carry! 


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: DINNER TABLE EFFECTS (UTENSILS, ET CETERA) ... THEN IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


EMMY: You'll have some more lamb, Charles, won't you?


CHARLIE: Well, Emmy, it's pretty good. 


JOE: Uh, what were you saying about your boat, Charles? 


CHARLIE: Well, that's about the finish of it, Joe. She was a beauty, that boat. Had some fine times on it. But all that's over and done with. It's a different world these days and we might as well face it. 


JOE: That's the truth, Charles. 


CHARLIE: Say! I've been forgetting something all this time. (LEANS AWAY, REACHES FOR BAG) I, er-- I brought a few things back with me. 


SOUND: PACKAGES HANDED OUT, UNWRAPPED, AND OPENED ... IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


CHARLIE: There you are, Joe. This is yours, from me. I didn't know whether you had one, Joe. 


JOE: Well, you didn't have to think of me, Charles. Presents are all right for the children-- (IMPRESSED) Say-- A wristwatch. Why, I've never had a wristwatch. The fellas at the bank'll think I'm quite a sport. 


CHARLIE: (CHUCKLES) One for you, Emmy. Now, you just try this on. 


EMMY: (DELIGHT, DISBELIEF) Charles! Charles, is it--? Oh, no! 


CHARLOTTE: (IMPRESSED) A silver fox! 


EMMY: Charles, I've wanted one all my life! 


CHARLIE: It's what you should have.


EMMY: Oh, it's beautiful! 


CHARLIE: And now - your little present, Charlie. 


CHARLOTTE: (QUIETLY OVERJOYED) Oh, I don't want anything. Right now I have enough. Before you came, I didn't think I had anything, but now I don't want another thing. (MOVING OFF) I - I'll go get the coffee.


EMMY: Charlotte! 


ROGER: She's crazy! 


ANN: You ask me, I think she's putting on.


JOE: She's not crazy. Smartest girl in her class at school. She's got brains. 


CHARLIE: Well, she'll like this when she sees it. Now, you folks just sit here and I'll take it to her. 


SOUND: WE FOLLOW CHARLIE'S STEPS TO KITCHEN 


EMMY: (CALLS AFTER HIM) Tell her the sugar and cream are on the kitchen table, Charles.


CHARLIE: All right! 


SOUND: CHARLIE'S STEPS STOP IN KITCHEN WHERE CHARLOTTE HANDLES DISHES, IN BG


CHARLIE: Charlie? What's the matter? Here-here-here, now you just put those dishes down a minute. 


SOUND: DISHES STOP


CHARLOTTE: I meant it. Please don't give me anything. 


CHARLIE: Nothing? Why? 


CHARLOTTE: I can't explain. You came here and mother's happy and I'm glad that she named me after you and that she thinks we're both alike. I think we are, too. I know it. It would spoil things if you should give me anything. 


CHARLIE: (AMUSED CHUCKLE) Well-- You're a strange girl, Charlie. Why would it spoil things?


CHARLOTTE: Because we're not just an uncle and a niece. I know you. I know that you don't tell people a lot of things. I don't either. I have a feeling that, inside you somewhere, there's something - something nobody knows. Something wonderful and-- I'll find it out.


CHARLIE: (CHUCKLES) It's not good to find out too much, Charlie. 


CHARLOTTE: So we're kind of like twins, don't you see? We have to know. 


CHARLIE: Here. Give me your hand. Now, you wear this ring. You wear it for me. You hear? 


CHARLOTTE: Thank you. 


CHARLIE: But you haven't even looked at it. 


CHARLOTTE: I don't have to look it. 


CHARLIE: (CHUCKLES) Let me show it to you. It's a good emerald. A really good one. And good emeralds are the most beautiful things in the world.


CHARLOTTE: (STARTLED EXCLAMATION) Oh! Why, you've had something engraved on it. 


CHARLIE: (SURPRISED) Er-- No, I haven't, but, er, I will, if you'd like me to. 


CHARLOTTE: But you have, Uncle Charlie, you have. It's very faint; I can just read it. It says, "T. S. from B. M." (REALIZES) Why, they must be someone else's initials. 


CHARLIE: (PAUSE, LOW, COLD) Jeweler rooked me. He rooked me! 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, it doesn't matter; really it doesn't. 


CHARLIE: It's secondhand -- he rooked me. (WITH DISGUST) Hah. The whole rotten world's crooked. Give it back to me. 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, but I like it this way. Someone else was probably happy with this ring. 


CHARLIE: The world's rotten. Give it back to me. I'll have that taken off. 


CHARLOTTE: No, it's perfect the way it is. I'm going to keep it, Uncle Charlie.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: DINNER TABLE BACKGROUND ... COFFEE POURED ... CLINK! OF COFFEE CUPS, ET CETERA, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


EMMY: It's a beautiful ring. You're too good, Charles.


CHARLIE: Well, nothing's too good for my favorite niece. 


CHARLOTTE: Coffee, Uncle Charlie?


CHARLIE: Thanks.


EMMY: Charles, why can't you stay here -- forever? 


CHARLOTTE: (HUMS WALTZ TUNE FROM "THE MERRY WIDOW" TO HERSELF, IN BG)


CHARLIE: I've been thinking about that, Emmy. You know, I'd like to open up a new chapter in my life. New surroundings. Everything new! 


CHARLOTTE: (STOPS HUMMING) What is that thing I'm humming? Anybody know? 


ANN: Sing at the table, you'll marry a crazy husband. 


CHARLIE: (TO EMMY) Yes, I've been thinking about transferring some of my money out here from the East. (LIGHTLY) I suppose you take money at your bank, Joe. 


JOE: (CHUCKLES) Well, that's one thing we do, all right. Rake in the dough. Can't promise to give it back.


CHARLOTTE: (HUMMING THE WALTZ AGAIN, IN BG)


CHARLIE: (CHUCKLES, TO JOE) Well, I'll go down tomorrow morning and open an account. Say thirty, forty thousand. Just to start things off right.


JOE: Say, that's a lot of money. 


CHARLOTTE: (STOPS HUMMING) I can't get that tune out of my head. If somebody will tell me what it is, maybe I'll stop. 


EMMY: It's a waltz, dear.


CHARLOTTE: 'Course it's a waltz, but what waltz? You know, it's the funniest thing, but sometimes I think of a tune and then pretty soon I hear somebody else humming it. I think tunes jump from head to head. What is it, Uncle Charlie? (HUMS THE WALTZ) What is it? 


CHARLIE: (FEIGNS IGNORANCE) Why, er-- I don't know. 


EMMY: Oh, I know what that is! Oh, it's right on the tip of my tongue--


CHARLIE: (INTERRUPTS, QUICKLY) Er, er-- It's - it's the Blue Danube waltz. Yes.


CHARLOTTE: Of course! That's what it is. (REALIZES, QUICKLY) Oh, no, it isn't, Uncle Charlie, it's not "The Blue Danube," it's "The Merry Wi--" (INTERRUPTED BY--)


SOUND: SMASH! OF CHARLIE'S COFFEE CUP ON FLOOR


CHARLOTTE: (STARTLED EXCLAMATION) Oh! 


CHARLIE: Oh, now look what I did. A whole cup of coffee. I'm terribly sorry, Emmy. Er, er-- Hand me a napkin, Ann. 


EMMY: Oh, now, it's nothing to make a fuss about. Just sit down, Ann. And, Charles, while we do the dishes, you go in the living room and read the evening paper. You look tired.


CHARLIE: All right, I will. Thanks, Emmy.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER, IN BG, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


ROGER: Uncle Charlie, when you get finished with the paper, will you give me the funnies?


CHARLIE: Oh, you can have 'em now if you want.


ROGER: I can wait.


CHARLIE: Any time you say. (YAWNS, EXHALES) Well, nothing much to read these days, Roger. Nothing but trouble. You know, sometimes I think that-- (STOPS SHORT)


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... SLOW, UNEASY VERSION OF MERRY WIDOW WALTZ, IN BG


ROGER: What's the matter? What's the matter, Uncle Charlie? What are you looking at? 


