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Martians Never Die

Tales of Tomorrow

Martians Never Die

Mar 12 1953



WJZ AND NETWORK   TALES OF TOMORROW

9:00-9:30 PM EST  MARCH 12, 1953  THURSDAY




"MARTIANS NEVER DIE"

BY

LUCIUS DANIEL


SCRIPT: DON WITTY

DIRECTION: WARREN SOMERVILLE 

MUSIC: BOBBY CHRISTIAN


CAST:

OMENTOR

HAL STERN

FAY CURTIS

CLYDE CURTIS (DBL REPORTER)

DR. ANDERSON (DBL CUB





WJZ & NET  TALES OF TOMORROW

(  )  (  )

9:00-9:30 PM EST  MARCH 12, 1953  THURSDAY



(MUSIC:. . .THEME. . .)


ANNCR: TALES OF TOMORROW. TALES BEYOND HUMAN IMAGINATION...UNTIL THEY HAPPEN!


(MUSIC:. . .ACCENT. . .)


ANNCR: TALES OF TOMORROW. STORY NUMBER ELEVEN!


(MUSIC:. . .ACCENT. . .)


ANNCR: "MARTIANS NEVER DIE," BY LUCIUS DANIEL.


(MUSIC:. . .CLIMAX AND OUT. . .)


OMENTOR: This is your host, OMENTOR, saying hello for ABC.


(MUSIC:. . .UNDER. . . SPECULATIVE. . .)


OMENTOR: What is the ideal bodyguard? The most ferocious looking? The most efficient killer? Or the most devoted. On earth, you might find a combination of all three; but he'd never be as effective in the long run as the curious creature which came back from Mars with Dr. Clyde Curtis, in the year 2512. We shall very soon sense the unique qualities of this pet -- one Shaughtowel by name - the inspiration for a story in Galaxy Magazine called MARTIANS NEVER DIE.


(MUSIC:. . .UP AND FADE UNDER. . .)


OMENTOR: (NOTE: OMENTOR SHOULD HEREIN CREATE THE MOOD OF A SLIGHTLY SUPER-BEING, LOOKING DOWN WITH AMUSED DETACHMENT AS A STORY ACTUALLY TAKES PLACE UNDER HIS EYES)


The building is of massive stone and completely circular. There is an inner room, a barren circle with unbroken walls three feet in diameter and entirely open to the sky at the top. The only access to it from the ground level is a door of steel, four inches thick, with a series of small holes drilled through the top.


The outer room is a narrow passageway which completely encircles the inner chamber. No windows, no furnishings; the wall broken only by another door which leads to the street. A fluorescent tube spreads its cold light in the narrow space between the two doors, and under it stand Hal Stern and Fay Curtis. She looks beautiful, he chunky and affluent, and they both are nervous.


(SLIGHT ECHO. . .NOTHING ELSE)


FAY: I'm frightened, Hal.


HAL: (GRUFFLY) No need to be.


FAY: Suppose Clyde comes back...?


HAL: He hasn't come back the last four years and there's no reason to think he'll come back this time. I wouldn't have come over to this grim place if you hadn't...


FAY: (GENTLY) Don't Hal.


HAL: Well, why can't you forget Clyde completely?


FAY: You can't expect me to. Not until I feel absolutely certain he won't return.


HAL: (GRUMBLES) Said himself...If I don't get back from Mars by the second year, he said, I'll probably never make it.


FAY: It's a little thing to ask...to wait for fifteen minutes once a year...


HAL: It's a lot to ask, considering the way I feel about you! Let's have an end to this nonsense! Let's have him declared legally dead and ...!


(THERE'S FIDDLING WITH THE DOOR KNOB)


FAY: (QUICKLY) Wait.


(THE DOOR OPENS...CLOSES)


HAL: (COLD) Who are you?


CUB: I'm from the Telegram.


HAL: So they're sending cub reporters now.


CUB: (INDIGNANT) I'm no cub....I've been with them a whole year!


HAL: You're a little early. Wait outside.


CUB: What time is he supposed to come back? 


HAL: At three forty-four and twenty-nine seconds. If he comes.


CUB: How can you spot the exact second that way?


FAY: (BEING PLEASANT TO COVER HAL'S CRUSTINESS) Because that's the time when the solar currents are the most favorable.


CUB: Once a year? 


FAY: Yes. 


CUB: You're Mrs. Curtis, aren't you?


FAY: I am.


