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Night Must Fall

Best Plays

Night Must Fall

Dec 21 1952



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

HOST, John Chapman

NBC ANNCR (1 line)


MRS. BRAMSON, domineering, neurotic

OLIVIA GRAYNE, Mrs. Bramson's bookish niece

HUBERT LAURIE, uninteresting boarder

MRS. TERENCE, no-nonsense cook

DORA PARKOE, not-too-bright maid

INSPECTOR BELSIZE, Scotland Yard

DAN, cheerful and obliging




MUSIC: DRUM ROLL


ANNOUNCER: From New York, where the American stage begins, NBC presents BEST PLAYS, transcribed, with John Chapman.


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: BEST PLAYS, a series of hour-length dramas selected from the outstanding successes of the New York stage. Now, John Chapman, editor of the theatrical yearbook "Best Plays" and drama critic of the New York Daily News, is here to introduce Alfred Drake and Mary Boland in "Night Must Fall."


MUSIC: TAG


ANNOUNCER: Mr. Chapman.


HOST: English theatergoers are much more fond than we are in New York of the psychological thriller, the melodrama of suspense. So they get a great many more of these plays and we get few. However, once in a while, Britain sends us one which is greatly to our liking, such as "Angel Street," "Payment Deferred," or Maurice Evans' current hit, "Dial M for Murder."  Our play this evening, "Night Must Fall," is one of the best of this kind. Emlyn Williams is the rare type of actor who doesn't wait around for some dramatist to bring him a play. If he needs a play, he can write it himself. And thus it was that he wrote "Night Must Fall" -- so that he could be a particularly creepy, thoroughly enjoyable villain. 


And now we are passing Mr. Williams' role to another actor of great versatility and intelligence, Alfred Drake. I'm going to be just as interested as you are -- or he is -- in seeing how Mr. Drake comes out as Dan, the cheerful and obliging hotel bellboy. With him, as our play begins, will be Mary Boland and Carmen Matthews, whom it is always a pleasure to welcome anywhere. Right now, these three, and others, find themselves in a country boardinghouse in a remote spot in England.


MUSIC: FOR AN INTRODUCTION 


SOUND: CLOCK CHIMES, IN BG 


OLIVIA: (READS) "And Lady Isabel humbly crossed her attenuated hands upon her chest. 'I am on my way to God,' she whispered, 'to answer for all my sins and sorrows.' 'Child,' said Miss Carlyle, 'had I anything to do with sending you from East Lynne?'"


MRS. BRAMSON: A beautiful character! Go on reading, Olivia.


SOUND: CLOCK OUT BEHIND--


OLIVIA: (READS) "'I want to see Archibald,' whispered Lady Isabel."


MRS. BRAMSON: Olivia!


OLIVIA: Yes, Auntie?


MRS. BRAMSON: You're skipping!


OLIVIA: Am I?


MRS. BRAMSON: Yes, you've missed about Lady Isabel taking up her cross. I may be a fool, but I do know "East Lynne." (BEAT) Very convenient when you want to go for a walk.


OLIVIA: But I--


MRS. BRAMSON: Shame on you, trying to cheat an invalid in a wheelchair of her only pleasure in life.


OLIVIA: But you were feeling so much better. You had two helpings of bacon at breakfast--


MRS. BRAMSON: Doctor's orders. Every mouthful an agony. (CALLS) Oh, Mr. Laurie?


HUBERT: Huh? Oh, beg pardon. I was just reading my paper.

 

SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER


HUBERT: There's a man here in Weston-super-Mare who stood on his head for twenty minutes and he hasn't come to yet.


MRS. BRAMSON: Olivia? What's the matter?


OLIVIA: Nothing.


MRS. BRAMSON: Your face is as long as your arm.


OLIVIA: (DRY) Well, I'm afraid it's made like that.


MRS. BRAMSON: Aren't you happy here? You have a good position helping me. We have Mr. Laurie here -- a guest to give you compliments. There's Dora to do the dirty work and Mrs. Terence to do the cooking. Is anything wrong?


OLIVIA: It's a bit lonely, that's all.


MRS. BRAMSON: If you think just because the house is tucked away in the woods you're going to get a raise in salary, you won't. I expect you've got an idea I'm worth a great deal of money, eh?


OLIVIA: I don't want your money, Auntie. If you like, I'll go.


MRS. BRAMSON: Can you afford to go?


OLIVIA: No. You know I can't.


MRS. BRAMSON: Then clear the breakfast dishes and no nonsense.


OLIVIA: It isn't my job. I'll - I'll ring for Mrs. Terence.


SOUND: RING! OF LITTLE HANDBELL


MRS. BRAMSON: "Pride goeth before a fall"! You won't catch a husband with your nose in the air.


OLIVIA: I don't want a husband.


MRS. BRAMSON: Ha! Heh! Did you hear that, Mr. Laurie?


HUBERT: (STAMMERS, TO OLIVIA) Oh, well, I don't really believe a pretty girl like you, Olivia--


OLIVIA: (CHANGES SUBJECT) It's going to be a nice day, don't you think, Hubert? (TO MRS. B) Er, shall I pack the other half of Mrs. Henry Wood, Auntie?


MRS. BRAMSON: Who?


OLIVIA: (DRY) The lady who wrote "East Lynne."


MRS. BRAMSON: (ACCUSING) You're a dark one, you are, Olivia.


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS


MRS. TERENCE: Who rang?


MRS. BRAMSON: Clear away, Mrs. Terence!


MRS. TERENCE: That's Dora's job. 


MRS. BRAMSON: Dora's busy gathering firewood. Now, clear away.


SOUND: DISHES CLEARED DURING FOLLOWING--


MRS. TERENCE: Oh, all right. Hmph! Old sourpuss.


HUBERT: (SURPRISED) What - what was that, Mrs. Terence?


MRS. TERENCE: You heard. And so did she. Oh, she has to save her face pretending she hasn't heard. But she knows nobody but me'd stay here a day.


MRS. BRAMSON: Mrs. Terence! You - you've cut the roses too young!


MRS. TERENCE: Then you come out and cut 'em yourself.


MRS. BRAMSON: That's a nice way to talk to an invalid.


MRS. TERENCE: Ho! If you're an invalid, I'm the Prince of Wales. (MOVING OFF) I'll be in the garden if you've a mind to choose some roses.


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES AS MRS. TERENCE EXITS


OLIVIA: Would you like me to read some more?


BRAMSON: No. No, she's upset me for the day now. I've a good mind to bring an action against her. Best wheel myself out and see she doesn't mangle my roses.


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS 


MRS. BRAMSON: Mrs. Terence! Wait for me!


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR CLOSES AS MRS. BRAMSON EXITS


OLIVIA: (EXHALES WEARILY) That's the fifth action she's threatened this week. 


HUBERT: (LIGHTLY) Well, a woman like that is going to be found murdered one of these days. By Jove, it says in the paper here--


OLIVIA: (PLEASE DON'T) Oh, Hubert!


HUBERT: Oh. Sorry. I guess you're fed up with this place, eh, old girl?


OLIVIA: "Fed up" is such an inadequate expression. (BEAT) Hm! How bright the sun is today. I hadn't even noticed.


HUBERT: What are you thinking, hm?


OLIVIA: Mm, I was just wondering what it will be like when darkness falls out there. We never know, do we? And yet-- (BREAKS OFF) Who are those men?


HUBERT: Where?


OLIVIA: Poking about in the brush out there.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS


HUBERT: Oh, here's Dora with the firewood; maybe she knows.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR CLOSES


HUBERT: Dora?


DORA: Sir?


HUBERT: Uh, who are those men out in the woods?


DORA: I don't know, sir. They seem to be looking for something. (MOVING OFF) Excuse me.


HUBERT: (ACKNOWLEDGES HER DEPARTURE) Eh. (BEAT, LOW, TO OLIVIA) She looks a bit off-color, doesn't she?


OLIVIA: The atmosphere around here! Oh, I don't know why you wish to spend a two-week holiday here.


HUBERT: (STAMMERS) Oh, I wouldn't have, except that--


OLIVIA: Except what?


HUBERT: (BEAT) Why, don't you know, Olivia?


OLIVIA: Hm! I suppose I do.


HUBERT: I don't want to sound rude, et cetera, but women don't get men proposing to them every day, right?


OLIVIA: I really can't think why you want to marry me, Hubert. I suppose you think I'm steady. 


HUBERT: Well, nothing to be ashamed of in being steady. I'm steady myself.


OLIVIA: Mm, I know. 


HUBERT: Well, then why aren't you keen on marrying me, what?


OLIVIA: Because, Hubert, you're an unmitigated bore.


HUBERT: A - a bore?! Me, a bore? Well, upon my word, Olivia, I think you're a bit eccentric. I'm sorry to be rude, and all that, but I've never been called a bore!


OLIVIA: Bores never are. People are too bored with them to call them anything.


HUBERT: I say. You are bored, aren't you?


OLIVIA: I know I'm being tiresome, Hubert--


HUBERT: Will you at least think it over? My holiday's up on the twenty-seventh, you know.


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS


MRS. BRAMSON: (FROM OFF) --the most disgraceful thing I ever heard of!


HUBERT: (LOW, TO OLIVIA) Oh, Madam Crocodile's coming back. Will you think about it?


