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Night Must Fall

The Screen Guild Players

Night Must Fall

Jul 24 1944



CAST:

ANNOUNCER, Truman Bradley

LADY ESTHER, beauty authority


OLIVIA, repressed (ROSEMARY DeCAMP)

DANNY, charming (JAMES CAGNEY)

MRS. BRAMSON, imperious (DAME MAY WHITTY)

DORA, the maid

BELSIZE, of the county police




MUSIC: THEME


ANNOUNCER: Lady Esther presents THE SCREEN GUILD PLAYERS. 


MUSIC: THEME FILLS A PAUSE


ANNOUNCER: The Lady Esther Screen Guild play tonight -- "Night Must Fall." The starring players--


CAGNEY: This is James Cagney.


DeCAMP: This is Rosemary DeCamp.


WHITTY: And this is May Whitty.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


MUSIC: THEME ... TO A FINISH


ANNOUNCER: Tonight, Lady Esther presents THE SCREEN GUILD PLAYERS in Emlyn Williams' fascinating study of a psychopathic mind, "Night Must Fall," adapted from the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture. It stars Rosemary DeCamp as Olivia, James Cagney as Danny, and Dame May Whitty as Mrs. Bramson. The Lady Esther Screen Guild Players in "Night Must Fall." 


MUSIC: AN UNEASY INTRODUCTION ... THEN FADES OUT FOR--


DANNY: (WHISTLES "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE" ... CONTINUES BEHIND--)


OLIVIA: (NARRATES) I can still hear him sometimes. I can still hear him whistling that tune. It's only in my mind, I know, but I'm like a child that's been left alone in the dark -- frightened, terrified, till I think I'm going mad.


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND OLIVIA'S NARRATION--


OLIVIA: (NARRATES) I know now that it began for me with that little paragraph in our local paper -- a tiny item that didn't concern me, but somehow -- I never knew why -- I was secretly disturbed. I remember that I turned to my aunt and said-- (TO MRS. BRAMSON) Auntie, the papers say a woman has disappeared from the summer hotel -- a Mrs. Chalfont.


MRS. B: (SHARP, IRRITATED) A Mrs. Chalfont? What's that to us? We don't know her, do we?


OLIVIA: No, but - but suppose something's happened to her? Suppose she's been--?


MRS. B: (UNCARING) Oh, now you're going to say she's murdered. Rubbish! I'll have another one of those chocolates.


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND OLIVIA--


OLIVIA: (NARRATES) My aunt was like that -- always sharp and irritable. She wasn't well, you see. At least, she'd convinced herself she wasn't; a professional invalid who loved her wheelchair. She'd been in a horrible mood that morning. Dora, the maid, had broken several cups. That had meant a scolding, of course, and a threat of dismissal. The girl had cried and said she hadn't been herself. She'd been having trouble with her "gentleman."


DORA: (SOBS) He's a page-boy, mum, over to the hotel. He's been treatin' me fair awful, he has.


MRS. B: (WITH DISGUST) The good-for-nothing scoundrel.


DORA: Oh, he's really not. He's mighty sweet when he wants to be -- and nice, too, mum. They call him "Baby-face."


MRS. B: "Baby-face," indeed? Huh! I'd like to give him a piece of my mind.


DORA: Mrs. Bramson, would you?


MRS. B: Would I what?


DORA: See him. Talk to him. He said he'd be droppin' over this mornin'. Maybe if you had a word with him, mum--?


MRS. B: Yes, I certainly will. You send him in when he gets here, Dora. I'll deal with him, all right.


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND OLIVIA--


OLIVIA: (NARRATES) It was just before noon when he came. There was something about him from the very first -- smiling, familiar, almost but not quite insolent; an unlit cigarette in his mouth. And then when he spoke--


DANNY: (CHEERFUL) Mornin', folks!


MRS. B: (WITH CONTEMPT) Well? So you're "Baby-face." 


DANNY: That's me. Silly name, isn't it?


SOUND: MATCH STRIKES AS DANNY LIGHTS CIGARETTE


MRS. B: Hm. You smoke, I see.