SOUND: NEWSPAPER CRUMPLED


ROGER: Say, you better not do that to papa's paper. He gets mad. 


CHARLIE: Oh, er, Roger-- Roger, come here. 


ROGER: Huh? 


CHARLIE: Look. Er-- Did you, er--? Did you ever make a house out of newspapers?


MUSIC: OUT GENTLY BEHIND--


SOUND: NEWSPAPER HANDLED, CUT, AND FOLDED IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


CHARLIE: You see what I mean? Now, first you stretch them all out on the floor, see? And then you, ah-- Look. You - you cut out a door. See? Now, this is the doorway--


ROGER: (IMPRESSED) Hey!


ANN: (APPROACHES) Roger? Papa wants the papers.


CHARLIE: Here you are, Ann. And look what we've got -- a real Eskimo's igloo. 


ANN: You've got papa's paper. 


CHARLIE: (FEIGNS SURPRISE, LIGHTLY) Say--! Ho ho ho! I guess I should have thought of that. (CONFIDENTIALLY) Well, we'll - we'll fold it up again -- and your father won't know the difference.


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER


ROGER: Can you make hats, Uncle Charlie? 


CHARLIE: Hats? Well, let's see. No, I don't think I can make hats. You show me how, Roger. 


CHARLOTTE: (APPROACHES) What are you all up to? (SEES PAPER, ADMONISHES) Why, Ann; Roger -- that's papa's paper! 


CHARLIE: It's my fault. I began it. I was showing them a game and I never thought about the paper.


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER BEHIND--


CHARLOTTE: Well, it's all right. Let's see. Page one. Two. Page five. Why, where's page three? Where is it? Ann, did you go out on the porch with it somewhere? 


ANN: I just came in here.


CHARLIE: (CHUCKLES) Yeah, that's funny. 


CHARLOTTE: Page three and four -- where are they? 


ANN: We never touched it. Uncle Charlie's the only one who touched it. 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, well. Papa may not notice it, if we fold it very neatly, see? And very evenly.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, NEWSPAPER FOLDED


CHARLIE: Oh, that's fine, Charlie. You're a lifesaver.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: KNOCK ON BEDROOM DOOR


CHARLIE: Come in!


SOUND: BEDROOM DOOR OPENS


CHARLIE: Hello. Well! You still up? 


CHARLOTTE: (APPROACHES) I remembered you like a pitcher of water by your bed. Here you are.


SOUND: PITCHER SET DOWN


CHARLIE: Ohhh, thank you, dear. You're very thoughtful. And I guess I ought to thank you for giving up your room to me, too. 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, I'll be comfortable in with Ann. 


CHARLIE: Well, good night. Sweet dreams. 


CHARLOTTE: (CONSPIRATORIAL, TEASING) Oh, Uncle Charlie--? I know something. I know a secret that you don't think I know. 


CHARLIE: What secret?


CHARLOTTE: Well, remember I said you couldn't hide anything from me? Well, now I know there was something in the evening paper about you.


CHARLIE: (LIGHTLY) About me? In the evening paper? 


CHARLOTTE: About you. Please show it to me. I won't tell a soul. 


CHARLIE: Well, how do you know there was something?


CHARLOTTE: That's why you played that game with Roger and Ann. You didn't want us to know, and you wanted to tear it out of the paper. So now that I know, you've got to tell me.


CHARLIE: (CHUCKLES) Well, I guess you have me. But it wasn't about me


CHARLOTTE: Is that the page there on the dresser? 


CHARLIE: (MORE SERIOUS) Well, look now, just, er-- Don't bother your head about it.


CHARLOTTE: (PLAYFUL) I want to see it.


SOUND: CHARLOTTE SNATCHES THE PAPER AND CHARLIE TRIES TO SNATCH IT BACK ... IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


CHARLIE: No, no, no. 


CHARLOTTE: But I want to.


CHARLIE: Stop it. It's none of your business. (WITH EFFORT) Give it to me. 


CHARLOTTE: (STARTLED, IN PAIN) Ohhh! 


CHARLIE: (FORCED PLAYFULNESS) Let go. Let go, you hear? 


CHARLOTTE: Ooh, Uncle Charlie, you're hurting me! Your hand!


CHARLIE: (LIGHTLY) Oh ho! I'm sorry. (WITH EFFORT) But give me the paper, Charlie.


SOUND: CHARLIE SECURES THE PAPER FROM CHARLOTTE


CHARLOTTE: (QUIETLY) You hurt my ring.


SOUND: SNEAKS IN ... A SOMBER MERRY WIDOW WALTZ, IN BG


CHARLIE: Oh, Charlie, I - I didn't mean to. I guess I must have grabbed you harder than I thought. (CHUCKLES) I was just fooling about it. You know, it was some gossip -- not too pretty -- about someone I, er, met up with once. It's nothing for you to read. Forget it. (NO RESPONSE) Charlie -- don't look at me like that. It's nothing, really.


CHARLOTTE: (UNCONVINCED) Nothing? 


CHARLIE: Of course not. Now, good night.


CHARLOTTE: (UNCERTAIN, MOVING OFF) Good night, Uncle Charlie. Pleasant dreams.


MUSIC: UP FOR CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: In just a few moments, Mr. DeMille presents William Powell and Teresa Wright in Act II of "Shadow of a Doubt." 


SALLY: Mr. Kennedy? 


ANNOUNCER: Yes, Sally? 


SALLY: Isn't it nice that there's still time to make a New Year's resolution?


ANNOUNCER: Yes, I guess January third is still under the line. Why, Sally? Have you something special in mind, may I ask? 


SALLY: Oh, I've been thinking how many women must have made up their minds that they're really going to do right by their own good looks and look their prettiest during Nineteen Forty-Four. 


ANNOUNCER: A very fine resolution, Sally, and one that should make life brighter for everybody. 


SALLY: But it's one thing to decide you ought to do that and another thing to do it. So here's one simple easy way I thought of that will help any woman to be lovelier.


ANNOUNCER: Aha! Something involving Lux Toilet Soap maybe, Sally? 


SALLY: Of course! If every woman who really wants her skin to be softer, smoother, more appealing, would say to herself, "I'm not going to neglect my Lux Soap facials for even a single day," and if she should stick to that resolution--


ANNOUNCER: --in a very short time she'd be delighted at how much nicer her skin looks.


SALLY: You bet she would. Daily facials with Lux Toilet Soap give complexions real beauty care. Famous screen stars depend on that rich active lather to give their skin protection it needs. 


ANNOUNCER: Right, Sally. Nine out of ten Hollywood stars use Lux Toilet Soap. It's so gentle and mild, they say, and it leaves skin feeling soft and smooth. And now I'm going to ask the ladies in our audience to take your tip, Sally. They'll find they never made a wiser beauty resolution than to use this fine white soap regularly. Day by day, it helps skin to be lovelier. Recent tests show actually three out of four complexions improved with regular Lux Toilet Soap care. Why not ask for Lux Toilet Soap tomorrow? And if your dealer is out of stock due to wartime conditions, he's sure to have more soon. Remember, Lux Toilet Soap, the beauty soap of the stars, is worth waiting for. And now Mr. DeMille returns to the microphone.


HOST: Act II of "Shadow of a Doubt," starring William Powell as Uncle Charlie and Teresa Wright as Charlotte.


MUSIC: BRIEF INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND HOST--


HOST: It's the following morning and Emmy has just brought Uncle Charlie his breakfast. He sits up in bed, the tray on his knees, smiling genially at his sister. 


CHARLIE: Oh, I can't face the world in the morning. I must have coffee before I can speak.


EMMY: Well, I don't mind coddling you your first morning.


CHARLIE: (CHUCKLES) What are you all up to today? 


EMMY: Well, a young man came about an hour ago. Said his name was Graham. And he wants to interview everybody in the house. 


CHARLIE: (DISQUIETED) Interview everybody? 


