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Princess Moonbeam

Let's Pretend

Princess Moonbeam

Mar 20 1943



CAST:

ANNOUNCER, Hugh Conover

GWEN

BETTY JEAN

MIRIAM

PAUL

DOROTHY GORDON


YEN-KI

HATSU

MOON MOTHER

MOON RAY

PRINCESS MOONBEAM

PAGE

EMPEROR, imperious, sinister, vain

COUNCILOR




MUSIC: LET'S PRETEND THEME ... KOMZAK'S "FAIRY TALE" ... "Allegretto from 'Fairy Tale'" Volksliedchen und Märchen, Opus 135, No. 2) by Karel Komzak II ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: The Columbia Broadcasting System presents Nila Mack's LET'S PRETENDERS!


SOUND: APPLAUSE


MUSIC: OUT BEHIND--


ANNOUNCER: With the gallant music of "Fairy Tales," once more the Columbia Broadcasting System invites young and old to join us in another visit to the magical land of make-believe. But before we start, here are two things for you to bear in mind. At the end of today's story, we have a most charming guest with us who brings you an important message. And then there's a special announcement about LET'S PRETEND which you'll want to hear and remember. So be sure to stay tuned in until the very end of the program. And now, ladies and gentlemen, take over.


GWEN: Thank you, Mr. Conover.


BETTY JEAN: What's the story for today, Miss Secretary?


GWEN: Well, let's read the letter that tells us.


SOUND: RATTLE OF LETTER


GWEN: Here it is. "Dear Pretenders: Our whole family are grateful to you for the pleasure and entertainment you bring to us. All your stories are delightful, but we have our most special favorite. Can you let us hear it? It's "Princess Moonbeam" -- and how happy we'll be if you'll do it for us. Thank you."


MIRIAM: Oh, "Princess Moonbeam" is a grand story!


GWEN: Mm, it certainly is. Well, how about it, Pretenders? Shall we play it?


CAST: (MURMURS ENTHUSIASTIC AGREEMENT)


GWEN: All right. Paul Porter, Jr., I believe it's your turn to say how we'll travel to the land of make-believe.


PAUL: How about a flock of lions and tigers?


GWEN: Hmm. Real wild ones?


PAUL: Roars, snarls, and everything.


CAST: (LAUGHS AND GIGGLES)


GWEN: Well, okay. (CHUCKLES) Every man for himself. And here they come! One, two, threeee!


SOUND: WHIZ BANG! ... FOR THE ANIMALS' SUDDEN APPEARANCE


GWEN: Hi, Leo!


SOUND: LION ROARS!


GWEN: Hold that tiger!


SOUND: TIGER GROWLS, LION ROARS, ET CETERA ... CAST SHOUTS ("COME ON!" "LOOK OUT!" ET CETERA) AND MURMURS EXCITEDLY AS THE ANIMALS CARRY THEM AWAY ... SCENE FADES OUT


MUSIC: INTRODUCTION


YEN-KI: (APPROACHES) Hatsu? Hatsu, I'm home! Where are you?


HATSU: Here I am, honorable husband. Here.


YEN-KI: Oh, but why do you hide in the shadow of the bamboos, little wife?


HATSU: It is not that I hide, Yen-ki.


YEN-KI: Then what is it?


HATSU: It is because from here I can see the soft white peaks of Py-ling Mountain. And besides, it's soon time for the moon to rise, and then it's all so beautiful.


YEN-KI: Oh, true, little Hatsu. (A VERY GENTLE REBUKE) But look, here am I, your husband come home from a hard day of work in the rice fields. I'm hungry. Come, come! Where's my supper?


HATSU: It is prepared, honorable husband. Forgive me, I did not know the hour was so late.


YEN-KI: Dreaming again, Hatsu? And not happy dreams, I fear. Your eyes are very sad. What troubles thy heart, my wife?