OLIVIA: (UNENTHUSIASTIC) Yes, I'll think about it.


HUBERT: Let me hold the door for you, ladies. I was just on my way for a constitutional.


MRS. TERENCE: Thank you, Mr. Laurie.


HUBERT: (MOVING OFF) Righto!


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR CLOSES AS HUBERT EXITS


MRS. BRAMSON: I don't care what you say, Mrs. Terence! Fetch that girl here at once!


MRS. TERENCE: Oh, leave the child alone.


OLIVIA: What child?


MRS. TERENCE: Dora.


MRS. BRAMSON: Broken three of my Crown Derby, and thought if she buried them in the rose-bed I wouldn't see them. (CONTEMPTUOUS CHUCKLE) Well, I've seen 'em! (CALLS) Dora! Dora?!


SOUND: DORA'S STEPS APPROACH


DORA: Mum?


MRS. BRAMSON: Huh! Crown Derby to you, my gal!


DORA: Beg pardon?


MRS. BRAMSON: Broke three of 'em -- just like the one you're carrying now. I suppose you think that china came from the village shop!


DORA: (WEEPS, THEN BEHIND--)


OLIVIA: Now, come, Dora, it isn't as serious as that.


DORA: Oh, it's worse, Miss Olivia.


MRS. BRAMSON: You can leave! That's all. Leave!


DORA: Oh, mum, I--


SOUND: DORA DROPS SAUCER ON FLOOR, WHERE IT BREAKS 


DORA: See, I've dropped the other one.


MRS. BRAMSON: That does it! Now you'll have to leave!


DORA: Oh, please, mum, I-- I--


MRS. BRAMSON: Well?


DORA: Mum, I'm not meself. I'm in a terrible tizzy.


MRS. BRAMSON: What kind of a tizzy?


DORA: It-- Well, it's a young man.


MRS. BRAMSON: Hmm. You've gone and made a fool of yourself.


DORA: (PROTESTS) You'll not call it that, mum.


MRS. BRAMSON: I suppose he told you he'd marry you and you believed him.


DORA: Yes, mum.


MRS. BRAMSON: There isn't a one of 'em ya can trust! What happened?


DORA: Well, mum, I met this young man, after a manner of speaking, and he seemed very nice and we went for walks and -- things.


MRS. BRAMSON: Hah! "Things," indeed.


DORA: And he seemed very sincere, mum, and - and then after a while, I - I said I didn't want to see him unless his intentions was honorable, and he said they was, and-- (WEEPS) Oh, mum!


MRS. BRAMSON: When were you to be married?


DORA: (TEARFUL) Next Sunday was the day we'd meant, mum, but now-- Now he-- Well, he isn't keen about it. I don't think he wants me.


MRS. BRAMSON: Indeed! I'll make him keen. The idea of frittering away your time and affections; making you so nervous you can't do your work! Who is he?


DORA: Dan his name is. He's a page at the Tallboys.


MRS. BRAMSON: The big boardinghouse up the road?


DORA: Yes, mum.


MRS. BRAMSON: (DARK LAUGH) I knew it! These places that are too fancy for ordinary kerosene lamps like the rest of us have. I've always said you - you breed nothing but mischief in a place where it's so easy to turn the lights on and off! What's his character, this good-for-nothing?


DORA: Oh, he's a nice sort, really. He's done wrong by me, but he's all right.


MRS. BRAMSON: Where's he from?


DORA: I don't know. Used to be a sailor, I think. He's strange. "Baby-face" they call him. Ever so open, yet I can never seem to get hold of what he's thinking.


MRS. BRAMSON: I'll get hold of it! You just let me talk to him!


DORA: Oh, mum, if you only would. Perhaps I could stay on.


MRS. BRAMSON: You fetch him here.


DORA: Well, as a matter of fact, mum, he's on a half-day, and he said he'd pop in to see me.


MRS. BRAMSON: You fetch him here when he comes.


DORA: Yes, mum. (GRATEFUL) Oh, mum--


MRS. BRAMSON: (INTERRUPTS) I'll stop the Crown Derby out of your wages. What were you going to say?


DORA: Well, mum, I was gonna say I don't know how to thank you for your generosity. (BEAT, MOVING OFF) Excuse me, mum.


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES AS DORA EXITS 


MRS. BRAMSON: Well, Mrs. Terence, did you know about Dora's trouble?


MRS. TERENCE: Well-- Well, she did mention it to me. 


MRS. BRAMSON: (CONTEMPTUOUS) Playing with fire, that's the game.


MRS. TERENCE: (DISAGREES) Playing with fiddlesticks. She's been a fool over a young man, but she's no criminal. 


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES AS DORA ENTERS 


DORA: (EXCITED) Mum! Mrs. Bramson, mum!


MRS. BRAMSON: (ANNOYED) What is it now?


DORA: Oh, dear. There's a gentleman at the back. He - he says he's from Scotland Yard. Says he wants to see you on a - very particular matter.


MRS. BRAMSON: Well, stop sniveling -- and show him in.


BELSIZE: (APPROACHES) I've already taken the liberty, ladies. I'm sorry to break in on you like this. I - I'm Inspector Belsize, Scotland Yard.


MRS. BRAMSON: I don't like having people in my house, Inspector.


BELSIZE: Well, I'm afraid the law sometimes makes it necessary, Mrs. Bramson. Would you be good enough to introduce me to these people?


MRS. BRAMSON: Hm. My niece, Olivia Grayne. 


OLIVIA: How do you do?


MRS. BRAMSON: My cook, Mrs. Terence. 


MRS. TERENCE: How do you do?


MRS. BRAMSON: And Dora Parkoe.


BELSIZE: Dora and I met at the back door.


MRS. BRAMSON: You can go, Dora.


DORA: Yes, mum.


MRS. BRAMSON: Mrs. Terence--?


MRS. TERENCE: I'll stay. I might have to be arrested for stealing sugar.


BELSIZE: Well, as a matter of fact, I wish you would stay. You may be useful. 


MRS. BRAMSON: If you've come about Dora's carrying on with a young man--


BELSIZE: Well, fortunately, that sort of thing is not in my line. Do you all live here?


MRS. TERENCE: Well, Dora and I ride in from town every day.


BELSIZE: Well, it's a pity you don't walk. 


MRS. BRAMSON: Why?


BELSIZE: Well, if they walked, they might have have seen something on the foot-path.


MRS. BRAMSON: Something - of what?


BELSIZE: I'll tell you in a moment. Who's the gentleman coming up the walk now?


OLIVIA: Oh, that's Mr. Hubert Laurie.


BELSIZE: Has he been here long?


MRS. BRAMSON: About a week. On a holiday.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS ... THEN CLOSES BEHIND--


HUBERT: (CHEERFUL) Hello!


OLIVIA: This is Inspector Belsize, Hubert.


HUBERT: Inspector? I say, it isn't about my car, is it?


BELSIZE: No.


HUBERT: (WITH RELIEF) Well, how do you do? I - I knew a chap on the stock exchange once who was taken through the Black Museum at Scotland Yard.


BELSIZE: (UNINTERESTED) Really?


HUBERT: Yes. It was very interesting, he said. A bit ghoulish.


BELSIZE: Yes, I expect so. (DOWN TO BUSINESS) Now I wonder if you've seen anything out of the ordinary in the woods, Mr. Laurie.


HUBERT: Out of the ordinary?


BELSIZE: Like a body.


HUBERT: (AMUSED) By Jove! Fancy walking in the woods and stumbling over a dead body, what? (CHUCKLES)


MRS. TERENCE: I've stumbled over bodies in them woods. But they wasn't dead. 


BELSIZE: Yes, mm hm. Er, have any of you seen anything?


MRS. BRAMSON: Olivia's always moping in the woods. 


OLIVIA: I haven't seen anything, I'm afraid. Oh, except those men beating the brush today.


BELSIZE: Yes. There's a lady missing. They're searching for her.


MRS. TERENCE: A lady? Where from?


BELSIZE: The Tallboys.


MRS. BRAMSON: Who was she?


BELSIZE: A Mrs. Chalfont.


MRS. TERENCE: (INHALES SHARPLY) Chalfont? What happened to her?


BELSIZE: She left the Tallboys last Friday afternoon and went for a walk -- through the woods in this direction. She hasn't been seen since.


MRS. BRAMSON: You don't think she's been done in, do you?


BELSIZE: (DRY) It has happened.


MRS. BRAMSON: Trash. Anybody'd think you'd been brought up on penny dreadfuls.


BELSIZE: (TO OLIVIA) Miss Grayne, you seem preoccupied. What were you thinking?


OLIVIA: Nothing. Only -- how strange it is.


BELSIZE: What?


OLIVIA: Well, here we are, perfectly ordinary English people--


MRS. BRAMSON: Don't be silly, Olivia.


BELSIZE: No, let her speak.


OLIVIA: Well, we woke up this morning, thinking, "Here's another day." We looked at the weather--


MRS. BRAMSON: My dear, the policeman isn't interested--


BELSIZE: (STERN, TO MRS. B) If you please! (GENTLY, TO OLIVIA) Go on, Miss Grayne.


OLIVIA: (SLOWLY) And all the time - there may be something - lying in the woods. Hidden under a bush, perhaps, with two feet just showing. Perhaps one high heel catching the sunlight; the other, a stockinged foot, with blood dried into the openwork. And somewhere is a man talking, walking about, like us; and he - killed her. 