EMMY: Yes, he's been sent around the country by a magazine or something, and he's to pick out representative American families and ask them questions. 


CHARLIE: How'd he happen to pick this family?


EMMY: Well, he said he'd looked around and asked around -- and he decided that we were the ones he wanted. 


CHARLIE: Well, if he's gonna ask a lot of questions, he can leave me out of it.


EMMY: Why, you'd have more to tell him than any of us. He's going to take our pictures, too.


CHARLIE: Pictures?


EMMY: Yes. You see, there were really two young men. One takes the pictures. 


CHARLIE: (QUIETLY) Oh. There were two of them. 


EMMY: Yes, but Mr. Graham was the nicest, though. 


CHARLIE: Emmy, women are fools. They fall for anything. Now, why do you let two strangers come into your house and turn the place upside down? Why expose your family to a couple of snoopers? I thought you had more sense.


EMMY: Oh, but, Charles-- 


CHARLOTTE: (APPROACHES, CHEERFUL) Good morning, Uncle Charlie!


CHARLIE: Oh, good morning. (CHUCKLES) Your mother's just been telling me about the Newtons being picked for all-American suckers. Now, look here, Emmy, I won't have anything to do with it. I'm just a visitor. My advice to you is to slam the door in their faces. 


EMMY: Oh, I couldn't do that.


CHARLOTTE: I think it's kind of exciting. They take a photograph of you and then we could have it. It would be free.


CHARLIE: No, thank you. I've never been photographed in my life; I don't want to be. 


EMMY: Why, Charles, what makes you talk that way? I had a picture of you. I gave to Charlie.


CHARLIE: Oh, I tell you, there are none. 


EMMY: Well, I guess you've forgotten all about it. Get it, Charlie. 


CHARLOTTE: (OFF) It's right here. (APPROACHES) I think you're cute, Uncle Charlie. 


CHARLIE: Let me see. (BEAT) Well, I don't remember this at all. 


EMMY: You were nine, Charles. You had it taken the Christmas you got your bicycle -- just before your accident. 


CHARLOTTE: Uncle Charlie, you were beautiful.


EMMY: Wasn't he, though? But I always said papa should never have bought you that bicycle. Charlotte, he took it right out on the icy road and he skidded into a streetcar. (INHALES SHARPLY) We thought he was going to die. 


CHARLOTTE: I'm glad he didn't. 


EMMY: Well, he had a fractured skull and he was laid up so long. And when he got well there was no holding him! It was as though all that resting up was too much for him and he had to get into all sorts of mischief to blow off steam. (CHUCKLES)


CHARLIE: (LOW, TO HIMSELF) The whole world's rotten. The whole world's changed. Everything's different. 


EMMY: (IGNORING HIM) Oh, you were a wonderful boy, really, Charles.


CHARLIE: (UP, DISMISSIVE) Ah, what's the use of looking backward? What's the use of looking ahead? Today is the thing. That's my philosophy. Today. 


EMMY: Well, Charles, if today's the thing, you'd better get your clothes on and get to the bank. Joe will be waiting. He's going to take you into Mr. Greene. He's the president.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


GREENE: (SURPRISED) Did you say thirty thousand dollars, Mr. Spencer? 


CHARLIE: Yes, thirty. Maybe forty, Mr. Greene. 


GREENE: (QUIETLY IMPRESSED) Well, well!


CHARLIE: Yes, I thought I might settle down here for a while. It's great country. Great country.


GREENE: Well, we think so. What have you been doing, Mr. Spencer? 


CHARLIE: Well, I suppose you'd call me a promoter -- real estate, shipping, South America. Heh! It's not hard to make money, Mr. Greene. The only trouble I find is that once I make it, I'm not interested in it. 


GREENE: (MILDLY SCANDALIZED) Not interested in money? Well!


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR OPENS AS MRS. POTTER BARGES IN


MRS. POTTER: Harry, I wonder-- Oh, dear! I didn't know you were busy. I could come back--


GREENE: (RESIGNED) Come in, Ella. Now that you're here, come in. Mr. Spencer this is Mrs. Potter. 


MRS. POTTER: Oh! Emma's brother! Oh, we've heard so much about you, Mr. Spencer. 


CHARLIE: How do you do, Miss Potter?


MRS. POTTER: (CORRECTS HIM) Oh, no -- Mrs. Potter. I'm a widow. (CHUCKLES FLIRTATIOUSLY)


CHARLIE: (CHUCKLES, ALSO FLIRTY) I'm sorry. There was something about you that made me think, er--


MRS. POTTER: (INTERESTED) Yes?


GREENE: (A LITTLE EXASPERATED) Er, what did you want, Ella? 


MRS. POTTER: (QUICKLY) Oh, well, I was just going shopping and I only had five dollars and I thought--


GREENE: (INTERRUPTS, CURTLY) Here you are. I'll make out the withdrawal slip later. 


MRS. POTTER: (TWINKLING) There is something to being a widow, isn't there, Mr. Spencer? One doesn't have to ask a man for money anyway. (CHUCKLES, FLIRTY) Goodbye! 


CHARLIE: (THE SAME) Goodbye, Miss, er-- (CHUCKLES) Mrs. Potter.


MRS. POTTER: (CHUCKLES)


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR CLOSES AS MRS. POTTER EXITS


GREENE: So, Mr. Spencer, where were we? 


MUSIC: STEALS IN ... MERRY WIDOW WALTZ, IN BG


CHARLIE: Very attractive woman, that Mrs. Potter. A widow, huh? 


GREENE: Yes. Potter left her quite a bit of money.


CHARLIE: (PLEASED) Mmmm, you don't say? 


MUSIC: UP FOR TRANSITION ... FADES OUT


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... SCENE FADES IN


GRAHAM: Okay, Saunders, go ahead and get some pictures of the upstairs rooms. 


SAUNDERS: Right.


GRAHAM: And then we'd like one of you, Miss Charlotte.


CHARLOTTE: All right. Should I change my dress, Mr. Graham? 


GRAHAM: No, no -- just as you are -- please. 


CHARLOTTE: Funny you happened to choose our family. Why did you? 


GRAHAM: Oh, we looked around, asked some questions, thought you were just about what we wanted. And why not use your family? You haven't got any skeletons in your closet, have you? 


CHARLOTTE: (CHUCKLES) Of course we haven't. I wish we did have a few. We're pretty prosaic. You know, your picking us out as an average family gave me kind of a funny feeling.


GRAHAM: What kind of a funny feeling? 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, I don't know. I guess I don't like to be an average girl in an average family.


GRAHAM: Oh, average families are the best. Look at me. I'm from an average family. 


CHARLOTTE: As average as ours? 


GRAHAM: Sure. Besides, I don't think you are average.


CHARLOTTE: That's because you're seeing me now. You should have seen me a few days ago. I was in the dumps. And then Uncle Charlie came and-- He's so wonderful, he's waked us all up. He makes me feel wonderful, too.


GRAHAM: But he only got here last night. You haven't seen him in a long time. Maybe you just think that-- 


CHARLOTTE: I don't think, I know. It's funny. When I try to think how I feel, I always come back to Uncle Charlie. (REALIZES) Are you trying to tell me not to think he's so wonderful? 


GRAHAM: Why would I do that? I haven't even seen him.


CHARLOTTE: (FIRMLY) He's not interested in this survey, Mr. Graham. I promised him he wouldn't be bothered. 


GRAHAM: But, you see, the whole idea of this thing is--


CHARLOTTE: (INTERRUPTS, POINTED) When someone asks for privacy, he should have it.


GRAHAM: (CONCEDES) Okay, Miss Charlotte. 


CHARLIE: (SLIGHTLY OFF, FRIENDLY) Ah, I'll take the roll of film, please.


SAUNDERS: (SLIGHTLY OFF) What's the matter? I only wanted to take--


CHARLIE: (SLIGHTLY OFF) Give it to me.


CHARLOTTE: Uncle Charlie, what's the matter? 


