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Murder in the Air

Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons

Murder in the Air

Feb 24 1944



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

2ND ANNCR (1 line)

CBS ANNCR (1 line)


MR. KEEN

MISS ELLIS

BARBARA HALLIDAY

MAN, on the street

MARIAN, the waitress

MIKE CLANCY, Irish

CHESTER TAGUS




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MUSIC: FANFARE


ANNOUNCER: "Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons" is on the air.


MUSIC: THEME (Noël Coward's "Someday I'll Find You") ... THEN BEHIND--


ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, the makers of Kolynos Toothpaste present "Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons" -- one of the most famous characters of American fiction in one of radio's most thrilling dramas. Tonight and every Thursday night from seven-thirty to eight Eastern War Time, the famous old investigator will take from his files and bring to us one of his most celebrated missing persons cases. 


MUSIC: THEME UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: To have a charming attractive smile -- teeth that feel fresh and clean -- resolve right now to use Kolynos, a high-polishing toothpaste. Kolynos helps clean and polish teeth beautifully, yet with utmost safety. Kolynos has a refreshing minty flavor you're bound to go for, because it leaves your mouth feeling fresh as a daisy. Get Kolynos -- K-O-L-Y-N-O-S -- Kolynos Toothpaste tonight.


MUSIC: TAG ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: And now for Mr. Keen and the case of "Murder in the Air." It is almost midnight and in Mr. Keen's office as the tracer and his spinster secretary Miss Ellis finish up a very hard day's work-- 


KEEN: You've worked long enough, Miss Ellis. Don't you think you better go home now?


ELLIS: Well, there's still some more work to be done, Mr. Keen. 


KEEN: We can finish it in the morning. Do you realize what time it is? 


ELLIS: 'Round nine, I should think. 


KEEN: It's almost midnight.


ELLIS: No! 


KEEN: Yes! And I just as soon you wouldn't come in at all in the morning. Now get a good night's sleep.


ELLIS: I'll be here at the usual time. 


KEEN: I had a feeling that's what you'd say.


ELLIS: (CHUCKLES) Oh, may I have the key to that closet, Mr. Keen? 


KEEN: The key?


ELLIS: (YES) Mmm.


KEEN: Oh, I don't have the key.


ELLIS: You didn't take it out of the door this evening? 


KEEN: No.


ELLIS: Well, that's odd.


KEEN: Maybe Mike has it. 


ELLIS: Oh, yes, I didn't think of Mike. 


KEEN: You want to get something out of the closet, Miss Ellis?


ELLIS: Just a book I left there. I tried to open the closet before, but it was locked. Mike must have accidentally locked it before he left. Oh, well, it doesn't matter anyway. I'm not going to do much reading tonight. 


KEEN: (AMUSED) I should hope not. You go home and get some rest, Miss Ellis. I'll finish up here and lock the office.


ELLIS: All right, Mr. Keen.


SOUND: CLOCK STRIKES MIDNIGHT 


KEEN: (EXHALES) Just midnight, I guess. 


ELLIS: Hmm, late even for you. 


KEEN: I'll be leaving very soon. 


ELLIS: (MOVING OFF) Goodnight, Mr. Keen.


KEEN: Goodnight, Miss Ellis, and thanks for staying in.


SOUND: DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS AS MISS ELLIS EXITS ... CLOCK FINISHES STRIKING MIDNIGHT 


KEEN: (EXHALES, TO HIMSELF) I think I'll check this correspondence in the morning. I'm getting rather tired. 


SOUND: LOUD NOISE FROM THE CLOSET


KEEN: (BEAT, SHARPLY) Come out of that closet and keep your hands above your head. (NO RESPONSE) I said come out of that closet. 


SOUND: CLOSET DOOR UNLOCKS AND CREAKS SLOWLY OPEN


KEEN: Well! Good evening. 


BARBARA: (OFF, MEEKLY) Good evening. 


KEEN: May I ask how long you've been in there?


