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Our Own Kind

Hallmark Playhouse

Our Own Kind

Mar 17 1949



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

HOST, James Hilton


NED McDERMOTT

NELL, Ned's wife

CHRIS, Ned's son

TIM, Ned's friend

FOREMAN (2 lines)

WILLIE, Ned's grandson, age 7

PURSER

CATHERINE DALY, teacher

LARRY, police officer


NOTE: The older characters -- NED, NELL, and TIM -- have pronounced Irish accents.




ANNOUNCER: Remember, a Hallmark Card -- when you care enough to send the very best.


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG

 

ANNOUNCER: Tonight from Hollywood, the makers of Hallmark Greeting Cards bring you Barry Fitzgerald in Edward McSorley's "Our Own Kind" on the Hallmark Playhouse. (PAUSE) Each week Hallmark will bring you Hollywood's greatest stars in outstanding stories chosen by one of the world's best-known authors, the distinguished novelist Mr. James Hilton. 


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. This is James Hilton. Tonight on our Hallmark Playhouse, we present a story ideally suited to the day -- St. Patrick's Day. It is called "Our Own Kind" by Edward McSorley and Mr. McSorley is evidently the man with experience to write it, for he has been at various times a farmer, a sailor, and a fisherman. And not only do we have this warm-hearted and appropriate story, but we are especially lucky to have in the starring part that superb Irish actor Barry Fitzgerald, a man whose genius I have admired ever since the days many years ago when I used to line up outside the Abbey Theatre in Dublin to see his wonderful performances in that famous, almost fabulous theater. So here we are on St. Patrick's night all ready to enjoy ourselves with Barry Fitzgerald in Edward McSorley's "Our Own Kind." And now, Frank Goss, have you a word or two about Hallmark? 


ANNOUNCER: There are Hallmark Cards for every memorable occasion on your calendar -- for birthdays, anniversaries, holidays. Yes, for a friendly greeting, a word of good cheer, an expression of sympathy -- there is a Hallmark Card that says just what you want to say, the way you want to say it. And that identifying hallmark on the back? That says you cared enough to send the very best. (BEAT) Now Hallmark Playhouse. Presenting Edward McSorley's "Our Own Kind" and starring Barry Fitzgerald.


MUSIC: WISTFUL, ROMANTIC IRISH INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND NED--


NED: (NARRATES) St. Patrick's Day -- a great day for the Irish -- but especially so for me, for wasn't it on St. Patrick's Day that I got me first glimpse of America? Aye, that was a long time ago. I was a young one then and so was me wife, Nell. But we found happiness here. In Providence, Rhode Island we lived, and we raised two fine sons. But we found sadness, too, when the oldest -- God rest him -- was lost.


NELL: (WEEPS, THEN IN BG)


NED: There, there, Nell. It's all over now. But don't hold in. Go into your room, have a good cry. It'll do you good.


CHRIS: That's right, mum, and try to get some rest. 


NELL: Oh, Chris, Chris -- you're all we have left. Poor Will. (SOBS QUIETLY IN BG)


CHRIS: Will is in good hands now, Ma. Remember what Father O'Connor told ya. Here now, try to sleep.


NELL: I'll try. I'll try.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, BEDROOM DOOR OPENS, NELL'S STEPS INTO BEDROOM ... THEN DOOR CLOSES ... THEN NED & CHRIS' STEPS IN HALL


CHRIS: You ought to get some rest yourself, Dad.


NED: Ah, there'll be time enough for resting later. We've somebody else to be thinking about now -- little Willie. 


CHRIS: Well, he can stay at Aunt Tessie's for a while. He'll be all right there until we can make some arrangements.


NED: Arrangements? Arrangements for what? 


CHRIS: To have him taken into the boys' home. He'll get good care there anyway. He'd be better off in an institution.


NED: Do ye really think so? Chris, would you think so if he were your own? 


CHRIS: Without being sentimental about it -- yes. 


