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Rebecca

The Matinee Theater

Rebecca

Jan 21 1945



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

"I" -- the second Mrs. de Winter 

MRS. DANVERS -- the cruel housekeeper

MAXIM DE WINTER -- the brooding husband

FRANK -- the friendly overseer

TABB, boat builder; working class accent

CORONER

JACK FAVELL, (fuh-VEL) ne'er-do-well

COL. JULYAN, of the police

and a CROWD at the inquest




ANNOUNCER: Vicks presents the Matinee Theater production of "Rebecca."


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: Vicks -- the makers of Vicks VapoRub, Vicks Va-tro-nal Vicks Cough Drops, and Vicks Inhaler -- brings you the Matinee Theater. Today, while Victor Jory is vacationing for one week, we bring you the great play that so many of you have been asking for: Daphne du Maurier's "Rebecca," featuring Gertrude Warner as the second Mrs. de Winter, Blanche Yurka as Mrs. Danvers, and Martin Gabel as Maxim. Now here's a good thing to remember when you catch a cold: the best-known home remedy for relieving miseries of colds is Vicks VapoRub.


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: And now, "Rebecca."


MUSIC: INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND "I"--


"I": (NARRATES) When Maxim asked me to marry him, I could not believe that anything so incredibly beautiful was happening to me. He had been staying at a hotel on the Riviera where I'd been acting as companion to an American woman. We'd spent a lot of time together, but actually I knew very little about Maxim beyond the fact that he'd been married to one of the most fabulous beauties of England, Rebecca de Winter, who had died about a year before. He never said, "I love you"; he only said, "Will you marry me?" But I married him, gladly and happily, and he brought me home to his great estate, Manderley. A shy awkward girl in a stockinette dress, I was considered an intruder at Manderley. Mrs. Danvers, the housekeeper, made that very apparent from the moment I arrived.


MUSIC: DURING ABOVE, GENTLY OUT


"I": Mrs. Danvers, I hope we can be friends. 


DANVERS: Friends, madam? I came here when the first Mrs. de Winter was a bride. I'm afraid I find it a little hard to visualize someone else here in her place. I'm afraid everyone who comes to Manderley will find that a little hard. You see, she planned everything in this house and outside it: the gardens, lawns, furnishings. Everywhere you look there's something to see of Rebecca.


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND "I"--


"I": (NARRATES) I started my married life with those words ringing in my ears -- nervous, frightened, wanting desperately to become a part of Manderley and Maxim's life, but never knowing quite how. The weeks that followed had a shadow cast across them -- the shadow of Rebecca. Looking back on them now, they seem a hideous nightmare that I lived in the daytime and dreamt about at night.


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN IN BG, FOR A DREAM MONTAGE--


"I": Oh, Maxim darling, look at those azaleas! They're beautiful! I'd never believe they'd grow this close to the beach. 


MAXIM: No one believed they would. Rebecca had them planted.


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN IN BG


DANVERS: You're going for a walk, madam? Here, throw this coat around your shoulders. 


"I": (UNEASY) It's - too long for me.


DANVERS: Yes, it was Rebecca's. She was very tall, you know. Tall and stately. She walked like a queen. Mr. de Winter never used to be able to take his eyes off her. 


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN IN BG


"I": Maxim, I passed a cottage on the beach today. The door was unlocked, so I went in.


MAXIM: (UPSET) You went in? You went in?! 


"I": (TAKEN ABACK) It wasn't locked. 


MAXIM: I don't want you ever to go near that cottage again! That was Rebecca's cottage! You've no business there! 


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN IN BG


DANVERS: It's beautiful here in the morning room, isn't it? Mrs. de Winter picked out every ornament for it herself. I remember she brought back that cupid on the mantel from Paris as a present for Mr. de Winter. I remember the card: it just said "To Maxim, for now and forever, from Rebecca."


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN IN BG, FOR CLIMAX OF THE DREAM MONTAGE ... EACH LINE PUNCTUATED BY MINOR ACCENT


SOUND: DANVERS AND MAXIM'S VOICES ON FILTER


DANVERS: She planned every room--


MAXIM: Rebecca's flowers--


DANVERS: Rebecca's decorating--


MAXIM: Rebecca's dog--


DANVERS: Rebecca's husband-- Rebecca's husband-- Rebecca's husband--


MUSIC: UP FOR BIG ACCENT AND OUT


"I": (HALF ASLEEP, DISTRESSED) Oh, no! No, no! 