HATSU: Oh, Yen-ki, there's no use pretending. You know why my heart is heavy. I'm lonely for a baby to come to our house. (HELPLESSLY) Why? Why should we be denied this greatest of Heaven's blessings?


YEN-KI: Oh, Hatsu, I do not know. I only know that a little one here beside us would be more welcome to me than the cherry blossoms in the spring. Dearer than all the jewels of the emperor.


HATSU: Yen-ki, I know you grieve, too. Forgive me for being so selfish. I'll try not to distress you any more with my tears. I-- (SEES SOMETHING) Oh, Yen-ki! Look!


YEN-KI: What is it, my dear?


HATSU: The moon. See? It - it's [rushed?] up through the sky.


YEN-KI: See the snow on Py-ling? It has turned to fairy silver in the moonlight. See how it glitters and gleams.


HATSU: Look, my husband. There seems to be a path of shimmering silver from the Lady of the Moon right straight to the snow-capped peaks of the mountain.


YEN-KI: It does, indeed. I've never seen it more beautiful.


HATSU: Do you know, my husband? Somehow, when the silver moon rides high in the sky, it is then I am most happy. Why should that be so?


YEN-KI: I cannot say, Hatsu. But come, let us have our supper, and to cheer us up a bit, perhaps a wee drop of saki with our rice. How about it? Shall we?


HATSU: Yes, Yen-ki, and I will not be sad.


YEN-KI: Excellent! And who knows, my sweet? Perhaps someday the gods will hear your prayers and bless us with a tiny little baby of our own.


HATSU: Amen to that, my husband. Amen.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: WHOOSH! ... BRIEF GUST OF WIND TO INDICATE THAT WE ARE IN THE HEAVENS ... THEN ECHO ON VOICES


MOTHER: Moon Ray? Moon Ray, come here!


MOON RAY: Yes, Mother Moon? How may I serve your Highness?


MOTHER: Where is my daughter, the Princess Moonbeam?


MOON RAY: I'm not sure, your Highness, but I think she's playing with the Dog Star along the Milky Way somewhere.


MOTHER: Let three shooting stars fall in quick succession and she will come to me then.


MOON RAY: Yes, your Majesty.


MUSIC: THREE HEAVILY ECHOED DESCENDING HARP GLISSES ... FOR THREE FALLING STARS


MOON RAY: It is done, Majesty.


MOTHER: Thank you. And, Moon Ray? Send some of your extra rays to touch those clouds above the lake with silver. There isn't quite enough on them.


MOON RAY: Yes, Majesty Moon Mother.


SOUND: WHOOSH! ... BRIEF GUST OF WIND FOR THE ARRIVAL OF PRINCESS MOONBEAM


MOON RAY: Here is the Princess Moonbeam, your Highness.


MOONBEAM: Oh, Moon Mother! I saw the signal of the shooting stars and I knew you wanted me.


MOTHER: Yes, my sweet Moonbeam. Stand here close to me, for I'm going to glide through these fluffy clouds and I want you to hear what I have to say.


MOONBEAM: Yes, mother. I'll put my arm around you and glide with you.


MOTHER: My sweet daughter, for months and months I have looked down upon the mortal Earth below us, and watched the people there in their hurrying and scurrying about.


MOONBEAM: I have, too, mother dear. (TROUBLED, PUZZLED) And is it because our light isn't as strong as the Sun Emperor that I can't see many smiling faces or aren't they really happy?


MOTHER: Few are really happy, my daughter. But I have watched one little couple particularly -- Yen-ki and Hatsu by name. They are very dear to me.


MOONBEAM: Why, Moon Mother?


MOTHER: Because they love children so -- and they have none of their own.


MOONBEAM: Oh. That's really too bad.


SOUND: WHOOSH! ... FOR A GUARD ZIPPING BY


MOONBEAM: (STARTLED, AMUSED) Oh! That guard almost separated us for a moment!


MOTHER: (CHUCKLES)


MOONBEAM: (SERIOUS AGAIN) Please tell me more about Yen-ki and Hatsu.


