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Machinal

Arthur Hopkins Presents

Machinal 

June 07 1944




CAST:

ANNOUNCER

HOST, Arthur Hopkins


Dramatis Personae:

HELEN, the Young Woman

JONES, Helen's boss and husband (Scenes 1, 3, 4, & 7)

DICK, Helen's lover (Scenes 5, 6, & 7)


1. To Business:

ADDING CLERK

FILING CLERK

STENOGRAPHER

TELEPHONE GIRL (also Scene 5)


2. At Home:

MOTHER, a termagant (also Scene 9)

SINGER, on radio; male

JANITOR (1 line)


3. Honeymoon:

BELLBOY (2 lines)


4. Maternal:

NURSE

DOCTOR


5. Prohibited:

SALESMAN


6. Intimate


7. Domestic:

VOICES, singers

PEDDLER (1 line)


8. The Law:

JUDGE

DEFENSE

PROSECUTION

BAILIFF (2 lines)

FIRST REPORTER (also Scene 9)

COURT REPORTER (3 lines)

SECOND REPORTER (also Scene 9)

and a COURTROOM CROWD


9. A Machine:

NEGRO, who sings a spiritual

PRIEST

JAILER

MATRON (3 lines)

GUARD (2 lines)


[The Plot is the story of a woman who murders her husband - an ordinary young 

woman, any woman.


The Plan is to tell this story by showing the different phases of life that 

the woman comes in contact with, and in none of which she finds any place, any 

peace. The woman is essentially soft, tender, and the life around her is 

essentially hard, mechanized. Business, home, marriage, having a child, 

seeking pleasure - all are difficult for her - mechanical, nerve nagging. Only 

in an illicit love does she find anything with life in it for her, and when 

she loses this, the desperate effort to win free to it again is her undoing.


The story is told in nine scenes. In the dialogue of these scenes there is the 

attempt to catch the rhythm of our common city speech, its brassy sound, its 

trick of repetition, etc.


Then there is, also, the use of many different sounds chosen primarily for 

their inherent emotional effect (steel riveting, a priest chanting, a Negro 

singing, jazz band, etc.), but contributing also to the creation of a 

background, an atmosphere.]






MUSIC: NBC CHIMES PLAYED BY ORCHESTRA


ANNOUNCER: "Arthur Hopkins Presents"!


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: Through the facilities of the National Broadcasting Company and its 

independent affiliated stations, Arthur Hopkins presents Sophie Treadwell's 

"Machinal," starring Zita Johann of the original production, Sidney Blackmer 

who is now appearing on Broadway in "Chicken Every Sunday," and Harold 

Vermilyea who is also appearing on Broadway in "Jacobowsky and the Colonel." 

Tonight's production of "Machinal" is directed by Wynn Wright from a radio 

version by Gerald Holland. Now here is Mr. Hopkins to speak to you.


HOST: "Machinal," Sophie Treadwell's brilliant dramatization of human 

frustration, is one of the few important American plays produced in the past 

fifteen years. For ten years, it has been a permanent part of the repertoire 

of leading Russian theaters. Thus, theatergoers in far-off Siberia may still 

see a play long ago abandoned in its own land.


In Russia, the theater is regarded as an essential cultural element of 

everyday life. It is more than entertainment or escape; it plays an energetic 

part in forming the character and thinking of the people. Despite the strains 

and drains of war, it was insisted that the theaters continue their full 

activity. How much this added to the stamina of the people in crisis we do not 

know, but it fully reveals the place of the theater as an essential of Russian 

life.


In the not-too-distant future, the adult theater will be recognized as an 

important factor in our life. Permanent community theaters with professional 

companies will be established. This program is already proving the great 

hunger throughout the country for worthy plays. (COUGHS) It is my belief that 

these performances will help create audiences for the community theaters when 

they are launched.


Tonight, we are fortunate in having the sensitive and eloquent Zita Johann who 

created the role of the young victim in the original production of "Machinal." 

With her are Sidney Blackmer as the Man and Harold Vermilyea as her husband. 

So without the inconvenience of a trip to Russia, in one hour, you will know 

Sophie Treadwell's moving and compassionate "Machinal." Thank you.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


[1. To Business:]



MUSIC: INTRODUCTION ... FOR A COLD, URBAN, MECHANICAL WORLD ... THEN OUT 

GRIMLY BEHIND--


SOUND: IN BG, A JUMBLE OF MACHINES ACCOMPANY THE DRONING OFFICE WORKERS WHOSE 

VOICES OVERLAP ONE ANOTHER--


ADDING CLERK: (AT ADDING MACHINE) Twenty-four ninety, twenty-eight, seventy-

eight and three-fourths, three-six-eight-four-two, one, one-fourth, thirty-

seven, eight-oh-four.


FILING CLERK: (AT FILING CABINET) Accounts - A. Bonds - B. Contracts - C. 

Data - D. Earnings - E.


STENOGRAPHER: (AT TYPEWRITER) Dear Sir - in re - your letter - recent date - 

will state--


TELEPHONE GIRL: (AT SWITCHBOARD) Hello - Hello - George H. Jones Company, good 

morning - Hello - Hello - George H. Jones Company, good morning - Hello.


SOUND: OFFICE MACHINES CONTINUE IN BG UNTIL END OF SCENE


JONES: (ENTERS) Good morning, everybody!


WORKERS: Good morning, Mr. Jones!


JONES: Miss A. isn't in yet?


TELEPHONE GIRL: Not yet, Mr. J.


STENOGRAPHER: She's late.


JONES: When she comes in, tell her I want her to take a letter. It's 

important.


TELEPHONE GIRL: (MAKING A NOTE) Miss A. - important.


JONES: And I don't want to be disturbed.


TELEPHONE GIRL: You're in conference?


JONES: I'm in conference. Unless it's A. B., of course.


TELEPHONE GIRL: Of course; A. B.


JONES: (MOVING OFF) And tell Miss A. the early bird catches the worm. (LAUGHS 

HEARTILY)


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR SLAMS, OFF


TELEPHONE GIRL: (GIGGLES) The early worm gets caught.


ADDING CLERK: He's caught.


FILING CLERK: Hooked!


ADDING CLERK: In the pan.


WORKERS: (LAUGH AND CHUCKLE)


HELEN: (ENTERS, REALIZES WITH DISMAY) Oh. I'm late. 


FILING CLERK: I'll say you're late.


STENOGRAPHER: Why are you late?


HELEN: The subway.


STENOGRAPHER: Stalled?


HELEN: I had to get out.


ADDING CLERK: Out?


FILING CLERK: Out?


STENOGRAPHER: Out where?


HELEN: In the air. I thought I'd faint. I had to get out in the air.


STENOGRAPHER: Same thing yesterday. And the day before.


HELEN: Yes. What am I gonna do?


ADDING CLERK: Take a taxi!


WORKERS: (LAUGH AND CHUCKLE)


TELEPHONE GIRL: Mr. J. wants you.


HELEN: Me?


TELEPHONE GIRL: Yes, he's bellowing for you.


HELEN: I'll go in.


SOUND: OFFICE DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES AS HELEN EXITS


TELEPHONE GIRL: Do you think he'll marry her?


ADDING CLERK: If she'll have him.


STENOGRAPHER: If she'll have him?!


FILING CLERK: Do you think she'll have him?


TELEPHONE GIRL: How much does he get?


ADDING CLERK: Plenty! (MECHANICALLY) Five thousand, ten thousand, fifteen 

thousand.


SOUND: THE WORKERS' VOICES BEGIN TO OVERLAP AGAIN AND TURN MECHANICAL AS THEIR 

MACHINES GROW LOUDER IN BG 


STENOGRAPHER: (OVERLAPS WITH ABOVE LINE) And plenty put away!


FILING CLERK: (MECHANICALLY) Gas Preferred - 4's - steel - 5's - oil - 6's.


STENOGRAPHER: Will she have him?! (MECHANICALLY) This agreement entered into - 

party of the first part - party of the second part - Will he have her?


TELEPHONE GIRL: (MECHANICALLY) Good morning - good morning.


SOUND: MACHINES TOP WORKERS' VOICES AND FILL A TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... THEN 

JONES' OFFICE DOOR OPENS AND CLOSES AS HELEN RETURNS


TELEPHONE GIRL: Miss A? My boyfriend's got a friend. Want to come?


HELEN: No. Can't.


TELEPHONE GIRL: Date?


HELEN: No. Mother.


STENOGRAPHER: Worries?


TELEPHONE GIRL: Nags! (INTO PHONE) Hello, George H. Jones Company - Oh, hello, 

Lois. Listen, tonight-- No, no, no. Wait, Lois. (FADES OUT)


SOUND: MACHINES AND MURMURING WORKERS FILL A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG


HELEN: (TO HERSELF, STREAM-OF-CONSCIOUSNESS) George H. Jones. He likes me. 

Loves me. Loves me not. Loves me. (IMITATES JONES) "You're late, my dear. Ah, 

yes, the subway." Could fire me. He's an old woman. I can be a bride. I can be 

the bride of a fat old woman. George H. Jones. Mrs. George H. Jones. "Dear 

Madam, in reply to your--" Why does he want me? He says he loves my hands. His 

are fat hands. (IMITATES MOTHER) "Well, my fine lady, how do you think we're 

gonna live if you're too proud to work? Is that the way to talk to your 

mother? Your poor old mother?!" (IMITATES TRAINMAN) "Ninety-Sixth Street. 