BARBARA: (CLOSER) Since eight o'clock. There was no one in the office when I came in and--


KEEN: (DRY) And you waited in the closet because it was so convenient, eh? 


BARBARA: Please, Mr. Keen, I know what you're thinking, but - I'm not a thief; I swear it. 


KEEN: What is your name, young lady? 


BARBARA: Barbara Halliday.


KEEN: And your business here? 


BARBARA: I had to see you, sir. 


KEEN: I have a telephone and a secretary. I usually make my appointments with her. 


BARBARA: I, er-- I was going to wait here in the office, but when I heard someone trying the outside door, I became frightened. That's why I hid in the closet.


KEEN: What frightened you? 


BARBARA: (BEAT, SLOWLY) Mr. Keen, do you know what it's like to be marked for murder?


KEEN: (BEAT) Please sit down, Miss Halliday. 


BARBARA: (SHIVERS) Thank you. You'll help me, won't you, Mr. Keen? I have no one else to turn to. 


KEEN: My real job in life is helping those who've had a loved one suddenly or mysteriously disappear. There are thousands of real missing persons cases every year in this country. 


BARBARA: I know there must be a great many, Mr. Keen, but I saw your name in connection with the Bennett murder case -- the singing star at the Palladium? 


KEEN: Well, that's true. In that case I'd been asked by a man who loved that girl to try to find her when she disappeared. But I found her murdered. 


BARBARA: Mr. Keen, do I have to wait until I'm murdered to get you to take my case?


KEEN: Very well put. Of course you don't, my dear.


BARBARA: I have money; inherited when my sister died. I - I can pay you whatever you charge.


KEEN: The money is not important. I happen to have all I need and I'm an old bachelor. But go on now with your story. 


BARBARA: Well, Mr. Keen, I live in Cleveland. Up until the time of my sister's death a month ago, I'd been living with her and with my brother-in-law. His name is Tagus; Chester Tagus. 


KEEN: I see. 


BARBARA: After Grace's death I decided I needed a rest. It was all too much for me. We were very close, and her sudden death was a blow. 


KEEN: Her sudden death? 


BARBARA: Yes, Mr. Keen. 


KEEN: Go on, please. 


BARBARA: I arrived in New York about two weeks ago. And that's when things began to happen.


KEEN: What things, Miss Halliday?


BARBARA: Three attempts were made on my life. Any one of them could have been my finish. Frankly, I - I don't know yet why they all failed. 


KEEN: Well, tell me about them.


BARBARA: The first occurred on the street -- in full view of several people. 


KEEN: And where was this?


BARBARA: Uptown, near Columbia University. I - I'd gone up to the university on a sightseeing tour, by myself. I took a Fifth Avenue bus and got off at One Hundred and Tenth Street.


KEEN: But the university is at One Hundred and Sixteenth.


BARBARA: I know, Mr. Keen, but I wanted to walk for a few blocks. I had an uncomfortable feeling on that bus -- as if someone were watching me. I walked up the drive to One Hundred and Thirteenth Street and then turned east toward Broadway. Do you know the street, sir? 


KEEN: I think so. A few apartment houses, mostly four-story walk-ups.


BARBARA: Halfway up the block, some workmen were about to lower a piano to the street. They were moving it apparently. There was a large pulley on the roof and they had the piano halfway through a window. I only half noticed those things as I walked up the street. My mind was on something else. 


KEEN: Oh? What? 


BARBARA: A man was following me: a man in a dark coat, the collar turned up; dark glasses. There were other people on the street and I got the feeling for a moment that it was all very silly. What harm could a man possibly do in a street full of people? That's how I argued to myself.


SOUND: INTO A FLASHBACK ... BARBARA'S STEPS ON SIDEWALK ... THEN IN BG


BARBARA: (NARRATES) For a moment I thought of running. I walked faster. 


SOUND: FASTER STEPS, IN BG


BARBARA: (NARRATES) So did he. 


