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Joyce and Mary Clean House

Joyce Jordan, M.D.

Joyce and Mary Clean House

Jun 07 1944




CAST:

ANNOUNCER

VOICE, female

HUSBAND (1 line)

JUNIOR (1 line)

GRANDMA (1 line)

2ND ANNOUNCER (2 lines)

SINGER (2 lines)


JOYCE JORDAN, M.D.

VIC MANION

MARY, cleaning lady

CAROL BREWSTER, socialite






ANNOUNCER: At this time, Postum brings you "Joyce Jordan, M.D." We will interrupt the program to bring you any late news developments.


SOUND: TWO CHIMES ... OVER PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEM 


VOICE: (FILTER) Calling Dr. Jordan! 


SOUND: TWO CHIMES 


VOICE: (FILTER) Dr. Joyce Jordan! 


SOUND: TWO CHIMES 


VOICE: (FILTER) Calling Dr. Jordan! 


MUSIC: HARP SWEEPS IN ... FILLS A PAUSE ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: "Joyce Jordan, M.D."! Brought to you by Postum, spelled P-O-S-T-U-M. Postum -- a tempting, wholesome drink for all the family -- is the favorite mealtime drink in millions of American homes. Postum presents the story of Dr. Joyce Jordan, the private and professional life of a girl physician.


MUSIC: HARP UP AND OUT


ANNOUNCER: Tell me, ladies, do little things bother you? Are you the sort of person who simply can't sit still? Who must twirl a pencil in your fingers or drum on the table? Well, why not take steps to find out what's making you nervous? You know, it might be coffee. For coffee does make many people nervous and jittery, even though many others can drink it without ill effect. And if you think coffee might be causing your trouble, switch to Postum for a while. Postum contains no caffeine or other stimulant that could possibly upset anyone's nerves. And, boy, will you enjoy your switch to Postum. After one whiff of its tantalizing aroma -- one sip of its lusty flavor -- you'll agree that Postum is one of the best mealtime drinks you've ever met up with. So if coffee is the cause of your nervousness, drink Postum regularly instead of coffee. And, after you've given Postum a fair trial, see if you're not much less jittery. See if you don't feel much calmer and more easygoing thanks to your switch from coffee to delicious, swell-tasting Postum.


MUSIC: HARP ... TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: When Joyce Jordan married Dean Russell a few weeks ago, she had only one misgiving. That was the reaction of Vic Manion, who was still very much in love with her. And, as it turned out, her apprehension was more than justified, for the loss of Joyce was a staggering blow to Vic and for many days thereafter his behavior gave her cause for real alarm. But now he seems suddenly to have become reconciled to the situation. And it may be because -- in Carol Brewster, the attractive society girl who now works as a welder in the cargo plane factory -- Vic has been able to find an interest that takes his mind off Joyce -- for the time being, at any rate. 


It's late afternoon now and Joyce has just left her office for the day. When she reaches the end of the long corridor, she turns to the right, but as she does so, she collides with someone coming from the opposite direction.


JOYCE: (STARTLED) Oh! (CHUCKLES) 


VIC: Pardon, I--


JOYCE: For goodness sake, Vic!


VIC: Why, Joyce! (LIGHTLY) Well, this is a break I've been waiting for. In my arms, after all.


JOYCE: (LAUGHS)


VIC: Where you headed for?


JOYCE: I'm on my way to the new house.


VIC: Oh? You moved in already?


JOYCE: Just about. This'll be our first day there.


VIC: Well! Congratulations.


JOYCE: Thanks, Vic. I, er, put in a hard day here, so I'm leaving a little early.


VIC: Sure. Why not? Take it easy.


JOYCE: I'm afraid the hardest part of the day is still ahead.


VIC: How come?


JOYCE: Oh, I want to do some cleaning up before Dean gets there.


VIC: Cleaning?! You're not gonna tackle that house alone?


JOYCE: No, I'm having Mary help me.


VIC: Oh, the one who takes care of your office?


JOYCE: Mm hm. I'd be lost without her.


VIC: Well, I won't keep you. (MOVING OFF) Uh, don't overdo it.


JOYCE: I'll try not to. So long, Vic.