MAXIM: (SYMPATHETIC) Darling, what's wrong? You were tossing terribly in your sleep. Kept crying "No, no." Were you having a bad dream? 


"I": Yes, I was having a terrible dream. Oh, Maxim, put your arms around me. Hold me close.


MAXIM: (AFFECTIONATE) All right, darling. 


MUSIC: WARM AND TENDER, IN AND THEN IN BG


"I": Oh, Max-- Do you know what I wish? 


MAXIM: What? 


"I": I wish I were thirty-five years old and that I had a black satin dress with ropes of pearls to wear with it that went clear down to my waist-- 


MAXIM: (AMUSED) Why on earth should you wish that? 


"I": Because then I should be very wise and very sophisticated, and I would know all the right things to say and do.


MAXIM: Darling, do you know why I married you? 


"I": Why, Maxim?


MAXIM: Because you're not thirty-five, dressed in pearls and black satin. Because you're not sophisticated or too wise. Because you're young and sweet with a funny lost look to you. And because you're completely honest. 


"I": Maxim, you do love me, don't you? You aren't sorry you married me?


MUSIC: GENTLY OUT BEHIND--


MAXIM: Darling, what's got into you anyhow? Have I said anything or done anything to make you think I was sorry? (NO ANSWER) Well?


"I": No, it's - it's just that I know what a wonderful mistress of Manderley the first Mrs. de Winter was, and I know that I can never measure up to her-- 


MAXIM: (AGITATED) In the name of heaven, why do you keep eternally harping on Rebecca? Don't you understand? I can't bear to think about her or talk about her! 


"I": (BEAT, TAKEN ABACK) Yes, Maxim. Of course, I understand. I'm very sorry.


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND "I"--


"I": (NARRATES) Long after Maxim had gone back to sleep, I lay there, thinking -- the sick dread growing inside me that Maxim still loved Rebecca, and that I would never be able to take her place. About a week later I was in the morning room talking to Maxim's overseer and old friend, Frank Crawley. I had picked up the small cupid Rebecca had given Maxim and was fingering it nervously.


MUSIC: GENTLY OUT


"I": (NERVOUS) Frank, what actually happened to the first Mrs. de Winter?


FRANK: Rebecca? Well, she went sailing one night when the bay was a little rough. Her boat capsized and sank; she was washed overboard. 


"I": Couldn't anyone get to her? 


FRANK: Nobody knew that she'd gone. She often went out alone like that. 


"I": How long afterwards did they find her?


FRANK: About two months -- near Edgecombe, forty miles up channel. Maxim went up to identify her. 


"I": (SLOW, NERVOUS) Frank? Would you tell me just one thing? Very honestly? 


FRANK: I'll try. 


"I": Was Rebecca - very beautiful? 


FRANK: (POINTED) Yes. She was the most beautiful woman I've ever seen in my life.


SOUND: CRASH! OF CUPID DROPPED AND SHATTERED


"I": (STARTLED EXCLAMATION, THEN GASPS) Frank! Frank, I've broken the cupid! (LOW, FRANTIC) Here, help me pick up the pieces. Quick, quick -- before Mrs. Danvers comes in. 


SOUND: BROKEN PIECES GATHERED BEHIND--


FRANK: What a shame. Watch out you don't cut yourself. 


"I": Here, here -- we'll put them in an envelope. Maybe no one will miss the cupid.


FRANK: (AMUSED) Oh, I don't think it matters very much. 


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN BEHIND--


"I": (DISTRAUGHT) It does, it does! It was Rebecca's. Here, have we got all the pieces? I'll put the envelope in back of these books. Oh, I hope no one misses it. 


FRANK: (LIGHTLY REASSURING) Mrs. de Winter, this is your house. It doesn't matter if you break something.


"I": (INSISTS) Oh, no, Frank. This is Rebecca's house. It matters very much. You'll see. (TEARFUL) It matters very much!


MUSIC: UP FOR ACCENT AND OUT


MAXIM: (ANNOYED) Why do you do such strange things? Why the devil did you hide the pieces of that ornament in an envelope for Mrs. Danvers to find like an in-between maid?


"I": (RESIGNED) Because I'm like an in-between maid, I guess. I'm all wrong here somehow.


MAXIM: (COOL) Perhaps you are. Perhaps I did a very selfish thing in marrying you. (BEAT, MORE SYMPATHETIC) I'm not much of a companion to you, am I?