NED: All right then, let's be sentimental about it! Now, there's something a lad needs: somebody to run to when the world gets too big for him. Not only somebody to treat his bruises, but somebody to pat his head when they're doin' it. A boy needs comfort -- and you can't crawl into the lap of an institution. I'm bringing him home here where he belongs. Because you see, Chris -- he's our own kind.


MUSIC: TENDER BRIDGE ... THEN OUT BEHIND--


SOUND: FOUNDRY BACKGROUND ... CLANG OF SHOVELS, ET CETERA


TIM: (ANNOYED) What's the matter with you, Ned? You've ruined the board, man! You're acting like it was your first day in the foundry. 


NED: I'm sorry, Tim. I've got something on me mind. 


TIM: Little Willie again! How old is the boy now? 


NED: He'll be seven years old come October.


TIM: I'll be glad when he's old enough to come to work and then maybe you can forget about him.


NED: Well, he'll not be working here, so you needn't wait. He'll have readin' and writin', an' he'll not be a sod like his grandfather. Aye, and worse yet, like you. 


TIM: Ohhh?! It's a sod I am, is it? At least I can read and write me own name, which is more than you can do. 


NED: (LIGHTLY IRONIC) Oh, I'll tell them about that in the office. Maybe they'll make you president of the company. 


SOUND: FOREMAN'S STEPS APPROACH


FOREMAN: (APPROACHES, ANNOYED) McDermott?! Lee?! What's goin' on down here? 


NED: (GENTLY OBSEQUIOUS) Well, we were-- We were just reminiscin' about old times.


FOREMAN: Well, talk on your own time!


SOUND: FOREMAN'S STEPS DEPART BEHIND--


NED: Yes, sir, yes, sir. (BEAT, TO TIM) Hmmph! A man can't even talk to his old friend. 


TIM: I don't mind for meself, Ned, but I don't like him yellin' at you like that. If he wasn't a foreman, I'd go up and give him a taste of me shovel! 


NED: Ah, never mind. A man's home is his own. Come over and have supper with us Sunday.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: SUPPER TABLE BACKGROUND ... DISHES, UTENSILS, ET CETERA


TIM: Ah, that was a fine meal, Nell! 


CHRIS: Well, I'm goin' out. Goodbye, Tim; everybody.


TIM: Good night, Chris.


NED: (WITH A TWINKLE) Are ye seein' that young schoolteacher again? That, er--?


CHRIS: (WARMLY) Catherine Daly.


NED: Ah, good! Willie's in her class at school now. Might as well have the family on the right side.


CHRIS: (LAUGHS) So long!


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, CHRIS' STEPS TO DOOR, WHICH OPENS ... THEN SHUTS AS HE EXITS


NELL: Well, I'd best be gettin' the dishes done. Take Tim into the parlor. 


SOUND: NELL'S STEPS AWAY AS SHE EXITS


NED: Time for you to go to bed, Willie boy.


WILLIE: But how about the funnies, grandpa? You haven't read me the funnies.


NED: (UNEASY) Ah, well, er-- Let it go for another day. Tim and I want to talk.


TIM: (MISCHIEVOUS) Oh, don't let me be a bother.


WILLIE: You promised, grandpa.


NED: (DIPLOMATIC) Well now, seein' that Tim is a guest, maybe he'll read ya the funnies.


TIM: Oh, not at all! I'd like to have you read them.


NED: (BEAT, RELUCTANT) All right, Willie. Sit on me lap.


SOUND: NED SITS, WILLIE CLIMBS INTO HIS LAP ... NEWSPAPER RUSTLES BEHIND--


NED: Yes, well now, we'll - we'll start with this one.


TIM: (HIGHLY AMUSED) I'm all ears. 


NED: Yes -- that's typical of a donkey. ... 


WILLIE: Read, grandpa! 


NED: Well now, this here fellow; this-- He's a tinker by the name of, er, O'Rourke. 


WILLIE: What's a tinker? 