DANNY: Yes'm, I-- Oh, I'm sorry; I'm always forgettin' me company manners. I'll put it right out.


MRS. B: Well, then. You know why I've sent for you.


DANNY: Yes, ma'am, I think so.


MRS. B: You ought to be ashamed of yourself.


DANNY: Oh, I am.


MRS. B: Then you might as well-- (STOPS SHORT) What's the time?


DANNY: Half after eleven, I think.


MRS. B: (SHARPLY) Olivia?


OLIVIA: Yes, auntie?


MRS. B: You've forgotten my medicine again. It's half an hour late.


OLIVIA: I'm so sorry; I'll have it right here.


MRS. B: You know it doesn't do me any good unless it's taken regularly.


DANNY: That's right, mum. A lady that's delicate like you has got to be watching herself, she has.


MRS. B: Indeed I must. And I'm thankful someone recognizes it.


SOUND: SPOON AND MEDICINE BOTTLE


OLIVIA: Here you are, auntie.


MRS. B: (WITH DISTASTE) Filthy stuff.


DANNY: Say, why don't you eat one of them chocolates, mum? Some candy would be takin' the taste away.


MRS. B: (DELIGHTED) That's an excellent idea. (DOURLY) Olivia, you'd never think suggesting that. All you want from me is--


DORA: (OFF) Mrs. Bramson? The butcher's here.


MRS. B: Oh, very well, Dora. I'll be right out.


DANNY: Er, would you like me to wheel you, mum?


MRS. B: I can wheel myself, young man. You wait here with my niece. I'll only be a moment or two.


SOUND: SQUEAKY WHEELCHAIR ROLLS AWAY


DANNY: (WITH A WINK, TO OLIVIA) I'll bet she's somethin' to be livin' with, all right. (BEAT, MORE SERIOUS) Especially for a girl like you. Must get pretty lonesome, eh?


OLIVIA: (STIFFLY) Look, there's one thing you may as well understand. I happen to be employed by my aunt, but I'm not quite in Dora's position.


DANNY: You don't like me, do you?


OLIVIA: No.


DANNY: (BRIGHTLY) Well -- everyone else does! Including Mrs. Bramson.


OLIVIA: If you think you can inure me by playing up to my aunt--


DANNY: Playin' up?!


OLIVIA: --you may as well forget it. It won't get you anywhere.


DANNY: It won't, eh? (POINTEDLY) And would you like to bet me?


SOUND: ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND OLIVIA--


OLIVIA: (NARRATES) He was very sure of himself, sure of my aunt -- and, yes, I can say it now -- sure of me, too. It was almost frightening to watch him spin his web: the eager attention when my aunt spoke, the shrewd little flatteries, the mock humility. Before he left that morning, she'd offered him a job. That very afternoon he moved in. I remember I was sitting with my aunt--


MRS. B: Olivia, don't sit there mooning. Take a look at the afternoon papers. See if there's any more about that Chalfont woman.


SOUND: NEWSPAPER RUSTLES


OLIVIA: There was something on the front page, I think. Oh, yes, here it is. (READS) "It is reported that on the night Mrs. Chalfont disappeared someone was heard moving mysteriously in the woods and whistling 'Mighty Lak' a Rose.'"


MRS. B: (DISMISSIVE) Hmmm. That shows how hard they are up for news. "Mighty Lak' a Rose," indeed! Just rubbish, that's all.


DANNY: Well, here's your Danny boy, Mrs. Bramson! All fixed and settled!


MRS. B: (FONDLY) Mm, I'm wearing the shawl you brought me, Danny. You know, it was very sweet of you. Your own mother's shawl.


DANNY: It was the least I could do, the way you've taken me in, given me a home.


MRS. B: I like you, Danny. You're a good boy. And now it's time for my afternoon nap.


DANNY: Right you are, mum! I'll wheel you in.


SOUND: DANNY'S STEPS AND THE SQUEAKY WHEELCHAIR ... IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


DANNY: Say, you know this chair is awful stiff. Must be awful hard work pulling yourself around. I could put it right in a jiffy with a drop of oil now.


MRS. B: In here, Danny. This is my room.


DANNY: What! Almost went right by. 