CUB: Do you know the principle on which Dr. Curtis got to Mars? I mean....it sounds like fourth dimentional stuff to me.


FAY: It's not fourth dimensional and I'm afraid it's too complicated to explain.


CUB: Didn't you get a little sore... the Doctor taking off for another planet that way and leaving you behind?


HAL: That's an impertinent question if I ever heard one!


CUB: You're Mr. Stern, aren't you?


HAL: (DRAWING UP) I am.


CUB: And you helped Dr. Curtis finance this Mars project?


HAL: I have been his friend and financial adviser for many years, yes.


CUB: Is that all?


HAL: What do you mean by that?


CUB: Skip it. (HALF TURN) Where does that other door go?


FAY: To the projection room.


CUB: Could I take a look inside?


HAL: A diesel tractor couldn't pull that door open.


CUB: Well...how will the Doc get out if he does come back?


FAY: It opens by pneumatic pressure. The sphere will come into the projection chamber at tremendous speed. Air compression will open the door and act as a cushion for the sphere at the same time.


CUB: I guess those little holes at the top of the door are part of the system, right?


FAY: The air will come through those holes with a whistling sound ...


CUB: (JOVIALLY) Give you a little warning, huh?


(START AIR WHISTLING....FAINTLY BUT BUILD FAST)


HAL: (ANGRILY) That sounds very much like an insinuation that...


FAY: (QUICKLY) Hal...please.


CUB: Hey! What's that noise!


FAY: (CATCHING HER BREATH) Hal...


HAL: It's the air pressure!


FAY: He is back!


CUB: Oh, brother, I get a break!


(BUILD AIR PRESSURE TO PEAK AND HOLD IT)


OMENTOR: (OVER SOUND...CYNICALLY AMUSED) There they stand, all three faces stamped with fascination as the heavy steel door is slowly and noiselessly forced open. The cub reporter is aglow with his good fortune at stumbling into a major story. The lady contemplates a husband she had never expected to see again. But Mr. Stern is our man. For reasons of his own, Mr. Stern has not wanted Dr. Curtis to reappear, and the fascination on his face is mixed with several other emotions. He is saying to himself...


HAL: (MUTTERING) It can't make any difference. It mustn't!


OMENTOR: The steel door stands wide now. The rush of compressed air is receding (SOUND FOLLOW) and the grey hull of the sphere is sinking slowly into view. It comes to rest on the floor of the projection chamber and a curved hatch swings outward directly behind the steel door. It's the moment when Dr. Curtis should appear, but there is no immediate sign of him. There is only this "creature" slithering through the hatch...


FAY: (HORRIFIED) Hal! What is it!


HAL: (SHIVERING) Move back, Fay! What if it should jump!


CUB: (EAGERLY) It's a Martian! It must be a Martian!


HAL: Unless it's Clyde...and something has happened to him!


FAY: (COVERING HER EYES) Oh, no!


CUB: (YELPS) It's not! I mean...there's Dr. Curtis behind the thing!


FAY: (LOOKING UP) Clyde? (THEN RUNNING TOWARD HIM) Clyde!


HAL: Fay! Look out for the thing!


CUB: Watch those tentacles... (CRINGING) ... look out!


CLYDE: (SLIGHTLY OFF) (QUIETLY) It's all right, Shaughtowel.


CUB: (IMPRESSED) Look at that. Behaves like a dog.


FAY: (OFF) (HAPPILY ANNOYED) Where have you been, darling...why have you stayed so long!


CLYDE: Later, Fay. We'll talk about it later.


FAY: (ANXIOUSLY) Are you ill?


CLYDE: (MOVING ON) No, but I must rest. Take me home.


CUB: (FAST) How about a word for the press, Doctor? Can you tell me about that thing?


CLYDE: I'll have a good many words for the press, son. Later.


CUB: Aw...not even a statement?


CLYDE: (WITH A SMILE) Don't worry....I'll see that you're given due credit for your patience.


HAL: (JOVIALLY) Have you got a word for an old friend, Clyde?


CLYDE: (SIGHS) Hello, Hal...hello.


HAL: If you'll move that beast out of the way I'd like to shake hands.


CLYDE: Shaughtowel will never bother a friend of mine. I must get home, though...please, Fay, help me to the car.


(MUSIC:. . . WEIRD, AS BEFITS THE BEAST. . .)