MRS. BRAMSON: (ANNOYED DISBELIEF) Well! Did you ever--?!


BELSIZE: (DRY) I don't think the lady can quite describe herself as ordinary after that flight of fancy.


MRS. BRAMSON: (CHUCKLES) Oh, that's nothing for her.


BELSIZE: Well, I hope she's wrong about this. However, keep your eyes and ears open-- Uh, do you have a phone?


MRS. BRAMSON: No.


BELSIZE: Oh, that's too bad. Well, if anything happens, nip up to Shepperley police station and ask for me. Good morning.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


MRS. BRAMSON: Well, what are you all standing around looking like that for?


HUBERT: Funny, I - I can't get out of my mind what Olivia said about the man "being somewhere" who's murdered her.


MRS. TERENCE: (CHUCKLES) Might even be you, Mr. Laurie.


HUBERT: Huh? (CHUCKLES) Oh, come, come, Mrs. Terence!


MRS. TERENCE: Well, he's not going to walk about snarlin', is he?


MRS. BRAMSON: Missing woman indeed! More likely she's in some saloon. 


SOUND: TAPPING ON KITCHEN DOOR


MRS. BRAMSON: Who's there?!


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS


DORA: (APPROACHES) Please, mum, 'e's 'ere!


MRS. BRAMSON: Who?


DORA: My boy-- (CORRECTS HERSELF) Er, gentleman friend, from the Tallboys.


MRS. BRAMSON: Well, send him in here. I'm ready for him. You stay in the kitchen, Dora.


DORA: (MOVING OFF) Yes, mum.


HUBERT: What gentleman friend? 


OLIVIA: The maid's in trouble over a young man.


HUBERT: By Jove.


MRS. TERENCE: Ssh, Mr. Laurie. He's coming.


DAN: (APPROACHES; DISARMINGLY GOOD-HUMORED) Morning, all!


MRS. BRAMSON: (APPRAISING, SKEPTICAL) Hmmm. So you're Baby-face?


DAN: Silly name, isn't it? I must apologize to you for these overalls, but I didn't know it was going to be a party. With ladies, I mean.


HUBERT: Are you shy with ladies?


DAN: Oh, yes.


MRS. BRAMSON: You know my maid, Miss Dora Parkoe, I believe?


DAN: Well, we have met.


MRS. BRAMSON: "Met," indeed. Have you ever heard of a breach-of-promise suit, young man?


DAN: You know, ma'am, there's two sides to every story.


OLIVIA: You work at the Tallboys, don't you?


DAN: Yes, miss. Twenty-four hours a day.


HUBERT: Oh, then perhaps you can tell us something about the female who's been murdered?


DAN: Murdered, sir? How do you know?


HUBERT: (TAKEN ABACK) Oh-- Well, I mean-- Well, she might have been, you see?


DAN: Oh, yes. Yes, she might have been.


HUBERT: Have you ever seen her?


DAN: Mrs. Chalfont? I used to take cigarettes and drinks for her.


MRS. BRAMSON: What's she like?


DAN: (MUSES) Ooooh, she's - on the tall side. Thin ankles. Fair hair.


OLIVIA: (BEAT, PUZZLED) Go on. Why are you staring at me?


DAN: I was just admiring your hair, miss. Dark. Not like hers.


MRS. BRAMSON: (IMPATIENT) Go on!


DAN: Let me see. (SLOW, A LITTLE CREEPY) Thin eyebrows, with white marks in 'em where they was pulled out -- to be in fashion, you know. Her mouth - a bit thin, with red stuff painted around it, to make it look more; you can rub it off -- I suppose. Her neck - rather thick. Laughs a bit loud; then stops. (BEAT) She's very lively. (LIGHTLY, TO BREAK THE UNCOMFORTABLE MOOD) Ha! You can't say I don't keep my eyes skinned, can you?


HUBERT: (STAMMERS) I should say you do.


OLIVIA: (IMPRESSED) You're very observant.


DAN: Why, thank you, miss.


MRS. BRAMSON: (CHUCKLES DARKLY) If he weren't so observant, Dora mightn't be in the fix she's in.


DAN: (CHEERFUL) That's true, ma'am.


OLIVIA: You don't sound very repentant.


MRS. BRAMSON: (SHARP) Olivia! Why don't you and Hubert go and take a little walk? I want to speak to this young man alone.


HUBERT: (RELUCTANT) Well, now--


MRS. BRAMSON: (INSISTS) It's a personal matter!


HUBERT: (RELENTS) Uh huh. Right. Well, then I will charge off. (MOVING OFF) Olivia?


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS 


OLIVIA: (MOVING OFF) Wait outside; I'll get my coat!


SOUND: FRONT DOOR CLOSES AS HUBERT AND OLIVIA EXIT


DAN: (DRY) She's a nice bit of ice for next summer, isn't she?


MRS. BRAMSON: Now look here, young man--!


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS


MRS. BRAMSON: (ANNOYED) What is it, Mrs. Terence?


MRS. TERENCE: The butcher wants payin'. And there's some men ferretin' at the bottom of the garden lookin' for that Mrs. Chalfont.


MRS. BRAMSON: (UNHAPPY) In my garden? Among my roses? (CALLS) Olivia?! (NO ANSWER, TO HERSELF) Where is that girl?


DAN: You sent her for a walk.


MRS. BRAMSON: I won't have those men out there.


MRS. TERENCE: Shall I wheel you out?


MRS. BRAMSON: I'll manage myself, thank you. I've no wish to be pushed into the nettles today.


MRS. TERENCE: (CONTEMPTUOUS) Hmph!


MRS. BRAMSON: Hold the door open!


DAN: Yes, mum!


MRS. BRAMSON: (YELLS) Hey! Hey! Come out of my garden! All of you! This instant! (MOVING OFF) Come out of my garden, I say!


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR CLOSES AS MRS. BRAMSON EXITS BEHIND--


DAN: (TO MRS. TERENCE) Makes a good deal of toot, don't she?


MRS. TERENCE: Stubborn old fool. Won't even let me pay the butcher -- so's I won't know where she keeps her purse.


DAN: They say at the Tallboys she's got enough money inside of it, too. 


MRS. TERENCE: Well, nobody's ever seen it open. And if you 'ave a peep inside, you'll go down in history.


DAN: (CHUCKLES)


MRS. TERENCE: (HURRYING OFF) Oh, excuse me now. I've left the butcher hangin' at the door.


DAN: Go right ahead.


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR CLOSES AS MRS. TERENCE EXITS


DAN: (WHISTLES A TUNE)


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS ... OLIVIA'S STEPS IN


OLIVIA: Auntie, did you call--? (SEES DAN) Oh. I, er-- I didn't know you were still here.


DAN: Perfectly all right, miss. Come in.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR CLOSES


OLIVIA: Did my aunt call?


DAN: She'll be back in a mo'.


OLIVIA: Oh. I'll wait for her.


DAN: Not much doin' around here for a pretty girl like yourself, is there? (NO ANSWER) I said, it's not a very entertaining quarter of the world for a young lady, is it?


OLIVIA: (COOL) I'm not a snob, but I'd like to point out that although I'm employed by my aunt, I'm not quite in Dora's position.


DAN: I hope not. (BEAT) Though I'll be putting it right for Dora. I guess I'll marry her. After she comes off her high horse a bit.


OLIVIA: I don't believe you.


DAN: No? You don't like me, do you?


OLIVIA: No.


DAN: Too bad. Everybody else does. Why don't you?


OLIVIA: I don't quite know. Your eyes are set wide apart, your hands are quite good. I - I really don't know what's wrong with you.


DAN: Hmmm. You've been looking at me quite close, I see. 


OLIVIA: I'm observant, too.


DAN: I've been looking at you. (BEAT) You're lonely.


OLIVIA: (BEAT) What makes you say so?


DAN: I can tell. You're looking for someone. Someone who understands them deep feelings inside you. Someone--


OLIVIA: It's a waste of time doing your stuff with me! I'm not the type. 


DAN: No?


OLIVIA: You might try Mrs. Bramson, but then, that's a waste of time, isn't it?


DAN: I don't know. They say she's got plenty of money.


OLIVIA: You don't stand a chance playing up to her.


DAN: Want to bet?


OLIVIA: You are cocky.


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS


MRS. BRAMSON: (IRRITATED) Hold this door open! Don't let me wait here all day! Hurry up!


DAN: (WITH A TWINKLE) Yes, Your Ladyship!


MRS. BRAMSON: Idiots. Trampling my rose bushes like that. They say they've got permits to look for that silly woman! If there's anything I hate, it's the men who think they've got authority.


OLIVIA: (ICY) I don't think they're quite as bad as men who think they've got charm.


DAN: Hmm.


OLIVIA: I, er-- I'm going for a walk with Hubert. (MOVING OFF) Excuse me.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES AS OLIVIA EXITS


MRS. BRAMSON: All right, young man. Now that we're alone-- What about Dora? I won't have my maid all broken up about this, and dropping my best china on the floor, just because--


DAN: (SWEET) Excuse me. I didn't mean to interrupt, but - wouldn't you be more comfortable facing the sun, Mrs. Bramson? Er, like this? (BEAT) There. That's better. You're looking pale, you know. I am sorry to interrupt. 