SOUND: BARBARA'S AND MAN'S BRISK STEPS, IN BG


BARBARA: (NARRATES) But suddenly I decided to face him and I turned. 


SOUND: THEIR STEPS ABRUPTLY STOP


BARBARA: (INHALES, TENSE) What do you want? 


MAN: (FEIGNS INNOCENCE) Uh, pardon me, ma'am? 


BARBARA: You've been following me. What you want?! 


MAN: I'm terribly sorry. I - I didn't mean to frighten you. I'm a stranger in New York and I wanted to ask directions.


BARBARA: You could have asked someone else. 


MAN: Of course. I'm sorry. Er, do you have the right time?


BARBARA: (CHECKS WATCH) Er, it's four-thirty. 


MAN: Four-thirty. You're very kind. 


BARBARA: Now will you please go? (SCREAMS) Watch out!


SOUND: HUGE CRASH! OF FALLING PIANO ON SIDEWALK!


MUSIC: HUGE CURTAIN! ... FOR THE END OF THE FLASHBACK


BARBARA: It was the piano, Mr. Keen. It hit a projecting ledge as it fell and missed me. Otherwise I wouldn't be telling you this right now.


KEEN: You think that was deliberate? 


BARBARA: I know it was now. I know it sounds crazy, but I'm convinced that that man kept me there under the piano until his accomplice opened the pulley on the roof. 


KEEN: Well, I, er-- I don't want to sound skeptical, Miss Halliday, but don't you think it was quite a coincidence that you happened to walk up a certain street at a certain time just when some workmen were removing a piano? 


BARBARA: This is my explanation, Mr. Keen. It may not be logical to you, but I believe it. There were two men following me. They actually had a different plan in mind, but they saw the piano -- and they made their attempt with that on the spur of the moment. 


KEEN: And the workmen saw nothing? 


BARBARA: No. There was no one on the roof at the time. 


KEEN: Hmm. You say there were three attempts to kill you? 


BARBARA: Yes. The second attempt occurred on the subway. The following morning I decided to visit the Cloisters. I took a subway at Forty-Second Street; an express. 


KEEN: At what time was this?


BARBARA: Around eleven o'clock. It wasn't the rush hour and I - I was alone in the rear car. At least, I thought I was alone -- until I noticed a man sitting at the other end. The same dark glasses; dark coat with the collar turned up. He disappeared in the confusion right after the piano fell and-- There he was again. I watched him out of the corner of my eye. When the train reached Fifty-Ninth Street he'd moved his feet and he was now directly opposite me. 


KEEN: Didn't you try to get out?


BARBARA: I was afraid to move! I prayed that someone else would board the car, but it was still empty except for us when the doors closed -- and the train began to move.


KEEN: What happened then? 


SOUND: INTO ANOTHER FLASHBACK ... SUBWAY INTERIOR SNEAKS IN BEHIND--


BARBARA: (NARRATES) The run between Fifty-Ninth and One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth Street is the longest on the line. I suppose it really only takes a few minutes, but to me it seemed as if I was living my whole lifetime over again, because the man with the dark glasses had deliberately changed his seat again and he was now sitting next to me. 


SOUND: SUBWAY INTERIOR UP, TO FILL A PAUSE, CONTINUES BEHIND--


BARBARA: (NARRATES) There was no conductor on that subway car -- sometimes there aren't. I started to get panicky. I - I couldn't scream. We were in the last car and the noise was too strong. I got up and moved towards the end of the train. And he followed. Then I knew what he wanted to do! He wanted to push me off the train! I started to choke with fear. I - I wanted to beg him to leave me alone, but the words wouldn't come. And he was pushing me against the gate and fumbling for the catch. Suddenly I found my voice and I screamed at the top of my lungs! (SCREAMS JUST AS--)


SOUND: BRAKES SQUEAL! WHISTLE BLOWS!