Change for express. Don't crowd, don't push." I must get out or I'll scream. 

All those bodies pressing. I must have air. I don't care if I'm late; I must 

get out! He's a fine man; he would give me everything; I could rest; I could 

sleep mornings. (IMITATES SERVANT) "Did Madam ring? I'll bring your coffee at 

once, Madam." When he touches me, my blood runs cold. He's a good man. He's 

loves me. Anything to get away from Ma. Ma and subways and offices and cheap 

places. Maybe I'd get used to it. I wonder if you do. I'll ask Ma. I gotta ask 

somebody. She's the only person I could ask that. Anybody else'd think I was 

crazy. George H. Jones. Mrs. George H. Jones. "Dear Madam--"


STENOGRAPHER: Quit your dreaming, kid. Get a move on.


TELEPHONE GIRL: (OVERLAPS WITH NEXT SOUND CUE) George H. Jones Company, good 

morning - hello hello hello - George H. Jones Company, good morning.


SOUND: MACHINES AND MURMURING WORKERS ... UP QUICKLY, TOPPING THE SCENE FOR A 

CLIMAX


[2. At Home:]



MUSIC: HARSH AND RAPID MECHANICAL BRIDGE WHICH SLOWS TO A GRIM STOP ... THEN A 

RADIO PLAYING A POPULAR 1916 BALLAD, "IF YOU WERE THE ONLY GIRL (IN THE 

WORLD)" (MUSIC BY NAT D. AYER AND LYRICS BY CLIFFORD GREY) ... MALE SINGER, 

ACCOMPANIED BY PIANO, SLOWLY CROONS A CHORUS ... IN BG


SINGER: (BEHIND FOLLOWING DIALOGUE)

If you were the only girl in the world

And I was the only boy,


Nothing else would matter in the world today.

We could go on loving in the same old way.


A garden of Eden just made for two

With nothing to mar our joy.


I would say such wonderful things to you,

There would be such wonderful things to do,

If you were the only girl in the world

and I were the only boy.


HELEN: (ANXIOUS) Ma? I want to talk to you.


MOTHER: (UNINTERESTED) Aren't you eating a potato?


HELEN: No.


MOTHER: Why not?


HELEN: I don't want one.


MOTHER: Why, that's no reason. Here. Take one.


HELEN: I don't want it.


MOTHER: Potato goes with stew. Here.


HELEN: Ma, I don't want it!


MOTHER: Want it! Take it.


HELEN: But I-- Oh, all right. Ma, I want to ask you something.


MOTHER: Eat your potato.


HELEN: Ma, there's something I want to ask you. Something important.


SOUND: DOOR BUZZER


MOTHER: (SUDDENLY INTERESTED) There's the garbage.


SOUND: MOTHER WALKS TO DUMBWAITER AND OPENS IT


JANITOR: (OFF, CALLS) Gar-bage!


MOTHER: (CALLS, PLEASANTLY) All right! 


SOUND: MOTHER SENDS DOWN GARBAGE AND CLOSES DUMBWAITER


MOTHER: (ANNOYED, TO HELEN) What's the matter now?


HELEN: (DISTRESSED) Nothing.


MOTHER: That jumping up from the table every night the garbage is collected! 

You act like you're crazy.


HELEN: Oh, Ma, don't talk.


MOTHER: You just said you wanted to talk.


HELEN: Well, now I want to think. I gotta think.


MOTHER: Aren't you going to finish your potato?


HELEN: Oh, Ma!


MOTHER: Is there anything the matter with it?


HELEN: Ma, don't nag!


MUSIC: SONG ON RADIO FADES OUT BEHIND--


MOTHER: Nag! Just because I try to look out for you. Nag! Just because I try 

to care for you. Nag! Why, you haven't sense enough to eat! What would become 

of you, I'd like to know, if I didn't nag?


HELEN: I'm grown up, Ma.


MOTHER: Grown up! What do you mean by that?


HELEN: Nothing much, I guess.


SOUND: MOTHER RISES ... CLATTER OF DISHES, WHICH CONTINUES IN BG


HELEN: Ma, let's not do the dishes right away. Let's talk. I gotta, Ma.


MOTHER: Well, I can't talk with dirty dishes around. You may be able to, but--


HELEN: Ma, listen. Listen! There's a man wants to marry me.


SOUND: CLATTER OF DISHES OUT


MOTHER: What man?


HELEN: He says he fell in love with my hands.


MOTHER: Hm. In love? Well, where'd you meet him? Where did you come to know 

him?


HELEN: In the office.


MOTHER: In the office?


HELEN: It's Mr. J.


MOTHER: Mr. J.?


HELEN: The Vice-President.


MOTHER: (IMPRESSED) Vice-President! His income must be-- (SHARPLY) Does he 

know you've got a mother to support?


HELEN: Yes.


MOTHER: What does he say?


HELEN: All right.


MOTHER: (EAGERLY) How soon are you going to marry him?


HELEN: (BEAT) I'm not going to.


MOTHER: (SLOWLY) Not going to?


HELEN: I don't love him. I don't love him, Ma.


MOTHER: (SCORNFUL) Love! 


HELEN: Didn't you love Pa?


MOTHER: (UNCONVINCING) Oh, I suppose I did.


HELEN: Oh, Ma, tell me about it.


MOTHER: (EXASPERATED) Tell you what?


HELEN: (THE DAM BURSTS AND THE WORDS POUR OUT, FAST AND DIZZY) Tell me love is 

real. Ain't it? It isn't all just-- You fall in love, don't you? And then your 

skin oughtn't to curl, ought it, when he just comes near you, ought it? That's 

wrong, ain't it? You don't get over that, do you - ever, do you? Or don't you? 

How is it, Ma? Do you?


MOTHER: Do you what?


HELEN: Do you get used to it, so after a while it doesn't matter? Or don't 

you? Does it always matter? You ought to be in love, oughtn't you, Ma? You 

must be in love, mustn't you, Ma? That changes everything, doesn't it? Or does 

it? I haven't found anybody like that yet. I haven't found anybody. Why, I've 

hardly known anybody; you'd never let me go with anybody and--


MOTHER: Are you throwing it up to me that--?!


HELEN: No, no. Let me finish, Ma. Let me finish. I just mean I've never found 

anybody. Anybody! Well, nobody's ever asked me till now. He's the only man 

that's ever asked me and I suppose I got to marry somebody. All girls do.


MOTHER: Oh, nonsense.


HELEN: But I can't go on like this, Ma. I don't know why, but I can't. It's 

like I'm all tight inside. Sometimes I feel like I'm stifling. (HOPELESSLY) 

Oh, you don't know. (INCREASINGLY HYSTERICAL) Stifling. I can't go on like 

this much longer -- going to work, coming home, going to work, coming home. I 

can't. Sometimes in the subway I think I'm gonna die. Sometimes, even in the 

office, if something don't happen, I got to do something. I don't know; it - 

it's like I'm all tight inside.


MOTHER: You're crazy.


HELEN: (HURT) Oh, Ma!


MOTHER: You're crazy!


HELEN: Ma, if you tell me that again, I'll kill you. I'll kill you!


MOTHER: If that isn't crazy--!


HELEN: I'll kill you! Maybe I am crazy. I don't know, sometimes I think I am 

-- the thoughts that go on in my mind. Sometimes I think I am. I - I can't 

help it if I am. I do the best I can! I do the best I can and I'm nearly 

crazy. Go away! Go away! You don't know anything about anything. And you 

haven't any pity. No pity. You just suck my life-- All my youth--! I never had 

any youth! (TEARFUL) Go away! Go away or I'll kill you!


MUSIC: ANOTHER OLD SENTIMENTAL SONG ON THE RADIO FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG


MOTHER: (SOBS) My own child! (WEEPS) 


HELEN: (CALM, SORROWFUL) Oh, Ma. Forgive me. Forgive me. 


MOTHER: (TEARFUL) My own child. To be spoken to like that by my own child.


HELEN: (MISERABLE) I didn't mean it, Ma. I didn't mean it.


MOTHER: You're all I've got in the world. And you don't want me. You want to 

kill me.


HELEN: No - no, I don't, Ma. I just said that. I--


MOTHER: I've worked for you and slaved for you.


HELEN: You rest now, Ma. You rest.


MOTHER: I - I got to do the dishes.


HELEN: I'll do the dishes. You listen to the music, Ma. I'll do the dishes. 

I'll get my rubber gloves.


MOTHER: (INCREASINGLY HER OLD SELF AGAIN) Rubber gloves! I've been washing 

dishes for forty years and I never wore gloves! (SARCASTIC) But my lady's 

hands! My lady's hands!


HELEN: Sometimes you talk to me like you're jealous, Ma.


MOTHER: Jealous?


HELEN: It's my hands got me a husband.


MOTHER: A husband. So! You're gonna marry him now!


HELEN: (UNENTHUSIASTIC) I suppose so.


MOTHER: (EXASPERATED, HARSHLY) If you ain't the craziest--!


[3. Honeymoon:]



MUSIC: BRIDGE ... FOR A RELUCTANT HONEYMOON


SOUND: HOTEL ROOM DOOR UNLOCKS AND OPENS ... HELEN, JONES, AND BELLBOY ENTER 

... BELLBOY PUTS LUGGAGE DOWN, RAISES WINDOW SHADES BEHIND--


JONES: (SLOWLY; WITH SEX ON HIS MIND) Yes, sir! Well, here we are! (CHUCKLES) 

Yes, sir, here we are. (CHUCKLES) 


BELLBOY: Anything else, sir? 