MRS. BRAMSON: (TAKEN BY HIS KINDNESS) Pale? Did - did you say I was looking pale?


DAN: Not enough sun. The minute I saw you, I said to myself, now there's a lady that's got a lot to contend with.


MRS. BRAMSON: Oh, you're right, you know. Nobody knows it better than me.


DAN: No, I'm sure. Oh, it must be terrible to watch everybody else striding up and down enjoying everything-- Oh, excuse me. I shouldn't have said that.


MRS. BRAMSON: (EMOTIONAL) It's - it's true, though! As true as you're my witness! Nobody else around here ever-- (PULLS HERSELF TOGETHER) Now look, about you and Dora--


DAN: Excuse me a minute.


MRS. BRAMSON: What is it?


DAN: That twitching.


MRS. BRAMSON: Twitching?


DAN: Mm, about your throat. Very slight, of course. Nerves, I expect. But I hope your doctor knows about it. Do you mind if I ask what your ailments are?


MRS. BRAMSON: (EAGER TO TALK) Hadn't you better sit down?


DAN: (QUIETLY TRIUMPHANT BECAUSE HE KNOWS HE'S GOT HER HOOKED) Thank you.


SOUND: DAN SITS IN CHAIR


DAN: Now--


MRS. BRAMSON: Well, I have the most terrible palpitations.


DAN: Palpitations! (WHISTLES IN SURPRISE) But the way you get about! Why, nine women out of ten in your position would just be giving way.


MRS. BRAMSON: Do you think so?


DAN: I've known people with palpitations. (MAUDLIN) Somebody very close to me. (INHALES DEEPLY; SOBERLY) They're dead now.


MRS. BRAMSON: Ohhhh?


DAN: My mother, as a matter of fact. She died when I was six. It's strange, but-- 


MRS. BRAMSON: Yes?


DAN: You remind me of her a bit.


MRS. BRAMSON: Of your mother? 


DAN: Yes. Have you a son, Mrs. Bramson?


MRS. BRAMSON: I? (SELF-PITYING) I haven't anyone at all.


DAN: She had the same eyes -- very wide apart, as you -- and the same good hands.


MRS. BRAMSON: And the same palpitations?


DAN: Yes. I hope you didn't mind my talking about your health. You know, you ought to get used to letting other people do things for you.


MRS. BRAMSON: Yes! Yes, you're right. (BEAT) You're a funny young man.


DAN: How so?


MRS. BRAMSON: You seem so much better class than most.


DAN: Well, I never had many advantages, but I try to do the right thing.


MRS. BRAMSON: (SUDDENLY SHARP AGAIN) About Dora?


DAN: (QUICKLY) I mean to do the right thing there, ma'am. But, you see, working at the Tallboys, I only get thirty bob a week, with tips.


MRS. BRAMSON: Uh, how would you like to help out around here?


DAN: Do you mean it, mum?


MRS. BRAMSON: It - it wouldn't pay much, mind.


DAN: Anything at all extra, mum, and Dora and I could save up.


MRS. BRAMSON: Good! When could you come?


DAN: Well, matter of fact, this is my half-day today.


MRS. BRAMSON: Go out to the kitchen and tell Dora to fix you some lunch. Then -- you may come back and read to me.


DAN: Yes, mom! Thank you very much, mom!


MRS. BRAMSON: Hm.


DAN: (MOVES OFF, WHISTLING)


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS AS DAN EXITS ... THEN FRONT DOOR OPENS AS OLIVIA ENTERS


MRS. BRAMSON: Olivia! I thought you went for a walk.


OLIVIA: (OFF) I didn't feel like walking somehow.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR CLOSES 


OLIVIA: (CLOSER) Has he gone?


MRS. BRAMSON: Who?


OLIVIA: That smart-aleck from the Tallboys.


MRS. BRAMSON: He's having some lunch.


OLIVIA: Here?


MRS. BRAMSON: Why not? That boy's got understanding, he has.


OLIVIA: Enough to marry Dora after breaking her heart?


MRS. BRAMSON: You ought to be less bitter. You'll never hook a man that way. Besides, with him and that Dora, I'm not so sure it wasn't six of one and half a dozen of the other. 


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS


MRS. TERENCE: Look! Look! It's in the papers!


MRS. BRAMSON: What do you mean buttin' in here like a gala wind? What's in the papers?


MRS. TERENCE: The mailman just brought the Standard. It's on page one. "Shepperley Mystery"!


MRS. BRAMSON: Stupid sensationalism.


MRS. TERENCE: But they've got it right here -- about that Mrs. Chalfont.


MRS. BRAMSON: Give it here!


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER


OLIVIA: (DRY) I thought you said it was stupid sensationalism.


MRS. BRAMSON: Do be quiet!


SOUND: NEWSPAPER PAGES TURNED


MRS. BRAMSON: (IMPATIENT) Oh, where is it?


OLIVIA: Here. (BEAT, AS SHE SCANS ARTICLE) Huh. "Disappeared mysteriously -- woods around the village searched." And then her description. Here's an interesting bit. 


MRS. BRAMSON: (BEAT) Read it! Hurry up.


OLIVIA: (READS) "A keeper in Shepperley woods was questioned. He said he had heard a woman's voice on the afternoon in question, and a man's voice singing 'Mighty Lak' a Rose.'"


MRS. BRAMSON: "Mighty Lak' a Rose." What rubbish! Ah, I'll hear no more of this stupidity. Olivia, fetch some string from the kitchen and wrap that book for my sister.


OLIVIA: Yes, Auntie.


SOUND: OLIVIA'S STEPS TO KITCHEN DOOR, WHICH OPENS


MRS. BRAMSON: And hurry!


OLIVIA: (SEES DAN, SURPRISED) Oh.


DAN: (SEES OLIVIA, PLEASED) Well! Come in.


SOUND: OLIVIA'S HESITANT STEPS IN .. KITCHEN DOOR CLOSES


OLIVIA: I, um-- I need a bit of string. Would you get it, Dora?


DORA: Yes, mum.


SOUND: DORA'S STEPS AWAY BEHIND--


DAN: I hope you don't mind my having a bit of lunch -- in the kitchen.


OLIVIA: It's not for me to say. I'm only a servant here.


DAN: But not a very ordinary one. Are you?


OLIVIA: No.


DAN: Neither am I. Sit down while you're waiting for Dora.


SOUND: OLIVIA SITS BEHIND--


OLIVIA: All right.


DAN: Have some tea.


SOUND: TEACUP AND TEAPOT CLINK, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


OLIVIA: Well, my aunt is waiting.


DAN: She'll wait.


SOUND: DAN POURS TEA


DAN: Here. (WHISTLES OPENING PHRASE "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE")


OLIVIA: (GASPS) What's - what's that you're whistling?


DAN: (BEAT) That? (BEAT) Just a song. (WHISTLES THE CONCLUDING PART OF "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE")


MUSIC: CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: In a moment, Act Two of "Night Must Fall," starring Alfred Drake and Mary Boland, with Carmen Matthews. This is NBC, the National Broadcasting Company.


SOUND: PAUSE FOR STATION IDENTIFICATION


MUSIC: DRUM ROLL ... BRIEF TAG


ANNOUNCER: Now Act Two of the BEST PLAYS production of "Night Must Fall," starring Alfred Drake and Mary Boland, with Carmen Matthews. And here again is John Chapman.


HOST: Before we go on with the second act of this thriller, I have a little exciting news of my own. During the past few weeks, we've been busy hatching some plans here at NBC. We hope the result is going to be a company of BEST PLAYS stars to tour the country next season in something we're calling "Theater in Concert." Next week, I'll tell you much more about the plans and also about a way that you at home can take a real part in the project. Now let's get on with Act Two.


MUSIC: IN BRIEFLY AND BEHIND HOST--


HOST: Let's get back to the brooding atmosphere of that English cottage where Dan has made himself so very much at home. One week has passed. 


DAN: Here. Let me fix the shawl about you.


MRS. BRAMSON: (PURRS) Mmmmm. Thank you, dear.


DAN: Time for our constitutional, you know.


MRS. BRAMSON: A whole week and we haven't missed an afternoon walk. I don't know what I did before you started to take care of me, Danny.


OLIVIA: (DRY) Nor I.


DAN: Ready, old dear?


MRS. BRAMSON: Yes. Do you have my pills?


DAN: In my pocket.


MRS. BRAMSON: Mr. Laurie, will you give me my hat, please?


HUBERT: Ah, certainly.


DAN: Don't bother, Mr. Laurie. I have it. (GRABS HAT) There! And off we go. (MOVING OFF) See you all later! (OFF, TO MRS. B) Come on, dear -- through the door. (WHISTLES CHEERFULLY)


SOUND: FRONT DOOR CLOSES AS DAN AND MRS. BRAMSON EXIT


HUBERT: Ah, well. Granny's white-haired boy, huh? Why, he's certainly managed to ingratiate himself with the old girl.


OLIVIA: What do you think of him, Hubert?


HUBERT: Oh, he looks pretty honest.


OLIVIA: (MUSES, SLOW AND SOMBER) Looks? Hm. It's rather frightening to think of what a face can hide. Careful lips, black eyes. And then I find I'm staring at myself in the glass -- and I know that we're all strangers. Windows, without blinds, and behind them -- secrets. What's behind his eyes? 