MUSIC: HUGE CURTAIN! ... FOR THE END OF THE FLASHBACK


BARBARA: (SLOW AND WEARY) Later, I opened my eyes, and found a conductor looking down at me. I - I'd fainted. My enemy was gone. 


KEEN: Was there an investigation? 


BARBARA: No, I - I didn't tell anyone what had happened; I just took a cab home as quickly as I could and went to bed. The next day I was ill from fear and anxiety. Every time I heard a footstep in my hall I thought it was the man with the dark glasses. 


KEEN: You kept to your room then for several days?


BARBARA: Yes, I had my meals sent up. The only one I would admit was the waitress who brought my food from the restaurant downstairs.


KEEN: Where were you living? 


BARBARA: In a brownstone house on Thirty-Seventh, Mr. Keen. I've since changed to a woman's hotel, the Charlotte. 


KEEN: Yes. Go on. 


BARBARA: Well, at the end of three days I began to get hold of myself again. I felt stronger and I decided to leave town as soon as I could. And then one evening Marian, the waitress, brought my dinner as usual.


SOUND: INTO ANOTHER FLASHBACK ... KNOCK ON DOOR


BARBARA: (STARTLED GASP) Who is it? 


MARIAN: (BEHIND DOOR) Marian, ma'am.


BARBARA: (RELIEVED) Oh. Just a moment, I'll let you in.


SOUND: RATTLE OF CHAIN AS BROWNSTONE DOOR UNLOCKS AND OPENS


MARIAN: How are ya today, Miss Halliday? 


BARBARA: I'm fine, thank you; much better. 


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES


MARIAN: I got you some tasty stew -- Irish stew. I'm sure you'll like it. 


BARBARA: Thank you, Marian. 


MARIAN: Oh, my goodness, you've been leading a hermit's life up here. No friends, no fresh air, no movies. 


BARBARA: (LIGHTLY) I didn't miss the movies so much, but the fresh air -- I could certainly use some of that. 


MARIAN: Why don't you go out for a walk after dinner? 


BARBARA: (TENSE) No, I - I don't think so. 


MARIAN: Oh, but it's so nice out and you'll feel fine after you have that lovely dinner. Mmmm, wait till you taste that stew. I had some myself and it's super.


BARBARA: I'll bet it is.


MARIAN: Do you want me to uncover it for you?


BARBARA: No, thanks, I'll do it. 


SOUND: METAL COVER REMOVED


BARBARA: Mmmm, stew does look good. 


MARIAN: There's hot potatoes under the other cover.


SOUND: SECOND COVER REMOVED


BARBARA: Oh, they look nice, too. 


MARIAN: And under that third dish, um-- Oh, I guess they must be the peas. 


SOUND: THIRD COVER REMOVED


BARBARA: Oh, thank you very much. (BIG STARTLED GASP)


MARIAN: What is it, Miss Halliday? 


BARBARA: (BEAT, SHAKEN) In-- In the dish, Marian. 


MARIAN: (HORRIFIED EXCLAMATION)


SOUND: CRASH! OF DISH SMASHED ON FLOOR


MARIAN: (UNEASY, QUIETLY) It's a spider. A dead spider.


BARBARA: (THOROUGHLY UNNERVED, SLOWLY) Do you know what kind of a spider that is? (NO ANSWER) They call it the Black Widow -- the deadliest in the country.


MUSIC: FIRST ACT CURTAIN


ANNOUNCER: What a strange story Barbara tells Mr. Keen. It continues in just a minute. "Mr. Keen" is broadcast to you by Kolynos Toothpaste. After all is said and done, all any dentifrice is supposed to do is clean your teeth. Thousands of folks like you and me have found that Kolynos, the high-polishing toothpaste, does that job thoroughly and safely. And Kolynos does a real job in helping remove surface film from teeth. Safely, quickly, it helps brush away that clouding surface film which often hides the true beauty of your smile. It leaves your teeth shining clean; looking their loveliest. Run your tongue over your teeth and you feel the difference. Look in the mirror and you see the difference. What's more, you'll be delighted with the pleasant minty taste of Kolynos. You'll find it leaves your mouth feeling cool and fresh as a May morning. If you do not already use Kolynos Toothpaste, won't you try it soon? That's spelled K-O-L-Y-N-O-S, Kolynos Toothpaste. 