MOTHER: They would love a child. And that is what I want to talk to you about.


MOONBEAM: To me, mother?


MOTHER: Yes. Though you are dearer to me than anything else I possess, it is my wish that you become mortal for a span of years, descend to the Earth, and make these people happy; comfort them; be their own child until I come for you. Will you do that?


MOONBEAM: Why, yes, Mother Moon. If you wish me to, I will.


MOTHER: It will be a happy adventure for you, my dear little princess. You will be changed to a mortal baby. You shall grow into lovely womanhood. Then, too, you will enrich their lives and they will be content.


MOONBEAM: But - won't they be so very sad when I shall leave?


MOTHER: I have thought of that, my dear. And here is my answer. Are people sad in the dark of the moon when I am on the other side of the world?


MOONBEAM: No. Because they know you'll come to them again.


MOTHER: Exactly! How much better to have had the silvery light of the moon for a little while than never to know its beauty. And though they may lose its shimmering light, then in tender memories they cherish me until I come to them again. And so it will be with you. To have you and love you will be so much better for them than never knowing the love of a child. And when you have gone away, they, too, will know that someday, high up above their mortal world, they will be united with you again.


MOONBEAM: But, mother? You say I shall stay until I'm a grown woman.


MOTHER: Yes, my dear.


MOONBEAM: Isn't that an awfully long time to be away from you?


MOTHER: (AMUSED) As they measure time, yes. But how long have we shone over their village? How long have the stars twinkled in the sky?


MOONBEAM: Without beginning or without end, Moon Mother.


MOTHER: Then what can one span of human life matter to us, my little princess? We have already learned that life goes on and on like the stars. I will search you out each month when I ride high in the sky, and you will find the silver path that leads to me, and it is then that we shall touch hands without speaking, for there is no need to speak.


MOONBEAM: I'll go gladly, Moon Mother, and do all that I can to make them happy.


MOTHER: Very well. Soon Hatsu will come out of their little bamboo hut and pray to me. Then I shall put all my power into silvery light -- and she will understand my answer. Then you, as a tiny mortal baby, will descend on the path of moonbeams to the top of Mount Py-ling, and they will find you there, wrapped in silver gossamer and smiling, ready to be welcomed into their lives.


HATSU: (OFF, PRAYING) Oh, honorable Lady of the Moon--


MOONBEAM: Listen! I think Hatsu is speaking now.


HATSU: (CLOSER) Our house is dark without a baby's smile. Our hearts are dead without a baby's laughter. Grant me this prayer. Send to me a little child that we may love, and cherish, and serve. Oh, honorable Lady of the Moon, hear me.


SOUND: OF THE SHIMMERING SILVER PATH OF LIGHT FORMING ... THEN IN BG


MOTHER: (TO MOONBEAM) Now is the time, my sweet!


SOUND: SHIMMERING ... UP TO FILL A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG


HATSU: (STARTLED) Oh! (CALLS) Oh, Yen-Ki! Yen-Ki, come quickly! Quickly!


YEN-KI: (APPROACHES) What is it, Hatsu? What has happened?


HATSU: A miracle! Look! Again I so [?] in my prayer to the Lady of the Moon. I prayed earnestly! And then-- Well, see what is happening! The moonbeams have stopped between the clouds. The moonbeams shimmered, blended, and finally formed themselves into a path of silver light! Do you see it? Look! It goes straight into the forest there, near the brook! See?


YEN-KI: I see the path of silver, little wife, but nothing else. The moon is full tonight and very bright. That is all I see.


HATSU: Oh, no, no! There is more! Come with me quickly! This time it's different, I know it! (MOVING OFF) Let's follow the moonbeam path!


YEN-KI: Wait, little wife! It's dark in the forest! (MOVING OFF) Wait for me!


SOUND: SHIMMERING SILVER PATH CONTINUES IN BG


MUSIC: GENTLE ... QUOTES DEBUSSY'S "CLAIR DE LUNE" AND FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG


HATSU: Look! Yen-Ki, look!