JONES: (TIPS THE BELLBOY) Uh, here.


BELLBOY: Oh, thank you, sir.


SOUND: HOTEL ROOM DOOR CLOSES AS BELLBOY EXITS


JONES: (TO HELEN) Well, here we are. (CHUCKLES)


HELEN: (FEIGNS ENTHUSIASM) Yes, here we are.


JONES: (LIGHTLY) Well, aren't you going to take your hat off and stay a while? 


HELEN: Yes.


MUSIC: FROM SLIGHTLY OFF, A DANCE ORCHESTRA PLAYS A GENTLE TUNE THAT WAFTS 

THROUGH THE OPEN WINDOW ... SNEAKS IN BEHIND--


JONES: Well, this is all right, isn't it? (NO ANSWER) Huh? Huh?


HELEN: It's very nice.


JONES: Twelve bucks a day! They know how to soak you in these pleasure 

resorts. Twelve bucks! Well, we'll get our money's worth out of it all right. 

You can't economize on a honeymoon. (CHUCKLES) Er, what are you looking at?


HELEN: (ON EDGE) I thought you said there'd be a view of the ocean!


JONES: Sure, there is.


HELEN: I just see people - dancing.


JONES: The ocean's beyond.


HELEN: I was counting on seeing it!


JONES: You'll see it tomorrow. What's eating you? We'll take in the boardwalk. 

(SLYLY) Say, pull down the blind.


HELEN: (WITH LONGING) That music. Young people dancing.


JONES: Hey, you look a little white around the gills. What's the matter?


HELEN: (UNCONVINCING) Nothing.


JONES: You look like you're scared.


HELEN: No. I--


JONES: Nothing to be scared of. (CHUCKLES) You're with your husband.


HELEN: I know.


JONES: Happy?


HELEN: Yes.


JONES: (LIGHTLY) Then come over here and give us a kiss. 


HELEN: (PAUSE AS THEY KISS; EXHALES, SHIVERING A LITTLE)


JONES: (SATISFIED) Yeah. That's the girlie. (CHUCKLES) Say, you've got to 

learn to relax, little girl.


MUSIC: DANCE ORCHESTRA FINISHES ITS NUMBER


HELEN: Yes.


JONES: That's one of the biggest things to learn in life. That's part of what 

I owe my success to. Now you go and change those heavy clothes and relax.


HELEN: Well, I thought maybe-- Can't we go out for a little while?


JONES: Out? What for?


HELEN: For fresh air - walk - and talk.


JONES: Well, we can talk here. I'll tell you all about myself. Go along now.


HELEN: (MOVING OFF) All right.


JONES: I'm going to enjoy life from now on. I haven't had such an easy time of 

it. I got where I am by hard work and self-denial. And now I'm going to enjoy 

life - I'm going to make up for all I missed.


HELEN: (NERVOUS, OFF) Yes.


JONES: And next year maybe we'll go to Paris. You can buy a lot of that French 

underwear. (LAUGHS) And Switzerland! All my life I've wanted a Swiss watch - 

that I bought right there. I coulda got a Swiss watch here, but I always 

wanted one that I bought right there. (LAUGHS) Isn't that funny? Huh? (NO 

ANSWER) Isn't it? Huh? Huh?


HELEN: (NERVOUS, OFF) Yes.


JONES: All my life I've wanted a Swiss watch that I bought right there. 

(CHUCKLES) Hey, uh, what's keepin' ya?


HELEN: (BEAT, SUPPRESSES TERROR, CLOSER) Here I am.


JONES: Well! And don't you look pretty? (BEAT) Here. Give us a kiss.


HELEN: (WEEPS QUIETLY)


JONES: (SURPRISED) Aw, hey. You're crying. What are you--? What are you crying 

for?


HELEN: Ma! Ma! I want my mother.


JONES: Well, I thought you were glad to get away from her.


HELEN: I want her now. I want somebody.


JONES: Well, you got me, haven't you?


HELEN: (DEEPLY DISTRESSED) Somebody - somebody -


JONES: (NOT SOOTHING) There's nothing to cry about. (CHUCKLES) There's nothing 

to cry about.


[4. Maternal:]



MUSIC: BRIDGE ... A BRISK, SLIGHTLY OUT-OF-CONTROL WALTZ RHYTHM THAT ENDS ON A 

GRIM NOTE


SOUND: DURING SCENE, PERIODIC NOISE OF RIVETING MACHINES OUTSIDE HOSPITAL 

WINDOW ... LOUD AND INTERMITTENT


NURSE: (RELENTLESSLY CHEERFUL) How are you feeling today? Better? No pain? (NO 

ANSWER) You're getting along fine. Such a sweet baby you have, too! Aren't you 

glad it's a girl? (BEAT) You're not? Oh, my! That's no way to talk! Men want 

boys -- women ought to want girls! (BEAT) Anything else you want? (BEAT) What? 

The noise? The riveting? Oh, that can't he helped. Hospital's got to have a 

new wing. We're the biggest Maternity Hospital in the world. I'll close the 

window. (BEAT) No?


HELEN: (WEAK, UNHAPPY) I - I smell everything then.


NURSE: Here's your man!


JONES: (ENTERS, BRIGHTLY, TO HELEN) Well, how are ya today? 


NURSE: She's getting stronger.


JONES: Of course she is!


NURSE: See what your husband brought you?


JONES: Yeah. Better put 'em in water right away.


NURSE: (MOVING OFF) Yes, sir!


JONES: Well, everything okay? (BEAT) Now see here, my dear, you've got to 

brace up, you know, and - and face things! Everybody's got to brace up and 

face things. That's what makes the world go round. I know all that you've been 

through, but-- Oh, yes I do. I know all about it! I was right outside all the 

time. ... Yeah, but you've got to brace up now! Make an effort! Pull yourself 

together! Start the uphill climb! Oh, I've been down, but I haven't stayed 

down. I've been licked, but I haven't stayed licked. I've pulled myself up by 

my own bootstraps, and that's what you've got to do. Will power! That's what 

conquers! Look at me. Now, you've got to brace up. Face the music. Stand the 

gaff! Take life by the horns! Look it in the face! Having a baby's natural

Perfectly natural thing. Now, why should you--?


HELEN: (CHOKES, GASPS FOR AIR)


NURSE: (APPROACHES) What's the matter?


JONES: She's got that choking again, like she had the last time I was here.


NURSE: You'd better go, sir.


JONES: (RELUCTANT TO GO) I'll be back.


NURSE: She needs rest.


JONES: (MOVING OFF) Tomorrow then. I'll be back tomorrow. Tomorrow and every 

day. Goodbye!


NURSE: You got a mighty nice husband, I guess you know that?


DOCTOR: (APPROACHES) Uh, how's the little lady today?


NURSE: She's better, Doctor.


DOCTOR: Of course she's better. She's all right -- aren't you? (NO ANSWER) 

What's the matter? Can't you talk? 


NURSE: Oh, she's a little weak yet, Doctor.


DOCTOR: Bring the baby.


HELEN: (HOARSE) No-o!


DOCTOR: Well! That's strong enough. I thought we were too weak to talk. That's 

better. You don't want your baby?


HELEN: (MURMURS) No.


DOCTOR: What do you want?


HELEN: (MURMURS DESPERATELY) Let alone. Let alone.


DOCTOR: (TO NURSE) Bring the baby.


NURSE: Yes, Doctor. She's behaved very badly every time, Doctor -- very upset. 

Maybe we'd better not.


DOCTOR: I decide what we "better and better not" here, Nurse!


NURSE: Yes, Doctor.


DOCTOR: (MOVING OFF) Bring the baby. I'll look in later.


NURSE: (MOVING OFF) Yes, Doctor. Right away.


HELEN: (TO HERSELF, STREAM-OF-CONSCIOUSNESS) Ohhhh, let me alone, let me 

alone, let me alone. I've submitted to enough. I was dead. I was climbing the 

golden stairs. I met my baby coming down. All the dead going up to heaven to 

rest and all the babies coming down to Earth to be born. Dead going up. Babies 

coming down. I can't go on. Oh, let me alone, let me alone.


[5. Prohibited:]



MUSIC: BRIDGE ... THEN JAZZ TUNE ON PLAYER PIANO ... THEN IN BG


DICK: I'm gonna beat it.


SALESMAN: Aw, for the love of Mike. Stick around. Have a drink.


DICK: They ain't gonna show.


SALESMAN: Oh, sure, they'll show.


DICK: How do you know they'll show?


SALESMAN: I tell you, you can't keep that baby away from me. Just got to - 

(SNAPS FINGERS) - she comes a-runnin'.


DICK: Looks like it. I'm gonna beat it.


SALESMAN: Aw, for the love of Mike. Have a heart. Listen -- as a favor to me. 

I got to be home by six. I promised my wife, sure. That doesn't leave me no 

time at all if I got to hang around entertaining some dame. You got to take 

her off my hands.


DICK: Maybe she won't fall for me.


SALESMAN: Sure, she'll fall for you. They all fall for you. Hey! Hey, here 

they come.


GIRL: (APPROACHES, SHE'S THE TELEPHONE GIRL FROM THE OFFICE) Hello!


SALESMAN: (GROUCHY) Good night.