MUSIC: TAG ... THEN OUT BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: Now back to Barbara and Mr. Keen. 


KEEN: You say the spider was dead, Miss Halliday? 


BARBARA: Yes.


KEEN: It may have been dead when it was placed there. I don't suppose the waitress knew anything about it. 


BARBARA: She was just as frightened as I was.


KEEN: You see, I have a theory, Miss Halliday. I don't believe anyone was really trying to kill you. If they wanted you dead, they could have accomplished it in the subway or in some other less complicated way. 


BARBARA: But you do believe all this has happened to me? You don't think I'm making it up? 


KEEN: No, my dear, I believe you, but I think they've all been merely attempts at murder -- attempts to frighten you.


BARBARA: But why? 


KEEN: That's what I'm going to find out. Now, you say you're living at the Charlotte? 


BARBARA: Yes, sir. 


KEEN: Do you believe you're safe there? 


BARBARA: Safe as I could be anywhere.


KEEN: Well, suppose I see you home now. I must say, this is one of the most peculiar cases I've ever had. And if it's in my power, my dear, I'll solve it for both of us.


MUSIC: BRIDGE 


TAGUS: And you say Mr. Keen won't be in until noon? 


CLANCY: I doubt it, Mr. Tagus. My name is Clancy; Mike Clancy. I'm his assistant. Can I help you, sir? 


TAGUS: Well, perhaps. You see, my sister-in-law disappeared from our home in Cleveland. 


CLANCY: When was this, Mr. Tagus? 


TAGUS: Two weeks ago, following my wife's death. I know she came to New York, and I've heard of Mr. Keen's marvelous work as a tracer of lost persons. I was-- Well, I was hoping he might be able to help me.


CLANCY: What is your sister-in-law's name, sir? 


TAGUS: Halliday. Barbara Halliday. I have a picture of her here. 


CLANCY: Oh. I see. Well, if it's just a simple case--


TAGUS: Well, I'm afraid it isn't, Mr. Clancy. Simple, I mean. 


CLANCY: Oh. 


TAGUS: You see, Miss Halliday is not ---- well. She has what you might call ---- hallucinations. 


CLANCY: Oh, I see. 


TAGUS: As a matter of fact, sir, there's no question about it. 


CLANCY: About what, Mr. Tagus? 


TAGUS: My sister-in-law Barbara ---- has lost her mind. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE


KEEN: So he said she'd lost her mind, Mike? 


CLANCY: Yes, Mr. Keen, sir. And according to Mr. Tagus she tried to run away from home on several occasions. He was going to put her under the care of a doctor when this happened. 


KEEN: And she has hallucinations? 


CLANCY: Yes, sir. She thinks someone's trying to kill her. 


KEEN: Hmm. What sort of a man was this Mr. Tagus, Mike? 


CLANCY: Oh, very pleasant; nice to talk to. He was mighty worried. I told him you might be able to find the girl if he gave you a little time, sir. 


KEEN: I have found her, Mike. 


CLANCY: You what, sir? 


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP


CLANCY: (INTO PHONE) Mr. Keen's office. -- Eh? Well, just a minute, please. (TO KEEN) Cleveland calling, sir. 


KEEN: Thanks, Mike. (INTO PHONE) Hello? -- Oh, yes, inspector. You received my wire? -- Well, it's just a hunch. I suggest you call the coroner and consult with him. -- Yes. -- Yes, you can reach me here in my office. -- Very well, Inspector Bragg, and thank you. 


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


CLANCY: What's this all about, Mr. Keen? 


KEEN: I can't explain now, Mike, because all the pieces don't fit, but I'll try to give you a slight idea of what's been going on while we're on our way.