YEN-KI: Where? What is it?


HATSU: Here. Here in the branches of the bamboo tree. 


YEN-KI: (REACHES INTO BRANCHES) Oh.


HATSU: Oh, my husband! Careful. Look.


YEN-KI: A baby.


HATSU: The most beautiful baby I've ever seen. (LOVINGLY, TO MOONBEAM) Oh, my little one.


YEN-KI: Hatsu, look at her wrappings. They are of moon film. Her eyes are like the stars in the purple sky. (TO MOONBEAM) Oh, dainty little being, who are you?


MOONBEAM: I am Princess Moonbeam.


HATSU: Princess Moonbeam, my darling? And how is it you speak?


MOONBEAM: Because I come from the ageless celestial kingdom.


HATSU: But -- how came you here, my precious little one?


MOONBEAM: In answer to your prayer, mother.


YEN-KI: Do you mean then that you -- you, beautiful one -- you are to be our very own child?


MOONBEAM: Yes, dear father. I - I don't know how long I'm to stay, but-- Now -- will you take me - home?


MUSIC: UP BIG FOR A WARM CELEBRATORY BRIDGE ... THEN FADES OUT


MOONBEAM: Why, little Mother Hatsu, why do you look so sad?


HATSU: There is no use in denying it, daughter. For years -- ever since you came to us -- we have known that you were only loaned to us. And now that you're a grown maiden, we fear that you may disappear as you came. And we dread the time when you must go.


MOONBEAM: Are you sorry that I came to you? Would you rather never have had me here?


YEN-KI: Would someone blind now regret that he once had eyes to see the flowers, the sky, the stars?


HATSU: Oh, no, no, my darling. It's as your father said. You have brought a lasting happiness that will warm our hearts always. And even though we knew that you were only loaned to us-- After all, isn't everything we have in this life - just loaned?


YEN-KI: We shall keep you as long as we are permitted, my princess. And when the time comes that you must go, we shall be as brave as we can. But always -- always -- grateful for this blessing.


SOUND: OF MANY HORSES APPROACHING


YEN-KI: Why, listen. I hear the sound of many horses!


HATSU: Wha--? Oh, look, Moonbeam! It's the emperor's retinue! Oh, Yen-ki, do you suppose it's really His Majesty passing this way?


YEN-KI: Must be.


SOUND: HORSES STOP ... HORSES SNUFFLE


HATSU: (SURPRISED) Oh! Oh, he's stopped! Yen-Ki, a page is coming into the yard! Quickly, see what he wants!


SOUND: SHARP KNOCKING AT DOOR


PAGE: (BEHIND DOOR) His Imperial Majesty commands a word with you!


YEN-KI: Enter!


SOUND: DOOR OPENS ... PAGE ENTERS


YEN-KI: You do our humble house great honor. How may we serve you?


PAGE: His Imperial Majesty, and the ruler of your kingdom, is weary from a long day of travel. He asks for a cup of tea -- and a place, sheltered from the sun, where he may rest.


HATSU: We are indeed honored. (NERVOUSLY AND RAPIDLY FIRING OFF ORDERS) Moonbeam, start the charcoal fire under the kettle!


MOONBEAM: Yes, mother.


HATSU: Yen-ki, carry fresh mats into the [?] by the spring. Page? Tell our emperor he does our home great honor.


PAGE: Yes, madam.


SOUND: DOOR SHUTS AS PAGE EXITS


HATSU: (MUMBLES EXCITEDLY TO HERSELF BEHIND--)


YEN-KI: (LAUGHS) Look at your mother, Moonbeam! She's trying to be ten places at once!


MOONBEAM: (EXCITED) Oh, do you think it's really the emperor?


HATSU: There are the mats, Yen-Ki. Is the fire going nicely, Moonbeam?


MOONBEAM: Yes, mother. The kettle is already boiling. It'll only take a second.