GIRL: "Good night"? What's eating you?


SALESMAN: Nothin's eatin' me; thought somethin' musta swallowed you.


GIRL: Why?


SALESMAN: You're late.


GIRL: (SCREW YOU) Heh! (INTRODUCTIONS) Mrs. Jones, Mr. Smith.


SALESMAN: Yeah, meet my friend, Mr. Roe. (CALLS) Waiter? Two more. 


MUSIC: PIANO FINISHES PLAYING TUNE


GIRL: Well! So we kept you waiting, did we?


SALESMAN: About an hour. Dick was about ready to beat it.


DICK: That's before I met the little lady. Hm. (A TOAST) Here's how.


SALESMAN: Here's to ya.


GIRL: Here's looking at ya.


HELEN: (FORCED CHEERFULNESS) Here's - happy days.


DICK: (CHUCKLES, ABOUT THE DRINKS) That's good stuff.


SALESMAN: Yeah, off a boat.


DICK: Off a boat?


SALESMAN: Yeah, they get all their stuff here off a boat.


GIRL: Yeah, that's what they say.


SALESMAN: (INSISTS) Sure! Sure, they do! Sure!


GIRL: (EXASPERATED) All right. It's all right with me.


SALESMAN: But they do! Sure!


GIRL: (SEDUCTIVE) I believe ya, honey.


SALESMAN: (CHUCKLES) Well, baby, how they comin', huh?


GIRL: Couldn't do better.


SALESMAN: How's every little thing?


GIRL: Just great.


SALESMAN: Miss me?


GIRL: I'll say so. When did you get in?


SALESMAN: Oh, just a couple of hours ago. 


GIRL: Miss me?


SALESMAN: Did I? Hey, you don't know the half of it.


GIRL: Well, then, tell me, tell me, spill it.


SALESMAN: Let's beat it.


GIRL: (LOW, SELF-CONSCIOUS) We just got here.


SALESMAN: (LOW) Don't I know it. Come on.


GIRL: (LOW) But - but-- But what about them?


SALESMAN: (LOW) Oh, they're all set. (UP, TO DICK) Aren't you?


DICK: Are we? 


SALESMAN: (PLEADS, TO GIRL) Oh, I - I got to be out to the house by six. Come 

on. (BEAT) Oh, come on, kid - let's beat it! (FINALLY THINKS UP A SOCIALLY 

ACCEPTABLE REASON TO LEAVE) Business is business, you know. I got a lot to do 

yet this afternoon. Thought you might like to go along with me, help me out. 

(CHUCKLES) How 'bout it?


GIRL: (RELIEVED, PLAYS ALONG) Oh, sure. Sure, I'll go along with ya. Help ya 

out. 


SALESMAN: All right with you folks?


DICK: All right with me.


HELEN: (BEAT, SELF-CONSCIOUS CHUCKLE) Uh, I know what business is like.


DICK: You do, do ya?


HELEN: I used to be a business girl myself, before--


DICK: Before what?


HELEN: Well, before I - quit.


DICK: What'd you quit for?


HELEN: I just - quit.


DICK: You're married, huh?


HELEN: Yes. Uh, I am.


DICK: It's all right with me.


SALESMAN: Oh, Dick! Dick, don't forget about tomorrow.


DICK: Okay.


SALESMAN: (TO HELEN) Say, get this bird to tell you about himself. Get him to 

tell you how he killed a couple of spics down in Mexico. (TO GIRL) Come on, 

kid.


GIRL: (OFF) Okay.


HELEN: (TO DICK) You - killed a man?


SALESMAN: Oh, two of 'em. With a bottle! Get him to tell ya. With a bottle! 

(MOVING OFF) Come on, kid, come on. (TO DICK) Goodbye.


DICK: So long.


HELEN: (BEAT) Why did you?


DICK: What?


HELEN: Kill them?


DICK: To get free.


HELEN: Oh.


MUSIC: PLAYER PIANO STARTS ANOTHER JAZZ TUNE, IN BG


DICK: There were a bunch of bandidos -- bandits, you know. Took me into the 

hills - holding me there. What was I to do? I got the two birds that guarded 

me drunk one night, and then I filled the empty bottles with small stones and 

let 'em have it. I had to get free, didn't I? You don't have to have a gun to 

kill a man. Just a bottle and some stones.


HELEN: Oh - then what did you do?


DICK: Then I beat it.


HELEN: Where to?


DICK: Right here. (BEAT) Ya glad?


HELEN: Yes.


DICK: Necessity, you know -- mother of invention. Ain't a bad weapon. First 

you got a sledge hammer, then you got a knife.


HELEN: (SHIVERS) Oooh.


DICK: Women don't like knives, do they?


HELEN: No.


DICK: Don't mind a hammer so much, though, do you?


HELEN: (UNCOMFORTABLE) No.


DICK: I didn't like it myself - any of it. But I had to get free, didn't I? I 

sure had to get free, didn't I? Now I'm glad I did.


HELEN: Why?


DICK: You know why. Let's go.


HELEN: Where?


DICK: You haven't been around much, have you, kid?


HELEN: No.


DICK: I could tell that just to look at you.


HELEN: You could?


DICK: Sure, I could. Hey, what are you running around with a girl like that 

other one for?


MUSIC: PIANO FINISHES ITS TUNE


HELEN: I don't know. She - she seems to have a good time.


DICK: So that's it.


HELEN: Doesn't she?


DICK: Well, don't you?


HELEN: No.


DICK: Never?


HELEN: Never.


DICK: What's the matter?


HELEN: Nothin'. Just me, I guess.


DICK: You're all right.


HELEN: Do you - like me?


DICK: Like ya? You don't know the half of it. Listen. You know what you seem 

like to me?


HELEN: What?


DICK: An angel. Just like an angel.


HELEN: I do?


DICK: That's what I said. Let's go.


HELEN: All right.


DICK: Hey, wait a minute, I got to pay the damage. And I'll - I'll get a 

bottle of something to take along to my place.


HELEN: No! Don't!


DICK: Why not?


HELEN: Well, uh, don't bring any pebbles.


DICK: (AMUSED) Say, forget that, will ya?


HELEN: I just mean I don't think I'll need anything to drink.


DICK: You like me, don't you, kid?


HELEN: Do you me?


DICK: Sure. Sure, I do, kid.


[6. Intimate:]



MUSIC: MILDLY ROMANTIC BRIDGE


DICK: You're awfully still, honey. What're you thinking about?


HELEN: About sea shells.


DICK: She - she--? (CHUCKLES DRUNKENLY) I can't even say it!


HELEN: (CHUCKLES) When I was little, my grandmother used to have a big pink 

sea shell on the mantle behind the stove. When we'd go to visit her, they'd 

let me hold it, and listen. That's what I was thinking about now.


DICK: Yeah?


HELEN: You can hear the sea in 'em, you know.


DICK: Yeah, I know.


HELEN: Wonder why that is?


DICK: Search me. (BEAT) You got mighty pretty hands, honey. 


MUSIC: A HAND ORGAN APPROACHES FROM DISTANCE PLAYING A TUNE ("CIELITO LINDO") 

... CONTINUES IN BG


DICK: (PLAYFUL) This little pig went to market. This little pig stayed home. 

This little pig went--


HELEN: (LAUGHS) Went diddle-dee, diddle-dee, dee. (LAUGHS) 


DICK: (LAUGHS, BEAT) You got awful pretty hands.


HELEN: I used to have. But I haven't taken much care of them lately. I will 

now. (BEAT, ABOUT THE MUSIC) What's that?


DICK: What?


HELEN: That music?


DICK: It's a hand organ. I gave him two bits the first day I got here, so he 

comes every day.


HELEN: I mean, what's that he's playing?


DICK: "Cielito Lindo."


HELEN: What does that mean?


DICK: Little Heaven.


HELEN: Little Heaven?


DICK: That's what lovers call each other in Spain.


HELEN: Spain's where all the castles are, ain't it?


DICK: Yeah.


HELEN: "Little Heaven." Sing it!


DICK: (HUMS A LITTLE, THEN SINGS) "Da la sierra morena viene, bajando viene, 

bajando--" (HUMS THE REST)


HELEN: What does it mean?


DICK: (TRANSLATES) "From the high dark mountains--"


HELEN: From the high dark mountains?


DICK: Oh, it doesn't mean anything. It doesn't make sense. It's love. (SINGS) 

"Ay-ay-ay-ay."


HELEN: Oh, I know what that means.


DICK: What?


HELEN: (SINGS) "Ay-ay-ay-ay." (LAUGHS) 


DICK: (LAUGHS, THEN SINGS) Canta y no llores - (TRANSLATES FOR HER BENEFIT, 

SPEAKS) Say, sing and don't cry. 


HELEN: (GIGGLES)


DICK 

& HELEN: (SING TOGETHER) La-la-la-la, Little Heaven.


MUSIC: SONG ENDS ... HAND ORGAN OUT


DICK: You got a nice voice, honey.


HELEN: Have I?


DICK: You bet you have. (LAUGHS AS SHE TICKLES HIM, RESISTS GENTLY) Hey-hey-

hey-hey-hey!


HELEN: (GIGGLES) You ticklish?


DICK: (LAUGHS) Sure I am! Hey! 


HELEN: (GIGGLES) 


DICK: (CHUCKLES) Go on, honey, sing something.


HELEN: Oh, I couldn't.


DICK: Go on. You got a fine voice.