OMENTOR: An animus has already formed between Stern and the beast. Shaughtowel has been steadily eyeing the old friend and financial adviser. Stern's scalp develops a chronic tingling sensation. There's a strong leather odor as the creature brushes past Stern and gallumps to the door. It's built in the manner of a frog, except it stands five feet high while squatting on its powerful haunches. The feet are different, too, being studded with suction cups like those of an octopus. Mr. Stern is filled with loathing as he follows its grotesque form through the door. Imagine his state of mind as he finds himself sharing the rear seat of the car with it.


(MUSIC:. . . A FIGURE AND OUT. . .)


OMENTOR: Things grew worse for Stern as they arrive at the Curtis home. Fay appears not to notice him at all.


(DOOR CLOSE)


FAY: Now then, Clyde, there's your old easy chair. I want you to sit down and be completely relaxed...I am going to take care of you.


CLYDE: (SITTING) Don't be too concerned, Fay. This strange feeling I have is quite normal, really.


FAY: Nevertheless, I'm going to call Dr. Anderson. Here...let me open the top of your shirt.


CLYDE: Thank you darling. Has everything gone well for you?


FAY: You couldn't expect me to be terribly happy with you away so long.


CLYDE: It was necessary, believe me.


FAY: (GENTLY) I'm sure it was. Would you like a brandy?


CLYDE: No, thank you. Just rest.


FAY: I'm going to fix something to eat. How about some hot broth?


CLYDE: (SMILES) Let's try it.


FAY: (ABRUPTLY) Hal...?


HAL: Yes?


FAY: Go in the kitchen and put on some water to heat, will you? While I phone the doctor?


HAL: (MOVING OFF) Of course.


FAY: And Hal..... (HE LOOKS BACK) See if you can find a razor in that downstairs wash room. I'm sure he'll feel better with a clean shave.


(MUSIC:. . . ANGER. . .)


OMENTOR: (NO PAUSE) Mr. Stern is being made to feel like a houseboy and he is not pleased. He would gladly find the razor and out the throat of Doctor Curtis, except that he is fully aware of the consequences. He snatches a hasty glance at the thing. It is sitting close to the easy chair, alert to the discomfort of its master. Stern notes that its attention, at least, has ceased to focus on him, and he goes on into the kitchen where he can wonder quietly just what should be done. Fay follows him in before his thoughts have a chance to take form. Here is the opportunity for a quiet word of reassurance and he closes the door noiselessly behind her.


HAL: Fay...


FAY: (OFF) Did you find the bouillon cubes, Hal?


HAL: (WALKS TO HER QUICKLY) Hang the bouillon! Listen to me... we've got to find time for a little private discussion.


FAY: (STEPPING ON) About what?


HAL: About us, of course! About what we have to do now that Clyde is back!


FAY: (ABSENTLY) What we have to do is take care of him...now where did I put those cubes? 


(OPENS CUPBOARD DOOR)


HAL: (IMPATIENTLY) Have you forgotten everything we'd planned?


FAY: (SURPRISED) How can you even think about that, Hal? We talked about those plans when it looked as though Clyde would never come back. But he has some back, and he's sick, and he needs me.


HAL: So do I!


FAY: (SIMPLY) I'm sorry that's the way it is.


HAL: (THOROUGHLY ANGRY NOW) Suppose I just tell him the way things have been between us?


FAY: Mmm. .(A MOMENT'S THOUGHT) . .I think Clyde would understand.


HAL: (BLURTING) He wouldn't understand the speculating I've done with his investments!


FAY: (QUIETLY SURPRISED) What?


HAL: I did it for you! I was trying to get back some of the money he wasted on that machine!


FAY: But I never asked you to. There was plenty for everything I needed.


HAL: Nevertheless, it was done for you, and I'll make that perfectly clear.


FAY: (COMPASSIONATE) Poor Hal. You must have lost a great deal of Clyde's money.


HAL: Whether I lost it or not...the point is that Clyde never approved of speculation and at your insistence....


FAY: (IMPATIENTLY) Oh, please! I'll stay with Clyde and look after him as long as he wants me. You can handle the situation according to your own standards!


HAL: You bet I will!


FAY: Meantime you might cooperate until Doctor Anderson gets here and we find out how sick Clyde really is. You certainly can't be boorish enough to bother him in his present condition!


(MUSIC: . . . . . . . . CONFLICT. . . .)