HATSU: Oh, lucky for us that only today I made fresh rice!


YEN-KI: (CHUCKLES) 


MOONBEAM: The tea is ready, mother. Shall I take it out?


HATSU: Oh, wait, wait! Here. Here is the tray. Put the tea on it here.


MOONBEAM: Yes.


SOUND: ITEMS PLACED ON ON TRAY ... CONTINUES, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


MOONBEAM: There you are. 


HATSU: Now the rice and almond seed cake. 


MOONBEAM: Uh huh.


HATSU: Oh, wait! Put the bowl of kumquats and tangerines on it!


MOONBEAM: All right.


HATSU: And here -- a bit of saki, in case he would want it. Now then, is everything there?


MOONBEAM: I think so.


HATSU: Kumquats, tea-- All right then, help me. Open the door and tell the boy.


SOUND: DOOR OPENS AS YEN-KI RETURNS AND PUTS MATS ON FLOOR


MOONBEAM: Oh, he's there already. Father arrived just in time. (SEES EMPEROR) Oh, look, Mother Hatsu, he's very handsome.


HATSU: (LOW, NERVOUS) He'll hear you! Now, make your prettiest curtsey as he approaches.


EMPEROR: (APPROACHES) Well, then, madam -- you're indeed prompt. Ah, that tea smells good.


HATSU: Most Imperial Emperor, my thanks.


EMPEROR: It's jasmine-scented, isn't it?


HATSU: Yes, sire.


EMPEROR: Councilor, we were fortunate to select this house. It isn't every day one finds tea like this along the way.


COUNCILOR: Quite right, sire.


YEN-KI: It is we who are fortunate, Most Imperial Emperor.


HATSU: Moonbeam, serve the rice cakes.


MOONBEAM: Yes, mother. Most Imperial Emperor, will you have some rice cakes? They're really very good. Mother made them only today.


HATSU: (CHIDES) Moonbeam, that is not the proper way to address His Majesty.


MOONBEAM: Oh, but why not? They are fresh today, aren't they?


YEN-KI: Most Imperial Majesty, forgive her. She is not versed in addressing royalty.


MOONBEAM: (LIGHTLY) Not as well as I'm used to being addressed by them. (MORE SERIOUS, TO EMPEROR) Why, what is it? What are you looking at, your Majesty?


EMPEROR: This is the most beautiful creature I have ever seen. Who are you? Where did you come from?


YEN-KI: She is our daughter, sire.


EMPEROR: She's too beautiful to be mortal.


YEN-KI: Well, you see, sire--


EMPEROR: (INTERRUPTS) Councilor?


COUNCILOR: Yes, sire?


EMPEROR: Where was this girl when I sent couriers all over the kingdom to find the most beautiful women in my empire?


COUNCILOR: (TAKEN ABACK, APOLOGETIC) Why, sire, we never dreamed that so poor a hut could house such beauty. We - we didn't stop here.


EMPEROR: (WITH DISAPPROVAL) Ehh. (TO YEN-KI) What is your name, father?


YEN-KI: I am called Yen-ki. This is my wife, Hatsu, and this is our daughter, Moonbeam.


EMPEROR: Hm. A fitting name for one so lovely. Well, Moonbeam, let us not waste words. I have long searched for one who could inspire me to love. For years, we have sought for one worthy of the title of Empress of my kingdom. In a word, you are that woman. I offer you marriage.


MOONBEAM: Thank you very much, Imperial Majesty--


EMPEROR: (INTERRUPTS) Ah, don't say another word. I know you must be overwhelmed that the emperor offers marriage. But your beauty makes it possible for me to be so generous. (CLEARS THROAT) Now then -- when will you be ready to come to the palace for the wedding ceremony?


MOONBEAM: Never, your Majesty.


EMPEROR: What's that?!


YEN-KI: (ADMONISHES) Moonbeam, you're forgetting. You are addressing the emperor himself.