SOUND: WHEELCHAIR STOPS


DANNY: Look, ma'am, I'd better lift you onto the bed. Then while you're nappin' I can take the chair and have it good as new in half a tick.


MRS. B: Be careful now.


DANNY: Oh, don't you worry about your Danny boy. (WITH EFFORT) Upsy daisy! Up you come now! (BEAT) There ya are. Now! "Pleasant dreams, sweet repose, / half the bed, and all the clothes."


MRS. B: (CHUCKLES) You silly boy!


DANNY: (CHUCKLES) Get a good sleep, mum. I'll take the chair right along.


SOUND: BEDROOM DOOR CLOSES ... DANNY'S STEPS AND SQUEAKY WHEELCHAIR TO OLIVIA ... THEN OUT AFTER--


OLIVIA: (DRY) Oh, Danny?


DANNY: How's that? You talkin' to me?


OLIVIA: I've got something for you.


DANNY: Have you now? Really?


OLIVIA: It's a price tag, Danny. (VERY DRY) I took it off your old mother's shawl.


DANNY: (BEAT) You don't like my bein' here, do you?


OLIVIA: Doesn't make any difference what I like. I've told you, I'm a servant here myself.


DANNY: Well, you're certainly not an ordinary servant, though, are ye?


OLIVIA: No, I - I suppose not.


DANNY: Well, neither am I. (BRIGHTLY) Well! Have to fix this chair.


SOUND: WHEELCHAIR TURNED OVER AND SQUEAKY WHEEL TURNED, BRIEFLY BEHIND--


DANNY: You can watch, if you'd like. (BEAT) You know, you're a fair good-lookin' girl. You'd be pretty if you didn't wear your hair so tight. I'm - I'm quite particular about hair, I am. I--


OLIVIA: (SHARPLY) Aren't you forgetting your work?


DANNY: Ah. Sorry, mum.


SOUND: TINKERING WITH WHEELCHAIR, BEHIND--


DANNY: Hm! That's a locked nut on there. Be a bit of a job to get it off. Well, easy does it. (WHISTLES "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE")


OLIVIA: (GASPS)


DANNY: (STOPS WHISTLING) Hm? Say something?


OLIVIA: (SHAKEN) No. No, I didn't say anything at all.


MUSIC: UNEASY TRANSITION ... QUOTES "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE" ... THEN IN BG


OLIVIA: But, Dora, don't you know anything about him?


DORA: Not much, Miss Olivia. Only that he was born in London, he's been to sea, and things like that. You might say [he's a] bit of a mystery, mum.


OLIVIA: Anything else?


DORA: Well, he thinks he's a bit of all right, if you know what I mean.


OLIVIA: Yes, that incredible vanity. They always have it; always.


DORA: Who, mum?


OLIVIA: Murderers.


DORA: (DISMAYED) Murderers? Oh, mum--


OLIVIA: (DECISIVE) Dora, I'm going through his things. Will you help me?


DORA: Me? (RELUCTANT) S-sure, Miss Olivia. If you say so.


MUSIC: UP, FOR BRIEF TRANSITION


DORA: That's funny. He hasn't unpacked his bags, mum.


OLIVIA: That is strange, Dora; he's had plenty of time.


DORA: Here's his wallet, though.


OLIVIA: Anything in it?


DORA: Nothin' much. Couple o' snapshots, some bus tickets--


OLIVIA: Wait a minute, Dora! That snapshot. That's Mrs. Chalfont, the missing woman. There was a picture in the paper today.


DORA: You don't think that--?


OLIVIA: See if there's another bag under the bed.


DORA: Mmm, no, mum. Just his hatbox, that's all.


OLIVIA: (REALIZES, INHALES)


DORA: What is it, miss?


OLIVIA: Dora, do you suppose there's something inside it?


DANNY: (OFF) Why not ask me?


OLIVIA: (WHISPERS, UNNERVED) Danny?


DANNY: (APPROACHES, SEES WHAT THEY'RE DOING) Oh. (INSTANTLY CHEERFUL) The old lady wants me to take her for a walk. I came back to get me hat. (A LITTLE POINTEDLY) Could I have my wallet please? It's the only one I've got.