NED: He's a man who fixes pots and pans as good as new. Now, this one over here-- Oh, he's the bad fella. (LOW, OMINOUS) He's an Englishman-- ... (MATTER-OF-FACT) It goes without sayin'.


WILLIE: Who's the lady, grandpa? Who's she?


NED: Oh, well, let me see now. Oh, she bought the pots 'n' pans from the Englishman. Yes, robbed her, too, he did. ... They were no good until O'Rourke fixed them! 


WILLIE: But now they're all right? 


NED: Yes, but the Englishman wants to take them back now because the poor woman can't pay these sums. 


TIM: (AMUSED) I wonder if the paper knows they've got that comic strip in there. ...


NED: (LOW) Cheer up, [?] Tim.


WILLIE: Go on, grandpa. Go on.


NED: Well, then O'Rourke and the Englishman get in a fight, as ye can see, with O'Rourke naturally gettin' the best of it. Here now, that's enough for tonight.


SOUND: NEWSPAPER RUSTLES


WILLIE: All right, grandpa. (MOVING OFF) Goodnight, Uncle Tim! 


SOUND: WILLIE'S STEPS AWAY AS HE EXITS


TIM: Goodnight, Willie! (LIGHTLY, TO NED) I never heard such a comic strip before in all me life.


NED: (VERY SERIOUS) And you want him to know that I can't read or write? I don't want him to follow me, Tim. I don't want him to follow his father -- or Chris, who learned a little and then stopped. (REFLECTIVE) He's got to see things, too, now he's started to school. I'd like to take him on a little trip. 


TIM: Take a trip?! You want to take a trip?! Get all dressed up and put on tight shoes?! For what? 


NED: Well, I don't want the boy to think that the whole of America has been squeezed into one little city called Providence, Rhode Island, now do we? Well, we can go someplace of a Sunday, can't we?


TIM: Well, there's the boats to Block Island and other places that leave from the wharf. 


NED: Block Island? Now, that doesn't sound bad at all. 


TIM: There's two boats that makes the trips: the Warwick and the Mount Hope. The Warwick's a bit slower, but it's a-- It's a half a dollar cheaper. 


NED: Well, then we'll take the Warwick. 


TIM: However, the captain of the Mount Hope is named O'Flaherty.


NED: O'Flaherty? Well now, I think it's worth the extra half dollar to ensure a man's life gettin' there safely. ... We'll take the Mount Hope.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: SPLASH! AND WHOOSH! OF WATER ... SHIP DECK BACKGROUND


TIM: Get a load o' this fella coming along the deck with the hat! I haven't seen him do a lick of work since we left the dock. The - the purser, they call him.


SOUND: DISTANT SHIP HORN


WILLIE: (EXCITED) Look, grandpa, over there! Another boat!


NED: Yeah. Yeah, a pretty sight, isn't she?


WILLIE: (SPELLS OUT LETTERS ON SIDE OF BOAT) "M-O-U--" Grandpa! It's the Mount Hope! 


NED: No, this is the Mount Hope, Willie. We're on the Mount Hope ourselves. Now, try to read it again. Now, see if ye make it out any better this time.


WILLIE: I can spell it out for you, if you want me to.


TIM: Go ahead, lad. Spell it out.


WILLIE: (SPELLS) M-O-U-N-T H-O-P-E. That says Mount Hope.


NED: (CHUCKLES) Well-- Now, try again, try again. Practice makes perfect, as ye may say.


TIM: (REALIZES) Oh, good heavens, Ned, I believe the boy is right. It is the Mount Hope.


NED: (FURIOUS) And what kind of a dirty trick is this?! (CALLS, TO PURSER) Hey, you! You, with hat there! 


SOUND: PURSER'S STEPS APPROACH


PURSER: Is there anything wrong? 


NED: [?] Now, what ship is this we're on?


PURSER: When we left the wharf, she was the Edgemont. She probably still is! 


NED: Well, where's the Mount Hope then? What's become of the Mount Hope?


PURSER: That's her alongside of us there. 


TIM: That's her all right, Ned. 


NED: Well, then where's Captain O'Flaherty? 