HELEN: (GIGGLES) 


DICK: (CHUCKLES) 


HELEN: (SINGS UNSERIOUSLY) 

Hey, diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle. 

The cow jumped over the moon. 

The little dog laughed to see such sport, 

And the dish ran away with the spoon.


DICK 

& HELEN: (LAUGH)


HELEN: I never thought that had any sense before. Now I get it.


DICK: (PUZZLED) You got me beat.


HELEN: It's you and me. You're the dish and I'm the spoon.


DICK: You're a little spoon all right.


HELEN: And I guess I'm the little cow that jumped over the moon. Do you 

believe in sorta guardian angels?


DICK: What?


HELEN: Guardian angels.


DICK: I don't know. Maybe.


HELEN: I do. There must be something that looks out for you and brings you 

your happiness, at last. Well, look at us. How did we both happen to go to 

that place today if there wasn't something?


DICK: Maybe you're right.


HELEN: (THOUGHTFUL) Look at us.


DICK: Everything's "us" to you, kid - ain't it?


HELEN: Well, ain't it?


DICK: It's all right with me.


HELEN: (TOO SERIOUSLY) We belong to each other. We belong together and we're 

gonna to stick together, ain't we?


DICK: (POLITELY CHANGES SUBJECT) Sing something else.


HELEN: Oh, I tell you, I can't sing.


DICK: Sure, you can!


HELEN: I tell you, I haven't thought of singing since I was a little bit of a 

girl. (CHUCKLES)


DICK: Well, sing anyway.


HELEN: (SINGS) 

And every little wavelet had its night cap on,

Its night cap, white cap, night cap on,

And every little wavelet had its night cap on,

So very, very early in the morning.


DICK: (CHUCKLES) 


HELEN: Did you used to sing that when you were a little kid?


DICK: No.


HELEN: Didn't you? We used to. In the first grade, little kids; we used to go 

'round and 'round in a ring and flop our hands up and down. Supposed to be the 

waves. I remember it used to confuse me, because we did just the same thing to 

be little angels.


DICK: (LAUGHS) Yeah? (CHUCKLES) 


HELEN: (MORE SERIOUS) You know why I came here?


DICK: I can make a good guess.


HELEN: Because you told me I looked like an angel to you. That's why I came.


DICK: Honey, all women look like angels to me -- all white women. I ain't been 

seeing nothing but Indians, you know, for the last couple o' years. 


HELEN: You've known a lot of women, haven't you?


DICK: Not so many - real ones.


HELEN: Did you - like any of 'em - better than me?


DICK: Nope. There wasn't one of 'em any sweeter than you, honey. Not as sweet. 

No, not as sweet.


HELEN: I like to hear you say it. Say it again.


DICK: (CHUCKLES, GOOD-NATURED) No--


HELEN: Go on; tell me again!


DICK: Here. (PAUSE, THEY KISS) Does that tell you?


HELEN: (DEEPLY) Yes. We're gonna stick together always, aren't we?


DICK: (BEAT, HONESTLY) I'll have to be moving on, kid - someday, you know.


HELEN: When?


DICK: Quien sabe?


HELEN: What's that mean?


DICK: You got to learn that, kid, if you're figuring on coming with me. It's 

the answer to everything below the Rio Grande.


HELEN: But what does it mean?


DICK: It means, "Who knows?"


HELEN: Quien sabe?


DICK: Yep. Don't forget it now.


HELEN: (SOBERLY) I'll never get below the Rio Grande. I'll never get out of 

here.


DICK: Quien sabe?


HELEN: (CHANGE OF MOOD, UPBEAT) That's right! Quien sabe? Who knows?


DICK: That's the stuff.


HELEN: You must like it down there.


DICK: Can't live anywhere else - for long.


HELEN: Why not?


DICK: Oh, you're free down there. You're free.


HELEN: (SLIGHTLY STARTLED) What's that?


DICK: Just the street light going on.


HELEN: Is it as late as that?


DICK: Late as what?


HELEN: Dark.


DICK: Oh, it's been dark for hours. Didn't you know that?


HELEN: No. I must go! 


DICK: Wait, the moon'll be up in a little while -- full moon.


HELEN: It isn't that. I'm late; I must go. (BEAT) What's that?


DICK: What?


HELEN: On the window ledge.


DICK: A flower.


HELEN: Who gave it to you?


DICK: Nobody gave it to me. I bought it.


HELEN: For yourself?


DICK: Sure. Why not?


HELEN: I don't know.


DICK: Chinatown - made me think of Frisco where I was a kid - so I bought it.


HELEN: That where you were born? Frisco?


DICK: Yep. Twin Peaks.


HELEN: What's that?


DICK: A couple of hills, together.


HELEN: One for you and one for me.


DICK: (CHUCKLES) I bet you'd like Frisco.


HELEN: Oh, I know a woman went out there once.


DICK: The bay and the hills -- that's the life! Every Saturday we used to 

cross the Bay - get a couple of nags and just ride over the hills. One would 

have a blanket on the saddle and the other, the grub. At night, we'd make a 

little fire and eat - and then roll up in the old blanket--


HELEN: Who? Who was with you?


DICK: (INDIFFERENTLY) Anybody. You look in good shape, kid. Couple of months 

riding over the mountains with me, you'd be great.


HELEN: Can I?


DICK: What?


HELEN: Someday - ride mountains with you?


DICK: Ride mountains, ride donkeys.


HELEN: It's the same thing, with you. Can I, someday? The high dark mountains?


DICK: Who knows?


HELEN: Oh, it must be great.


DICK: You ever been off like that, kid? High up? On top of the world?


HELEN: Yes.


DICK: When?


HELEN: Today.


DICK: You're pretty sweet.


HELEN: I never knew anything like this was. I never knew that I could feel 

like this. So - so purified.


DICK: (CHUCKLES)


HELEN: Oh, don't laugh at me.


DICK: Oh, I ain't-- I ain't laughing, honey.


HELEN: Purified.


DICK: It's a hell of a word, but I know what you mean. That's the way it is 

sometimes.


HELEN: Well-- Goodbye.


DICK: Hey, aren't you forgetting something? 


HELEN: No, I - I'm not forgetting. (BEAT) Can I have that lily?


DICK: Sure. Why not?


HELEN: Goodbye. 


SOUND: ROOM DOOR OPENS, OFF


DICK: Goodbye, honey.


SOUND: ROOM DOOR CLOSES, OFF


MUSIC: PEACEFUL BRIDGE, WHICH ENDS WITH A FEW QUIRKY NOTES


ANNOUNCER: We pause briefly for station identification. (BEAT) WEAF, New York.


[7. Domestic:]



MUSIC: BRIEF QUIRKY BRIDGE


JONES: (INTO PHONE) Then it's all settled? Everything signed? --- Tell 

Williams to call me up.


SOUND: PHONE RECEIVER DOWN


JONES: (PLEASED) Heh! Well, it's all settled! (LAUGHS) Now watch me! 

(CHUCKLES)


HELEN: (MECHANICALLY) Did you put it over?


JONES: Did I put it over? Sure, I put it over.


HELEN: Did you swing it?


JONES: Sure, I swung it.


HELEN: Did they come through?


JONES: Sure, they came through.


HELEN: Did they sign?


JONES: Ha ha! I'll say they signed!


HELEN: On the dotted line?


JONES: On the dotted line!


HELEN: The property's yours?


JONES: The property's mine. I'll put a first mortgage. I'll put a second 

mortgage. The property's mine. I put it over! I sold them on the idea! 

(LAUGHS) I put it through! Heh! (BEAT, QUIETLY) Hey, you don't seem to care. 

(BEAT) What are you looking at?


HELEN: Nothing.


JONES: Huh. Must be looking at something.


HELEN: Nothing. The moon.


JONES: Well, the moon is something, isn't it?


HELEN: (WEARILY) Yes.


JONES: What's it doing?


HELEN: Nothing.


JONES: (CHUCKLES, LIGHTLY) It must be doing something.


HELEN: (SADLY) It's moving - moving -


SOUND: PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP


JONES: (INTO PHONE) Hello? --- Yeah, hello, Phillips. Well, I put it over! 

Yeah. (LAUGHS) I swung it. --- Sure, they came through. --- Did they sign? 

Well, ask me. Right on the dotted line. (LAUGHS) The property's mine. I made 

the proposition; I sold 'em the idea. Now watch me! (LAUGHS) --- Yeah, see ya 

tomorrow. Tell Evans to call me up.


SOUND: RECEIVER DOWN


JONES: That was Phillips. And wasn't he surprised! Heh! Say, you know, I'm not 

so sure about Mrs. Phillips. I think she's a little gay.


HELEN: (UNINTERESTED) Oh, really?


JONES: Sure. I guess I'm lucky. It's the lucky man these days who has a wife 

he can be sure of-- (BEAT) What's the matter?


HELEN: Nothing.


JONES: Must be something. My, but you're nervous tonight.


HELEN: I try not to be.


JONES: Well, you are.


HELEN: Well, I try not to show it.


JONES: You inherit that from your mother. She was in the office today.


HELEN: Today?


JONES: Sure. It's the first of the month, ain't it? 


HELEN: Oh. Er, yes.


JONES: (CHUCKLES) The old girl never wastes any time collecting her allowance.


HELEN: Poor Ma.


JONES: She's coming over tomorrow to see the baby. She gets a lot of comfort 

out of that kid. A mother's a very precious thing -- a good mother.