OLIVIA: (EVENLY) Danny, do you know anything about Mrs. Chalfont's whereabouts?


DANNY: Mrs. who?


OLIVIA: Don't pretend you've never heard of her!


DANNY: Oh, Mrs. Chalfont. Thought you said Chalfontswear. (CHUCKLES) Kind of silly. Swear about-- I couldn't think.


OLIVIA: You haven't answered me.


DANNY: Well, I've got nothin' to go on, but-- I think she's been murdered.


OLIVIA: Who did it? Who killed her?


DANNY: (SMOOTHLY) Ah, sorry, miss; the old girl wants her Danny boy. If you'll excuse me now, I'll - I'll be running along!


MUSIC: BRIDGE ... QUOTES "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE" 


OLIVIA: (SOBER) Been waiting for you, Danny. I've got to talk to you.


DANNY: (MERRY) As they say in the movies, mum, "I'm chabbed." 


OLIVIA: (BLUNTLY) Did you do it?


DANNY: You know, you look mighty pretty tonight. Wearin' your hair a lot looser, aren't you?


OLIVIA: You haven't answered again.


DANNY: Look now, suppose I ask a question or two. Why are you so interested in me?


OLIVIA: Well, because you don't talk. So I have to guess at what you're thinking.


DANNY: You'd be surprised.


OLIVIA: Maybe not. Maybe I know.


DANNY: You think so, huh?


OLIVIA: Yes. You haven't any feeling at all.


DANNY: No feelings?


OLIVIA: You live in a world of your own, your own imagination.


DANNY: I don't understand that talk. Bit over me head it is, mum.


OLIVIA: You understand me perfectly.


DANNY: Well, maybe. Maybe not. You, er-- You still think there's been some dirty work, eh?


OLIVIA: I don't know. Perhaps not, but-- If she has been killed, the murderer will be caught.


DANNY: What makes you think that?


OLIVIA: They always are. There's always some mistake they make. 


DANNY: And what about the clever ones? The ones who do it and get away with it? The ones who--


SOUND: KNOCKING AT DOOR


DANNY: Someone's at the door.


OLIVIA: I'll go. (CALLS) Just a moment!


SOUND: OLIVIA'S STEPS TO FRONT DOOR, WHICH OPENS


BELSIZE: Good evening, miss. The name is Belsize; Belsize of the county police.


OLIVIA: Oh.


BELSIZE: Sorry to bother you this late. Could I use your phone?


OLIVIA: Of course.


SOUND: BELSIZE'S STEPS IN ... DOOR CLOSES 


OLIVIA: It's right here in the hall.


SOUND: BELSIZE'S STEPS TO PHONE ... RECEIVER UP, CRADLE RATTLES


BELSIZE: (INTO PHONE) Hello? Hello, get me the county police, will you? -- Yes, and hurry please. -- Thank you.


OLIVIA: What is it? What's happened?


BELSIZE: I'd rather not say, miss. It's - it's not very pleasant.


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... AN UNEASY "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE"


BELSIZE: (INTO PHONE) Hello? -- Hello, George. This is Belsize. -- Yes, we've found her. In the woods, right back of the Bramson place. -- No, not yet, George. We, uh-- Well, we can't be positive. -- The head is missing.


MUSIC: UP BIG, FOR CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: Lady Esther has presented Act One of "Night Must Fall," starring Dame May Whitty, Rosemary DeCamp, and James Cagney. In just a moment, we will hear the Lady Esther Screen Guild Players in Act Two. But first a word from our hostess, Lady Esther. 