SAUNDERS: (CLOSER, COMPLAINS) Say, Graham, I took some shots of the upstairs hall and this guy was there and he wants--


CHARLIE: (CLOSER, LIGHTLY) I said, give me that film. I don't like to be photographed. (CHUCKLES) Well, give it to me, please. 


GRAHAM: (BEAT) Give it to him, Fred. 


SAUNDERS: (RELUCTANT) Okay. Too bad, though. (SOUND: CAMERA OPENS) Mrs. Newton's on this roll, too. (TO CHARLIE) Here. 


CHARLIE: Thank you. Sorry to trouble you. 


GRAHAM: It's all right. Oh, Miss Charlotte? I wonder if you'd show me around the town this evening. I'd like to pick up some atmosphere.


CHARLOTTE: Why, of course. 


GRAHAM: Thanks. I'll drop around about eight. (MOVING OFF) Come on, Saunders. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: NOCTURNAL BACKGROUND (CRICKETS CHIRP, ET CETERA) ... CHARLOTTE AND GRAHAM'S STEPS ON SIDEWALK


GRAHAM: (LAUGHS) 


CHARLOTTE: (LAUGHS) I can't get over your breaking your arm when you were ten, and my breaking my arm when I was ten in exactly the same place! 


GRAHAM: And my wanting to run away from home, and you wanting to run away from home. 


CHARLOTTE: I didn't want to, really. It was just a gesture. 


GRAHAM: I didn't want to, either. I guess I was just showing off.


CHARLOTTE: Well, you don't have to show off with me. Shall we sit down?


GRAHAM: Sure.


SOUND: STEPS STOP AS THEY SIT 


GRAHAM: (CASUALLY WHISTLES THE MERRY WIDOW WALTZ ... THEN IN BG)


CHARLOTTE: You know, Mr. Graham, I think you must have an awfully interesting job -- going into people's houses, asking a lot of questions, just like an international spy. (SUDDENLY TROUBLED) You-- That tune you're whistling--? 


GRAHAM: (STOPS WHISTLING) Yes? 


CHARLOTTE: Why did you whistle that? 


GRAHAM: No particular reason. Why do you ask?


CHARLOTTE: There's something strange about you. All those questions, the things you want to know-- 


GRAHAM: Charlotte, listen-- 


CHARLOTTE: (REALIZES, DISMAYED) I know what you are! You're a detective! There's something the matter and you're a detective. 


GRAHAM: Listen to me-- 


CHARLOTTE: I don't want to listen! 


GRAHAM: I came here to this town to find a man. I hadn't counted on you. 


CHARLOTTE: Find a man? What man? 


GRAHAM: There's a man loose in this country. We're after him. We don't know much about him. We don't even know what he looks like. Charlotte, think. How much do you know about your uncle? 


CHARLOTTE: (ALARMED) Why, he's my uncle. He's my mother's brother. What has he done? 


GRAHAM: I can't tell you what he's done, but this man we want may be your uncle. 


CHARLOTTE: I don't believe you! 


GRAHAM: We're after one man. Your uncle may be the man. We think he is. But in the East there's another man who's being hunted, too. Hunted through Massachusetts and into Maine. He may be the man. 


CHARLOTTE: (AGITATED) Uncle Charlie hasn't done anything! He knows it would kill my mother if he'd done anything. Why, he's her brother, just like Roger is mine. Why don't they arrest the man in Maine? Why don't you go away and leave us alone? 


GRAHAM: Charlotte, I'm going to try and make it easy for you. If your Uncle Charlie's the man we want, we'll get him out of town quietly. We won't arrest him here. 


CHARLOTTE: (HORRIFIED) Arrest him here? In this town? 


GRAHAM: I'm trying to tell you we won't. And he may not be the one. It may be the other guy, the one in the East. 


CHARLOTTE: (SLIGHTLY REASSURED) Of course. It's probably all a mistake.


GRAHAM: I hope I'm wrong. I never wanted to be wrong so much in my life.


MUSIC: TRANSITION 


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPERS ... PAGES FLIPPED, IN BG


MISS C: (IRRITATED) Charlotte, the library's supposed to close at nine o'clock sharp. 


CHARLOTTE: Yes, I know, Miss Corcoran. I just want to look at this newspaper. 


MISS C: If I make one exception, I'll have to make a thousand. Anyway, that's yesterday's paper.


CHARLOTTE: It's - it's a recipe I want. Someone tore it out at home. 


MISS C: (MOVING OFF) Well, hurry up. I'm closing right away. 


SOUND: PAGES STOP FLIPPING


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... SLOW, UNEASY ... THE MERRY WIDOW WALTZ, IN BG


CHARLOTTE: (GASPS, BEAT, READS WITH INCREASING HORROR) "Police Hunt Murderer. Boston, Massachusetts, February eighth. In their search for the so-called Merry Widow murderer, the police have thrown a cordon around the northeastern states and the announcement of his arrest is expected daily. All names he has used are thought to be aliases. When found he'll be charged with the murder of three wealthy women. The victims have uniformly been widows of large means. His latest victim was Mrs. Bruce Matthewson, the former musical comedy star known to audiences at the beginning of the century as Teresa Schenley." (SOBS)


SOUND: NEWSPAPER CRUMPLES


MUSIC: UP FOR ACCENT ... THEN IN BG


CHARLOTTE: (TO HERSELF, REALIZES, WITH DREAD) "T. S. from B. M." The ring. "T. S." -- Teresa Schenley.


MUSIC: UP FOR TRANSITIONAL ACCENT AND OUT


EMMY: Come on now, everybody sit down. Dinner's ready. 


SOUND: DINNER TABLE BACKGROUND


CHARLIE: Where's Charlie? I haven't seen her all day. 


JOE: Been in her room. Had a headache.


EMMY: Oh, I'm glad she's had a good rest. She's not looking like herself at all. 


CHARLIE: Er, she was out last night with that young journalist fellow, wasn't she? 


CHARLOTTE: (APPROACHES, CHEERFUL) Yes, I was.


CHARLIE: Well! Here she is. Here's my girl.


EMMY: Sit right down, dear. 


JOE: (GOOD-NATURED) You won't be able to sleep tonight, Charlotte. Nobody who sleeps all day can sleep all night, too. 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, I slept, all right. And I kept dreaming. Perfect nightmares. About you, Uncle Charlie. 


CHARLIE: Nightmares? About me? 


CHARLOTTE: About you. I'll tell them to you if you like. You were on a train and I had a feeling you were running away from something. And when I saw you on the train I felt happy -- terribly happy.


EMMY: But, Charlotte, how could you be happy seeing Uncle Charlie on a train? I hope he stays here -- forever.


CHARLOTTE: Well, I suppose he'll go sometime. He has to go sometime. We have to face the facts. 


EMMY: Now, Charlotte, what's the matter with you?


CHARLIE: (CHUCKLES) I guess Charlie slept a little too long. She's not awake yet. I suppose that young fellow kept her out half the night. 


EMMY: No, no -- she got back quite early. I was surprised. 


CHARLIE: Well, Charlie's a pretty girl. I suppose he's been hanging around today, hm?


EMMY: He called twice, but she didn't see him. (SUDDENLY REMEMBERS) Oh, Charles! Charles, you're going to kill me when you hear what I've done. 


CHARLIE: Emmy, I'd never kill you no matter what you've done. 


EMMY: Well, I've simply promised Mrs. Potter, the president of our club, that you'd speak to the ladies. 


CHARLIE: Oh, is that all? Well, I guess we can manage that. 


CHARLOTTE: For Mrs. Potter, yes. She's a widow, Uncle Charlie. 


EMMY: Mmm, she'll be so pleased, Charles. 


CHARLIE: Er, what kind of audience will it be? 