HUBERT: (LIGHTLY) You know something, Olivia? 


OLIVIA: What?


HUBERT: (LAUGHS) I think you're infatuated with him.


OLIVIA: (INDIGNANT) He's common and insolent, and I dislike him intensely!


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS AS MRS. TERENCE ENTERS


HUBERT: Well, here's Mrs. Terence. Let's see what she thinks of him.


MRS. TERENCE: Thinks? Of who?


OLIVIA: Dan.


MRS. TERENCE: Him? Oh, ho! Oh, he's a terrible liar, of course. But then lots of us are.


HUBERT: What sort of a liar, Mrs. Terence?


MRS. TERENCE: Why, he told me he used to hunt the hounds and have his own pack. (DRY) Huh. Before he went up in the world and became a page-boy, I suppose.


OLIVIA: (TO HUBERT) You see? 


HUBERT: Well, still no reason to talk about him as if he'd done something terrible.


MRS. TERENCE: And what's he done?


OLIVIA: I don't know, but I feel so strongly-- Perhaps Dora knows. (CALLS) Dora?!


MRS. TERENCE: Oh, she won't know anything. She's as half-witted as she is lazy. Cut off her nose to stop the dust-bin from smelling, she would.


DORA: (APPROACHES) Did you call, Miss Olivia?


OLIVIA: Dora, has Dan said any more about marrying you?


DORA: All he's ever said is how-do-you-do and beg-pardon for a week now.


OLIVIA: What do you think of him, Dora?


DORA: Dan? Oh, he's all right. Takes his fun where he finds it. And leaves it. Pretends he doesn't care a twopenny, but always got his eye on what you're thinkin' of him.


OLIVIA: (ALMOST TO HERSELF) Incredible vanity -- they always have it. Always.


HUBERT: Who?


OLIVIA: (BEAT) Murderers.


HUBERT: Murderers?


MRS. TERENCE: (DISMISSIVE) Oh, he's too ordinary.


OLIVIA: No. Ever since I heard him whistling that song--


HUBERT: Oh, you mean that, uh, "Mighty Lak' a Rose" thing?


OLIVIA: Yes.


HUBERT: Well, after all, "Mighty Lak' a Rose" is a pretty familiar song.


OLIVIA: It's more than that. If we could search his luggage--


HUBERT: (RELUCTANT) Oh, I say, I say, that's a bit thick, you know.


OLIVIA: With Mrs. Chalfont murdered? Why, we may be living with a monster and not even know it.


HUBERT: (UNCONVINCED) Oh, well, uh--


MRS. TERENCE: (WITH A SHRUG) He's gone for a walk with the old woman.


DORA: (EAGER) I'd like to take a look at some of his things, I can tell you.


OLIVIA: (DECISIVE) I'm going into his room. Are you coming? (NO ANSWER) Hubert?


HUBERT: Well, uh-- (RELENTS) Well, perhaps - perhaps it might not be a bad idea at that. Just to be on the safe side.


MUSIC: BRIEF BRIDGE


MRS. TERENCE: Huh. One dirty shirt. A packet of razor-blades.


HUBERT: (UNCOMFORTABLE) We shouldn't be going through his things like this.


OLIVIA: Here's a letter.


SOUND: LETTER UNFOLDED


HUBERT: Now, that - that's too much!


MRS. TERENCE: Don't be silly. Your wife'll do it to you hundreds of times. 


OLIVIA: (READS) "Dear Baby-Face. Next time you strike Newcastle, O.K. by me, baby." Signed, "Lil."


MRS. TERENCE: (GASPS) I say! There she is! Mrs. Chalfont!


HUBERT: What?


MRS. TERENCE: Here, in this snapshot. In his wallet, it was.


OLIVIA: Wasn't there another suitcase, Dora? 


DORA: Just the big hat-box up in the closet.


OLIVIA: Let's see it.


DORA: Yes, mum.


SOUND: HAT-BOX LIFTED DOWN


DORA: (WITH EFFORT) Ooh, it's a bit heavy to be holding a hat.


OLIVIA: Oh, put it on the table.


SOUND: HAT-BOX SET DOWN HEAVILY ON TABLE


DORA: There. Whew.


HUBERT: (DISAPPOINTED) Oh. It has a lock on it. Wonder what's inside?


OLIVIA: (WITH DREAD) We'll open it and--


SOUND: BANG! AS ROOM DOOR BURSTS OPEN


OLIVIA & DORA: (STARTLED GASPS)


MRS. TERENCE: Good heavens.


HUBERT: (LOW) It's him.


DAN: (VERY PLEASANT THROUGHOUT SCENE) Hello, all.


MRS. TERENCE: (EMBARRASSED CHUCKLE)


DAN: Remembered I'd left my wallet. Could I have it back, please? 


HUBERT: Well, uh-- Yes. Yes, of course. (APOLOGETIC) I - I can't think of what to say--


DAN: (TAKES WALLET) Thank you. Did you see the picture of Mrs. Chalfont?


HUBERT: Oh. Yes. 


DAN: What did you think of the letter?


MRS. TERENCE: (EMBARRASSED CHUCKLE) Letter?


DAN: You've got in your hand, Mrs. Terence.


MRS. TERENCE: Oh.


DAN: I'd like it back. 


SOUND: RATTLE OF LETTER HANDED OVER


DAN: (TAKES LETTER) Thank you. Means well, does Lil; but she would spy on me. And if there's anything I hate, it's spying. Don't you agree, Miss Olivia?


OLIVIA: I--


DAN: Sooner have anything than a spy. Bar a murderer, of course.


HUBERT: Murderer? Oh. I, er-- I think I'll go out for a breath of air. (MOVING OFF) Excuse me.


MRS. TERENCE: Oh, and I'll go with ya! I could use a breath meself.


DORA: I have the mending to do.


HUBERT: (OFF, TO DAN) Excuse us. (CALLS, TO OLIVIA) Coming, Olivia?


OLIVIA: I'll stay and help him tidy up. We made rather a mess.


SOUND: HUBERT, DORA, AND MRS. TERENCE EXIT MURMURING ... ROOM DOOR CLOSES


DAN: (BEAT) Hand me that hat-box, would you? I'll just put it back in the closet.


SOUND: HAT-BOX RETURNED TO CLOSET


DAN: Well? (BEAT) Why are you staring at me?


OLIVIA: (SLOWLY) You - did it. Didn't you?


DAN: You know, you wouldn't be a bad-looking girl without the glasses.


OLIVIA: I asked you a question.


DAN: I like dark hair. And it likes me.


OLIVIA: You're very conceited.


DAN: Yes.


OLIVIA: And acting. Acting all the time.


DAN: Acting? Acting what? (BEAT) See? I can look you in the eyes. 


OLIVIA: It's the criminals who can look you in the eyes. Honest people blush and look away.


DAN: You don't say?


OLIVIA: You are acting, aren't you?


DAN: (WHISPERS) Yes!


OLIVIA: (BEAT, SLOWLY) What are you like - when you're alone?


DAN: I act more than ever.


OLIVIA: Why?


DAN: I don't know.


OLIVIA: I think I've got your number.


DAN: (WITH A SHRUG) Carry on.


OLIVIA: You haven't any feelings. You live in a world of your own imagination.


DAN: I don't follow you.


OLIVIA: Yes, you do. 


DAN: Do you really think there's been a bit of dirty work?


OLIVIA: (BEAT, BREATHES) I don't know now. I suppose not.


DAN: Disappointed?


MRS. BRAMSON: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Danny!


DAN: What's that?


OLIVIA: In the garden.


DAN: Come on.


SOUND: ROOM DOOR OPENS ... DAN AND OLIVIA'S HURRIED STEPS THROUGH THE HOUSE


MRS. BRAMSON: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Danny! Danny!


DORA: (DISTRESSED) Miss Olivia! Oh, Miss Olivia!


OLIVIA: What is it? (NO ANSWER) Well, speak up, Dora.


DORA: Those men -- they were diggin' in the rubbish-pit!


OLIVIA: What about it?


DORA: There - there's somethin' sticking out!


OLIVIA: What?


DORA: A - a hand, miss. A woman's hand!


MUSIC: DURING ABOVE, SNEAKS IN AND BUILDS TO A CLIMAX ... THEN OUT


MRS. TERENCE: More tea, Mr. Laurie?


HUBERT: No, thank you. Anything new on the case, Mrs. Terence?


MRS. TERENCE: Oh, them police was 'round again.


OLIVIA: Well, why isn't Auntie here for tea?


MRS. TERENCE: Oh, she went over to Breakerly to be interviewed by the local paper. His Highness took her over.


HUBERT: I wonder if they'll ever nab him.


OLIVIA: Who?


HUBERT: Oh, the fellow that did in Mrs. Chalfont.


OLIVIA: Oh.


HUBERT: It was a clever job, you know. Of course, that was a rum touch, mangling her like that. The fact is, they still haven't the faintest idea where the poor woman's head is.


OLIVIA: (CONVULSIVELY) Oh, don't!


HUBERT: Wha--? Oh, I'm sorry.


OLIVIA: I, er-- (EXHALES) It's a bit of a strain, you know.


HUBERT: Well, why don't you get away?


OLIVIA: I - can't afford it.