LADY ESTHER: If you've ever been tempted to cake your skin with makeup -- to cover it over with a mask-like makeup coating -- I'd like you to consider what skin specialists have told me. They say skin should never be plastered over; it's dangerous. Caulking up the tiny pore openings can cause serious and lasting skin troubles. The surface of your skin may dry out, become rough and flaky. The pore openings may become stretched, coarser, years older-looking -- to say nothing of little bumps and even ugly blemishes. In short, the very defects such makeup is intended to conceal may actually be multiplied by its use. Isn't it shocking that women take such risks with their creamy skins when they're so unnecessary? I know, and millions of other women know, that Lady Esther Face Powder will give your skin the smooth flawless look you want, safely -- and in bright sunlight as well as artificial light. You see, Lady Esther is a very different face powder, made differently by a new patented process. It's smoother and finer than powder has ever been before and, because of that, it spreads on your skin like a delicate flattering film of beauty, hiding tiny lines and blemishes. And it clings for four long hours; on some skins, even longer. That's why I ask you to try Lady Esther Face Powder. See for yourself how it instantly makes your skin look younger, smoother. Yes, and gives it all the exciting loveliness you want, safely. You'll know why more lovely women now use Lady Esther Face Powder than any other makeup.


MUSIC: UNEASY INTRODUCTION ... QUOTES "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE" ... THEN BEHIND OLIVIA'S NARRATION--


OLIVIA: (NARRATES) I was right. It had been murder. And the head was missing. I couldn't sleep a wink that night, fighting that terrible, overpowering thought. Finally, at three o'clock, I went out to the kitchen to make some tea. I was standing near the stove when I heard -- or rather I should say, I felt someone there. I turned very quickly and-- (STARTLED GASP, THEN FLUSTERED, TO DANNY) Oh. It - it's you. I-- What do you want?


DANNY: I heard a noise. Hey, you makin' some tea?


OLIVIA: Yes, I couldn't sleep.


DANNY: Ah, too bad. Is there an extra cup for me?


OLIVIA: Think so. Be ready in a moment.


DANNY: Light?


OLIVIA: Thanks.


SOUND: MATCH STRIKES 


DANNY: Really now, what are you doin' out here? 


OLIVIA: I told you, I couldn't sleep. I was frightened.


DANNY: Why do you keep on stayin' in this place -- out in the woods, lonesome, and away from

everyone? You don't like it, do ye?


OLIVIA: No, I don't, but--


DANNY: I could tell you why you're stayin'. Because you want adventure, that's why. 


OLIVIA: (UNCOMFORTABLE) I don't know what you mean.


DANNY: (INCREASINGLY RAPID, INTENSE) Aye, ah, yes, you do; yes, you do. You want adventure, the kind that's right here now -- just us two, in the middle of the night like this. That's never happened to you before, has it? Bein' alone with a chap like me.


OLIVIA: Don't--


DANNY: Hm? You're not scared; you're excited. Your - your eyes are shining, and there's a color in your cheeks, and - and your heart is beating--


OLIVIA: Don't. I'm frightened--


DANNY: You feel all light, like air, don't you? You never knew there was something like this inside of you, did you? And that's why you're stayin' on in this place, isn't it? Isn't it?!


OLIVIA: (EXPLODES) Stop it, please! Please! I-- The water's boiling over!


DANNY: (QUIETLY) Oh, yes. I almost forgot. The tea.


OLIVIA: (SHAKEN) I, er-- You can pour it yourself. I don't want any. (MOVING OFF) I - I'm going to my room.


DANNY: (CHUCKLES, TO HIMSELF) All right. Go on pretending. I can wait for you. (BEAT) I can wait.


MUSIC: SOMBER BRIDGE ... QUOTES "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE"


DANNY: (CHUCKLES, A LITTLE DRUNKENLY) Really now, really now. Your face has been that long all day. You look just like an undertaker's assistant. You know, the old lady's beginning to get annoyed, you know that. Now, me, I try to stay in good spirits.


OLIVIA: (DRY) That's obvious. You've been drinking, haven't you? (UP) My aunt will order you off the place! 


DANNY: (CHUCKLES, INCREASINGLY ANGRY AND WILD) No, she won't. I've had enough of orders, I have. Why do you think I left the hotel? Orders, orders, orders! Everybody givin' me orders! "Go here, do this, do that! Page-boy! Page-boy! Page-boy!" And just when I think I can take it easy, there's someone naggin', naggin', naggin' at me, naggin' at me, and screams and screams and I can't make her stop! Only - only by--! (STARTLED GASP, REALIZES HE'S SAID TOO MUCH)


OLIVIA: (BEAT, QUIETLY) Go on.