EMMY: Oh, women like myself. Pretty busy with our homes, most of us. 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... MERRY WIDOW WALTZ ... SLOW, EERIE, IN BG


CHARLIE: Yes. Yes, most women keep busy in towns like this. In the cities it's different. Cities are full of women -- middle-aged widows. Their husbands are dead. The husbands -- who spent their lives making thousands -- working, working, working. And then they die. Leave their money to their wives. (CHUCKLES) Their silly wives. What do the wives do? These useless women? You see them in hotels -- the best hotels -- by the thousands. Eating the money, drinking the money, losing the money at bridge. Proud of their jewelry. Proud of nothing else. Horrible, faded, fat, greedy women.


CHARLOTTE: (A CRY WRUNG FROM HER) But they're alive! They're human beings! 


MUSIC: OUT


CHARLIE: Are they? Are they, Charlie? Are they human? Or are they just fat wheezing animals? And what happens to animals when they get too fat and too old?


CHARLOTTE: (SOBS, UNNERVED, RISES) Mama, I'm going for a walk. (MOVING OFF) I'll be back soon.


EMMY: Charlotte! Well, what in the world is she--? 


SOUND: DOOR SLAMS SHUT, OFF


EMMY: Roger, go after her. 


CHARLIE: No, no. No, I'll go. I'll catch up with her.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: CITY TRAFFIC, THEN IN BG ... CHARLOTTE'S HURRIED STEPS ON SIDEWALK ... CHARLIE'S STEPS CATCH UP WITH HER 


CHARLIE: (APPROACHES) Charlie? Charlie, wait. 


CHARLOTTE: Let me go, please


SOUND: THEIR STEPS STOP


CHARLIE: Charlie, what's the matter? (NO ANSWER) What's the matter? (NO ANSWER) Look, we can go into this bar here. I want to talk to you. 


CHARLOTTE: (DEFIANT) You're hurting my arm -- again


CHARLIE: Then come in with me. 


CHARLOTTE: I can't! I've never been in a place like this. 


CHARLIE: It's all right.


SOUND: BAR DOOR OPENS AS THEY ENTER ... THEN CLOSES, SHUTTING OUT TRAFFIC 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, why do you make me come in here? It's an awful place. 


CHARLIE: What does it matter where you are? Sit down.


WAITRESS: Yeah? What'll it be?


CHARLOTTE: (MISERABLE) Nothing. 


CHARLIE: Uh, bring her a ginger ale and I'll have a double brandy.


WAITRESS: Brandy? Okay. 


CHARLIE: (BEAT, AS WAITRESS LEAVES) Well, Charlie? 


CHARLOTTE: Well? 


CHARLIE: You think you know something. That young fellow told you something. 


CHARLOTTE: Jack? Why should he know anything about you? 


CHARLIE: Look, Charlie. Something's come between us. And I don't want that to happen. Why, we're old friends. More than old friends. Like twins. You said so yourself. 


CHARLOTTE: Don't touch me, Uncle Charlie! Don't touch my hand.


CHARLIE: (SHARPLY) What did he tell you? What'd that boy tell you? 


CHARLOTTE: (HELPLESSLY) How could you do things like that? You're my uncle. You're my mother's brother. We thought you were the most wonderful man in the world. 


CHARLIE: Charlie, what do you know? 


CHARLOTTE: I want to give you back your ring, Uncle Charlie.


SOUND: RING PLACED ON TABLE


CHARLOTTE: "T. S. from B. M." Teresa Schenley from Bruce Matthewson. (RISING) I'm going home!


SOUND: CHARLOTTE RISES BUT CHARLIE PULLS HER BACK DOWN


CHARLIE: No, no -- sit down. Sit down. (BEAT) Charlie, you think you're the clever little girl who knows something, don't you? Well, what do you really know? You're just an ordinary little girl living in an ordinary little town. You go through your ordinary little day and, at night, you sleep your untroubled, ordinary little sleep filled with pleasant, stupid dreams. And I brought you the nightmares? Or did I? You live in a dream. You're a sleepwalker -- blind. What do you know about the world? Do you know that if you rip away the fronts of houses you'll find swine? The world is rotten. What does it matter what happens in it? Are you silly enough to imagine that what I've done is important to anyone? (SCOFFS) Ah! Wake up. Use your wits, Charlie. Learn something.


CHARLOTTE: Let go of my hand! Let me alone! 


SOUND: CHARLOTTE RISES AND BOLTS FOR THE DOOR


CHARLIE: Charlie, come back!


SOUND: CHARLIE FOLLOWS CHARLOTTE AS THEY EXIT THROUGH THE BAR DOOR AND ONTO THE STREET ... TRAFFIC BACKGROUND AGAIN ... THEIR HURRIED STEPS ON SIDEWALK, IN BG


CHARLIE: You've got to listen to me, Charlie. 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, please! 


CHARLIE: So you think you found me out -- you and your young friend Graham? 


CHARLOTTE: I don't know. I'm not going to tell him what I know. He may find out, but I won't tell him.


CHARLIE: (WITH CONTEMPT) Ah, he won't find out. 


CHARLOTTE: I'm only asking you one thing. Go away and leave us alone. 


CHARLIE: No. I'm staying, Charlie. I'm not going away.


SOUND: TRAFFIC UP LOUD FOR AN ACCENT ... THEN FADES OUT FOR A TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... FADE IN NOCTURNAL BACKGROUND (CRICKETS, ET CETERA) ... CHARLIE AND CHARLOTTE'S SLOW STEPS ON SIDEWALK 


CHARLIE: Charlie--? 


CHARLOTTE: I'm going in the house. 


CHARLIE: Oh, but you've got to listen to me, Charlie -- now. 


CHARLOTTE: What do you want? 


CHARLIE: Charlie-- Help me. Will you help me?


CHARLOTTE: Help you?! 


CHARLIE: (A WEARY PLEA) Charlie, the same blood flows through our veins. A week ago, I was at the end of my rope. I'm so tired, Charlie. There's an end to the amount of running a man can do. And then I got the idea of coming out here. It was my last chance. Give it to me. These men -- Graham and the others -- they don't know. There's another man in the East. They suspect him, too. They're trying to catch him. If they catch him-- Oh, give me this one chance, Charlie. 


CHARLOTTE: Well, take your chances. Go! 


CHARLIE: I'll go, Charlie, if you give me a few days. Help me, Charlie. (BEAT) Think of your mother. It would kill your mother. 


CHARLOTTE: Yes, it would kill my mother. It would kill you, too, wouldn't it, Uncle Charlie? Well, you can have your few days! Then get away from here! 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... TENSE, IN BG


CHARLIE: Do you realize what it means - if they get me? The electric chair.


CHARLOTTE: (STARTLED EXCLAMATION)


CHARLIE: I count on you, Charlie. Don't forget. You said it yourself. We're not any ordinary uncle and niece. No matter what I've done -- we're twins.


MUSIC: UP FOR CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: We pause now for station identification. This is the Columbia Broadcasting System.


MUSIC: FILLS PAUSE FOR STATION IDENTIFICATION


ANNOUNCER: Now before William Powell and Teresa Wright return for Act III of "Shadow of a Doubt," Mr. DeMille presents our special guest of the evening.


HOST: America is many things: a little white house on an elm-shaded street; fifty thousand people yelling at an umpire; soldiers at the corner drugstore; and pretty girls who'd like to be Miss America. And we have Miss America here with us now. Ladies and gentlemen, the glamour girl of the year, Miss Jean Bartel, who is Miss America of Nineteen Forty-Three. 


SOUND: APPLAUSE


BARTEL: Thank you, Mr. DeMille. I hate to disillusion you, but I'm not a glamour girl.


HOST: No, my eyes can't be that far wrong. 


BARTEL: This year, Miss America was to be a typical American girl who might be able to carry out a mission for our country. 


HOST: In ordinary years, Miss America makes theater appearances, sings in nightclubs, haunts Hollywood for a contract, and usually makes herself quite a tidy little fortune. But this year, things are different. The fortune is-- 


BARTEL: --two and a half million dollars-- 


HOST: --and it went to the United States government.


BARTEL: (YES) Mm hm.


HOST: Since last September, Miss America has been going up and down America selling war bonds. I'll bet that two and a half million represents a lot of kisses.


BARTEL: Not a single one.