PURSER: Who's he? 


NED: He's the master of this vessel, that's who he is!


PURSER: There's no Captain O'Flaherty aboard this ship. The master's name is Reginald Crippingham and we're bound for New London.


NED: (STRICKEN) Tim, Tim! We're being shanghaied! ... They're taking us to England! ...


TIM: Oh, take it easy, Ned! New London's in Connecticut.


NED: Just the same, we've been trapped! (TO PURSER) Now looka here, you. I bought tickets for the Mount Hope this morning to go to Block Island. Here are me tickets. 


PURSER: You can read what they say, can't ya? "Steamer Edgemont to New London, Connecticut." We don't go near Block Island. You bought your tickets at the wrong window. 


NED: Don't you New London me! Your game is up! We're goin' to Block Island and that'll be all of that!


PURSER: Not on this ship! And don't make any disturbance unless you want to see the inside of the New London jail. 


SOUND: PURSER'S STEPS AWAY


NED: (SPUTTERS)


TIM: Oh, it's no use, Ned. He's right.


NED: Huh? (CALMS DOWN, MUTTERS AN OATH) If I was thirty years younger, I'd show that bucko. (COMFORTING, TO WILLIE) Now then, Willie, New London's nice enough -- just as good as Block Island.


TIM: And there's ice cream to be had there. There's none at all on Block Island, you know.


NED: Ice cream, lad! Fancy that. Now what makes ye look so sad? 


WILLIE: (REALIZES, TEARFUL) You - you couldn't read it. You couldn't read the sign on the boat. 


NED: Oh, well now-- I - I made a mistake, that's all. 


WILLIE: (ACCUSING) You couldn't read it! 


NED: (SLOW, UNCONVINCING) I - I wasn't wearin' me specs.


WILLIE: (TEARFUL) Grandpa! Grandpa, you couldn't read it!


MUSIC: FIRST ACT CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: In a moment James Hilton will return to present the second act of "Our Own Kind," starring Barry Fitzgerald. (BEAT) On this friendliest of days, when old friendships are renewed -- kept green and fresh as the fields of Kilkenny -- I don't think it would be amiss to remind you that the charm of this day lies in the "get-togetherness" of it. Not only the Irish, but all America seems to become one happy family. But as Thoreau wrote back in 1843, "Nothing makes the earth seem so spacious as to have friends at a distance." Now, no one better understands that truth than those who make Hallmark Cards. And because they understand your loneliness when you and your dear ones are separated, they offer you a way of bridging the miles, of keeping in touch -- with friendship cards. And you'll find Hallmark friendship cards always have a way of saying just what you want to say, the way you want to say it. It's a talent that those who make Hallmark Cards have. Like their talent for making cards that are top drawer in design, in materials, in the careful way they're put together. So when you choose your Hallmark Cards, do as your friends will surely do: look on the back for the hallmark that tells them you cared enough to send the very best.


MUSIC: TAG ... THEN IN BG


HOST: Now we present Act Two of Edward McSorley's "Our Own Kind," starring Barry Fitzgerald.


MUSIC: UP FOR A WARM IRISH INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND NED--


NED: (NARRATES) No, I couldn't read -- and Willie discovered it that day on the boat to New London. He never spoke of it again, but he didn't bring me the funnies of a Sunday, either. Nor did we stand together before the picture of brave Robert Emmet that hung in the parlor while I read the words beneath it to him -- the words that I had memorized. (BEAT) I had to do something about it, so I went to see Chris' girl, Catherine Daly the schoolteacher. 


CATHERINE: Couldn't I get you something, Mr. McDermott? Perhaps a cup of tea? 


NED: No-no-no, thank ye, no, no. I have a matter of grave importance on me mind.


CATHERINE: About Willie? 


NED: Yes, about Willie. 


CATHERINE: I don't know what's gotten into the boy. He was my best student. I was certain he'd win the class medal, but lately--


NED: Yes, I know. It's all my fault. My fault for not being able to help him. Miss Daly, will you help him?