DANNY: (BEAT, QUIETLY) Oh, no. (CHUCKLE, SLOWLY) No. You think I'm drunk, don't you? But I'm not. I'm too smart.


OLIVIA: But not so smart you can sleep at night.


DANNY: What?


OLIVIA: You couldn't sleep last night. There was something that was keeping you awake. Just a little thing. A box. And it's rather heavy.


DANNY: (LOW, THREATENING) Don't say it. Don't even try to say it. 


SOUND: KNOCK AT FRONT DOOR


OLIVIA: (STARTLED) Who's that?!


DANNY: Take it easy, take it easy. Anybody that's there, I'll handle 'em.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, DANNY'S STEPS TO DOOR ... THEN FRONT DOOR OPENS


BELSIZE: Hello, Danny. How's things?


DANNY: (CHEERFUL) Oh. Oh, fine, Mr. Belsize. Come in.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR CLOSES


BELSIZE: Well, we haven't scared you all out of the house yet, I see.


DANNY: Oh, not a chance, sir. Not a chance. Any - any clue to the murder yet?


BELSIZE: No, not yet. Pretty clever chap, all right.


DANNY: You don't say?


BELSIZE: Oh, absolutely. Why, he's got himself more publicity than a movie star.


DANNY: Say, that is on the clever side. Anyone who can make his name like that and not be caught, and the police not even know who he is--


BELSIZE: Oh, Danny?


DANNY: Yes?


BELSIZE: Er, just one thing, Danny. Matter of form. If you don't mind, I'll have a quick look through your room, huh?


MUSIC: BRIDGE


BELSIZE: Well, nothing in these bags of yours, Danny. Only the hatbox left, I guess.


SOUND: BELSIZE TRIES TO OPEN HATBOX


BELSIZE: Hm. Seems to be locked. You got the key?


DANNY: (A LITTLE TENSE) 'Tisn't mine.


BELSIZE: Not yours? Whose is it then?


DANNY: I don't know.


BELSIZE: (CHUCKLES) Why, that's funny. If it isn't yours--


OLIVIA: (OFF, FLATLY) It's mine.


BELSIZE: (SURPRISED) Miss Olivia?


OLIVIA: (APPROACHES) May I have it, please? It's got all my letters in it.


BELSIZE: But if it's yours, miss, what's it doin' in here?


OLIVIA: (THINKS FAST) Uh, we used this for a storeroom before Danny moved in.


BELSIZE: Oh, I see. (CHUCKLES, LIGHTLY) Well, here it is, miss. I wouldn't want to be prying through all your letters.


OLIVIA: (CHUCKLES) 


BELSIZE: Well, goodbye, Danny. (MOVING OFF) Keep me posted if anything turns up, huh?


SOUND: BELSIZE'S STEPS TO DOOR


DANNY: (CALLS AFTER HIM) I will, Mr. Belsize. I will.


SOUND: DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS AS BELSIZE EXITS


OLIVIA: (BEAT, QUIETLY BEWILDERED) I don't know why I did it, Danny. I don't know why.


DANNY: (KNOWINGLY) I do. (BEAT, MEASURED) Well, if you don't mind, I'll take that hatbox now.


MUSIC: BRIDGE ... THEN IN BG


DORA: I don't care what the old lady says, Miss Olivia. She can't make me stay in this awful house after dark. I'm goin' into the village and stay with me folks. 


OLIVIA: My aunt wouldn't like to be left here alone.


DORA: Oh, but she won't be alone, mum. You'll be here.


OLIVIA: No, I won't, Dora. I'm going in with you.


MUSIC: UP FOR AN ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND DANNY--


DANNY: (TO HIMSELF, MUSING) Gone. She's gone. They're all gone. Only she knows too much now. Suppose she talks. Suppose Belsize comes back. Huh. Got to do it, I guess. Got to do it, mm hm. Got to do it.