OMENTOR: (THOROUGHLY AMUSED AND A LITTLE DELIGHTED) The lady is leaving Mr. Stern flat and he is smoldering. One hardly feels sympathy for him...he's old enough to know that even Lloyds of London will not insure the affections of a woman. But now he turns, quite naturally if you like, to thoughts of mayhem. If Clyde lacked the common courtesy to get lost in the void then he, Mr. Stern, will have to put him out of the way. This will have to be done before Clyde gets around to revoking the power of attorney he had thoughtfully delegated to his old friend. So, the decision is made and immediately becomes irrevocable in Mr. Stern's mind...it is only a question of how. (CHUCKLES) With what a splendid sense of determination can a man will himself to destruction!


(MUSIC: . . UP AND OUT ON A SPLENDID SENSE OF DETERMINATION)


(DISTANT CLAMOR OF VOICES)


(POUNDING ON OUTER DOOR) 


OMENTOR: Mr. Stern sulks in the kitchen for a time. He is attracted back to the living room by a swelling clamor, and finds himself facing the awesome consequence of fame... public attention. The press and the curious ones have beaten a path to the door of the man who not only got to Mars, but made it back. If Dr. Curtis' life should depend on rest and quiet, he will have little chance to live.


FAY: (DISTRACTED) Hal will you please take care of those people at the door! It's impossible to hear yourself think!


HAL: (LOOKING OUT THE WINDOW) I don't think there are more than two hundred and fifty out there...shall I take a chair and drive them away?


FAY: At least make them stop that pounding on the door! Why must people be so inhuman!


HAL: (RELUCTANT) I'll do what I can.


(DOOR OPENED...CLAMOR COMES FULL ON)


REPORTER: We're the press, bud...let us in!


HAL: Sorry....and there's a chain bolt on this door so don't try to break it down.


REPORTER: Don't tell me the Doc is publicity shy!


HAL: Dr. Curtis is sick and can't talk to anyone yet.


REPORTER: What's he gonna do...keep his story a secret?


HAL: He'll make a statement as soon as he's able. He certainly won't talk to anyone until his physician has examined him.


REPORTER: When will that be?


HAL: Dr. Anderson has been called. That's all I know.


REPORTER: Who are you?


HAL: A friend.


REPORTER: How about telling us what you know?


HAL: I don't know any more than you do.


REPORTER: Is it true he brought a Martian back with him?


HAL: He brought back some creature from Mars, yes.


REPORTER: How about some pictures? Maybe Mrs. Curtis would pose with it....I hear she's a good looking gal.


HAL: No pictures and no story until further notice. Please have the common courtesy to stop pounding on the door.


REPORTER: (PLAINTIVE) Look, bud, I'm only trying to do my job!


HAL: (DROPS HIS VOICE) Lay off the door but stick around....I'll try to get some information for you later. I think there's something wrong with Dr. Curtis' heart.


REPORTER: (DITTO THE VOICE) Okay, bud...appreciate it. This is a hot story, y'know?


(DOOR CLOSE)


(REDUCE CLAMOR TO DISTANCE AS BEFORE)


FAY: Will they go away?


HAL: I don't think so. Clyde is news.


FAY: (DETERMINED) Then I'm going to call the police.


HAL: The police won't drive away the press.


(HEAVY POUNDING ON DOOR AGAIN)


FAY: Can't they stop that pounding on the door! Clyde is so weak he can hardly take this bouillon!


ANDERSON: (OUTSIDE) Open up in there! It's Doctor Anderson!


FAY: Thank heaven! Let him in, Hal...quickly!


HAL: It would help if you calmed your own nerves a little!


(DOOR OPENED)


ANDERSON: (IMPATIENT) Come-come! Take off that chain bolt, Stern!


HAL: (PIQUED) Just making sure you're not a reporter, Doctor!


(CHAIN BOLT TAKEN OFF)


ANDERSON: (WALKING IN) Where's Clyde!


(DOOR CLOSED BEHIND HIM...CHAIN BOLT BACK IN PLACE)


FAY: (NO PAUSE) Over here in his chair, Doctor Anderson. I'm afraid he'll have to be taken to a hospital.


CLYDE: (WEAKLY) No. No hospital.


ANDERSON: (BRUSQUE) Why not?


CLYDE: This condition is only temporary.


ANDERSON: How do you know? Are you an M.D.? Open his shirt all the way, Fay, while I get out a stethoscope. Where the devil have you been, Clyde, and what have you done to yourself to get in this condition? (TAKE) U-u-uh! What's this thing! Get it out of my way!


CLYDE: It's all right, Shaughtowel...Doctor Anderson is a friend.