CATHERINE: Why, of course I will. What would you suggest? 


NED: Well, maybe it'd be helpin' the boy if you could teach me to read and write. 


CATHERINE: You, Mr. McDermott? 


NED: (SLOWLY, EMBARRASSED) Yes, me. I'm askin' ye please, girl -- to teach an old man the ABC's. 


MUSIC: TENDER BRIDGE


SOUND: SLOW SCRATCH OF PEN ON PAPER IN AGREEMENT WITH--


NED: (AS HE WRITES, SLOWLY) T - H - E. "The brown--" C - O - W. (WITH QUIET PRIDE, TO HIMSELF) "The brown cow." 


SOUND: KNOCKING AT DOOR


NED: (CALLS, A LITTLE HARSH) Just a minute!


SOUND: HURRIED RUSTLE OF PAPER HIDDEN AWAY IN DRAWER, WHICH SHUTS ... NED'S STEPS TO DOOR, WHICH OPENS


NELL: Your cousin Larry is here. (MILDLY ANNOYED) And what are you lockin' yourself up in this room for, every blessèd night? Supper's on the table. 


SOUND: NED'S STEPS TO TABLE ... TABLE BACKGROUND


LARRY: Hello, Ned. 


NED: Well, I never expected to see you, Larry. I thought the whole police force would be restin' up for the St. Patrick's Day parade tomorrow. 


LARRY: I had some business over in this neighborhood -- checkin' up on a few young boys who have been getting into some devilment.


NED: Oh, indeed? What sort of devilment? (BEAT, TO WILLIE) Come on, Willie -- take your seat at the table. 


WILLIE: (RELUCTANT) I'm not too hungry.


LARRY: Bunch of our lads here have been gangin' up on kids from other parts of town.


NED: Mmm, sounds bad.


LARRY: Yes, and it's gettin' worse. Couple of days ago they picked on an old man; called him names and threw mud at him. 


NED: Go on, Larry.


LARRY: Well, one of the kids is the McNally boy, Stevie -- his parents'll take care of him, all right -- but he won't tell who the others were.


WILLIE: (UNEASY) Grandpa, I don't feel too good. I don't want to eat. Can I go to bed, sir?


NED: Yes, Willie, you can go to bed. I'll be in later to say goodnight to ye.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


NED: Willie? Are ye awake, lad?


WILLIE: Yes, grandpa. I'm awake. 


NED: What's wrong, now? 


WILLIE: (TEARFUL) I was with Stevie McNally. I was one of the boys Uncle Larry told you about. 


NED: Yes. I know you were. What made you do it? 


WILLIE: Stevie said foreigners had no right being over here.


NED: And because Stevie said that, you threw mud at an old man.


WILLIE: They're not own kind. You've always said we should stick to our own kind.


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... QUIETLY STIRRING, IN BG


NED: Now, that isn't the way I said it, Willie. Our own kind is the family and the family sticks together. But outside of that, our own kind means all the people who are here in this country with us -- working and building as we are -- no matter where they come from or what they were before. They're our own kind now. 


WILLIE: You never told me that before. 


NED: Well, I didn't think ye needed it before. I'm an old man meself, Willie, but I could walk through any part of this town tomorrow and none of the others would lift a hand to harm me. 


WILLIE: I won't do it again, grandpa -- honest.


NED: (CHUCKLES) I believe you, lad. Now, how about slippin' out of bed for a minute? 


WILLIE: Okay.


MUSIC: GENTLY FADES OUT 


NED: Here, there's some beef left over your grandmother put in the icebox -- and a boy who ate no supper should be a good match for a sandwich. 


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, WILLIE SLIPS OUT OF BED ... THEIR STEPS THROUGH BEDROOM DOOR, WHICH CLOSES ... THEN STEPS INTO PARLOR


NED: Sit here in the parlor by the cold stove. I'll get the sandwich. And then Robert Emmet's picture can watch ya while you eat. (BEAT) Been a long time since we read the words under the picture, hasn't it? Ahh, look at him -- brave Emmet that the judges condemned for tryin' to set Ireland free. Will I read his words to you? 