"I": (UNCONVINCING) Oh, Maxim, please don't say those things. I'm very happy. 


MAXIM: No, you're not. You're thinner. You've lost your color. I - I haven't had much chance to amuse you. You should have someone closer to your own age. Our marriage isn't much of a success, is it? 


"I": (BROKENLY) Do you - want me to - go away, Maxim? 


MAXIM: I don't know what I want.


"I": Maxim, I'm sorry about the cupid. I know Rebecca gave it to you-- 


MAXIM: (BITTER) I thought you would be able to adjust yourself to Manderley. But it just hasn't happened, has it? 


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND "I"--


"I": (NARRATES) I walked from the room, fighting back the tears. I was sure then there was no hope. That it had always been Rebecca for Maxim, and that it always would be. (BEAT) That afternoon I went up to the west wing to her room. It was quite dark because a low fog had rolled in from the sea. I stood close to the door, glancing all about that shadowy room, my heart pounding. It looked as though she had left it but an instant before. There were flowers on the dressing table, and by the bed. A dressing gown lay on a chair, and a pair of bedroom slippers beneath it. (FALTERS) I - I began to feel a little faint. And then--


SOUND: BEDROOM DOOR OPENS 


DANVERS: I saw you come up.


"I": (STARTLED) Oh! 


DANVERS: (UNUSUALLY FRIENDLY) I've been ready to show this room to you every day; you had only to ask. It's a lovely room, isn't it? 


"I": (UNEASY) Yes. Lovely. 


DANVERS: I keep the golden coverlet on the bed always. It was her favorite. I did everything for her, you know. "No one can take care of me but you, Danny," she used to say. You'd never think that she had been gone now for so long, would you? You can feel her in every room in the house, can't you? 


"I": (HUSHED) Yes.


DANVERS: Sometimes when I walk along the corridor, I fancy I hear her just behind me. That quick, light footstep. Sometimes I think I hear the sweep of her dress coming down to dinner.


"I": (EXPLODES) Why do you hate me so?! What have I ever done that you should hate me so?!


DANVERS: You tried to take her place. (WITHERING) You. Heh! You thought you could make him happy.


"I": He is happy! Oh, he is happy. 


DANVERS: (COOL, CRISP) You know he isn't. You've only to look in his eyes. He's looked like that ever since she died. She's the real Mrs. de Winter, not you. She's still mistress here. It's you that's the shadow and the ghost. It's you that's forgotten and not wanted and pushed aside. Why don't you leave Manderley to her? Why don't you go? He doesn't want you. He wants to be alone in the house with her. It's you that ought to be dead, not Rebecca. Let me show you how easy it would be. Come over to the window.


SOUND: DANVERS' STEPS TO WINDOW, WHICH UNLOCKS AND OPENS ... WHOOSH! AND CRASH! OF THE WAVES BELOW, WHICH CONTINUES IN BG


DANVERS: Look. Look down there.


"I": (GASPS, SHUDDERS WITH FEAR) 


DANVERS: Why don't you jump? It wouldn't hurt. It's a quick, kind way. You're not happy. Mr. de Winter doesn't love you. There's not much for you to live for, is there? Why don't you jump now and have done with it? Then you won't be unhappy any more.


"I": (HUSHED, HALF TO HERSELF) It is true. He doesn't love me. It's always been Rebecca. (EXPLODES, TEARFUL) Rebecca! Rebecca


DANVERS: Go on. Don't be afraid. 


"I": (BREATHLESS, INCREASINGLY DELIRIOUS) I wouldn't be unhappy any more. I could forget Rebecca. I wouldn't have to think about Rebecca any more. Rebecca! Rebecca! Rebecca! Rebecca!


MUSIC: DURING ABOVE, SNEAKS IN ... TOPS HER ... FOR A BIG ACCENT ... THEN OUT FOR--


SOUND: BIG EXPLOSION!


"I": (BLOODCURDLING SCREAM)


SOUND: WAVES, IN BG


"I": (GASPS FOR BREATH, URGENT) What is it? What was that explosion?! What's happened, Mrs. Danvers?! 


DANVERS: They're shooting up rockets. There must be a ship gone ashore in the bay.


SOUND: FRANK'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH


FRANK: (OFF) Mrs. Danvers?! Mrs. Danvers, a ship's gone ashore. They'll be needing you downstairs.


SOUND: FRANK'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY


DANVERS: (UNCONVINCINGLY SOLICITOUS) Would you like to stay here for a time, madam? 