CLANCY: On our way where, sir? 


KEEN: The Charlotte hotel. I'm going to make an offer to Miss Halliday -- and it's probably the strangest offer that's ever been made to anyone. Let's go, Mike. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE


BARBARA: We can talk here in the lobby, Mr. Keen. 


KEEN: This is my assistant Mike Clancy, Miss Halliday. 


BARBARA: How do you do? 


CLANCY: I'm glad to know you, miss, and sure and I just met your brother-in-law. 


BARBARA: My brother-in-law? Here in New York? 


CLANCY: Well, he-- 


KEEN: (INTERRUPTS QUICKLY) We haven't got much time, Mike. Do you mind? 


CLANCY: (SURPRISED) Oh. Well, no, of course not, sir. 


KEEN: Miss Halliday, I've been thinking over everything you told me about your home life, and I've been trying to make some logic out of those details you've given me concerning your sister and her husband. Now, you say you were always on good terms with him? 


BARBARA: Oh, always, Mr. Keen. Well, the only thing is, I - I believe he sometimes resented my presence in his home. But that was only natural. When he married Grace, he didn't bargain for a third party.


KEEN: Well, that's neither here nor there at the moment. I've thought of one way in which we might be able to catch the would-be murderer. But it involves a good deal of danger. 


BARBARA: I'm not afraid, Mr. Keen. 


KEEN: Well, first let me explain my plan and then give me your answer. Now, it's obvious that this man will make another attempt to kill you. I say it's obvious because he has something definite in mind. He wants you to believe you're in great danger for some reason. 


BARBARA: Go on, Mr. Keen.


KEEN: When a hunter in the African jungles wanted to bag a tiger, he'd set a lamb in the trap. 


BARBARA: (BEAT) Well?


KEEN: Would you be the lamb? 


BARBARA: (BEAT, UNEASY) You want me deliberately to expose myself to him? 


KEEN: Yes. 


BARBARA: (BEAT) All right. 


KEEN: Now, wait -- don't give me your answer so quickly. Let me explain the greatest danger of all. Up to now, as I've told you, he's only been bluffing, in my opinion -- just trying to frighten you half out of your mind. Well, if he discovers that you have help, and that you've set a trap for him, he may want to really finish the job this time. 


BARBARA: I understand.


KEEN: And you're still willing to do it? 


BARBARA: I'd rather take that chance than live like a hunted rabbit for the rest of my life. (TEARFUL) That's how I'm living now, Mr. Keen. And I can't stand it any longer. I can't stand it. (WEEPS BRIEFLY BEHIND--)


CLANCY: (COMFORTING) Oh, there, there now. 


KEEN: It's all right, Miss Halliday. We're going to help you, I promise. 


BARBARA: (SOBS, SNIFFLES)


KEEN: Now here is the plan. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE


SOUND: EERIE EAST RIVER BACKGROUND (BOAT HORNS, ET CETERA)


CLANCY: This is it, Miss Halliday -- the Brooklyn Bridge. 


BARBARA: (NERVOUS) Mr. Keen wants me to walk across it alone, Mr. Clancy? 


CLANCY: Yes. I'll follow you, but from a distance. We want to give this killer plenty of rope. 


BARBARA: It's very foggy tonight.


CLANCY: So much the better. 


BARBARA: The bridge seems to be empty now from here. 


CLANCY: People don't usually walk across it on a night like this. There's plenty of traffic goin' across in cars, but-- Well, they won't do you any good in case you get into trouble. 


BARBARA: I realize that. 


CLANCY: Now, somewhere on that bridge, Mr. Keen is waiting. I only hope he's waiting in the right place at the right time. 


BARBARA: I have enough confidence in him, Mr. Clancy. I'm not afraid. 


CLANCY: Well, good for you. Be steady now, and keep your wits about you. You can rest assured that Mr. Keen will be there when you need him. 