HATSU: Oh, yes, daughter. Please watch your words and think twice before you speak.


EMPEROR: Never mind the ceremony. Just explain what you meant by "never."


MOONBEAM: I have addressed you properly, Imperial Majesty, so that I might please my Earth-father and mother. But you're speaking to the Princess of the Moon.


EMPEROR: Princess of the Moon, eh? And do you think that a higher rank than Imperial Majesty?


MOONBEAM: Of course, my friend -- for my mother, the Lady of the Moon, rules the celestial kingdom: the kingdom of the sun, the planets, and the stars.


EMPEROR: Why, this is ridiculous! You mean to say you have a greater army than mine?


MOONBEAM: We have no armies at all, emperor.


EMPEROR: (SHORT LAUGH) That's what I thought! A kingdom without an army! Just who sees that your commands are obeyed? Who enforces your laws?


MOONBEAM: I doubt if you'd understand. But our laws work for themselves, because they're guided by the principle of eternity. And, you see, we of the celestial kingdom -- as well as you -- are a part of the principle.


EMPEROR: I don't believe it.


MOONBEAM: It's the greatest truth of all.


EMPEROR: Well, never mind that. I do understand that you are too lovely to be a mortal woman. But what are you doing here?


YEN-KI: Your Majesty, we -- Hatsu and I -- can explain that.


EMPEROR: (CASUALLY CONDESCENDING) Oh, I'd forgotten you were here. Well then, speak! Tell me!


HATSU: Your Majesty, we wanted a child of our own.


YEN-KI: And many years ago, each day, Hatsu would earnestly pray to the Lady of the Moon to send us one.


HATSU: And one night, when the moon was high over Mount Py-ling, she answered my prayer and the little princess came down to us in a path of silver, to be our greatest joy and happiness.


EMPEROR: Well then, if that is true, she will be returning to her own kingdom someday, won't she?


MOONBEAM: Yes, your Majesty. It's decreed that someday my Moon Mother will glide softly down the silver path, and I'll return with her.


EMPEROR: Well then, what becomes of you, Yen-ki, and you, Hatsu?


YEN-KI: We have always known she was only loaned to us.


HATSU: And the memories of her devotion will warm our hearts and enrich all the years of our lives.


EMPEROR: Well, I won't have it. This is my kingdom. I rule over it. You will obey me as everyone else does. Never in my life have I wanted anything so much. You send for your celestial mother and tell her I want you to be my wife.


MOONBEAM: It will do no good, emperor. Even you cannot change decrees of the divine.


EMPEROR: We'll see about that. Councilor?!


COUNCILOR: Yes, your Majesty?


EMPEROR: Go to the road. Give orders to the soldiers that the hunt is postponed. March them in here and surround the house. Send runners to the palace for more soldiers. This girl is to be guarded. And no one -- mind you, no one! -- is to leave or enter the grounds under any circumstances! Do you understand?


COUNCILOR: Yes, sire.


EMPEROR: Well, then see to it at once. And quickly, too! I want the house surrounded and the soldiers stationed at their posts before dark. (MOVING OFF) Oh, er, tell the captain I want a special guard--


HATSU: I'm afraid, Yen-ki!


YEN-KI: I, too, feel as if something, I know not what, is about to happen.


MOONBEAM: Don't be afraid, Mother Hatsu. I know that we're not in danger.


SOUND: SHIMMERING OF THE SILVER PATH ... THEN IN BG


HATSU: The moon is just coming over Mount Py-ling.


YEN-KI: It is brighter than usual tonight.


MOONBEAM: Do you see that silver path beginning to form?


HATSU: Yes. (REALIZES) Moonbeam! Does that mean--?


YEN-KI: Does that mean your Moon Mother comes for you tonight, my daughter?


MOONBEAM: I'm sure it does, my father.


HATSU: (EMOTIONAL) Oh, Moon--


MOONBEAM: Don't cry, little Mother Hatsu.


HATSU: (SURPRISED) Why, you are crying, too, Moonbeam.