MUSIC: HARP ... TRANSITION


JOYCE: Well, Mary, I see you have a head start on me.


MARY: Only a half hour, doctor. There's so much to do here.


JOYCE: Mmm, isn't there, though?


MARY: I thought we'd better start as soon as possible.


SOUND: TABLE MOVED DURING FOLLOWING--


JOYCE: Oh, here. Let me help you with the table.


MARY: (WITH SLIGHT EFFORT) Oh, no, no. Don't bother. I can manage. My goodness, how could a house get so dirty?


JOYCE: I'm afraid it hasn't been cleaned in an awfully long time.


MARY: Maybe you ought to wait a while.


JOYCE: Hm?


MARY: I mean, before movin' in. It's gonna take a few days at least to clean it up right.


JOYCE: Oh, we can get some of the top layers off today, anyway.


MARY: Oh, we can do better than that, but we won't be able to finish more than a few rooms.


JOYCE: Well, we'll try to do as many as we can and then we'll take care of the rest of the house later.


MARY: How about Mr. Russell? Isn't he comin' along soon to help?


JOYCE: Oh, no. This is our problem, Mary. He doesn't even know I'm here now.


MARY: Oh, wait. Don't try to move that sofa--


JOYCE: That's all right.


SOUND: SOFA LIFTED BEHIND--


MARY: No, it isn't, doctor. That's heavy. Now -- where do you want it?


JOYCE: (WITH EFFORT) Uh, let's put it over at this end for the time-- I want to clean along the wall.


SOUND: SCRAPE AND STRUGGLE OF SOFA LIFTED AND MOVED ... THEIR FOOTSTEPS IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


JOYCE: (EXHALES) Oh. That was heavy. Here we are. Thanks. (TO HERSELF) Now, uh, where did I put the, uh--? Oh, here it is. (UP) There must be some more dust rags around, aren't there, Mary?


MARY: Yes, plenty. I have a whole stack of 'em in that basket.


JOYCE: Oh, I see.


MARY: There's an extra duster, too.


JOYCE: Mm hm. 


MARY: Well, we'd better get some more windows open.


JOYCE: Yes, that's a good idea. It is getting stuffy in here.


SOUND: WINDOW OPENED


MARY: (EXHALES)


SOUND: MARY'S STEP TO ANOTHER WINDOW WHICH OPENS


MARY: There. That's better.


JOYCE: You know, Mary, I think this floor can stand some waxing.


MARY: (RELUCTANT) Oh, you didn't want to do that now?


JOYCE: No. Some other time.


SOUND: MARY PATS AND FLUFFS CUSHIONS


MARY: I may as well put these cushions near the window.


JOYCE: Mm hm. Well, the place looks a lot cleaner already.


MARY: Yeah. You know, doctor, now that the furniture's begin' to come out from under the dust, I - I can see what elegant stuff you really have here.


JOYCE: A little too elegant, I'm afraid.


MARY: Oh, I don't think so. Looks all right in a place like this.


JOYCE: What do you think of the house, Mary?


MARY: Hmm. Big.


JOYCE: (CHUCKLES) 


MARY: No, it's fine. I mean, sure it's big, but you're gonna make a warm and friendly place out of it. I just know you are.


JOYCE: I hope so. I'd like it to be a real home.


MARY: It takes a heap o' livin' for that. But don't get discouraged.


JOYCE: I won't. I think Mr. Russell and I'll be very happy here.


MARY: I'm sure you will. You know, doctor, you've changed a lot lately.


JOYCE: Have I? How do you mean?


MARY: You're not so serious any more.


JOYCE: Really?


MARY: Uh huh. It's sort of easier to talk to ya now. Oh, I don't mean you weren't friendly and nice before, but-- Well, you - you seem so much gayer now.


JOYCE: That's the way I feel.


MARY: Y'even look prettier.


JOYCE: (LAUGHS MODESTLY)


MARY: You really do. Gettin' married's been a fine thing for ya. I wouldn't be surprised that's what did it.


JOYCE: Then you recommend marriage?


MARY: That I do, doctor. I recommend it highly!