HELEN: (AN OUTBURST) Well, I try to be! I try!


JONES: Who was saying anything about you? Of course you're a good mother. Why 

wouldn't you be? Good home, husband who does everything for you, and a fine 

child.


HELEN: (UNENTHUSIASTIC) Yes. I have everything. I should be thankful.


JONES: We should both be thankful. And now this big deal going through. Well, 

I guess we're what you call "sittin' pretty." Heh.


HELEN: Do you think that we could go away for a little while?


JONES: What? Me, get away now? With this deal just going through? It'll be me 

with the old nose to the grindstone for a long time now.


HELEN: Well, maybe Ma and the baby and I could go to the seashore. I've been 

feeling terribly nervous lately. Sometimes I get scared.


JONES: Scared? (LAUGHS) Scared of what?


HELEN: I don't know. Just scared.


JONES: (CHUCKLES) Aw, there's nothing the matter with you. Now, what fun would 

you have going away with just your mother and the baby? Oh, wait, just wait. 

I'll take you on a real trip. We'll go to Europe and see the whole show -- 

England, France, Italy, Switzerland. I always wanted to buy a Swiss watch in 

Switzerland. (LAUGHS) Yeah. Funny, the ideas you get. (CHUCKLES) 


HELEN: (SUDDENLY TENSE) We can't go then?


JONES: Aw, you don't want to go away now. Wait for me and we'll do it right. 

(BEAT, TO HIMSELF) Now, let's see, uh--


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER


JONES: (TO HIMSELF) Anything in the paper? (BEAT, TO HELEN) Heh. Another 

revolution in Mexico.


HELEN: (SHARPLY) Anybody hurt? Any Americans?


JONES: No-sir-ree. I guess those greasers know now that your Uncle Sam is 

keeping an eye on things. Someday we'll go in and straighten out that country 

for good. No business sense. No efficiency.


HELEN: I - I think I'll go to bed.


JONES: Oh, it's early. It's only, er, ten forty-six. I don't want to go yet. 

Maybe somebody else will call me up about that deal.


HELEN: Well, you can stay up.


JONES: Yeah, and if you fall asleep I won't be able to wake you up; I know 

you. Hm. Come on, sit down. We'll both go to bed before long.


HELEN: (WEAKLY) I'm tired.


JONES: (ANNOYED, INSISTENT) Come on. Sit down and rest. (BEAT, EXHALES) You, 

uh, want anything to read?


HELEN: No.


JONES: Yeah, before this country gets through, there'll be peace all over the 

world. The world's spiritual leader. That's what we'll be. Hmm.


SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER


MUSIC: HAND ORGAN PLAYS "CIELITO LINDO" ... JOINED BRIEFLY BY A HANDFUL OF 

VOICES SINGING THE FIRST PART OF THE REFRAIN ("AY-AY-AY-AY") ... VOICES 

CONTINUE WORDLESSLY IN BG


DICK: There were a bunch of bandidos - bandits, you know. Took me into the 

hills - holding me there. What was I to do? I got the two birds that guarded 

me drunk one night, and then I filled the empty bottles with small stones and 

let 'em have it. I had to get free, didn't I? I let 'em have it. You don't 

have to have a gun to kill a man. Just a bottle and some stones.


VOICES: (SING TO THE TUNE)

Just a bottle and some stones.

Just a bottle and some stones.

Just a bottle and some stones.

Ay - ay - ay - ay---

(HUMS, IN BG)


PEDDLER: (HAWKING) Old bottles! New stones! Old bottles! New stones! Gem 

stones! Old bottles! New stones! Stepping stones!


VOICES: (SING TO THE TUNE)

Old bottles - New stones -

Old bottles - New stones -

Headstones -


MUSIC: HAND ORGAN AND VOICES OUT WITH--


HELEN: (BLOODCURDLING SCREAM) You won't let me get away!


JONES: Well, what's the matter?


HELEN: You won't let me get away!


JONES: You'll be all right.


HELEN: I've got to get awaaaaay!


[8. The Law:]



MUSIC: BRIDGE ... INTENSE, FOR THE MURDER ... THEN CALMER FOR THE AFTERMATH


JUDGE: Defense ready to proceed?


DEFENSE: We're ready, your Honor.


JUDGE: Proceed.


DEFENSE: Gentlemen of the jury, you have heard the case of the prosecution. 

You have heard the witnesses for the prosecution. Not many of them, it is true 

-- and with not very much that is pertinent to say.


PROSECUTION: I object, your Honor.


JUDGE: Objection sustained.


DEFENSE: Gentlemen of the jury, you have heard my client accused of the 

willful, cold-blooded, and brutal murder of her husband. This little woman - 

this young mother - this devoted wife - this filial daughter--!


PROSECUTION: I object, your Honor. Irrelevant, immaterial--


JUDGE: Objection sustained. Proceed with your witnesses.


DEFENSE: Helen Jones.


BAILIFF: (OFF, CALLS) Helen Jones?


DEFENSE: Mrs. Jones, will you take the stand?


FIRST REPORTER: (RAPID MONOTONE) The defense sprang a surprise at the opening 

of court this morning by putting the accused woman on the stand. (FADES OUT 

BEHIND--)


BAILIFF: Do you swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the 

truth, so help you God?


HELEN: I do.


JUDGE: You may sit.


FIRST REPORTER: (RAPID MONOTONE) Helen Jones, accused of the murder of her 

husband George H. Jones, walked calmly to the witness stand-- (FADES OUT 

BEHIND--)


COURT REPORTER: What is your name?


HELEN: Helen Jones.


COURT REPORTER: Your age?


HELEN: Twenty-nine.


COURT REPORTER: Where do you live?


HELEN: In prison.


DEFENSE: Mrs. Jones, you are the widow of the late George H. Jones, are you 

not?


HELEN: Yes.


DEFENSE: How long were you married to the late George H. Jones before his 

demise?


HELEN: Six years.


DEFENSE: In those six years of married life with your late husband, the late 

George H. Jones, did you ever have a quarrel?


HELEN: No, sir.


DEFENSE: You have one child, have you not, Mrs. Jones?


HELEN: Yes, sir.


DEFENSE: A little girl, is it not?


HELEN: Yes, sir.


DEFENSE: How old is she?


HELEN: She's five. Past five.


DEFENSE: Since the demise of the late Mr. Jones, you are the only parent she 

has living, are you not?


HELEN: Yes, sir.


DEFENSE: (MELODRAMATIC) Where is she now, this child? Robbed by fate of a 

father's protection and by law -- I do not say justice! -- of a mother's 

devotion! Where is she now?


HELEN: With my mother.


DEFENSE: Your mother. Before your marriage to the late Mr. Jones, you worked 

and supported your mother, did you not?


PROSECUTION: I object, your Honor! Irrelevant, immaterial, and--


JUDGE: Objection sustained.


DEFENSE: In order to support your mother and yourself as a girl, you worked, 

did you not?


HELEN: Yes, sir.


DEFENSE: What did you do?


HELEN: I was a stenographer.


DEFENSE: And you continued to work, continuously, in the support of your 

mother and yourself from the time you were fifteen until the date of your 

marriage. Is that true, Mrs. Jones?


HELEN: Yes.


DEFENSE: By what firm were you last employed, before your marriage to the late 

Mr. Jones?


HELEN: By his.


DEFENSE: By the firm of which he was the head, is that right?


HELEN: No, he was the Vice-President.


DEFENSE: And when you married him you were your mother's sole support, were 

you not?


HELEN: Yes, sir.


DEFENSE: And since your marriage you have continued as her sole support, have 

you not?


HELEN: Mr. Jones did, yes.


DEFENSE: Because you, er-- Through you, was it not?


HELEN: Yes, sir.


DEFENSE: (GRANDLY) A devoted daughter, gentlemen of the jury! As well as a 

devoted wife and a devoted mother!


PROSECUTION: (OBJECTS) Your Honor!


DEFENSE: (QUICKLY MOVING ON) And now, Mrs. Jones. I will ask you - the law 

expects me to ask you - it demands that I ask you - this one last question - 

this brutal, heartless question. Did you or did you not - on the night of June 

second last or the morning of June third last - kill your husband, the late 

George H. Jones? Did you or did you not?


HELEN: (BEAT) I did not.


DEFENSE: You did not?


HELEN: I did not.


DEFENSE: Now, Mrs. Jones, you have heard the witnesses for the State accuse 

you of deliberately murdering your own husband by brutally hitting him over 

the head with a bottle -- a bottle filled with small stones. Did you -- I 

repeat this -- or did you not?


HELEN: (BEAT) I did not.


DEFENSE: You did not! Of course you did not! Now, Mrs. Jones, will you tell 

the jury in your own words exactly what happened on the night of June second 

or the morning of June third last, at the time your husband was killed.


HELEN: Well, I - I was awakened by hearing something - somebody - in the room, 

and I saw two men standing by my husband's bed.


DEFENSE: I see. And what did you do, Mrs. Jones, when you suddenly awoke and 

saw two big dark-looking men standing beside your bed?


HELEN: I - I didn't do anything.


DEFENSE: You didn't have time to do anything, did you?


HELEN: No. 


DEFENSE: Why?


HELEN: Because before I could do anything, one of them raised something in his 

hand and struck Mr. Jones over the head with it.


DEFENSE: And what did Mr. Jones do?