HOST: Well, that's unheard of. You can't sell bonds without kisses. 


BARTEL: Oh, I thought the customers would rather kiss a movie star. 


HOST: That's what you think.


BARTEL: (CHUCKLES) ...


HOST: I don't want to sound like the Chamber of Commerce, but I must point out that before Jean became Miss America, she was Miss California, and a co-ed at the University of California in Los Angeles. How'd you get started on the road to Atlantic City, Jean? 


BARTEL: I was singing at a war bond rally and someone suggested I try for the contest. The next thing I knew, someone was putting a crown on my head. 


HOST: And the key to a city in your pocket. 


BARTEL: I do have quite a collection -- keys to about forty cities. Everywhere but Los Angeles.


HOST: (CHUCKLES) We knew you didn't need one to get home with, Jean. What were the exciting moments of your tour? 


BARTEL: Well, I saw snow for the first time. That was in Minneapolis. Then I had Thanksgiving dinner at four of New Orleans' wonderful restaurants. 


HOST: I know just what you mean. I've sampled their cooking. 


BARTEL: Those things were all fun, but I think the biggest thrills came in places like a war plant in Cleveland at two o'clock in the morning and a hospital in Denver late on a winter afternoon. 


HOST: Did you sell bonds in the hospital? 


BARTEL: No, I went to sing for the boys, but as I was walking around the wards one of them called me over and said, "Uh, listen, baby, I'm not very well-heeled with dough at the moment, but I could manage a few war stamps. Here's the money." He was just back from North Africa.


HOST: For that boy, you were really Miss America. I suppose now that you're home in Los Angeles, you'll settle down for a good long rest. 


BARTEL: I'm leaving tomorrow for New York to help open the Fourth War Loan Drive on January the eighteenth. After that, I'm going to continue with my career, which is singing. 


HOST: Well, I think you're singing a very sweet tune for the Treasury Department right now.


BARTEL: It's not a solo, Mr. DeMille, it's a chorus -- a chorus of a hundred and thirty million people. They know there's a war on and they and their sons and daughters will finish it. Thank you for asking me to come here. Now I'd like to join the audience for the third act. Good night.


HOST: Good night, Miss America. Your hometown is proud of you.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: After the mystery is solved, we'll have a chat with our stars, but now here's the curtain for the third act of "Shadow of a Doubt," starring William Powell and Teresa Wright.


MUSIC: BRIEF INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND HOST--


HOST: There's no longer any doubt in Charlotte's mind. She knows now that her Uncle Charlie is a criminal -- a murderer. The few days' grace she gave him are almost gone and still he hasn't left the house. Now, on a Sunday afternoon, the family is gathered in the living room waiting for dinner. 


CHARLIE: (LIGHTLY) How was church, Charlie? Did you count the house? Turn anybody away? 


CHARLOTTE: No, seats enough for everyone. 


CHARLIE: Glad to hear it. Show's had such a long run, I thought maybe attendance might be falling off. 


CHARLOTTE: We prayed for you, Uncle Charlie. At least, I did.


CHARLIE: (CHUCKLES, DRY) Thanks. 


JOE: Say, here's an interesting thing.


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


CHARLIE: What's that, Joe? 


JOE: In the paper here. Says they got that Merry Widow murderer.


CHARLIE: (BEAT, QUIETLY) They got him? Where? 


JOE: Up in Maine. Portland. Didn't catch him exactly. He was running from police at the airport. He ran plunk into the propeller of an airplane. Cut him to pieces. 


CHARLIE: (THE NEWS SINKS IN) Well, what do you know? Yeah, I guess that solves that case. Hmm. I guess that solves it, Charlie, hmm? 


CHARLOTTE: (UNENTHUSIASTIC) Yes, Uncle Charlie. 


CHARLIE: (WITH GREAT PLEASURE) Well, I think I'll wash up for dinner. I'm hungry. I don't know when I've been so hungry. 


EMMY: (APPROACHES) Charlotte? Charlotte, that young reporter fella's here. He wants to see you. 


CHARLOTTE: Well, tell him to wait out in front. I'll be right there. 


CHARLIE: Ah, see you at dinner, Charlie?


CHARLOTTE: Yes, of course.


CHARLIE: Fine.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: OUTDOOR BACKGROUND (BIRDS CHIRP, ET CETERA)


GRAHAM: (HAPPY) Then we got a wire from Maine. They called us off the job. I'm just coming up for air.


CHARLOTTE: Me, too. Now that it's over, Jack, I don't want to talk about it any more. I want to pretend that nothing ever happened.


GRAHAM: Well, you won't have to pretend much. Nothing did happen. I'm glad you never did know what we suspected your uncle of. 


CHARLOTTE: Yes. 


GRAHAM: Well, I guess that's all. Look, Charlotte, Saunders and I--


CHARLOTTE: I know. You have to go away. 


GRAHAM: Yes. 


CHARLOTTE: I knew you'd have to go away, but I haven't thought about it. I'll be alone again.


GRAHAM: Alone? In that beehive you live in? Besides, I'm coming back.


CHARLOTTE: (EAGER) Oh, when? When are you coming back?


GRAHAM: Soon as I can make it. 


CHARLOTTE: I don't want you to go. I feel--


GRAHAM: How do you feel? You're not frightened now are you, Charlotte? 


CHARLOTTE: Frightened? 


GRAHAM: I know what I did to you -- and don't think I haven't tossed around every night for a week worrying about you.


CHARLOTTE: Why? Why, Jack? 


GRAHAM: I don't know. I - I guess it's probably because I'm in love with you. 


CHARLOTTE: Are you? 


GRAHAM: That's why I'm coming back. 


CHARLOTTE: Oh?


GRAHAM: I, er-- I thought if we got engaged now -- today, I mean -- why-- Then maybe we could get married when I get back. 


CHARLOTTE: I suppose it is better be engaged for a while, even if it is only for a little while. 


GRAHAM: (PLEASED) We'll get married, that's all there is to it. Oh, Charlotte--


SOUND: DOOR SHUTS AS CHARLIE COMES OUT OF THE HOUSE


CHARLIE: (APPROACHES) Hello, there.


GRAHAM: Oh, hello, Mr. Spencer. I was just saying goodbye to Charlotte.


CHARLIE: Oh. All finished here? 


GRAHAM: All finished. I'll be back. You'll be seeing me around. 


CHARLIE: Oh, yes? 


GRAHAM: Not on business, though. 


CHARLIE: Well! (CHUCKLES) Sometimes I am pretty obtuse, but I think I understand about your coming back. Well, Charlie's a fine girl. 


GRAHAM: (CHUCKLES) I think so, too. Goodbye, Mr. Spencer.


CHARLIE: Goodbye.


GRAHAM: (WARMLY) Goodbye, Charlotte. 


CHARLOTTE: (THE SAME) Goodbye. Come back soon, Jack. 


GRAHAM: (MOVING OFF) You bet. Take good care of her, Mr. Spencer. 


CHARLIE: Oh, I will. I certainly will. (CHUCKLES, AFTER GRAHAM LEAVES) Fine boy, Charlie. Fine boy. 


CHARLOTTE: (POINTED) When are you leaving, Uncle Charlie? 


CHARLIE: Hmm? Oh, no need to hurry now. (CHUCKLES) We're all happy here. 


CHARLOTTE: (INSISTENT) When are you leaving, Uncle Charlie? 


CHARLIE: (AFFABLE) Look, I just told your mother. I'm going to build a new house for you folks. Give it to you.


CHARLOTTE: (DEAD SERIOUS, SHARP) When are you leaving? 


CHARLIE: I'm not going. I want to settle down here. Have money in the bank, have some sort of business. Be a part of this family.


CHARLOTTE: (COLDLY) I see. 


CHARLIE: And the most sensible thing for you to do -- is to be friends with me. I can do a lot for you, Charlie. Make life easier for your mother. Make you all happy. 


CHARLOTTE: No, not you. We don't want anything from you. I wish I told my mother about you. I wish I had! 