WILLIE: (UNSURE) If - if you want to. 


NED: Well, it says here, "When my country takes her place among the nations of the earth, then -- and not till then -- let my epitaph be written." Ah, fine words, aren't they?


WILLIE: (MEEKLY) Yes, grandpa.  


NED: Shall we read them together -- like we used to? 


WILLIE: (TEARFUL) You don't know how to read them. You memorized them. Grandma told me.


NED: Ah, she did, did she? Well now, let's see if she's right. (QUICK AND ASSERTIVE) Now, the first word is "when." That's W-H-E-N, "when" -- I believe, isn't it? Huh? And then we'll skip on to "my" and take, er-- Take "country." C-O-U-N-T-R-Y.


WILLIE: (ASTONISHED) Grandpa! You can read! You can!


NED: (WITH A TWINKLE) Eh, what made ya think I couldn't? ...


WILLIE: But the day on the boat--! 


NED: Ah, I didn't have me specs, as I told you. Do you want to read it with me now? 


WILLIE: (PLEASED) Oh, yes! Yes! 


NED: All right, just once through, though, because we have to be up early in the morning and get seats in the grandstand to watch the St. Patrick's Day parade. Now here we go.


NED &

WILLIE: "When my country takes her place among the nations of the earth--"


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: CROWD CHEERS AND MURMURS ... THEN PARADE BACKGROUND


WILLIE: There he is, grandpa! There's Uncle Tim!


NED: (CALLS) Hey, Tim! Up here, Tim! We've a seat for ye!


WILLIE: Look, grandpa! There they come! There comes the parade!


TIM: (OFF) I'm comin', if I can ever get through here!


NED: (TO CROWD) Ah, let the man through, there! Let the man through!


TIM: (CLOSER) Sometimes I wish I wasn't Irish at all.


NED: Oh, for heaven's sake, will ya look at Pete Carron on the white horse in front of the parade, Tim?


TIM: (LAUGHS)


NED: To look at the airs of him, you'd never think he slept on the floor of me kitchen the first few years after he came over here, would ye?


TIM: He's gettin' so fat I can hardly see the horse!


MUSIC: BAGPIPES APPROACH BEHIND FOLLOWING AND CONTINUE IN BG


NED: Well, I'm only assumin' there's a horse, because I know Pete isn't that tall. The weight of the money in his pockets kept him from growin' full-size. Oh ho, look, look! There's Teddy Donovan with the bagpipes! Didja ever see such a sight in your life?


TIM: I did not. With all the blowin' he does about other things, you wouldn't think he'd have breath enough left in him for the pipes!


WILLIE: Look! Look at the float with the four-leaf clovers and the midget!


NED: (SLIGHTLY EMBARRASSED) Ah, now, those aren't four-leaf clovers. They're shamrocks. And that isn't a midget. It's a leprechaun.


SOUND: PARADE BACKGROUND FADES OUT WITH--


MUSIC: BAGPIPES FADE OUT WITH--


SOUND: TIM, NED & WILLIE'S STEPS ON SIDEWALK ... THEN IN BG


NED: (QUIET SATISFACTION) Well, that was quite a parade, wasn't it? Come on back to the house, Tim. 


TIM: Surely.


NED: Come along, Willie.


WILLIE: But I was going to church, grandpa. They're having a play. Catherine Daly, my teacher, is in it.


NED: A play? On a holy day? Does Father O'Connor know about it?


WILLIE: Sure. He directed it.


NED: Oh, well, well -- I suppose if he directed it, it must be all right, huh? 


WILLIE: They're going to do it twice -- for the kids this afternoon, and you and grandma can see it tonight. 


NED: Ah, no. I'm not much of a one for plays. Run along and come home as soon as it's over.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS ... WILLIE'S HURRIED STEPS IN


WILLIE: (EXCITED) Grandpa! Grandpa!