HUBERT: Oh, you - you could, if you married me! Last chance, you know; I'm catching the five o'clock for London today.


OLIVIA: And I'm sorry, Hubert; I can't.


HUBERT: I shan't be back till my next holiday.


OLIVIA: (POLITE) I shall miss you.


HUBERT: (UNCONVINCED) Yes. It isn't another man, is it?


OLIVIA: Don't be ridiculous. What man could I possibly meet here?


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS


DAN: (IN HIGH SPIRITS) There we are! Back home again!


MRS. BRAMSON: (WEARILY) Oh, I feel dead. 


DAN: Now, don't be a silly old woman. 


SOUND: FRONT DOOR CLOSES


DAN: You look as pretty as a picture -- strawberries and cream in your face, and not a day over forty. When I've made you a cup of tea, you'll be twenty-five in the sun and eighteen with your back to the light. 


MRS. BRAMSON: (CHUCKLES) 


DAN: (CHUCKLES) 


MRS. BRAMSON: Danny, you are a terror! (TO THE OTHERS) He's been at me like this all the way from Breakerly. (CHUCKLES) 


DAN: What'd you like in your tea, huh? Gin, whisky, or a nice dollop of sailor's rum?


MRS. BRAMSON: (CHUCKLES) Now don't make me laugh, dear. My heart won't stand it.


DAN: You've lost your heart, and you know you have, to the little fellow what pushes your pram!


HUBERT: (STAMMERS) Well, if you'll excuse me, I must catch a cab to the station in a few minutes. I'd better get my things. (MOVING OFF) Excuse me.


MRS. BRAMSON: He seems in a hurry to get back to London. Olivia? What happened while I was out?


OLIVIA: Nothing.


MRS. TERENCE: They're still looking for the head.


MRS. BRAMSON: (DOESN'T WANT TO HEAR IT) Ohhhhh.


MRS. TERENCE: And your name is in the Evening Telegram again.


MRS. BRAMSON: (QUICK AND EAGER) Did you buy one?


MRS. TERENCE: Right here.


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


MRS. BRAMSON: (PLEASED) Ah, give it here, give it here. (IMPATIENT) Well, where is it?!


DAN: Shall I read it to you?


MRS. BRAMSON: Yes. Yes, dear, do.


DAN: (SCANS PAPER) Ah, yes. (READS LABORIOUSLY) "The murderer committed the crime in the forest most-- (GENTLE EXCLAMATION OF DISGUST, THEN CORRECTS HIMSELF) "The forest-- (BEAT) --most likely stripping beforehand and cleansing himself afterwards in the forest lake."


MRS. BRAMSON: (INHALES, THEN MOANS UNHAPPILY) Ohhhh.


DAN: (READS) "He buried the body shallow in the open pit, cunningly chancing it being filled, which it was -- the next day, by Mr. Laurie, a holiday guest at the murder bungalow. The eleventh--" (PLEASANTLY) That was the day 'fore I come here.


MRS. BRAMSON: So it was. Go on.


DAN: (READS) "The body was nude. Attempts had been made to er-- era-- erad-i-cate the fingerprints with a knife."


SOUND: DISTANT TOLLING OF VILLAGE BELLS, IN BG


DAN: (READS) "The head was severed by a skilled person, possibly a butcher. The murderer--" 


SOUND: RATTLE OF PAPER


MRS. BRAMSON: What's the matter? Why are you smiling?


DAN: (DREAMILY) It's Sunday.


SOUND: RATTLE OF PAPER


DAN: And as I was reading, I heard the bells. I forgot it was Sunday. They're going to church in the villages. All got up in their Sunday best, with prayer-books, and the organ playing, and windows shining. Shining on holy things, because holy things isn't afraid of daylight.


MRS. BRAMSON: (CHUCKLES, LIGHTLY) You've been drinking!


DAN: (LAUGHS) Just a drop -- while you were in at the newspaper. (RESUMES HIS REVERIE) And all the time the daylight's moving over the floor, and by the end of the sermon the air in the church is turning gray. And people isn't able to think of holy things so much no more, only of terrible things that's going on outside, like we're reading about in the papers. 


SOUND: VILLAGE BELLS OUT


DAN: They'll be thinking that soon - the day will end - and then ---- night - must fall.


MRS. BRAMSON: Good gracious, what's come over you, Danny?


DAN: (LIGHTLY) Oh, I speechify like anything when I'm roused! I used to go to Sunday school, see? Read the Bible quite a bit.


OLIVIA: You should have been a preacher. 


DAN: (CHUCKLES) Should I read some more?


MRS. BRAMSON: Ohhh, I'm feeling somewhat tired. I'll take the paper into my room.


DAN: Anything you say, mother o' mine. Shall I push you in?


MRS. BRAMSON: Mrs. Terence can do it. (CALLS) Mrs. Terence?


MRS. TERENCE: (DRY) Aye, Mrs. Terence can do it. (CHUCKLES, MOVING OFF) You'd think I hadn't a stick of work to do around here. Come along.


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES, OFF


DAN: (WHISTLES NONCHALANTLY BEHIND--)


SOUND: DAN OPENS A BOTTLE AND POURS A GLASS OF BRANDY


OLIVIA: Does she know you drink her brandy? Maybe you've had enough.


DAN: Maybe I have. And I feel fine! 


OLIVIA: You do live in your imagination, don't you?


DAN: (SLOW AND MAUDLIN) Only way to bear with the awful things you have to do.


OLIVIA: What awful things?


DAN: (THOUGHTFUL) Well-- (SUDDENLY LAUGHS MERRILY, SNORTS) I haven't had as much to drink as all that! You know, you're a dark horse, you are. This life, it isn't for you, is it? What's there to it, hey? 


OLIVIA: What's there to it? (CHUCKLES) Well, what was your life like at the Tallboys?


DAN: My life? Well-- The day don't start so good, with a lot of stuck-up boots to clean, and a lot of silly high heels to polish, and spoons that's been in the mouths of gaping fools that looks through me like I was a dirty window. (EXPLODES) Orders, orders, orders! Do this; don't do that, you idiot! I was never meant to take orders, never! (MIMICS A GUEST) "Waiter, my tea is cold!" (QUIETLY, SLOWLY) Just when I think I got a bit o' peace, there's somebody - lockin' the bedroom door - won't let me out; won't give me no money. Just screams and screams, so there's nothin' keeps a silly mouth shut, but-- (BEAT, QUIETLY INSANE) Oh, Lord, I wish I could hear a bit of music--


MUSIC: IN HIS HEAD ... IN BG


DAN: Ah! There. Hear it? Hm? Now I do. And I - I have a drop o' drink, and everything is fine. And you're beautiful. Beautiful. And when it's night--


OLIVIA: (BEAT) Go on.


DAN: (REALIZES HE'S GONE TOO FAR; FORCED LAUGHTER) Like to know, wouldn't you?! That's why you lie awake nights, isn't it? Thinking.


OLIVIA: How do you know I lie awake at night? 


DAN: I know.


OLIVIA: Yes. And shall I tell you why? Because you're awake yourself! You can't sleep, can you? Because there's one thing you've pushed into the back of your mind, and you can't do any more about it, and you never will! And do you know what that is? A box. A hat-box. With a lock in it. Only a little thing, but it's rather heavy. And inside it--


DAN: Stop it! Stop it!


OLIVIA: I'm right; I knew it.


DAN: (INSISTENT) But it's the only thing -- the only thing. Nothing worries me, nothing. I live by myself inside -- here. And the rest of you can go hang. Nothing's going to stop me. I'll manage. I--


MUSIC: OUT ABRUPTLY WITH--


SOUND: KNOCK AT DOOR


DAN: (STARTLED) Who - who's there? Who is it?


OLIVIA: You better answer it. I'm going into the kitchen.


DAN: Go ahead.


SOUND: DAN'S STEPS TO FRONT DOOR, WHICH OPENS


BELSIZE: (ALMOST TOO PLEASANT) Hello there, Dan. How are things?


DAN: (TRANSFORMS TO HIS CHEERFUL OLD SELF AGAIN) Oh. Hello, Inspector. Not bad. Come in.


SOUND: STEPS IN ... FRONT DOOR CLOSES 


BELSIZE: We haven't scared you all out of the house, I see.


DAN: Not a chance!


BELSIZE: You mind if I sit down?


DAN: Go ahead, sir. (BEAT) Uh, how's the case coming, sir?


BELSIZE: Well, I don't mind telling you, the fellow that did this job was a bloodstained chap.


DAN: You don't say?


BELSIZE: Uh huh. I've seen the remains. No matter; they'll nab him in time.


DAN: Oh? If he's as clever as you say, though--


BELSIZE: Any self-respecting murderer would have taken care to mutilate the body to such a degree that nobody could recognize it -- and here, we identify it first clip. (A CHUCKLE) You call that clever?


DAN: Well, sir, I'm a slow thinker, but it seems to me that it's even more clever to have a body identified and still not be caught.


BELSIZE: (VERY CASUAL) Is that why you didn't sleep in your bed on the night of the tenth?


DAN: (PAUSE) Sir?


BELSIZE: I said, you didn't sleep in your bed on the night of the murder.


DAN: (QUICKLY) Oh, but I did. Oh, well, that is, except for about half an hour. I - I couldn't sleep and then went up the fire-escape to smoke.