MUSIC: UP, FOR TRANSITION


MRS. B: (CALLS) Olivia? (NO ANSWER) Olivia? (NO ANSWER, TO HERSELF) Drat that girl; never around when I need her. (CALLS) Dora? (NO ANSWER) Dora? (NO ANSWER, TO HERSELF) That's another one I'll have to talk to. (CALLS) Danny? Danny, where are you? (NO ANSWER, TO HERSELF, INCREASINGLY FRIGHTENED) There's no one here. They've gone. They've all gone and left me. I'm all alone. I'm all alone! (LOW) I'm going to be murdered. I'm going to be-- (UP, CALLS) Danny?! Danny, where are you?! Where are you?! Danny, where--?!


SOUND: FOOTSTEPS, FROM OFF ... COMING CLOSER BEHIND--


MRS. B: (TO HERSELF, LOW, TERRIFIED) What's that? There's someone outside. There's someone outside! What shall I do? Oh, Lord. "Oh, Lord, forgive us our trespasses--"


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS


MRS. B: (SHOUTS IN RELIEF) Danny! Oh ho, Danny! (STARTS TO LAUGH HYSTERICALLY) Danny! It's you! Oh, Danny! Oh, what a relief when I saw your face, oh, Danny dear--!


DANNY: (WHISTLES "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE" ... THEN IN BG)


MRS. B: (STILL LAUGHING) Oh, you're the only one I can trust. Danny, you're the only one who-- (STOPS LAUGHING, INCREASINGLY TERRIFIED) Danny? That song. Why do you whistle it, Danny? Why do you look at me like that? (NO ANSWER) Say something. (NO ANSWER) Say something! In the name of God! Danny! Danny, what is it?! Danny! Danny! DANNY


MUSIC: UP BIG, FOR THE MURDER ... BRIDGE ... THEN BEHIND--


DANNY: (TO HIMSELF) Well, it's done now. Just gotta burn the house, that's all. Won't be lot enough to show. Nothin' to--


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS


DANNY: (NERVOUS, TO HIMSELF) What's that?


SOUND: FRONT DOOR CLOSES ... OLIVIA'S STEPS IN BEHIND--


DANNY: (TENSE) What--? Well, what is it? What is it?! Say somethin' or I'll--! (SEES OLIVIA, INCREASINGLY CALM) Oh. Oh. Oh, it's you. What have you come back for?


OLIVIA: (QUIETLY) You killed her. You've killed her, haven't you?


DANNY: Suppose I have?


OLIVIA: That's why I came back. I had to find out. I had to find you out.


DANNY: No, no -- that isn't why. You came back here for me -- to be alone with me, just like the other night, didn't you? (NO ANSWER) Didn't you?


OLIVIA: I thought I wanted to. I didn't know what murder was really like. (LOW, INTENSE) But they'll get you. They'll get you, Danny.


DANNY: Aw, no, not me. I'm too smart. (DELIBERATELY) No one will ever know -- because no living soul will be able to tell any other living soul what happened.


OLIVIA: (SIMPLY) You're going to kill me, too.


DANNY: That's right. And you're scared.


OLIVIA: No. Not any more. 'Cause it could've been worse. I might never have found out what you're really like. (ALMOST A WHISPER) You're mad. You're mad and horrible. (READY TO CRY) And I almost-- I almost--


SOUND: KNOCKING AT FRONT DOOR ... CONTINUES BEHIND--


DANNY: (INSANELY) Someone's there! They've been watching! They can't watch me! They can't! I'm the one that watches!


BELSIZE: (FROM BEHIND DOOR, WITH NO URGENCY) Anyone in there? It's me, Mr. Belsize.


DANNY: (INSANELY, TO OLIVIA) They've been watching from behind the tree! A hundred eyes behind each tree! Eyes! Eyes! Hundreds of them! Thousands--!


BELSIZE: (FROM BEHIND DOOR) Hello in there? Hello, anyone up?


OLIVIA: (NERVOUS, TO DANNY) It's Mr. Belsize. We ought to--


DANNY: (TENSELY) Don't say a word. Don't say a word, not a single word.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS


BELSIZE: What's goin' on? What are you two doin' in here?


DANNY: (HIS OLD CHEERFUL SELF) Oh, nothing, sir. Nothing. Just havin' a talk before goin' to bed.


BELSIZE: Well, why didn't you answer? Didn't you hear me call?