TIM: Here, here, boy. You'll knock the walls down. 


WILLIE: I saw the play! Catherine--! (MORE RESPECTFUL) Miss Daly -- she was beautiful


NED: Ah, yes, she's a pretty thing, all right. Now, what was the show about? Dancers doing jigs or reels, I suppose, eh?


WILLIE: Oh, no, no. It was a play about a British landlord. 


NED: (STRICKEN) A British landlord? 


TIM: In church?! 


NED: (HORRIFIED) On St. Patty's Day?! ...


WILLIE: The landlord was trying to drive the Irish tenants out of their houses because they wouldn't tell where their leader was hiding. He wanted to give the girl -- that was Miss Daly -- money if she would tell.


NED: (HIGHLY AGITATED) Y'see? Y'see? Y'see, Tim?! That's the way they work it! That's the way-- ... They want to make the girl turn informer! But she didn't! I just bet she didn't! (BEAT, LOW) Did she, Willie?


WILLIE: No!


NED: (PLEASED) Aha! I knew it! Good girl.


WILLIE: The leader, Roy, was her beau. She was hidin' him. But the landlord went and got the British -- and Roy escaped just before they came! 


NED: You mean he ran away from them?! 


TIM: Well, what'd you want him to do? Stay and fight the whole British Army?


NED: Well, what happened then, Willie? (SADLY) The British shot the poor man in the back, didn't they? 


WILLIE: No. But! He got caught later when a spy named Murphy snitched on him.


NED: Murphy?! (EXTRAVAGANTLY SAD) Ah, that's the disgrace of the Irish. ... There's forever a traitor amongst 'em.


WILLIE: Then the landlord offers to get Roy out of jail if Catherine will marry him.


NED: Ah! So that's his game! Well, he might as well get that right out of his mind; she'll never do it, never in God's world! (BEAT, LOW) She didn't, did she? ... 


WILLIE: No! Roy escapes and he gets all the rebels -- and they drive the British out of Ireland, and Roy and Catherine get married! 


NED: (CALLS, EXCITED) Mother! Mother, get your coat! Come on, come on, Tim!


TIM: Come on where? 


NED: To see the play! It's the greatest play you ever heard of!


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: SUPPER TABLE BACKGROUND ... DISHES, UTENSILS, ET CETERA


NED: Ah, the play was a delight, Catherine, that's what it was.


CATHERINE: I'm glad you liked it. 


TIM: Ah, it was grand, Miss Daly, just grand. 


CATHERINE: Well, frankly I'm a little worn out. I'd better go, Chris.


CHRIS: I'll get your coat.


SOUND: CHRIS' STEPS AWAY


NED: (KINDLY, TO CATHERINE) I hope you come again often since I've got a hunch ye'll be a member of the family soon. 


TIM: Oh, you're making the girl blush, Ned.


NED: Well, it's becomin' to her, isn't it?


CATHERINE: (CHUCKLES, THEN MORE SERIOUS) I think I have some good news for you about Willie. He came to me after the show this afternoon and begged for a chance to get back into the class contests -- for the reading medal. 


NED: And, er, did you refuse him? 


CATHERINE: No. I told him he'd have to make up some ground first.


NED: Did he say he would? 


CATHERINE: Yes. He said you'd help him. 


NED: (CHUCKLES WARMLY) I will, I will.


SOUND: CHRIS' STEPS RETURN


CHRIS: Are you ready, Catherine?


CATHERINE: Yes. Good night, everybody! 


TIM: Good night.


NED: Good night.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS AS CHRIS AND CATHERINE EXIT


NED: (QUIETLY THOUGHTFUL) Little Willie -- he'll be all right now, Tim. He'll do the Irish proud someday when he hangs out his shingle as a doctor or a lawyer. "Willie McDermott, M.D." Heh! I can see it in me mind. 


TIM: Ned, education costs money -- lots of it!