MUSIC: HARP ... TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: And now let's go on to another part of town. Vic Manion and Carol Brewster are spending the evening together. It's a little after nine. They've already had dinner and we find them walking along the riverfront.


SOUND: RIVERFRONT BACKGROUND (RIVER, FROGS, ET CETERA)


VIC: What are you thinking, Carol?


CAROL: You picked a beautiful evening.


VIC: Oh, that was easy.


CAROL: Oh?


VIC: I arranged it with the weatherman.


CAROL: (CHUCKLES) Oh, I see.


VIC: We exchange little favors now and then.


CAROL: Uh huh. Well, he was very obliging.


VIC: Yeah. He promised me a wonderful moon for tonight. And here it is -- on the job.


CAROL: I've never seen it quite so brilliant before.


VIC: We get some nice moons in Preston.


CAROL: So I'm discovering.


VIC: How do you like the town?


CAROL: I don't know. The job hasn't given me much time to get around.


VIC: Oh, that's too bad.


CAROL: Not at all. The job itself has been fun enough.


VIC: I'm glad you feel that way. It's a pretty tough and monotonous grind to most.


CAROL: Not to me! Maybe it's because I don't need it.


VIC: (AMUSED) Yes, could be. I guess it's sort of a lark to you. "Beautiful society girl doing her bit for the war."


CAROL: Well, that's how it may have started, but, don't forget, I've been on the job quite a while now.


VIC: I know.


CAROL: I've learned a lot, too -- from the simple girls around me. (CHUCKLES) "Simple" girls.


VIC: What's the joke?


CAROL: No joke at all. I guess I haven't learned so much at that.


VIC: Why? What do you mean?


CAROL: Well, I thought my days of snobbery were over. But I guess those things die pretty hard.


VIC: Well, we all have a trace of it.


CAROL: Well, I'm afraid I've a little more than that. It's a funny thing.


VIC: What?


CAROL: I actually do know better. And yet, at the bottom, I just can't help feeling superior.


VIC: (LIGHTLY) Well, that's not surprising. You really are.


CAROL: Oh, thanks. But I've got a pretty good line on Carol Brewster. She doesn't fool me for a second. Even if she does others.


VIC: Aren't you underselling yourself? After all, I have been with you a number of times now.


CAROL: Well, then you must have been taken in by her, too. I've always been able to put on a good act.


VIC: Well, didn't sound like one. You seemed to know a good deal.


CAROL: Oh, yes, I know all the smart answers. But I don't really know anything. I seem smart and sophisticated, but I'm really scared and confused. And very insecure. That's Carol Brewster.


VIC: That last part is probably most of us.


CAROL: Would you know?


VIC: Well, don't be surprised. I might be putting on an act myself.


CAROL: Why don't you tell me about it?


VIC: (BEAT) I said I might be.


CAROL: Oh. Oh, I forgot. You're the strong, silent type.


VIC: (BEAT) Do I give you the impression of strength, too?


CAROL: Is that the act?


VIC: Pretending a strength you don't feel can be quite handy at times.


CAROL: And difficult.


VIC: I've been getting a lot of practice lately.


CAROL: Oh?


VIC: (PAUSE, CHANGES SUBJECT) It is a beautiful evening.


CAROL: Yes. Yes, there's something very attractive about the moon's reflection in the water.


VIC: Mm hm.


CAROL: Don't you want to talk about it?


VIC: What?


CAROL: Never mind.


VIC: Maybe I'll tell you a story -- someday.


CAROL: I can wait.


VIC: (BEAT) Did you ever hear of the psychologist Carl Jung? Quite a famous man.


CAROL: Yes. Yes, of course. He's just a name to me, though. Why?


VIC: Well, he had a very interesting idea.


CAROL: Oh?


VIC: It was his theory that the main drive we have in life is to compensate for some weakness that we have.


CAROL: Hmm.


VIC: I don't know how true that is generally, but it explains a lot for me.


CAROL: How's that?


VIC: Well, I'd have to go back quite a way to - the time I was a puny kid, with all the remembered beatings and-- Well, anyway, I've had a drive to be strong, to get ahead, to be top man somehow.


CAROL: Well, you're right up there now.