"I": (BEAT, SLOW QUIET DEFIANCE) No, Mrs. Danvers. I'm going downstairs. I've seen all I intend to see - of Rebecca's room.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: In just a moment we will bring you the second act of "Rebecca."


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And now the second act of "Rebecca." 


MUSIC: BRIEF INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: When the divers went down to help get the distressed ship off the rocks, they found a small boat at the bottom of the cove, and they saw what appeared to be a body through one of the portholes. They started work immediately to bring the boat to the surface. Our story of "Rebecca" continues. 


MUSIC: UP FOR A MOMENT, THEN BEHIND "I"--


"I": (NARRATES) I stood by the window, waiting for Maxim to come up from the beach -- and somehow, I had changed in the last hours. I wasn't a child any longer. And I wasn't afraid of Rebecca. It was as though she and I had at last met face to face in that bedroom. She had done her best to destroy me -- and failed. At long last, Maxim came wearily into the library. 


MAXIM: (WEARY) Hello, darling. Did you hear? They think they found Rebecca's boat. 


"I": I know. But, darling, don't feel that you have to go through this alone. Let me share it with you. 


MAXIM: Oh, my dear. I must send you away from Manderley. There was only a slim chance for happiness for us in the beginning, but I took the chance and gambled on it. Well, we lost the gamble, my sweet. 


"I": I'll try harder. I think I could be a better wife now. I think I could run Manderley. 


MAXIM: Don't you understand? They found Rebecca's boat. 


"I": Maxim, she's dead. You can't go on loving her so desperately! 


MAXIM: (STUNNED) Loving her? What did you say? 


"I": Oh, my dear, I know you still love her and want her. 


MAXIM: Are you mad? I hated Rebecca. She was vicious and rotten to the core. We never had one day of happiness together. 


"I": (ASTONISHED, HUSHED) Maxim!


MAXIM: (REALIZES) So that's what's been between us. I thought you'd regretted marrying me because I was so much older than you. Oh, I wish we'd been able to talk to one another before.


"I": What does it matter? Let us be grateful that we do know now. 


MAXIM: Don't you understand? It's too late. Don't you realize what I'm saying to you? I killed Rebecca.


"I": (BEAT, STUNNED) You killed her?


MAXIM: (AS IF IT WERE OBVIOUS) Yes. (BEAT, BITTER) You know, when I married her, people told me I was the luckiest man in the world. Lucky! I found out all about her five days after we were married. She told me about herself. She stood there laughing and told me things I would never repeat to a living soul. She knew I'd never divorce her a week after our marriage. She knew I was too proud for that.


"I": Of course. 


MAXIM: I'm not going to tell you about those years -- the lies, the deceit. Some weekends she spent in London, some in the little beach cottage. She had a cousin named Jack Favell -- a rotter if there ever was one. He began to come here. One night, I suddenly couldn't stand it any longer. I took my revolver and I went down to the cottage. I thought Favell would be with her there, but she was alone. (BEAT) She looked - strange. I told her the bargain was finished -- that we had to get a divorce. She said that was impossible. She said, "I'm going to have a baby, Max, and neither you nor anyone else in the world will ever be able to prove he isn't yours. He'll grow up here at Manderley bearing your name, and I'll be the perfect mother -- as I've been the perfect wife." (BEAT) Then she started to laugh. (BEAT) When I shot her, she was laughing still.


"I": (TEARFUL) Oh, Maxim, Maxim-- 


MAXIM: I carried her out to the boat. It was very dark. There was no moon. I laid her body in the cabin. I got the boat underway. Then I took a spike and drove three holes into the planks in the bottom boards. I climbed into the dinghy and pulled away. Suddenly the boat keeled over and went down. (EXHALES) That was all. I've never been able to forget her smile or the way she looked at me before she died. She knew she would win in the end. Sometimes I even think she wanted me to kill her.


"I": Oh, my darling. What a terrible thing for you. What a heartbreaking thing. 


MAXIM: You see? That's why it's too late for you and me.


"I": No, it's not too late. Rebecca is dead. She can't speak. She can't harm you any more. A body disintegrates in water; they won't find the bullet. They won't know she was shot. Nobody knows but you and I what happened that night. 


MAXIM: (WITH CERTAINTY) Rebecca will win. You'll see. Even now, Rebecca will win.