BARBARA: Well, goodbye, Mr. Clancy. 


CLANCY: No, no, no -- not goodbye. Just "till we meet again." And good luck, miss. 


MUSIC: OMINOUS BRIDGE


SOUND: EAST RIVER BACKGROUND (BOAT HORNS, ET CETERA)


TAGUS: (CALLS, FROM OFF) Barbara-- 


BARBARA: (STARTLED) What--? (SURPRISED) Chester! What are you doing here?


TAGUS: (CLOSER, FRIENDLY) That's just what I was going to ask you. 


BARBARA: Oh, I was just walking.


TAGUS: Why, dear, do you realize how I've been searching for you? I've combed New York.


BARBARA: I'm sorry I left so suddenly, Chester. I didn't mean to worry you. 


TAGUS: Haven't you been well, Barbara? 


BARBARA: Yes, I've been-- (CHUCKLES) This is just about the most peculiar meeting I've ever had.


TAGUS: Is it? 


BARBARA: Well, don't you think it's a coincidence -- to meet on [the] Brooklyn Bridge in a city like this? 


TAGUS: Well, no matter. Come, we'll go home, Barbara. 


BARBARA: I can't go home.


TAGUS: Well, what do you mean?


BARBARA: Chester, I - I can't explain now, but - someone's been trying to kill me. 


TAGUS: What? 


BARBARA: I know it sounds crazy, but I have absolute proof. 


TAGUS: Have you? 


BARBARA: And someone is going to help me find this man.


TAGUS: Who, Barbara? 


BARBARA: I can't tell you that.


TAGUS: But you say you have proof? 


BARBARA: Yes, I - I'm going to the police tomorrow with my benefactor and-- 


TAGUS: (INTERRUPTS) Wait. Just stop here for a moment, hmm? 


BARBARA: Why? 


TAGUS: I have very bad news for you, Barbara. 


BARBARA: What is it? 


TAGUS: I'm the one who's been trying to kill you. 


BARBARA: You're joking.


TAGUS: Was the piano a joke? Or the subway? 


BARBARA: (REALIZES WITH HORROR) Chester-- 


TAGUS: Don't scream. It won't do any good. There's no one about. 


BARBARA: Please, Chester -- don't - don't look at me like that. Your eyes. Chester, you're mad! (TREMBLES, WHIMPERS, AND GASPS BEHIND--)


TAGUS: We're in the middle of the bridge. It's a long drop from here, my dear. They say Steve Brodie did it, but I don't see how he could have managed it and lived, do you? 


BARBARA: No-- No-- 


TAGUS: You have fifty thousand dollars in trusts, Barbara, which will go to me.


BARBARA: Keep away from me, do you hear? 


TAGUS: Goodbye, Barbara. 


BARBARA: Let me go. Let me--! (SCREAMS) 


KEEN: Take your hands off her!


TAGUS: Get out of my way. 


SOUND: TAGUS' RUNNING STEPS ON BRIDGE, IN AGREEMENT WITH--


KEEN: (CALLS) Mike! He's headed your way! 


CLANCY: He won't get far, sir! 


KEEN: We've got you between us now, Mr. Tagus, and there's no escaping.


CLANCY: No funny business now, mister. This gun really works. 


TAGUS: Stand back, so you hear?! Stand back!


BARBARA: He's climbing the rail!


CLANCY: He's gonna jump!


KEEN: Stop him, Mike!


CLANCY: I'll get him, boss!


TAGUS: (LAUGHS MANIACALLY) 


BARBARA: (SCREAMS)


CLANCY: I've got you, Tagus! Don't try to pull a Brodie on me. 


TAGUS: (STRUGGLES, DESPERATELY) Get away from me. Get away from me or I'll--


CLANCY: Aw, no, you don't. I got ya and I'm savin' ya for the police, me fine feathered friend. 


MUSIC: BRIDGE


KEEN: Feeling better now, Miss Halliday? 


BARBARA: Much better. Thank you, Mr. Keen. 