ANDERSON: (MOLLIFIED) Huh! Well-behaved, even if it looks a fright. Here now...let's listen to your pump --


FAY: I'm afraid there's a strain, Doctor. The difference in gravity between Mars and Earth, you know?


ANDERSON: (PREOCCUPIED) Mmm! Mmm!


FAY: And that awful crowd outside! They'll be coming through the cracks in the floor!


ANDERSON: Be quiet! 


CLYDE: Tell you there's nothing wrong, Andy. The Ladonais told me exactly what to expect and what to do.


ANDERSON: Ladonais? Never heard of them!


CLYDE: They're the intelligent race on Mars. Quite similar to men but smaller.


ANDERSON: Thought this thing was a Martian.


CLYDE: Shaughtowel and his breed are used as pets.


ANDERSON: These Ladonais. Any doctors among them?


CLYDE: They're incredibly advanced, in ways we'd never suspect. They told me I'd feel this way, and that rest would be the only cure.


ANDERSON: Why aren't you in bed, then?


CLYDE: Rest, I said...not collapse. Matter of fact, I should be taking a little walk soon.


ANDERSON: Hmm. Hmmm. Nothing seriously wrong...I'll leave some pills....but see he doesn't take more than one every three hours, Fay.


FAY: Are they powerful?


ANDERSON: Quite powerful. They'll have him back to normal in a couple of days. Call me if I'm wrong.


HAL: (HAPPILY) I'll let you out, Doctor.


ANDERSON: You staying here, Stern?


HAL: Yes, and don't worry. We'll see Clyde gets plenty of attention.


ANDERSON: Better support him if he's set on taking that stroll. Right now that heart is working pretty hard.


HAL: (SLOWLY) I'll walk him out in back and let him sit by the ravine.


(MUSIC: . . . .A DEEP PLUNGE. . THEN UNDER WITH SOME SINISTER STUFF)


OMENTOR: Things are progressing nicely for Mr. Stern. Doctor Anderson has unknowingly provided the method for murder. The police arrive and inform all they are quarantined until health inspectors have examined Dr. Curtis. Thus, no interruptions. The crowds continue to mill about in the street, maintaining an air of confusion. There remains only Shaughtowel, and the creature must be disposed of before Stern can deal with its master. Mr. Stern concentrates on the problem and examines the monster carefully.


How would it defend itself? It has no teeth and therefore no bite. A creature of his size would hardly be equipped with a sting. Its haunches and arms look powerful, and the suction cups on its fingers would make a grip difficult to break. On the other hand it must have a thin skull, adjusted to the slight atmospheric pressure of Mars. The beast returns his stare malevolently and inches closer to his master, Dr. Curtis...it is somehow aware of Stern's intent. Curtis dozes in his chair and Stern waits for him to awaken. Waits until after dark.


(MUSIC:. . .UP SLIGHTLY, EMPHASIZING STERN'S MALEVOLENCE...HOLD)


HAL: You awake, Clyde?


CLYDE: (SLIGHTLY DAZED) Yes. I think so. Where am I?


HAL: Home.


CLYDE: Curious.. I feel as though I'd been in a trance.


HAL: That's the way you looked.


CLYDE: What time is it?


HAL: Around eight.


CLYDE: (ROUSING HIMSELF WITH EFFORT) I must move about. The Ladonais told me to move about, or I'd have trouble with my legs.


HAL: I'll help you. (PAUSE) If your beast will let me.


CLYDE: Let him support me, Shaughtowel.


HAL: It certainly keeps a close watch on you.


CLYDE: (WITH EFFORT AS HE GETS UP) An amazing creature in many ways. There...I'll just lean on your shoulder, Hal.


(DOOR OPENS, OFF)


FAY: (OFF) Did I hear...Clyde! Are you sure it's all right to move around?


CLYDE: It's necessary, my dear.


FAY: Where are you going?


HAL: Out to the garden. That all right, Clyde?


CLYDE: Splendid.


HAL: It's cool out there...and your old bench is still at the edge of the ravine.


CLYDE: It'll be pleasant to sit there again and contemplate the stars. Are the stars out?


HAL: I think so.


FAY: (COMING ON) Go ahead, then, darling. I'm just fixing something for Hal and me to eat.


HAL: I'm about ready for a little food. Don't let anything stop you, Fay.


(MUSIC:. . .UP AND FADE INTO. . .)