BELSIZE: What time was that?


DAN: Oh, about-- You know how you wake up and don't know what time it is.


BELSIZE: Are you feeling warm?


DAN: No.


BELSIZE: Your shirt's wet through.


DAN: Oh, I've been sawing some wood.


BELSIZE: I see. All right, Dan. That'll be all.


DAN: (EXHALES IN RELIEF) Thank you, sir. Will you be going now?


BELSIZE: Yes -- after just one thing more.


DAN: Sir?


BELSIZE: Let's have a look at your luggage, shall we?


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: THUMP! OF LUGGAGE


BELSIZE: Everything seems in order here. What about this hat-box?


SOUND: THUMP! OF HAT-BOX


DAN: Hm?


BELSIZE: Is that a key?


DAN: That? It - it isn't mine.


BELSIZE: It's in your closet.


DAN: I know, sir, but it isn't mine. Someone must have left it there.


BELSIZE: Who?


DAN: I don't know, sir.


BELSIZE: Well, let's have a look at it anyway.


SOUND: KNOCK AT ROOM DOOR


BELSIZE: Yes?


SOUND: ROOM DOOR OPENS


OLIVIA: (ENTERS) May I come in? Oh, Inspector. I just came to get something.


BELSIZE: Just having a little check through Dan's things. You wouldn't happen to know about this hat-box, would you?


OLIVIA: That? Why, yes. You see, it's mine.


BELSIZE: Yours?


OLIVIA: Yes, it's got all my letters in it.


BELSIZE: But it's in Dan's--


OLIVIA: Yes, this room used to be the box-room before Dan came.


BELSIZE: I see.


OLIVIA: May I have it? 


BELSIZE: Yes, of course.


SOUND: HAT-BOX HANDED OVER


OLIVIA: I'll just take it and keep it in my own wardrobe; it'll be safer there. 


BELSIZE: I'll carry it in for you on my way out.


OLIVIA: (MOVING OFF) It's quite all right. I'll manage it myself.


SOUND: OLIVIA'S STEPS AWAY


BELSIZE: (APOLOGETIC, TO DAN) Oh. I'm afraid I've insulted her. Well, I'll pop off now. Sorry to have upset you.


DAN: Thank you, sir. And good day, sir.


BELSIZE: (BEAT) You do look a bit pale, you know.


DAN: I'm all right, sir. Good day. 


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, ROOM DOOR OPENS ... THEN SHUTS AS BELSIZE EXITS


DAN: (PAUSE, SINGS "MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE" SOFTLY TO HIMSELF) "Sweetest little feller / Everybody knows--" (BARELY SUPPRESSED CHUCKLING; THEN BROKENLY) "Don't know what to call him, but he's--"


SOUND: DAN'S BODY CRUMPLES TO THE FLOOR


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... CONTINUES IN BG


SOUND: KNOCK ON ROOM DOOR


DORA: (THROUGH DOOR) Dan? Mrs. Bramson wants you. Dan, are you in there?


SOUND: MORE KNOCKING ... THEN ROOM DOOR OPENS


DORA: (GASPS) Dan! (CALLS URGENTLY) Mrs. Terence?! Mrs. Terence, come quick! Something's wrong!


MUSIC: UP, FOR A SHIVERY ACCENT ... THEN OUT


MRS. TERENCE: There. There, now. Drink this, Dan.


DAN: (DRINKS, EXHALES)


MRS. TERENCE: Well!


SOUND: GLASS SET DOWN


MRS. TERENCE: Well, welcome back to the land of the living.


DAN: What happened?


MRS. TERENCE: You passed out, that's what. A bit too much drink, I expect. Dora came to get you and--


DORA: I knowed right away what it is! The monster's lurking, I says. And Dan's seen him!


MRS. TERENCE: I'll give you a "lurk." Get back and tend to supper.


DORA: I will, but when you leave here tonight, I'm leavin' with you!


MRS. TERENCE: Don't be a [?]. Now, go on!


SOUND: MRS. TERENCE POURS A DRINK BEHIND--


MRS. TERENCE: Dan? How're you feeling?


DAN: All right.


MRS. TERENCE: Drink this now.


DAN: (DRINKS, EXHALES)


MRS. TERENCE: There.


SOUND: GLASS SET DOWN


MRS. TERENCE: Better?


DAN: Yes. Proper girl's trick, passing out like that. (BEAT) Oh, the light's going. It's almost dark out.


MRS. BRAMSON: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Danny?!


DAN: (TO MRS. TERENCE) Does she know about it?


MRS. TERENCE: No, she's been asleep herself.


DAN: Good. Let's say no more, shall we?


MRS. TERENCE: As you please.


MRS. BRAMSON: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Danny?!


MRS. TERENCE: (TO DAN) Well, you'd best go in and [?] Madame Crocodile.


DAN: All right. 


SOUND: DAN'S STEPS TO MRS. BRAMSON BEHIND--


DAN: (CALLS, TO MRS. B) Coming! 


SOUND: DAN'S STEPS OUT WITH--


DAN: Well! There you are, mother o' mine. Now, what is it your highness is after?


MRS. BRAMSON: I - I'm cold. I need my shawl. And - and bring a can of kerosene for the lamp.


DAN: A shawl - and some kerosene. (PLAYFUL) No sooner said than done! One, two, three!


SOUND: DAN BOUNDS AWAY


MRS. BRAMSON: (CHUCKLES WARMLY) What a silly young man.


SOUND: KITCHEN DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES AS OLIVIA ENTERS


MRS. BRAMSON: Olivia! That you?


OLIVIA: (OFF) Yes.


MRS. BRAMSON: Where are you going with that suitcase?


OLIVIA: (OFF) I, er-- I thought you were asleep. I didn't want to bother you.


MRS. BRAMSON: Why are you sneaking off?


OLIVIA: (OFF) Because I'm afraid.


MRS. BRAMSON: Nonsense!


OLIVIA: (OFF) Is it? (APPROACHES) Listen to me. I've never known what it is before to be terrified. But when I saw today beginning to end, and tonight getting nearer and nearer, I could feel my fingertips getting cold. 


DAN: (WHISTLING IN BG, OFF)


MRS. BRAMSON: You might say goodbye to Dan.


OLIVIA: (DISTRESSED) No, I don't want to see him.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS AS OLIVIA HURRIEDLY EXITS


DAN: (ENTERS, STOPS WHISTLING) Well, who just ran out the door?


MRS. BRAMSON: My niece. Gone for the night, if you please.


DAN: (SURPRISED) For - the night?


MRS. BRAMSON: Yes. And Mr. Laurie gone. And Dora. And Mrs. Terence going home. It'll be just you and me.


DAN: Let me put your shawl about you. There. How's that?


MRS. BRAMSON: Oh, fine. (CHUCKLES) You're a great comfort to me, Danny; a great comfort.


DAN: Would you like a nice hot cup of tea now to take the chill off?


MRS. BRAMSON: Yes.


DAN: I'll go out in the kitchen and fix you some. You just close your eyes and don't worry about a thing.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: DOOR OPENS


MRS. TERENCE: Dora, you ready?


DAN: It's me, Dan.


MRS. TERENCE: (SURPRISED) Oh. You've got your coat.


DAN: Yes. I'm going over Payley Hill way.


MRS. TERENCE: (SURPRISED) And leaving her here alone?


DAN: She'll be all right. I have to see the doctor. I'm still feeling kind of queasy.


DORA: (APPROACHES) I'm ready! (SEES DAN) Well, is His Lordship going with us?


DAN: Just to the gate. Then I go the other way.


DORA: (SURPRISED) Leavin' the old woman? (SLIGHT GASP) She'll scream the place down.


DAN: I asked her this minute, and she don't seem to mind. Said she wouldn't hear of my staying. It's not good to argue with her.


DORA: Don't we know it.


MRS. TERENCE: Ah, you wait on her too much anyway. Well, come along.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS ... HEAVY WIND BLOWS, THEN IN BG


MRS. TERENCE: Ooh, it's blowin' up a bit!


DORA: I'm glad to be going with you, Mrs. Terence. I couldn't walk a step in those woods alone.


MRS. TERENCE: Have you got the flashlight?


DORA: Right here.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR CLOSES ... HEAVY WIND AND FOOTSTEPS ON PATH, IN BG


MRS. TERENCE: Whew, it's black as pitch in them woods. I'd be frightened to be by myself, I can tell ya. Oh, it's a pity you're not comin' our way, Dan.


DAN: I turn off here. See you in the morning! Toodle-oo! Good night, Dora. Maybe we can step out one night this week, eh?


DORA: If you ask nice like. Good night!


DAN: Good night!


MRS. TERENCE: Good night!


MUSIC: BRIDGE ... THEN OMINOUS, IN BG


MRS. BRAMSON: (ANXIOUS, TO HERSELF) I wish people wouldn't just walk out of the house and leave me high and dry. Where are my chocolates now? Ah, there.


SOUND: CHOCOLATE UNWRAPPED


MRS. BRAMSON: (UNHAPPY) That Dora's been at them again.


SOUND: BRIEF DISTANT HIGH-PITCHED CRY OF OWL COMING FROM THE WOODS


MRS. BRAMSON: (UNEASY) What's that? (CALLS) Danny?! (NO ANSWER) Danny!