CHARLIE: And - how do you think your mother would have felt? What do you think it would do to her now


CHARLOTTE: (RESIGNED) I know. Don't be afraid. I can't tell her. 


CHARLIE: Oh, but I'm not afraid, Charlie. And what have you to tell? Who'd believe you? A waltz runs through your head. You don't like the initials on a ring. You connect it all up with a newspaper clipping. And now you haven't the ring. I don't know what became of it.


CHARLOTTE: You have it. 


CHARLIE: Have I? Oh, no. I gave it you. 


CHARLOTTE: I don't want you here, Uncle Charlie! I don't want you to touch my mother! So go away! I'm warning you! (MOVING OFF) Go away.


SOUND: DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS AS CHARLOTTE RUNS INTO THE HOUSE 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... THE MERRY WIDOW WALTZ ... SLOW, OMINOUS, IN BG


CHARLIE: (WHISPERS SLOWLY, TO HIMSELF) She's the only one who knows. The only one. If it weren't for her, I'd never have to worry. I'd be safe. Safe.


MUSIC: UP FOR BIG ACCENT


EMMY: (CALLS) Hurry up, Joe! We'll be late for the lecture!


ROGER: Is Uncle Charlie going to speak, mama? 


EMMY: Yes, dear. Now you get your coat. It's almost eight o'clock. Where's Charlotte? 


ROGER: She went out to the garage to get the car. 


EMMY: Oh, Roger, when the lecture's over, we're having company here. They're all coming home with us, but you're going to have to--


ANN: (RUNS IN, AGITATED) Mama! Something's happened to Charlotte!


EMMY: (SHOCKED) Ann?!


ANN: In the garage! Something's happened! I think she's dead!


EMMY: (ALARMED) Charlotte! Charlotte


MUSIC: TRANSITION


EMMY: Charlotte! Charlotte dear, are you all right, darling? 


CHARLOTTE: (WEAKLY) Yes. Yes.


CHARLIE: (REASSURING) Aw, sure, she's fine, Emmy. Don't worry. See? She's fine now.


EMMY: (EXHALES HEAVILY)


ANN: (BREATHLESS) She was locked in the garage. I heard the car running and I opened the garage door and she was lying there on the floor!


CHARLIE: Carbon monoxide. Very common type of accident. 


EMMY: Charlotte, how did it happen, dear?


CHARLOTTE: (A BIT DIZZY) It was so funny. When I - I went to get the car, the motor was running. Couldn't find the key. The key was gone and then-- Then I heard the garage door close behind me.


CHARLIE: It must have been the wind. 


CHARLOTTE: Yes, the wind. But the keys? Why weren't they in the car? 


CHARLIE: Oh, why, they were, Charlie. When Ann found you, I went in and turned off the motor myself. 


CHARLOTTE: (REALIZES, DARKLY) Oh, I see. It was you, Uncle Charlie. 


CHARLIE: Yes. Yes, I turned off the motor. 


CHARLOTTE: I see. 


CHARLIE: Well, come on now. I'll carry you upstairs. 


CHARLOTTE: (PANICKED) No


EMMY: (SHOCKED) Charlotte? 


CHARLOTTE: (RECOVERS) Uh, I don't want him to carry me. I - I'm all right, mama. 


EMMY: Well, I'll call and postpone the lecture. 


CHARLOTTE: No, mama, please go. I want you to go, all of you. Please. 


EMMY: All right, dear. All right.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: CROWD LAUGHS AND MURMURS


GREENE: Fine speech there, Mr. Spencer. Congratulations.


CHARLIE: Thank you. 


MRS. POTTER: I thought it was wonderful. 


CHARLIE: (EXTRA NICE) Thank you, Mrs. Potter. 


EMMY: Will you have another glass of wine, Mrs. Potter?


MRS. POTTER: Why, I - I believe I will! (GIGGLES)


SOUND: CROWD QUIETS BEHIND--


CHARLIE: Ladies and gentlemen! Uh, I want to propose a toast to-- (STOPS SHORT, SEES CHARLOTTE) Oh. Is that Charlie? (OVERLY SOLICITOUS) Charlie? How are you feeling? 


SOUND: CROWD MURMURS SYMPATHETICALLY


CHARLOTTE: (WITH UNUSUAL CONFIDENCE) I'm all right now, thank you. I feel fine. 


CHARLIE: My favorite little niece. Well, now -- you don't, er, think you ought to be in bed, Charlie? 


CHARLOTTE: Oh, no, I wanted to come down. I wanted to show everybody my - my new ring. 


CHARLIE: Your ring? 


SOUND: CROWD MURMURS WITH INTEREST, IMPRESSED BY THE RING


CHARLOTTE: (PLAYFUL) The one you gave me, Uncle Charlie. I found it. You know where? In your room. I - I must have gone in and left it there. Force of habit. 


CHARLIE: Oh, yes, probably. (FORCED CHUCKLE)


MRS. POTTER: It's a beautiful ring, dear. Just beautiful. 


CHARLOTTE: Yes, it - it has an inscription, too. (QUIETLY PLAYFUL ULTIMATUM) Shall I show it, Uncle Charlie, or - shall we keep our little secret? 


CHARLIE: Uh, Charlie-- 


MRS. POTTER: (TO CHARLOTTE) Oh, do show it. 


CHARLOTTE: (QUIETLY POINTED) Well, Uncle Charlie? 


CHARLIE: (KNOWS HE'S BEATEN, CHUCKLES) Well, we'll talk it over later. (UP) Charlie, you're just in time for a farewell toast. (TO ALL, A BIG ANNOUNCEMENT) I, er-- I hate to break the news like this, but, er, tomorrow I must leave Santa Rosa.


SOUND: CROWD REACTS WITH SURPRISE AND DISAPPOINTMENT


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: BUSY TRAIN STATION BACKGROUND ... AS HEARD FROM ON BOARD THE TRAIN


EMMY: Come on, children! Better get off or the train will start with us! (WARM, TO CHARLIE) Goodbye, Charles!


CHARLIE: Goodbye, Emmy!


ROGER

& ANN: Bye, Uncle Charlie!


EMMY: Write to us, Charles! Write to us!


CHARLIE: I will! You write me! 


EMMY: (MOVING OFF) Hurry, Charlotte! The train's going to start!


CHARLOTTE: I'm coming.


CHARLIE: Oh, Charlie, uh, uh, wait. I'll, er-- I'll go out to the platform with you. 


CHARLOTTE: (FIRMLY) Goodbye, Uncle Charlie.


SOUND: THEY STEP INTO CORRIDOR ... COMPARTMENT DOOR CLOSES


CHARLIE: We've got a minute or two. I, er-- I want to speak to you. 


CHARLOTTE: I've got to get off.


CHARLIE: Oh, but there's plenty of time. 


SOUND: 2ND COMPARTMENT DOOR OPENS AS MRS. POTTER STICKS HER HEAD OUT


MRS. POTTER: Charles, did you forget--? (SEES CHARLOTTE, STARTLED) Oh!


SOUND: 2ND COMPARTMENT DOOR SHUTS AS MRS. POTTER RETREATS


CHARLOTTE: (SURPRISED) Why, that was Mrs. Potter! 


CHARLIE: Oh? Was it? 


CHARLOTTE: (REALIZES) The Widow Potter. Is she going with you?


CHARLIE: Oh, now, don't be a little fool. 


CHARLOTTE: (A WARNING) You know that I know about you, don't you, Uncle Charlie? And if I ever hear or read about anything-- Well, you know what I'm talking about, don't you? 


CHARLIE: You're being a foolish girl. 


SOUND: THE TRAIN STARTS MOVING, SLOWLY PICKS UP SPEED, IN BG


CHARLOTTE: I'm warning you. I-- (GASPS, AS CHARLIE GRABS HER ARM)


CHARLIE: Charlie, listen--


CHARLOTTE: (REALIZES) The train's moving! 


CHARLIE: Charlie--


CHARLOTTE: Let me go! 