(NIGHT SOUNDS)


(THE CROWD FAINTLY IN THE DISTANCE)


OMENTOR: The stars are uncovered, a perfectly clear sky. Dr. Curtis moves slowly to his bench by the ravine and looks up as though in meditation. Mr. Stern continues to stand, facing him, and the beast carefully takes up a position between its master and the yawning ravine falling abruptly away into the night. Shaughtowel fixes an adoring gaze on Doctor Curtis and sits motionless...even as Stern moves nervously about.


STERN: Why'd you stay away so long, Clyde?


CLYDE: To learn as much as I could.


HAL: Couldn't you have made other trips? Taken other scientists along?


CLYDE: I gave the Ladonais a solemn promise never to return, and to destroy my projection machine together with all its designs.


HAL: Why?


CLYDE: They're afraid of us.


HAL: We're civilized...


CLYDE: To them we're in a stage of barbarity. They've observed us for centuries. They've watched us and don't want to be like us.


HAL: You say they've been watching us for centuries?


CLYDE: Their civilization is advanced at least a thousand years beyond our own. In their physical science, I was like an island native trying to understand the Quantum Theory. Their social science is nearing perfection.


HAL: You mean they've come up with the perfect political system?


CLYDE: Not a political system, but a relationship between people. The individual is paramount...the government exists only to perform services. There is no violence of any kind, and crime is unknown.


HAL: How can that be possible?


CLYDE: The psychopathic criminal is treated for his disease. There is no poverty to create crime bred in want. As for the power seekers, there is no power to seek since the government does not govern and there's not even money. Their needs are produced in abundance and an individual merely presents a service card to take all he requires.


HAL: Nobody will believe that, Clyde!


CLYDE: It will be my mission to make them believe.


HAL: You mean to say nobody on Mars ever gets steamed up and throttles his wife?


CLYDE: It might happen but the one who is killed dies only in body. His mind and spirit will be transmigrated into the body of the attacker and the criminal is transformed into his own victim.


HAL: That you'll never have people believing....unless you're able to show how it's done and give demonstrations.


CLYDE: (SIGHS) Unfortunately I can't do that. The Ladonais were free with their explanations but they were beyond me...don't ask me to talk any more, Hal. It's making me very tired.


HAL: (QUICKLY) Oh! Sorry, Clyde. (THEN NERVOUSLY) You--uh--go back into your trance and rest up. I'll...just move around for a while and soak up the breeze.


(MUSIC:. . . .LOW STING, THEN UNDER WITH TREMELO)


OMENTOR: Dr. Curtis is slumping back in his seat, almost gratefully, and in another moment he is staring fixedly at the stars. Shaughtowel is apparently filled with anxiety for its master and watches him even more intently. Mr. Stern is pleased to note that nothing he does seems to distract the beast. After walking about the terrace for a bit he moves close to Shaughtowel. The creature pays him no heed. Mr. Stern picks up a rock and tosses it into the ravine.


(PAUSE......THE ROCK STRIKES OTHER ROCKS BELOW AND CLATTERS TO A STOP)


The creature is unmoved. Mr. Stern picks up another rock, a larger one, and again makes as though to throw it into the ravine. But he suddenly reverses his motion and brings it down crushingly on the back of the creature's head. There is no sound, and a slight push topples the creature backward into the ravine.


(PAUSE...THE BODY CAN BE HEARD LANDING BELOW)


The clumsy beast will appear to have fallen over the edge...and besides, the law can't punish a man for killing a non-human. Quite satisfied with himself, Mr. Stern leaves Dr. Curtis in his trance and strolls to find Fay in the kitchen.


(MUSIC:......A FIGURE AND INTO.....)


(SCREEN DOOR OPENED AND CLOSED)


(BRING IN KITCHEN SOUNDS...FOOD BEING PREPARED.....)


FAY: Hal. You didn't leave Clyde out there by himself.


HAL: Shaughtowel's sitting between him and the ravine. He's snoozing again.


FAY: I'm just getting a light supper here...it's nearly ready.


HAL: I've been talking with Clyde about Mars.


FAY: Does it sound like a nice place to visit?


HAL: Sounds like Utopia. Clyde's fascinated with it.


FAY: I must hear all about it...(POINTEDLY) when he's feeling better.


HAL: (CASUALLY) I wouldn't be surprised to see him go back after a while.


(PAN DROPPED)


FAY: (SHARPLY) What?


HAL: Can't blame the guy...if he's found the perfect place to live.


FAY: Was...there any mention of taking me along?


HAL: You didn't come into the conversation at all.


FAY: (CAUTIOUSLY) Hal...you're not just making this up?