SOUND: CRY OF OWL, CLOSER


MRS. BRAMSON: (TO HERSELF) An owl! Oh, Lord! (IMPATIENT) Oh, what is that boy doing in the kitchen? I've got the jitters. (CALLS) Danny?! (INCREASINGLY HYSTERICAL, TO HERSELF) Good Lord, has he gone and left me, too? Oh, Lord, help a poor woman. They've left me. I'm going to be murdered! (CALLS) Danny?! Danny?! Where are you?! (BEAT, NERVOUS) What's that? Someone's out there. Someone-- Oh, Lord, help me, help me. Forgive me my trespasses-- (MOANS MISERABLY) Oh! Ohhh! Ohhhhhh--


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES ... DAN'S SLOW FOOTSTEPS IN


MUSIC: OUT BEHIND--


MRS. BRAMSON: (MURMURS SLOWLY TO HERSELF) Danny, Danny--


DAN: (SLOW AND REASSURING) There, there. That's all right. There now.


MRS. BRAMSON: (TEARFUL) Thank God. Oh, thank God, you didn't leave me. Oh-- Oh, my heart.


SOUND: DAN POURS BRANDY


DAN: Here, have a drop of this. Do you good.


MRS. BRAMSON: I thought--


DAN: I am sorry. I am really. You see, Dora and Mrs. Terence wanted me to see them along the path, past the rubbish-pit where they found--


MRS. BRAMSON: (SELF-PITYING) I was all alone. Just an old woman calling for help, and no answer.


DAN: Poor old mum.


MRS. BRAMSON: You're the only one that really understands me, Danny. I don't have to tell you about my husband, how unkind and ungodly he was. I wouldn't have minded so much him being ungodly, but he was-- He was unkind.


DAN: Drink some more.


MRS. BRAMSON: Oh, bless you, Danny.


DAN: Now -- what would you like? Shall I read you to sleep?


MRS. BRAMSON: (SUDDENLY TENSE) Hush!


DAN: What is it?


MRS. BRAMSON: A sort of thumping noise. Why, Danny, it's - it's - it's your heart beating! Are you all right?


DAN: Fine. I've been running along the path, you see -- in the dark.


MRS. BRAMSON: Yes. Yes, it is dark.


DAN: Yes, it's night now.


MRS. BRAMSON: Well, it's been a long day and I'm stiff in the neck from the draft. I think I'll go to bed.


DAN: Let me rub your neck a bit. (BEAT) There. Shut your eyes.


MRS. BRAMSON: (PURRS) Oh, Danny, you're the only one--


DAN: There.


MRS. BRAMSON: What strong hands they are. You're a pet, my little chubby-face, my baby-face, my Danny. 


DAN: (SINGS, ALMOST INDECIPHERABLY, UNDER HIS BREATH) "Sweetest little fellow, everybody knows--"


MRS. BRAMSON: (STARTS TO CHOKE) Your - your hands-- They're-- They're-- They're too-- They're too tight!


DAN: (SINGS, LOW) "Don't know what to call him--"


MRS. BRAMSON: (CHOKING EXCLAMATIONS) Dan! Dan----ny!


DAN: (SINGS, LOW AND SAVAGE, WITH EFFORT) "But he's mighty - like - a - rose!"


SOUND: CREAK OF CHAIR ... MRS. BRAMSON'S BODY SLUMPS


MUSIC: ACCENT ... PUNCTUATES THE  MURDER ... THEN OUT


DAN: (TO HIMSELF) That's done it! A few gallons of kerosene sprinkled about -- and in a minute, it'll all be up in smoke. Just strike a match.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, RATTLE OF MATCHBOX ... THEN MATCH STRUCK 


DAN: (STARTLED) What's that?


SOUND: FRONT DOOR OPENS 


DAN: (QUIETLY STUNNED) You!


SOUND: FRONT DOOR CLOSES ... OLIVIA'S STEPS IN


OLIVIA: I decided to come back. (ALMOST DISAPPOINTED) Life - is so ordinary, isn't it? Even Mrs. Bramson, dead in her chair, is ordinary. 


DAN: What did you come back for?


OLIVIA: To find you out. 


DAN: Now you know. She didn't keep any money anywhere else, did she?


OLIVIA: I've read so much about evil--


DAN: (INSISTENT) Did she?


OLIVIA: I never expected to come across it in real life.


DAN: You like it, though, don't you?


OLIVIA: I hate you. 


DAN: No. You feel light as air. Same as me. Why, this is my big chance! Money I'm going to have now, and me telling other people what to do! The world's going to hear from me! You wait! (BEAT, QUIETLY) Oh, but then -- you can't wait.


OLIVIA: (SLIGHT GASP) What do you mean?


DAN: When I say I'll never be found out, I mean that no living soul will be able to tell another living soul about me.


OLIVIA: (ALARMED) You - you won't--


DAN: Oh, yes. That's what I am, see? I make up my mind -- and do it. 


OLIVIA: Don't. Stay away from me.


DAN: (SUDDENLY DISTRACTED) What's that?


OLIVIA: What?


DAN: That light -- out the window!


OLIVIA: I - I don't see--


DAN: (INCREASINGLY HYSTERICAL) It's there! They're watching me. Somebody's watching me! Somebody is watching! (DEFIANT) I'm the one that watches!


SOUND: POUNDING KNOCK AT DOOR ... CONTINUES INTERMITTENTLY IN BG


DAN: (HORRIFIED, HALF TO HIMSELF) What's that? A sound. Like a big wall falling over into the sea. 


OLIVIA: (ASTONISHED) You've stopped acting at last. You're real. You're frightened. 


DAN: But everything is slipping away. From underneath our feet. Can't you feel it? 


SOUND: A FINAL KNOCKING ... THEN OUT


DAN: Starting slow and then hundreds of miles an hour. I'm going backwards. Back to the day I was born! (HYSTERICAL) I can see it coming! The day I was born! (BEAT, SLOW REALIZATION) I'm going to die.


SOUND: FRONT DOOR KICKED OPEN ... BELSIZE'S STEPS IN ... WIND BLOWS FROM OUTSIDE, CONTINUES IN BG


BELSIZE: (SHARPLY, TO DAN) It's no use to run. (TO OLIVIA) What are you doing in this, Miss Grayne?


OLIVIA: I belong here, and--


DAN: (FIRMLY) She did nothing. I'm the feller, see? Anything I run, I run all by myself. 


BELSIZE: I don't believe you. (CASUAL) Let me see your hands, old boy.


DAN: (RELIEVED) Why, sure.


SOUND: CLICK! OF HANDCUFFS PLACED AND LOCKED ON WRISTS


DAN: Take off these handcuffs. Take them off! (SUDDEN HYSTERICAL WEEPING, THEN BEHIND--)


BELSIZE: Now, now. Come along. Come along quietly. (TO OLIVIA) I've a couple of men outside, Miss Grayne. I'll send them in. (TO DAN) Come along.


DAN: (PULLS HIMSELF TOGETHER) Inspector? One minute, please.


BELSIZE: Well?


DAN: Would you mind straightening my tie, Miss Olivia?


OLIVIA: All right.


DAN: (LOW, SERIOUS) This is the real thing, you know. Acting. That's what you said, isn't it? You was right. But now -- this is the real thing. (UP, LIGHTLY, TO BELSIZE) Got a cigarette?


OLIVIA: (SOBS)


BELSIZE: Here you are.


DAN: You aren't going to believe what she said? About helping me?


BELSIZE: No. Plenty of women get a bit hysterical about a lad in your position. You'll find 'em queuing up all right when the time comes. Proposals of marriage by the score.


DAN: (PLEASED) Oh? They will?


BELSIZE: Come along, Dan.


DAN: Dan? Oh, yes. I forgot about him. Poor little chap. You know, I'd like something now I never wanted before. A long walk, all by myself. And just when I can't have it. (LAUGHS) That's contrary, isn't it?


BELSIZE: Coming?


DAN: (LIGHT, CASUAL) Righto. (TO OLIVIA) Bye, girl.


OLIVIA: Bye, Dan.


DAN: (EXHALES) Well! Well, I'm going to be hanged! But they'll get their money's worth at the trial. You wait!


MUSIC: CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: You have just heard the BEST PLAYS production of "Night Must Fall" by Emlyn Williams, starring Alfred Drake and Mary Boland, with Carmen Matthews. And here again is your host, drama critic John Chapman.


HOST: Would you like to join me in congratulating Mr. Drake, Miss Boland, Miss Matthews, and company for giving us such a pleasantly horrifying hour? I hope you'll join us next week when we'll have a fine comedy-drama, "A Bell for Adano." This is Paul Osborne's BEST PLAYS adaptation of John Hersey's novel and our leading roles will be played by Arthur Kennedy and Myron McCormick. This is Chapman saying goodbye until next week.


MUSIC: CLOSING ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: "Night Must Fall" was transcribed and adapted for radio by George Lefferts. Heard in the cast were Richard Newton as Hubert, Mary Michael as Mrs. Terence, Horace Braham as Inspector Belsize, and Cathleen Cordell as Dora. BEST PLAYS is an NBC Production supervised by William Welch and directed by Fred Weihe. Your announcer is Robert Denton.


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


NBC ANNCR: Tonight hear another RADIO CITY PREVIEWS on NBC.


MUSIC: NBC CHIMES

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