HELEN: He gave a sort of groan and tried to raise up.


DEFENSE: Tried to raise up?


HELEN: Yes!


DEFENSE: And then what happened?


HELEN: The man struck him again and he fell back.


DEFENSE: I see. What did the men do then? The big dark-looking men.


HELEN: They turned and ran out of the room.


DEFENSE: I see. What did you do then, Mrs. Jones?


HELEN: Well, I saw Mr. Jones was bleeding from the temple. I got towels and 

tried to stop it, and then I realized he'd - passed away.


DEFENSE: I see. And what did you do then?


HELEN: Well, I - I didn't know what to do. But I thought I'd better call the 

police. So I went to the telephone and called the police.


DEFENSE: What happened then?


HELEN: Nothing. Nothing happened.


DEFENSE: The police came, didn't they?


HELEN: Yes. They came.


DEFENSE: (QUICKLY) And that is all you know concerning the death of your 

husband in the late hours of June second or the early hours of June third 

last, isn't it?


HELEN: Yes, sir.


DEFENSE: All?


HELEN: Yes, sir.


DEFENSE: (TO PROSECUTION) Take the witness.


SOUND: NEXT THREE LINES, REPORTERS SPEAK IN RAPID MONOTONE 


FIRST REPORTER: The defense finished their direct examination-- (FADES OUT)


SECOND REPORTER: The accused woman told a straightforward story of-- (FADES 

OUT)


FIRST REPORTER: The accused woman told a rambling, disconnected story of-- 

(FADES OUT)


PROSECUTION: Mrs. Jones, will you describe for the jury more fully just how 

these big dark-looking men looked?


HELEN: Well, I - I didn't see them very well. I - I said that I told the 

police that.


PROSECUTION: You made no effort to cry out, Mrs. Jones, did you, when you saw 

those two big dark men standing over your helpless husband, did you?


HELEN: No, sir. I didn't.


PROSECUTION: And when the two big dark-looking men turned and ran out of the 

room, you made no effort to follow them or cry out after them, did you?


HELEN: No, sir.


PROSECUTION: Why didn't you?


HELEN: Well, I - I saw Mr. Jones was hurt.


PROSECUTION: Ah! You saw Mr. Jones was hurt. You saw this. How'd you see it?


HELEN: Well, I just saw it.


PROSECUTION: There was a light in the room?


HELEN: Yes, the moon.


PROSECUTION: The moon?


HELEN: Yes, it was a bright moon!


PROSECUTION: It was a bright moon. You're sure of that?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: How are you sure?


HELEN: Well, I couldn't sleep. I never can sleep in the bright moon. I - I 

never can.


PROSECUTION: You were not asleep then when--?


HELEN: Yes, yes. Then I was. But before I - I wasn't.


PROSECUTION: Well, when did you go to bed? Do you remember that?


HELEN: Yes, sir. At eleven-twelve.


PROSECUTION: (AMUSED) You're quite sure it couldn't have been eleven-eleven or 

eleven-thirteen?


HELEN: No, sir. Eleven-twelve.


PROSECUTION: And how do you know it was exactly eleven-twelve?


HELEN: Well, Mr. Jones said so.


PROSECUTION: Ah! On the night he was to be murdered, Mr. Jones said--


HELEN: He always said it!


PROSECUTION: Said what?


HELEN: Said what time it was when he went to bed.


PROSECUTION: And you had perfect confidence in your husband, didn't you, Mrs. 

Jones? When he told you eleven-twelve, you knew it was eleven-twelve?


HELEN: Yes. He - he always kept the correct time. He was very particular about 

that. He was counting on going to Switzerland someday and - (TEARFUL) - buying 

a Swiss watch right there.


PROSECUTION: So it was eleven-twelve?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: Mrs. Jones, how does it happen, since it was your husband's 

custom to announce the time every night, that you so clearly noted the time on 

this particular night?


HELEN: I don't know.


PROSECUTION: (OH, COME NOW!) Mrs. Jones, was it because you knew as he stood 

there before you and looking at his watch that he was doing it for the last 

time?


HELEN: No! No! No!


PROSECUTION: Was it because you knew that in the morning he would lie 

murdered?


HELEN: No! No! No!


DEFENSE: I object, your Honor! I object!


JUDGE: Objection sustained. 


PROSECUTION: Now to resume. As I understand you, Mrs. Jones, you say you could 

not see the two men very well, but you could see your husband bleeding from 

the temple. You say you saw that.


HELEN: Yes, I - I said I saw that.


PROSECUTION: And did you see it?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: And did you call a doctor?


HELEN: No.


PROSECUTION: Why didn't you?


HELEN: Well, the police did.


PROSECUTION: But you didn't?


HELEN: No.


PROSECUTION: Why didn't you? (NO ANSWER) Why didn't you?


HELEN: I saw it was - useless.


PROSECUTION: Ah! You saw that! You saw that very clearly.


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: Mrs. Jones, did you ever see this before?


HELEN: (BEAT) I - think so.


PROSECUTION: You think so?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: And what do you think it is?


HELEN: I think it's the bottle that was used against Mr. Jones.


PROSECUTION: Used against him, yes. That's right. You've guessed right. This 

neck and these broken pieces and these pebbles were found on the floor and 

scattered over the bed. There were no fingerprints on this bottle, Mrs. Jones. 

None at all. Doesn't that seem strange to you?


HELEN: No.


PROSECUTION: It doesn't seem strange to you that this bottle held in the big 

dark hand of one of those big dark men left no mark? No print? That doesn't 

seem strange to you?


HELEN: No.


PROSECUTION: You're in the habit of wearing rubber gloves at night, Mrs. 

Jones, are you not? To protect, to soften your hands, are you not?


HELEN: Well, I - I used to.


PROSECUTION: Used to? When was that?


HELEN: Before I was married.


PROSECUTION: And after your marriage you gave it up?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: Why?


HELEN: Mr. Jones didn't like the feel of them.


PROSECUTION: You always did everything Mr. Jones wanted?


HELEN: I tried to. Anyway, I didn't care any more so much about my hands.


PROSECUTION: I see. So after your marriage you never wore gloves at night any 

more?


HELEN: No.


PROSECUTION: Mrs. Jones, isn't it true that you began wearing your rubber 

gloves again -- in spite of your husband's expressed dislike -- about a year 

ago? A year ago this spring?


HELEN: No.


PROSECUTION: You did not suddenly begin to care particularly for your hands 

again - about a year ago this spring?


HELEN: No.


PROSECUTION: You're quite sure of that?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: Quite sure?


HELEN: Yes!


PROSECUTION: Then you did not have in your possession, on the night of June 

the second last, a pair of rubber gloves?


HELEN: No.


PROSECUTION: (TO JUDGE) I'd like to introduce these gloves into evidence at 

this time, your Honor.


JUDGE: Exhibit Twenty-Four.


PROSECUTION: I'll return to them later. Now, Mrs. Jones-- Uh, this nightgown 

-- you recognize it, don't you?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: Yours, is it not?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: The one you were wearing the night your husband was murdered, 

isn't it?


HELEN: The night he died. Yes.


PROSECUTION: This was found -- not where the gloves were found, no -- but at 

the bottom of the soiled clothes hamper in the bathroom, rolled up and wet. 

Why was it wet, Mrs. Jones?


HELEN: Well, I - I tried to wash it.


PROSECUTION: Why?


HELEN: There was blood on it.


PROSECUTION: Spattered on it?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: How did that happen?


HELEN: Well, the bottle broke and the sharp edge cut.


PROSECUTION: Oh, the bottle broke and the sharp edge cut.


HELEN: Yes. That's what they told me afterwards.


PROSECUTION: Who told you?


HELEN: The police. That's what they say happened.


PROSECUTION: Mrs. Jones, why did you try so desperately to wash that blood 

away before you called the police?


DEFENSE: I object!


JUDGE: Objection overruled.


PROSECUTION: Why, Mrs. Jones?


HELEN: I don't know. It's what anyone would have done, wouldn't they?


PROSECUTION: (POINTEDLY) That depends, doesn't it? (BEAT) Mrs. Jones - when 

did you first see this bottle?


HELEN: The night my husband was done away with.


PROSECUTION: Done away with! You mean killed?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: Why don't you say killed?


HELEN: It sounds so brutal.


PROSECUTION: And you never saw this before then?


HELEN: No, sir.


PROSECUTION: You're quite sure of that?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: And these stones -- they were found with the bottle. When did you 

first see them?


HELEN: The night my husband was done away with.


PROSECUTION: Mrs. Jones, do you remember about a year ago -- a year ago this 

spring -- bringing to your house a lily, a Chinese water lily?


HELEN: No. I - I don't think I do.


PROSECUTION: I'll show you this bowl, Mrs. Jones. (BEAT) Does that refresh 

your memory?


HELEN: Well, I - I remember the bowl, but I - I don't remember the lily.


PROSECUTION: Do you recognize the bowl then?


HELEN: Yes.


PROSECUTION: It is yours, isn't it?


HELEN: It was in my house, yes.


PROSECUTION: How did it come there?


HELEN: How did it come there?


PROSECUTION: Yes. Where did you get it?


HELEN: I don't remember.


PROSECUTION: You don't remember?


HELEN: No.


PROSECUTION: You don't remember about a year ago bringing this bowl into your 

bedroom filled with small stones and some water and a water lily? You don't 

remember tending very carefully that lily till it died? And when it died you 

don't remember hiding the bowl and keeping it there until-- You don't 

remember?