HAL: (SHORT LAUGH) A lot of good that would do me...if he didn't actually get up and go.


FAY: (THOUGHTFULLY) If he is thinking of returning...and after being away for five years.


HAL: (EARNESTLY) Look, Fay. I understand how you feel about a man like Clyde. He's pretty phenomenal compared with me, and I've talked myself into being a good loser.


FAY: (ABSENTLY) I knew you'd come around to it, Hal. You were a nice enough -- I was thoroughly fond of you.....


HAL: (SOFTLY) Being a good loser and losing interest are .... are two different things, though. I'll always be around no matter what happens.


FAY: (QUICK SMILE) You're really nice, Hal.


HAL: Will you remember I'm always available?


FAY: I'm going to keep it very clearly in mind. (GRIMLY) Along with this idea of a return trip which is apparently circulating in Clyde's head.


HAL: (HAPPILY) That's all I'll ask.


FAY: (IN THE SAME GRIM TONE) This omelet is ready now...are you sure Clyde is all right out there?


HAL: You needn't worry about anything happening to him with that Shaughtowel standing guard. Look...have you got some iodine?


FAY: Have you cut yourself?


HAL: Must have pricked my finger on a thorn. It stings like fury.


FAY: There's a bottle in the medicine chest upstairs...but please hurry or the omelet will be ruined.


HAL: Oh...never mind...a little sting isn't going to kill me. (ABRUPTLY) Let's eat.


(MUSIC:.....SWIRLING UP WITH HAL'S AMBITION.....)


OMENTOR: Now the stage is completely set. Our Mr. Stern is reminding himself not to become overconfident. But progress is progress and he can't help an inward snicker at the way things are going. Shaughtowel, lately deceased, lies at the bottom of the ravine. A resentment against Clyde has been planted in Fay by Stern...and...the overdose of heart stimulant...he will administer to his old friend in a jigger of brandy will do the rest. True, the sting in Stern's finger has given him a moment's worry, because it did not come from any rose bush. It started at the moment he pushed Shaughtowel into the ravine...the monster must have caught the finger for a fraction of a second with one of its suction cups. But Stern is now booting himself mentally for being a fusspot as he attacks the omelet with relish.


(MUSIC:.....UP WITH AN ACCENT AND FADE IMMEDIATELY.....)


OMENTOR: Their supper out of the way, he and Fay help Dr. Curtis back to his chair in the living room. Stern's arm is around Clyde's shoulder, and he actually feels a surge of warmth toward his old friend. Warmth...and pity...because what has to be done must be done. Stern eases the Doctor into the chair, with a fond smile and a thoroughly affectionate pat on the shoulder. He then stands back to appraise the sick man carefully.


HAL: He certainly doesn't look any worse...do you think so, Fay?


FAY: Actually, Clyde, you're looking much better.


CLYDE: (TIREDLY, AS ALWAYS) If only I didn't feel so weak. (SIGHS) But it will pass...it will pass.


FAY: If you could eat a little solid food, darling...isn't there anything that will tempt you?


CLYDE: (SMILES) Nothing right now...and please don't worry.


HAL: (SNAPS HIS FINGERS) Something I completely forgot.


FAY: Forgot to do, Hal?


HAL: Doctor Anderson told me when he was leaving...Clyde is supposed to have a little brandy in between those pills.


CLYDE: (PROTESTING) No, I think not.


FAY: (GENTLY) But darling...if your own physician ordered it...


HAL: (JOVIALLY) Think on it, man. You haven't had a shot of your favorite brand for five years...and here you're ordered to take it.


CLYDE: Oh, very well.


HAL: (QUICKLY) I'll fix it. (TURNS AWAY) I think there's a bottle in this cabinet here.


(CABINET DOOR OPENED, OFF)


CLYDE: You seem to know your way around the house quite well, Hal.


HAL: (OFF) Had to stop around occasionally to keep an eye on your wife, y'know. She made me mix my own drinks.


FAY: (QUICKLY) I think I would have given you up for lost if it hadn't been for Hal, darling.


CLYDE: I'm deeply grateful to both of you for waiting me out. I fully expected to have Shaughtowel as the only friend left to me.


FAY: (FONDLY) You make a much more lasting impression than that.


CLYDE: (LOOKING AROUND) By the way...where is Shaughtowel?


HAL: (OFF...SURPRISED...) Didn't the thing come in with us?


CLYDE: Apparently not.


FAY: (WALKS OFF RAPIDLY) I'll look in the garden.