CHARLIE: No, Charlie, listen. You did a fine thing for your mother. You were right not to let her know. 


CHARLOTTE: My arm! You're hurting me!


CHARLIE: You're not getting off yet, Charlie. Wait a while. You see? (WITH EFFORT) We can just open the door like this--


SOUND: TRAIN DOOR OPENS ... CHUGGING OF TRAIN GROWS LOUDER, FASTER, IN BG


CHARLOTTE: (CONFUSED) What are you doing? What--?


CHARLIE: Then you can get off -- in just a minute or two. 


CHARLOTTE: (REALIZES, WITH HORROR) You're mad! You're a madman! 


CHARLIE: (VERY FOCUSED) Wait. Just a little faster. A little faster. I don't want you to be hurt, so just a little faster.


CHARLOTTE: (HALF-SCREAMS, THEN MUFFLED AS CHARLIE'S HAND CLAMPS OVER HER MOUTH)


CHARLIE: Now don't scream. No, no, Charlie. It's all so simple, isn't it? "She tried to get off while the train was moving. She was killed. Nice girl. Too bad."


CHARLOTTE: (MURMURS HELPLESSLY)


SOUND: TRAIN HAS REACHED TOP SPEED 


CHARLIE: Now, Charlie. Now.


SOUND: VIOLENT SCUFFLE BRIEFLY ... THEN BEHIND--


CHARLIE: Don't fight, Charlie. It's better for you if you don't! (LOSES HIS BALANCE, FALLS) Stop! Stop!


CHARLOTTE: (BLOODCURDLING SCREAM, THEN WEEPS IN HYSTERIA)


2ND PORTER: (APPROACHES) Miss?! Miss?! What is it?


CHARLOTTE: (HYSTERICAL) He fell! He fell! He fell off the train! (WEEPS)


MUSIC: TOPS SCENE FOR A TRANSITION


SOUND: QUIET OUTDOOR BACKGROUND ... BIRDS CHIRP


CHARLOTTE: (SAD) They held the funeral yesterday. The minister said that Santa Rosa had gained and lost a son that we could all be proud of. They didn't know.


GRAHAM: Charlotte, I - I wish I'd been here. If you'd only told me, darling. 


CHARLOTTE: I couldn't. He - he was my uncle. 


GRAHAM: I know. 


CHARLOTTE: He thought the world was a horrible place. He couldn't have been very happy, ever. 


GRAHAM: No. 


CHARLOTTE: He didn't trust people. He hated them. Hated the whole world. 


GRAHAM: Do you, Charlotte? 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... THOUGHTFUL, IN BG


CHARLOTTE: Hate the world? No. Oh, it sometimes needs a lot of watching, I guess. Seems to go to pieces now and then, like - like him. But it gets better. Almost in spite of itself it gets better. And - there's still love in the world. So much love.


MUSIC: UP FOR CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: There isn't the shadow of a doubt about the kind of acting we heard tonight, and here are William Powell and Teresa Wright for a well-deserved curtain call. 


POWELL: Thank you, Cecil. You know, this was really the first time I've been connected with a drama where I played opposite a beautiful girl named Charlie.


WRIGHT: (CHUCKLES) And the first play I ever heard of where Bill Powell turned out to be the murderer! What would the Thin Man say? 


HOST: We'll try and get you on the right side of the law next time, Bill.


POWELL: (CHUCKLES)


HOST: Did you know, by the way, that your co-star holds one of the most unusual records in Hollywood? 


POWELL: Well, she became a star just about overnight.


HOST: No, in addition to that. And this can only be whispered. Teresa has never been seen in a nightclub. 


POWELL: (CLICKS TONGUE WITH DISAPPROVAL)


SOUND: APPLAUSE


POWELL: That's practically a scandal in Hollywood. ...


WRIGHT: I may never live it down. 


HOST: We'll - we'll forgive you if you keep up the standard of performance you've already set. What was your background in the theater, Teresa? 


WRIGHT: I played in summer stock. Naturally, that included building scenery, wrestling props, painting backdrops, taking tickets, and sweeping up the theater.


HOST: (CHUCKLES) That sounds like Old Home Week to me. 


WRIGHT: Then just before Mr. Goldwyn brought me to Hollywood, I was in "Life with Father" in New York. 


POWELL: Hmm, from "Life with Father" to life with Goldwyn. (CHUCKLES) ... 


HOST: Sam and I started in the picture business together more than thirty years ago. He's a good showman and I'll bet he's got something special in mind for you now. 


WRIGHT: I believe the picture will be called "Those Endearing Young Charms." 


HOST: Well, that's a perfect title for you, Teresa. You know, we're kind of in the "endearing young charms" business ourselves.


WRIGHT: If you mean Lux Soap, Mr. DeMille, you're absolutely right. It endeared itself to me when I was quite young and everyone knows it's very helpful in keeping a charming complexion.


HOST: For proof of that, Teresa, I refer the Lux audience to any photograph that does you justice. 


POWELL: And that comes from an experienced judge of beauty. Now, what's on the docket next week, Cecil? 


HOST: It's the current Warner Brothers success "The Constant Nymph" -- and our stars will be Charles Boyer and Maureen O'Sullivan. 


SOUND: AUDIENCE MURMURS, IMPRESSED


HOST: "The Constant Nymph" is the story of a composer and a girl whose deep affection and sacrifice inspires his work. It was a great favorite on Broadway and has just become a hit motion picture. 


POWELL: I think you'll repeat that success on the air, Cecil. Good night. 


WRIGHT: Good night.


HOST: Good night, good night. Next time we have a murder case, Bill, we'll send for you.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: Ladies and gentlemen, a very fine New Year's gift has just come to the Lux Radio Theatre. This program has been named radio's number one dramatic production of 1943 in two different polls--


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: --one conducted by Radio Daily, the other by Motion Picture Daily. We're grateful to the editors and to you, our audience, for this honor. We'll regard it as a challenge for all of 1944. And now I'd like to tell you about a new radio program that starts this week. On Wednesday night over these same stations, Frank Sinatra -- he of the famous voice -- will begin a show of his own with Bert Wheeler. Ginger Rogers will be Frank's first guest and I understand Mrs. Nussbaum is coming over from the Jack Benny show. The Vimms chorus and orchestra rounds out a program that I think will be an important radio event of the week. 


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG


HOST: Our sponsors, the makers of Lux Toilet Soap, join me in inviting you to be with us again next Monday night when the Lux Radio Theatre presents Charles Boyer and Maureen O'Sullivan in "The Constant Nymph." This is Cecil B. DeMille saying good night to you from Hollywood.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: "Shadow of a Doubt" was produced by Universal Pictures whose current release is the Walter Wanger production "Gung Ho!" starring Randolph Scott. Teresa Wright will co-star with Gary Cooper in the International Pictures production "Casanova Q. Brown." Heard in tonight's play were Ed Emerson as Jack, Regina Wallace as Mrs. Newton, Norman Field as Mr. Newton, and Verna Felton, Mary Lou Harrington, Tommy Cook, Leo Cleary, Charlotte Treadway, Myra Marsh, Buck Woods, and Charles Seel. This program is broadcast to our fighting forces overseas by shortwave through cooperation with the Armed Forces Radio Service. Our music was directed by Louis Silvers and this is your announcer, John M. Kennedy, reminding you to tune in again next Monday night to hear Charles Boyer and Maureen O'Sullivan in "The Constant Nymph." 


SOUND: APPLAUSE ... FADES OUT FOR--


2ND ANNCR: Wanna know a secret? 


MUSIC: FOR JINGLE BEHIND--


TWO WOMEN: (SING) 

Your ration points go farther!

Go further! Go farther!

Your ration points go farther! (Further!) 

When you're cookin' with Spry!


2ND ANNCR: Yes, ma'am, Spry's the buy! [Makes?] lighter cakes; crispy, digestible fried foods; mouth-melting pastry. Tomorrow, ask your grocer for Spry Shortening!


ANNOUNCER: This is the Columbia Broadcasting System.

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