MOONBEAM: (A LITTLE TEARFUL) Only because I can't bear to see you unhappy.


YEN-KI: (IN AWE) There she is -- the Lady of the Moon.


SOUND: OF THE ARRIVAL OF THE MOON MOTHER


MOONBEAM: Mother! Hello, mother!


SOUND: SILVER PATH OUT ... ECHO ON MOTHER'S VOICE


MOTHER: Yes, my daughter, I am here. It is time for your return. Dear Hatsu and Yen-ki, do not grieve. We shall meet again, dear Earth parents of my princess. Each month when the moon is full, we shall float through the sky, Moonbeam and I. I will cover this little cottage with silver rays -- and that will be her message of eternal love to both of you.


EMPEROR: (APPROACHES) What is going on here?! Who dares to enter these grounds without my permission?


MOTHER: I ask permission from no one, emperor.


EMPEROR: Who dares to say that to me?


MOTHER: The Lady of the Moon.


EMPEROR: The very person I'm looking for! (AN ORDER) Soldiers! Surround this, er, person. Arrest her! (BEAT) Well, why don't you obey me?


MOTHER: Because, for the time being, emperor, they are turned to stone. 


EMPEROR: You can't do this! I want this princess to be my wife! And I intend to have her!


MOTHER: Do you think by wanting something, emperor, it is yours? Do you believe that might is right and no power is strong enough to resist it?


EMPEROR: And I've proven it!


MOTHER: Just for a brief moment in the span of your life, my tyrant. This princess is not mortal. She is of another world. Just as courage and honor are universal, so is the love she has brought these Earth-parents. And you can't kill things like that. They live on and on, to glorify and point the way toward the brotherhood of man -- to encourage those who will carry the love of progress long after you are dust. (TO MOONBEAM) Come, my daughter.


EMPEROR: I command that you release-- (CHOKES) What's the matter? I can't move! I - I can't - breathe.


MOTHER: Because you, too, are turning to stone, like your heart -- and these other soldiers.


EMPEROR: (WITH DIFFICULTY) I - can't - speak. I - I--


MOTHER: And this way you will remain, mortal man, until you learn that even you cannot change the course of the stars or stem the tides that will rise to defeat you.


EMPEROR: (GASPS, SHUDDERS)


SOUND: STONE EMPEROR TOPPLES OVER TO FLOOR


MOTHER: Are you ready, Moonbeam?


MOONBEAM: Yes, mother. (BEAT, WARM AND TEARFUL) Goodbye, Earth-father. We shall meet again. Goodbye, dear little Earth-mother Hatsu.


SOUND: SHIMMER OF SILVER PATH FORMING AND MOONBEAM DISAPPEARING ... THEN OUT


YEN-KI: (SADLY) Hatsu, she is gone. And look: teardrops have fallen from her lovely eyes upon my hand. (EXHALES) Oh, my Moonbeam, we shall miss you. But we are grateful for having you as long as we did.


HATSU: You are right, Yen-ki. All our lives will be better for having had this sweet little Moonbeam to love and-- (SEES SOMETHING) Look, Yen-ki! Look.


YEN-KI: What is it?


HATSU: Your hand -- where the teardrops were. Look how they shimmer and fade.


YEN-KI: Why, see? They have changed. They have wings. (BEAT) And there. They fly into the air.


HATSU: They are two moths. And more! The night is filled with Moonbeam's teardrops. What can it mean?


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... GENTLE VERSION OF LINCKE'S "THE GLOW-WORM" IN BG


YEN-KI: Moonbeam's teardrops have been changed into little silver fireflies that twinkle through the night, and tell us she is thinking of us, and sending us messages of love.


HATSU: And always and always they shall be called fireflies. And the love of Moonbeam will live on forever.