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... STIRRING, IN BG


NED: Willie doesn't need that kind of help, Tim. He needs the kind I've been able to give him. He needs the dreams and the ambition. There's a way open here in America -- things called scholarships. It's for the workin' fellow. You know, Tim, this is the biggest country in the world because it's Ireland as well as America -- the kind of Ireland that Robert Emmet dreamed about -- and it's every other country that has men like him who dream about liberty and a chance for a man to make good on his own. That's all that Willie needs -- and that's what he's got, and nothin' will ever stop him now. Nothin' will ever stop him.


MUSIC: UP ... FOR CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: In a moment James Hilton and Barry Fitzgerald will return, but first-- (BEAT) Is there anyone who doesn't love a bit of Blarney? Even if you aren't an O'Brien or a Quinn, chances are someone sent you a green-tinted card today. And didn't it please and flatter you to know that someone was thinking about you? Why not spread this same fun, sincere kind of thoughtfulness among those you care for? Send Hallmark friendship cards the year round. If you feel you haven't the gift for expressing what's in your mind, let the makers of Hallmark Cards take care of that. Picture the pleased grins that would greet your Hallmark Cards that simply say, "Hello," across the miles. To those old school pals you only see at class reunions. That favorite aunt you used to visit during vacations, remember? And gruff old Uncle Ben: how many years is it since he used to take you fishing? He was no softy who would tell you, but it's strange how his glasses sort of cloud up about some things -- like having your card to let him know you haven't forgotten him. Yes, there's a host of dear ones who'd welcome a little affectionate greeting from you -- the kind you'll find on the legions of Hallmark friendship cards. See them where you buy your Hallmark Cards. Send them. You'll be glad you did. (BEAT) Here again is James Hilton. 


HOST: Wasn't our play tonight a grand way to close a grand day? A delightful story of one of the most admirable of all human traits: that of wanting your children to have something better than you had. And we also enjoyed the company of one of the most delightful personalities in the whole acting profession -- a great actor, as you have heard, and a great Irishman. Thank you for being here, Barry Fitzgerald.


FITZGERALD: Thank you, Mr. Hilton. And I'd like to thank Gilbert Barnett who played my grandson and Dick Ryan who played Tim. I really enjoyed myself. In fact, I like it here. 


HOST: Well, we're certainly glad you do. 


FITZGERALD: Well, I might change some of the decorating around here!


HOST: (CHUCKLES) 


FITZGERALD: I think it could stand a touch more green, you know.


HOST: (CHUCKLES) 


FITZGERALD: And maybe I'd add a couple of more harps to that orchestra.


HOST: (CHUCKLES) 


FITZGERALD: Of course, I'd be sure not to change those Hallmark greeting cards of yours. They're mighty fine cards, just the way they are. And so is your playhouse. I've enjoyed being here tonight and I thank you for allowing me to celebrate this happy day with you.


HOST: Fine to have you with us, Mr. Fitzgerald. Come back and see us soon again and please listen next week when we bring you a great story of the early American West, Stuart Lakes' "Frontier Marshal," starring Richard Conte in the role of Wyatt Earp. And the following week it will be our great pleasure to welcome the current Academy Award-winning star, Loretta Young, in a dramatization of Irving Stone's book "Immortal Wife." And a week after that, Betty Smith's novel "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn," starring Margaret O'Brien. Our Hallmark Playhouse is every Thursday, our director-producer is Dee Englebach, our music is composed and conducted by Lyn Murray, and our play tonight was adapted by Joel Murcott. Until next Thursday then, this is James Hilton saying goodnight.


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG, UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: Look for Hallmark Cards that are sold only in stores that have been carefully selected to give you expert and friendly service. Remember, Hallmark Cards -- when you care enough to send the very best. Barry Fitzgerald will soon be seen in Bing Crosby's Paramount picture "Top of the Morning." This is Frank Goss saying goodnight to you all and inviting you next Thursday, and every Thursday, to tune in one half hour earlier and listen to the adventures of "Casey, Crime Photographer," followed by the Hallmark Playhouse. This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.


SOUND: APPLAUSE

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