HAL: Last I saw, it was sitting beside you with its back to the ravine.


FAY: (WAY OFF) Could it have slipped over the edge?


HAL: (COMING BACK ON) Here's your brandy, old friend.


CLYDE: Put it on the table here, Hal.


HAL: Fine. Going to join you, if you don't mind.


CLYDE: You're welcome to all you want.


FAY (COMING BACK) Clyde, there isn't a sign of Shaughtowel in the garden.


HAL: By golly then he must have toppled over the edge.


CLYDE: Yes, it's the only thing that would keep him away from me. Would you mind, Hal, taking a light out there and having a look in the ravine.


HAL: (ANXIOUSLY) Not now. I don't want to leave you.


CLYDE: (THOUGHTFULLY) You don't want to leave me?


HAL: (HIS VOICE IS GROWING A BIT THICK) Have to stay around, see nothing happens to my old friend.


FAY: (CURIOUSLY) Hal... have you been nipping at that brandy bottle?


HAL: (PIOUSLY) First t'day... s'help me.


FAY: Is... is there anything wrong? Do you feel all right?


HAL: Feel perf-kly wonerful... except..


FAY: Except what?


HAL: Except... that old prick in my finger.


FAY: It might be infected. Let me look.


HAL: Nah! S'nothin'.


FAY: Hal, it is infected! Your whole hand is inflamed!


CLYDE: Let me see, Hal.


HAL: (GROGGIER) Nothin', I tell you Clyde! Never give me a minute's thought, unnerstand?


CLYDE: (SIGHS) Poor old Shaughtowel.. he would come back with me.


HAL: You forget about Shaughtowel. Old Hal will see nothin' ever happens to you.. old Shaughtowel is dead.


CLYDE: Martians never die.


FAY: What do you mean by that, Clyde?


CLYDE: (QUIETLY) How do you feel now, Hal?


HAL: A little numb down this side of me..


FAY: (HORRIFIED) Right along with his inflamed hand. (TURNING AWAY) I'm going to call Dr. Anderson!


CLYDE: I don't believe Dr. Anderson can help, Fay. Hal.. listen to me.. can you understand what I'm saying?


HAL: Perf-kly!


CLYDE: How do you feel toward me?


HAL: (WITH GREAT DIFFICULTY) Most noble.. great man.. like to... sit at your feet.


PAY: (GASPS) Clyde! Whatever has come over him! He's actually squatting at your feet... the way Shaughtowel did!


CLYDE: (SADLY) So you killed Shaughtowel, Hal? Because you had to - so you could kill me!


HAL: (LIKE A FROG) Gallump!


CLYDE: Or tried to. Poor old Hal.


FAY: (COMPLETELY AGHAST) Clyde! Will you tell me what's happening? (HORROR) Look at him!


CLYDE: (IN RESIGNATION) It's no longer Hal, my dear.. but Shaughtowel in Hal's form. I went as far as to tell him straight out that a murdered Martian never really dies. No - not even their animals.


(MUSIC:. . .UP . . GALLUMPHING A LA SHAUGHTOWEL)


OMENTOR: And there sits our Mr. Stern.. But feel no sorrow for him.. he brought it upon himself. Besides, he was never happier than now.. sitting at the feet of his master, adoring the great man, ready to sacrifice his own life to keep his beloved friend from harm. Thus our tale ends quite cheerfully after all. Surprised?


(MUSIC:. . .CURTAIN)


[OMENTOR:] That's it. "Martians Never Die," by Lucius Daniel, thanks to GALAXY magazine now on the stands. Next week, another TALE OF TOMORROW out of Galaxy Science Fiction Magazine called "The Girls From Earth," by Frank M. Robinson - in which is dramatized the unique adventures of a pair of earthbound lovelies who seek romance - and find it - somewhere beyond the planets.


This is your host, Omentor. Until next week then, (CHUCKLE) don't stray too far from the phone, girls. You know, there might be such a thing as an interplanetary phone call. Good night.


(MUSIC:. . .THEME AND UNDER)


ANNCR: TALES OF TOMORROW! (BEAT) Heard in tonight's play were:







(MUSIC:. . .OUT)


ANNCR: Music composed and conducted by Bobby Christian. Script adaptation by Don Witty. Production and direction by Warren Somerville.


This program came to you from New York.


(TWO SECOND PAUSE)


THIS IS ABC.. RADIO NETWORK.



mn/aek/jg/bf/hz

3/3/53

10:15 am


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