OLIVIA: (TREMBLING) Mr. Belsize, my - my aunt--


BELSIZE: Steady now, miss.


DANNY: Aw, she's-- She been imagining all kinds of things. Bit on the balmy side, I think.


BELSIZE: Is that so? Here, let me see your hands.


DANNY: (BEAT, CONFUSED) What? My hands? Why, sure. Ain't nothin' in my hands. Nothin' but a--


SOUND: BELSIZE CLAPS HANDCUFFS ON DANNY


BELSIZE: Only a pair of handcuffs, that's all.


DANNY: (ASTONISHED, SLOWLY) Ah. I'm caught. I'm caught!


BELSIZE: I tried to phone here before -- just a routine check. They told me the wires had been cut.


DANNY: (REALIZES, A HINT OF MADNESS) I'm goin' to die. I'm goin' to die! 


SOUND: DANNY'S CUFFED HANDS POUND ON A TABLE OR A DOOR TO PUNCTUATE EACH SENTENCE BEHIND--


DANNY: (WILDLY, INSANELY) Die! Die! DIE! DIE!! (WEEPS QUIETLY BEHIND--)


BELSIZE: (GENTLY) I'm sorry you had to see this, Miss Olivia. I'm leaving two men to watch the house and the coroner will be coming out. You'll be safe here till morning. (BEAT) Coming, Danny?


DANNY: (NO LONGER WEEPING, REGAINS COMPOSURE) Who? Who, me? Sure. Sure. You know, it's funny. I'd like something now I never wanted before -- a long walk, all by meself. And just when I can't have it. That's contrary, isn't it? (CHEERFUL) But! I'm not through yet! I'll give 'em their money's worth at the trial!


BELSIZE: Let's go, Danny.


DANNY: Certainly, sir. Let's go! (WHISTLES MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE BEHIND--)


SOUND: DANNY'S FOOTSTEPS AWAY


MUSIC: CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: Thank you, James Cagney, Dame May Whitty, and Rosemary DeCamp for one of the most thrilling performances we have ever had. And our thanks, too, to Emlyn Williams, the author.


DeCAMP: Well, speaking for myself, Mr. Bradley, any girl would welcome a chance to play a role like Olivia. And, speaking for all of us, any actor considers it a privilege to be with the Lady Esther Screen Guild Players because it's these radio shows that support the Motion Picture Relief Fund and its wonderful work, the Country House and Clinic. And now before we tell you about next week's show, a word from one of America's foremost beauty authorities, Lady Esther.


LADY ESTHER: Thank you, Miss DeCamp. Ladies, I'd like to remind you again how careful you must be what makeup you use. Don't forget what skin specialists have told me. Makeup that cakes the skin with a heavy mask-like coating can cause a lot of serious skin trouble. It may dry out the skin, make it look rough and flaky. It may caulk up the tiny pore openings with material even washing and creaming won't remove. It may coarsen and age the appearance of the skin, even encourage ugly blemishes. Just remember, you can achieve a far lovelier appearance without all these dangers when you use Lady Esther Face Powder. It's the finest, most flattering makeup you can possibly find. It leaves your skin with a smooth flawless film of beauty that hides tiny lines and blemishes safely, and clings for fully four hours. So if you want to look exciting and lovely, without danger, without risk to your skin; if you want to look as attractive close-up as you do at a distance, I do hope you'll try my Lady Esther Face Powder.


MUSIC: THEME ... UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: Next week, the Lady Esther Screen Guild Players will present "The Good Fairy." It will star Gene Lockhart, Fredric March, and Deanna Durbin. Be sure to listen, will you? James Cagney will soon be starred in his next picture, "Blood on the Sun," a William Cagney production. Dame May Whitty can currently be seen in the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer production, "The White Cliffs of Dover." Rosemary DeCamp is soon to be seen in the Universal production, "The Merry Monahans." Music on tonight's program was arranged and conducted by Wilbur Hatch.


To try Lady Esther Four-Purpose Face Cream, just get the smallest size jar. Later you can get the economical large jar and keep refilling the small one for convenience. This is Truman Bradley, speaking for Lady Esther, saying thank you and goodnight, everyone.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.

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