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND "I"--


"I": (NARRATES) The inquest was held a few days later. I thought I'd stay in the car and wait for Maxim, but after an hour or so of waiting I had to go in. I sat down just by the door in the back of the room. James Tabb, the boat builder from the village, was standing up now and the coroner was questioning him. 


TABB: She was a French fishing boat originally.


CORONER: Had the boat ever been known to capsize before?


TABB: No, sir! She was a stout, seaworthy boat and could stand a lot of wind. And she didn't capsize this time! 


SOUND: CROWD MURMURS SURPRISE


CORONER: Why do you say that? 


TABB: When that boat was pulled up, I examined every corner of her. She had sunken sandy bottom. There wasn't the mark of a rock on her. But there were three holes in her planking.


CORONER: Well? 


TABB: That boat never capsized at all. She were scuttled!


MUSIC: BIG ACCENT AND OUT


"I": (NARRATES) The heat came up from the floor in slow flickering waves. I felt deathly ill. And then Frank Crawley helped me outside. He brought me home and went back to the inquest. I fell into an uneasy sleep in the morning room. When I woke I heard voices from the library -- Maxim's and a stranger's. I went slowly in.


MAXIM: (ANGRY) You know you're not welcome in this house, Favell.


FAVELL: (AFFABLE) I came to congratulate you on the result of the inquest. 


MAXIM: Will you leave this house or shall I throw you out?! (SEES "I" -- CALMER) Oh. Hello, dear.


"I": Maxim, the inquest -- what happened? 


FAVELL: Well! I don't think I've had the pleasure of meeting the second Mrs. de Winter.


MAXIM: This is Mr. Favell, dear -- Rebecca's cousin.


"I": How do you do? 


MAXIM: The verdict was suicide.


"I": (RELIEVED) Ohhhh. 


FAVELL: (SCORNFUL) Suicide! Rebecca no more committed suicide than I did. Let me read you both a note I received from Rebecca the day she died. 


SOUND: PAPER RUSTLES


FAVELL: (READS) "Dear Jack, I tried to ring you at the London flat but could get no answer. I'm going to Manderley right away. I have something to tell you and I want to see you as soon as possible. I'll wait for you at the cottage on the beach. Rebecca." 


SOUND: PAPER RUSTLES


FAVELL: Does that sound to you like the note of someone who was contemplating suicide that night? 


MAXIM: Why didn't you give that note to the jury this afternoon? 


FAVELL: (CHUCKLES, CAGEY) Why-- Why, Max, I bear no malice towards you. In fact, I have a proposition for you. If I had a settlement of, say, oh, two or three thousand pounds a year for life, I could jog along quite comfortably and I'd never trouble you again, I swear I wouldn't.


MAXIM: (EVENLY) Darling, please phone Colonel Julyan. Ask him to come here at once. 


"I": All right, Maxim.


FAVELL: You wouldn't dare call in the police. I've got enough evidence in this note to hang you. 


MAXIM: (INSISTS) Call Colonel Julyan, darling, and ask him to come at once.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


FAVELL: (SAVAGE) I tell you, Colonel Julyan, Rebecca never killed herself! Rebecca was murdered! And there's the murderer standing there with that rotten superior smile on his face! Mr. Maxim de Winter of Manderley! 


JULYAN: (CALM) Eh, Mr. Favell, there's not the slightest use shouting at me. If you expect to make any sort of point at all, you'll have to control yourself. Now, you say you were going to marry your cousin Rebecca had she lived, and that you often had secret meetings with her at the cottage on the beach. Can you prove that? 


FAVELL: Yes, I can prove it. Max, will you ask Mrs. Danvers to come here? 


MAXIM: Of course.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION


MAXIM: Mrs. Danvers, Colonel Julyan would like to ask you some questions.


DANVERS: Yes, sir.


JULYAN: Mrs. Danvers, were you aware of the relationship between Mr. Favell and the late Mrs. de Winter? 


DANVERS: (HESITANT) I - I don't think I understand, sir.


FAVELL: Oh, you can speak freely, Danny. (CHUCKLES) Rebecca was in love with me, wasn't she? 


DANVERS: (VEHEMENT) She was not.


FAVELL: (STARTLED) What? 


DANVERS: (WITH SAVAGE CONTEMPT) She wasn't in love with you or any other man. I've known her to come back here and rock with laughter at the lot of you.


MAXIM: Mrs. Danvers, we're trying to find the motive for Mrs. de Winter's suicide. Can you think of any reason why she should have taken her life?


DANVERS: No, sir, I cannot. 