KEEN: I brought you back to my office before taking you home, because I wanted to show you this wire from Inspector Bragg in Cleveland. Shall I read it to you? 


BARBARA: Please. Mr. Keen, I'm so mixed up. 


KEEN: As well you might be. This wire will be quite a shock. (READS) "Have definite proof that Grace Tagus was murdered. Handkerchief found in Chester Tagus' trunk contained traces of poison. Have wired New York police to hold Tagus. Thanks, Bragg." 


BARBARA: Dear God. Poor Grace. 


KEEN: You thought your sister was attempting to exterminate ants in your home when she accidentally breathed some deadly poison fumes, Miss Halliday? 


BARBARA: Yes, that's right, Mr. Keen. But I'm amazed how you should know all this. 


KEEN: I've investigated it, my dear. Actually, those fumes came from a handkerchief, which her husband used to kill her with.


BARBARA: He must be mad.


KEEN: He seemed to be, on that bridge. At any rate, we've got him now. And there's still another explanation for his actions in the case. 


BARBARA: Yes? 


KEEN: Did you ever hear of a codicil in your mother's will which stated that her money was to go to her eldest daughter, and then to you should your sister die, providing the beneficiary was sane and completely capable of handling the financial affairs of the family? 


BARBARA: Why, no. I wasn't present at the reading of the original will.


KEEN: Well, your brother-in-law was. I've contacted the family lawyer -- a man you told me about the other day -- and he gave me enough information to come to certain very definite conclusions. It was then that I began to realize that someone was trying to drive you mad, Miss Halliday, and I suspected that someone was Chester Tagus. Well, apparently I was right. He would have been next in line for the money with you in the asylum. But now he'll have to face the charge of the murder of your sister.


BARBARA: Mr. Keen, how can I ever thank you for what you've done for me? 


KEEN: It's not necessary to thank me, my dear. The thanks I receive from seeing that justice is done is quite enough. You can go home now, Miss Halliday, with no fear or foreboding. I can assure you now, there'll be no more "murder in the air."


MUSIC: CURTAIN ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: Listen next week at the same time when Mr. Keen brings us the fascinating case of "The Lady Who Didn't Want to Be Found." 


MUSIC: UP AND OUT 


ANNOUNCER: Have you noticed any change in the taste of your dentifrice lately? If so, we invite you to treat yourself to Kolynos, a toothpaste that really tastes good. You'll love its tangy minty flavor that sets your tongue a tingle; leaves your mouth feeling cool and fresh as a sea breeze. And children really go for that zippy Kolynos flavor. You never have to coax youngsters to clean their teeth with keen-tasting Kolynos. What a job Kolynos does in cleaning teeth! Gets them clean; looking their best. That's because Kolynos is a high-polishing toothpaste. Its action on teeth is like a jeweler's polish removing tarnish from precious silver, because it helps brush away masking surface film. Kolynos leaves your teeth shining clean. Ask your druggist for Kolynos -- K-O-L-Y-N-O-S -- Kolynos Toothpaste tonight. You'll be glad you did. 


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: You've been listening to "Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons," now on the air at a new time, every Thursday night, seven-thirty to eight, Eastern War Time, over this network. Don't miss "Mr. Keen" next Thursday night when the kindly old tracer turns to the case of "The Lady Who Didn't Want to Be Found." This is Larry Elliott saying good night for the makers of Kolynos Toothpaste and inviting you to listen to "Friday on Broadway" at seven-thirty p.m. Eastern War Time over most of these stations tomorrow night. 


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


2ND ANNCR: Here's marvelous news, ladies. Aerowax gives you sparkling new-looking floors for old in six to nine minutes flat without a single stroke of rubbing. Just apply and let it dry itself. In no time at all you're proud of your shining wax floors. A full pint costs only twenty-five cents. Be sure to get Aerowax, A-E-R-O-W-A-X, tomorrow.


CBS ANNCR: This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.


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