VIC: Yeah. And now that I am--


CAROL: "So what?" Is that it?


VIC: Yeah. Pretty much. (BEAT) I look back on it now and I-- Well, they tell me, though, I have accomplished a few things in my time. Least, I can be really proud of what I've been able to do right here for the war.


CAROL: You certainly can.


VIC: Maybe that's reason enough for everything.


CAROL: Vic?


VIC: Yeah?


CAROL: Would you--? Would you like to put your arms around me?


VIC: (PAUSE, AS THEY KISS; THEN EXHALES) 


CAROL: (EXHALES)


VIC: I'm sorry. I shouldn't have done that.


CAROL: Why not, Vic? Didn't you enjoy kissing me?


VIC: Yes, I did. (BEAT) More than I care to admit.


MUSIC: HARP ... TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER, OUT AT [X]


ANNOUNCER: There's a long moment of silence now as Carol tries to fathom the meaning of Vic's words. And as she looks up at him with the moon shining full on her face, she makes an appealing figure indeed. Then Vic takes her hand and they continue walking along the river's edge. In just a moment, we'll tell you about tomorrow's chapter. [X]


Ladies, here are some famous first words you're going to be hearing again and again from your family this summer. When friend husband comes home from work, his first words will be--


HUSBAND: Gosh, it's hot.


ANNOUNCER: And the first words Junior will say when he comes in from play will be--


JUNIOR: Whew! It's hot out.


ANNOUNCER: And grandma will come home from shopping and greet you with--


GRANDMA: I've never seen such a hot day.


ANNOUNCER: Well, when you hear these famous first words, you'll certainly make a hit if you're Johnny-on-the-spot with the last word in cooling refreshment, Iced Postum! Why, just looking at a tall, tinkling, frosted glass of Iced Postum is almost as refreshing as a mountain breeze, a cool dip, and a summer shower all rolled into one! And tasting Iced Postum is something to write poetry about. It has the heartiest, most delicious flavor you ever tasted. And the extra-swell thing about Iced Postum is that you can give it to your family any time they feel like having cooling refreshment, without any trouble to you -- for you can make a whole pitcher full of Iced Postum at a time, put it away in the icebox, and it'll keep perfectly for hours. So get some Postum from your grocer's today -- either Regular Postum, which is ground for pot, percolator, or drip maker; or Instant Postum, which dissolves instantly with boiling water. And whenever your family feels like having a long, cold drink, serve them that beat-the-heat treat, Iced Postum!


MUSIC: HARP ... TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND ANNOUNCER--


ANNOUNCER: Joyce has some unexpected visitors and Vic Manion makes an unwitting betrayal in tomorrow's chapter of "Joyce Jordan, M.D."


MUSIC: HARP UP AND OUT


SOUND: TWO CHIMES ... OVER PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEM 


VOICE: (FILTER) Dr. Jordan? 


SOUND: TWO CHIMES


VOICE: (FILTER) Dr. Jordan? 


SOUND: TWO CHIMES


VOICE: (FILTER) Appointment tomorrow -- same time, same station.


MUSIC: HARP SWEEPS IN ... FOR A FINISH


2ND ANNCR: Sing a song of "La France"!


MUSIC: STRUMMED HARP ... JINGLE (TO A VARIATION ON THE TUNE OF "NUTS IN MAY"/"MULBERRY BUSH") ACCOMPANIES SINGER--


SINGER: 

There's one sure way to keep clothes white,

Keep clothes white, white and bright.

There's one sure way to keep clothes white,

Just use La France on wash day.


La France saves spots and bluing streaks,

Bluing streaks, bluing streaks.

La France saves spots and bluing streaks,

So use La France on wash day.


2ND ANNCR: Yes, ladies, La France does a perfect bluing job -- and an easier one! Because La France works along with your soap; blues while you wash!


MUSIC: STRUMMED HARP ... JINGLE ACCOMPANIES SINGER--


SINGER: 

So if you want clothes dazzling white,

Dazzling white, white and bright.

So if you want clothes dazzling white,

Just use La France on wash day.


MUSIC: HARP ... IN BG UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: Ken Roberts speaking. This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.

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