FAVELL: Of course you can't! Rebecca was murdered!


JULYAN: Mrs. Danvers, have you any idea how she spent that last day in London? 


DANVERS: Yes, sir. I have her appointment book here. (BEAT) Here it is, sir. June fourth. 


JULYAN: Good. (READS, SLOWLY) "June the fourth. Hair, ten-thirty. Twelve o'clock, lunch at the club. Twelve forty-five, Dr. Baker." (TO DANVERS) Who is Dr. Baker? 


DANVERS: A woman specialist in London, sir. 


JULYAN: We'll phone him at once. Mrs. de Winter, would you mind--?


"I": (WITH QUIET DREAD) No, of course not. I'll put through the call at once. 


MUSIC: SOMBER ... THEN BEHIND "I"--


"I": (NARRATES) I went slowly across the library, my heart pounding, my hands like ice. Everything seemed to be coming to an end. Dr. Baker would tell them Rebecca was going to have a baby and there would be no question of suicide. Yes, Rebecca would win after all. 


MUSIC: OUT


"I": Here's your call, Colonel Julyan. 


JULYAN: Thank you. (INTO PHONE) Hello? Hello, Dr. Baker? Please forgive this very unorthodox call at such an hour. I'm Colonel Julyan, chief constable for the county of-- (FADES OUT) 


MUSIC: TOPS JULYAN FOR A TRANSITION


JULYAN: Thank you, Dr. Baker. Goodbye, sir. 


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


JULYAN: All right, here is what Dr. Baker had to say. Mrs. de Winter consulted him first in May. He took some x-ray photographs. When she went again on June the fourth, he told her that - she was suffering from a malignant disease which was quite incurable. That's what she was going to tell you that night at the cottage, Favell. There's the motive for her suicide.


MUSIC: CONVEYING GREAT RELIEF ... FOR A TRANSITION


DANVERS: (POLITE) Mr. de Winter; madam -- I wish to give notice. I would like to leave Manderley tonight.


MAXIM: Just as you wish, Mrs. Danvers. 


DANVERS: (REFLECTIVE) There's nothing to keep me here any longer. There's nothing left of Rebecca. I used to think she still moved about these rooms. But now she seems completely gone. You are the mistress here now, Mrs. de Winter. 


"I": (WITH QUIET ACCEPTANCE) Yes, Mrs. Danvers. I am the mistress here now.


MUSIC: WARM TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG


MAXIM: (AFFECTIONATE, AMUSED) That funny little lost look I loved so much is gone. 


"I": Of course. I'm not a child any longer. This is my home and you're my husband. It's time I grew up and took care of you both. It's time there were children at Manderley, and laughter and contentment, and peace. 


MAXIM: These things will happen now? 


"I": Yes, these things will happen. We're home now -- with the rest of our lives before us. 


MAXIM: I love you, Mrs. de Winter. 


"I": Mr. de Winter, I'll love you -- forever. 


MUSIC: UP FOR CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: In just a moment, an important message from Mr. Gabel. You know, my friends, the war has caused many shortages. In many cases, it has made the use of substitutes necessary, but this is not true of that famous family standby, Vicks VapoRub. There are no wartime substitutes in the VapoRub you buy. Although some of the countries that supplied us with aromatics and medications were taken by the enemy, we found new sources. As a result, there are no wartime substitutes in VapoRub. It is the same fine effective VapoRub, the same high quality you enjoyed before the war: the best known home remedy for relieving miseries of colds -- time-tested, home-proved Vicks VapoRub. 


MUSIC: TAG


GABEL: Next week, after a well-earned vacation, Victor Jory will be back in one of the finest plays that Jean Holloway's ever written, a love story of the south and of music that has become part of the heartbeat of America: "Beautiful Dreamer," the romance of Stephen Collins Foster. 


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG, UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: Our production today was based on the famous Daphne du Maurier story of "Rebecca," and was adapted by Jean Holloway and directed by Richard Sanville. Daphne du Maurier's play "Rebecca," presented by Victor Payne-Jennings, is one of the newest hits on Broadway, featuring Bramwell Fletcher, Florence Reed, and Diana Barrymore. Music for this series is under the direction of Mark Warnow. Be sure to be with us next week when Vicks -- the makers of Vicks VapoRub, Vicks Va-tro-nal, Vicks Cough Drops, and Vicks Inhaler -- brings you the Matinee Theater production of "Beautiful Dreamer," starring Victor Jory. This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.


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