HELEN: No, I - I don't remember.


PROSECUTION: You don't remember the lily or the stones?


HELEN: No. No, I don't!


PROSECUTION: Your Honor, I'd like to introduce this paper into evidence at 

this time.


JUDGE: What is it?


PROSECUTION: It's an affidavit taken in the State of Guanajato, Mexico. It's 

signed by one Richard Roe, and its purpose is to refresh the memory of the 

witness on the point at issue -- and incidentally [supply] a motive for this 

murder; this brutal and cold-blooded murder of a sleeping man by--


DEFENSE: I protest, your Honor! I object!


JUDGE: Let me see the document. 


SOUND: RATTLE OF PAPER


JUDGE: (BEAT) Perfectly regular. (BEAT) Do you offer this affidavit in 

evidence at this time for the purpose of refreshing the memory of the witness 

at this time?


PROSECUTION: Yes, your Honor.


JUDGE: You may introduce the evidence.


DEFENSE: Why is this witness himself not brought into court, so he can be 

cross-questioned?


PROSECUTION: The witness is a resident of the Republic of Mexico and as such 

is not subject to subpoena as a witness to this court.


JUDGE: Proceed with the evidence.


PROSECUTION: (CLEARS THROAT) The affidavit reads-- (READS) "In the matter of 

the State versus Helen Jones, I, Richard Roe, being of sound mind, do herein 

depose and state that I know the accused, Helen Jones, and have known her for 

a period of over one year immediately preceding the date of the signature of 

this affidavit. That I first met the said Helen Jones in a so-called speak-

easy somewhere in the West Forties in New York City. That on the day I met 

her, she went with me to my apartment, also somewhere in the West Forties in 

New York City--"


HELEN: (INHALES, SHUDDERING VIOLENTLY)


PROSECUTION: (READS) "--and where I gave her a blue bowl filled with pebbles, 

also containing a flowering lily. That from the first day we met until I 

departed for Mexico in the Fall, the said Helen Jones was an almost daily 

visitor to my apartment--"


HELEN: (CRIES OUT IN DESPAIR) No! No! 


PROSECUTION: What is it, Mrs. Jones? What is it?


HELEN: Don't read any more! No more!


PROSECUTION: Why not?!


HELEN: I did it! I did it! I did it!


SOUND: COURTROOM CROWD MURMURS


PROSECUTION: You confess?!


HELEN: Yes! I did it!


DEFENSE: I object, your Honor!


JUDGE: You confess you killed your husband?


HELEN: I put him out of the way. Yes.


JUDGE: Why?


HELEN: To be free.


JUDGE: To be free? Is that the only reason?


HELEN: Yes.


JUDGE: If you just wanted to be free, why didn't you divorce him?


HELEN: (SOBS, TEARFUL) I couldn't do that! I couldn't hurt him like that!


SOUND: COURTROOM CROWD LAUGHS


JUDGE: Silence! Silence! (BEAT) Mrs. Jones, why? Why?


HELEN: (CAN'T SPEAK, INHALES AND EXHALES IN AGONY)


DEFENSE: Your Honor, I ask a recess!


JUDGE: Court's adjourned!


[9. A Machine:]



MUSIC: BRIDGE


NEGRO: (SINGS A SPIRITUAL, UNACCOMPANIED ... CONTINUES IN BG)


PRIEST: (MECHANICALLY) Hear, oh Lord, my prayer; and let my cry come to Thee. 

Turn not Thy face away from me; in the day when I am in trouble, incline Thy 

ear to me. In what day soever I shall call upon Thee, hear me speedily. For my 

days are vanished like smoke--


JAILER: (ANNOYED) Stop that guy yelling!


HELEN: No! Let him sing. He helps me.


MATRON: You can't hear the Father.


HELEN: He helps me.


PRIEST: Don't I help you, daughter?


HELEN: I understand him. I understand him. He's condemned. (BEAT) Father? (NO 

ANSWER) Father? Why was I born?


PRIEST: "I came forth from the Father and have come into the world. I leave 

the world and go into the Father."


HELEN: When I'm dead, won't I have peace?


PRIEST: "Ye shall indeed drink of my cup."


HELEN: Will I have peace tomorrow? Life has been a hell to me, Father.


PRIEST: Because you never knew God.


HELEN: I sought something. I was always seeking something.


PRIEST: What? What were you seeking?


HELEN: Peace. Rest and peace. Will I find it tonight, Father? Will I find it?


PRIEST: Your sins are forgiven. Your sins are forgiven.


HELEN: (LONGINGLY) And that other sin - that other sin - that sin of love-- 

That's all I ever knew of Heaven - Heaven on earth. How is that, Father? How 

can that be? A sin - a mortal sin - all I know of heaven? (BEAT, ANXIOUS) 

Who's that woman?


JAILER: Your mother.


MATRON: Your mother.


JAILER: She's come to say goodbye.


HELEN: She's a stranger. Take her away. She's a stranger. 


JAILER: She's come to say goodbye to you.


MATRON: To say goodbye.


HELEN: But she's never known me - never known me - ever. (TO MOTHER) Go away. 

You're a stranger.


MOTHER: (SADLY) Oh, no.


HELEN: Stranger! 


MOTHER: No.


HELEN: Stranger! (INHALES AS SHE SUDDENLY RECOGNIZES HER) Oh, Mother! Mother


MOTHER: (AS THEY EMBRACE, PITIFUL) My child, my child.


PRIEST: Come, daughter.


GUARD: It's time.


HELEN: Wait! (TO MOTHER, MISERABLY, A PLEA) Mother? My child; my little 

strange child! I never knew her. She'll never know me. Let her live, Mother. 

Let her live. Live! Tell her.


PRIEST: Come, daughter.


HELEN: Wait, wait. (TO MOTHER) Tell her!


MOTHER: (FROM OFF) Goodbye, daughter.


GUARD: It's time.


HELEN: (MOVING OFF) Wait! Wait! Tell her! Wait! Just a minute more! There's so 

much I want to tell her. Wait--


SOUND: SCENE FADES OUT ... TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... SCENE FADES IN


PRIEST: (MECHANICALLY) St. Peter, pray for us - St. Paul, pray for us - St. 

James, pray for us - St. John, pray for us - all ye holy Angels and Archangels 

- all ye holy orders of blessed spirits - St. Joseph - St. John the Baptist - 

St. Thomas--


FIRST REPORTER: Here they are.


SECOND REPORTER: How little she looks. She's gotten smaller.


FIRST REPORTER: Sssh.


PRIEST: St. Phillip, pray for us. All you Holy Patriarchs and prophets - St. 

Phillip - St. Matthew - St. Simon - St. Thaddeus - All ye holy apostles - all 

ye holy disciples - all ye holy innocents - Pray for us - Pray for us - Pray 

for us-- (MOVES OFF)


FIRST REPORTER: Suppose the machine shouldn't work?


SECOND REPORTER: It'll work. It always does.


FIRST REPORTER: Sssh!


PRIEST: (OFF) Saints of God, make intercession for us - Be merciful - Spare 

us, oh Lord - be merciful--


FIRST REPORTER: Her lips are moving. What is she saying?


SECOND REPORTER: I wonder.


FIRST REPORTER: She walks alone.


SECOND REPORTER: Doesn't want them to help her.


FIRST REPORTER: Now she - sits alone.


SECOND REPORTER: Yes. A lonesome seep.


FIRST REPORTER: How calm she is.


SECOND REPORTER: And beautiful.


FIRST REPORTER: God, what waste.


SECOND REPORTER: Thou shalt not kill.


FIRST REPORTER: (DARK HUMOR) Not unless you're the state.


SECOND REPORTER: (IRONIC) The sovereign state.


FIRST REPORTER: Vengeance is mine, saith the Lord.


SECOND REPORTER: (WRY) Vengeance is mine, says the state.


FIRST REPORTER: The sovereign state.


SECOND REPORTER: What does she see?


FIRST REPORTER: Something - beautiful.


SECOND REPORTER: Her face glows.


FIRST REPORTER: She's listening.


SECOND REPORTER: What does she hear?


FIRST REPORTER: Something - beautiful.


SECOND REPORTER: (PAUSE, EXHALES) The state wins.


MUSIC: SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL ... SNEAKS IN ... BUILDS SLOWLY DURING FOLLOWING--


FIRST REPORTER: Yes. It's over.


SECOND REPORTER: She kept listening, to the end. I wonder what she heard.


MUSIC: UP, FOR A BEAUTIFUL CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: I convey your thanks to Sophie Treadwell, Zita Johann, and the cast, for 

a beautiful theater experience. Next week, we bring you Grace George in 

Somerset Maugham's "The Circle," with Cecil Humphries, Horace Braham, and 

Edgar Stehli. Thank you and good night.


ANNOUNCER: Thank you, Mr. Hopkins.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: Tonight's production of "Machinal" by Sophie Treadwell was directed 

by Wynn Wright from a radio version by Gerald Holland and starred Zita Johann, 

Sidney Blackmer, and Harold Vermilyea. Others in the cast included Jean Adair, 

John Connery, Eda Heinemann, Dorothy Knox, Charles Kennedy, Hal Dawson, James 

MacDonald, Eugene Earl, Karl Weber, and John Sylvester. Music was written and 

directed by Morris Mamorsky.


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN OUT


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: This is the National Broadcasting Company.

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