MUSIC: "GLOW WORM" ... UP FOR CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: And so ends another chapter of LET'S PRETEND and the story of the Princess Moonbeam has come to life. Was it your favorite? If not, write to LET'S PRETEND and we'll try to make your favorite story come true. If you'd like to see this famous group broadcast, write for passes. Address all mail to LET'S PRETEND, care of the Columbia Broadcasting System, New York City.


And now for our charming visitor who has an important message for you. It's my pleasure to introduce the beloved personality of radio and stage, the national director of children's radio programs for the Office of Civilian Defense, Miss Dorothy Gordon.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


DOROTHY GORDON: Hello, boys and girls. I feel guilty to take one second away from today's lovely story. And yet, I know that all of you want to do everything you possibly can to help us win the war. That's why I stole three minutes out of LET'S PRETEND to tell you of the job that you can do. 


Of course, you all know that we're at war with horrible men: Hitler and the Japanese. These men are just like those giants of old, the ones that put on their seven-league boots and stepped into everyone's country and grabbed up everything. They are like the emperor in today's story, who thought that whatever he wanted he had a right to take. These men are like the giant that Jack killed, who wanted to keep the gold and the music and the food of the world all to himself. You remember how he robbed everybody and made them afraid? Jack just had to kill him to make people free again. And that's our job. We, the United Nations, will have to get rid of those terrible men who are robbing the world of freedom and happiness.


To do that, we have to work together and help our government in every way. We'll have to give up lots of things that we would like to have, so that we can win, and then have all the things we need and want. America is the land of the free. People have come here from all over the world because here they found a country where they could have whatever religion they wanted, where they could work at any trade, where they could get an education, where they could live happily with their families. 


There are in America today ten million men and women who have come from different parts of the world who have never as yet learned how to speak English. It isn't that they don't love America -- for they do very much -- but many of them found it difficult to learn another language after they were grown up. However, these ten million people have several million children who go to school here and who do know how to speak English. Some of you boys and girls listening-in this moment may be the children of those foreign-language-speaking people, or you may be a relative, or you may be just a friend. 


Now, you boys and girls can help a great deal by explaining things to the men and women who do not speak English. For instance, tell them that every time anyone turns a wheel in unnecessary driving, they are turning the wheel against our soldiers and in favor of Hitler. Tell them that they are not to pay any attention to people who say, "Ah, there's enough gas to go around!" The reason gasoline is being rationed all over the country is because no gas means no driving. No driving saves rubber. And the army and the navy must have rubber for their work to win the war.


And there's another thing. I know that you boys and girls, just as most of us, like whipped cream on your cake. Well, we cannot get cream for whipping. Why? Because heavy whipping cream makes butter and milk powder. We need a lot of butter and a lot of milk powder to feed our army and navy. So you'll just give up your charlotte russes and heavy cream desserts, and other things, as time goes on, because you boys and girls want to be the Jacks who will help rid the world of the terrible giants, so that we can all be happy and free.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: Thank you, Dorothy Gordon, for speaking with us today. And now the Pretenders identify themselves as the players in the story of "Princess Moonbeam." The secretary of our letter department--


GWEN: Gwen Davies.


ANNOUNCER: The Princess Moonbeam--


MOONBEAM: Sybil Trent.


ANNOUNCER: The Moon Mother--


MOTHER: Miriam Wolfe.


ANNOUNCER: The servant Moon Ray--


MOON RAY: Betty Jane Tyler.


ANNOUNCER: Yen-Ki--


YEN-KI: Kingsley Colton.


ANNOUNCER: Hatsu--


HATSU: Patricia Ryan.


ANNOUNCER: The emperor--


EMPEROR: Arthur Anderson.


ANNOUNCER: His page--


PAGE: Paul Porter, Jr.


ANNOUNCER: His royal councilor--


COUNCILOR: Bill Lipton.


ANNOUNCER: And studio technician for LET'S PRETEND, Fred Hendrickson. These stories are dramatized and produced under the direction of Nila Mack.


SOUND: APPLAUSE ... UNTIL END


MUSIC: THEME ... UNTIL END


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