Microphone Plays‎ > ‎

Jane Eyre

The Lux Radio Theatre

Jane Eyre

June 05 1944




CAST:


The Lux Team:

ANNOUNCER, John Milton Kennedy

HOST, Cecil B. DeMille

LIBBY COLLINS, our Hollywood reporter

LADY

MARY

2ND ANNCR

MAN (1 line)

1ST WOMAN (1 line)

2ND WOMAN (1 line)


Dramatis Personae:

JANE EYRE (LORETTA YOUNG)

ROCHESTER (ORSON WELLES)

BROCKLEHURST, cruel

YOUNG JANE, age ten

MRS. FAIRFAX, kind

ADELE, young girl; French accent

BERTHA

GRACE POOLE

BLANCHE INGRAM

LADY INGRAM, Blanche's mother

DOCTOR

MASON

MINISTER

and a CROWD of PARTY GUESTS





ANNOUNCER: Lux presents Hollywood!


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: THE LUX RADIO THEATRE brings you Orson Welles and Loretta Young in "Jane Eyre." Ladies and gentlemen, your producer, Mr. Cecil B. DeMille.


MUSIC: THEME ... UP AND OUT


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: Greetings from Hollywood, ladies and gentlemen. This is the beginning of a busy week for me, with Gary Cooper in "The Story of Dr. Wassell" opening in New York tomorrow night and here in Hollywood on Wednesday. And tonight the week is certainly off to a wonderful start, with two of our town's most accomplished artists in one of the immortal love stories of the English language, Loretta Young and Orson Welles in "Jane Eyre." 


Charlotte Brontë wrote "Jane Eyre" almost a century ago and yet in a world at war, this tempestuous story of the emotions is a bigger success than ever, for several new editions of the novel have appeared in the last few months and the recent Twentieth Century-Fox picture version has been one of the hits of the motion picture year. Tonight, you'll hear Orson Welles as Edward Rochester, the same role he played in the picture, and as the lovely Jane Eyre we have the lovely Loretta Young. 


We'll go back to England in the nineteenth century when a fast sailing packet astonished the world by crossing the ocean in sixteen days, a dictator with delusions of world conquest had just been exiled to a small island in the Atlantic Ocean, and the richest duchess in England would have traded all her beauty secrets for one cake of Lux Toilet Soap. ... And so if the gay whirl of nineteenth century society seems more exciting than keeping house, you should remember the duchess of Eighteen Twenty who'd be happy to exchange places for an automobile, electric lights, or little modern luxuries like that cake of Lux Toilet Soap.


And here's the warning signal for the curtain to go up on the first act of "Jane Eyre," starring Orson Welles as Edward Rochester and Loretta Young as Jane Eyre.


MUSIC: INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) My name is Jane Eyre. I was born in Eighteen Twenty, a time of harsh changes in England. Money and position were all that mattered. Charity was a cold and disagreeable word, and religion-- Well, too often merely a mask to cover bigotry and meanness. As a child, I had no one, only an aunt, and I cannot remember even once did she speak a single word of kindness to me. When I was ten, she sent me away to school, to a place called Lowood.


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES


BROCKLEHURST: What do you want?


YOUNG JANE: I'm the new girl, sir. Jane Eyre.


BROCKLEHURST: You are aware of my identity, Eyre?


YOUNG JANE: They told me [you are] Mr. Brocklehurst, sir.


BROCKLEHURST: That is correct. I am the supervisor of this institution.


YOUNG JANE: Institution, sir?


BROCKLEHURST: Did I give you leave to question me?


YOUNG JANE: No, sir, but--


BROCKLEHURST: Perhaps the word institution annoys you.


YOUNG JANE: Excuse me, sir. I thought this was a school.


BROCKLEHURST: Lowood is a refuge, Eyre. A refuge for paupers and orphans, who but for these portals are without homes. Here we give everything. In return, we demand nothing short of absolute obedience and humility.


YOUNG JANE: I've tried to be a good girl, sir.


BROCKLEHURST: You've tried only to torment your poor aunt. From what she told and from what is readily observed, you're a wicked and worthless child.


YOUNG JANE: That isn't so!


BROCKLEHURST: In all the Earth, there is no sight so terrible as a wicked child. But I promise -- all wickedness will be driven from you here. Eyre?


YOUNG JANE: Yes, sir?


BROCKLEHURST: Get to your knees. We shall pray together for the salvation of your soul.


MUSIC: GRIM TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) That was my introduction to Lowood. It was like a prison, dark and cold -- but never so dark nor cold as Mr. Brocklehurst. His hand reached everywhere through those somber walls and, in the guise of Christian charity, tormented body and soul alike. Two weeks after my arrival, he found cause to assemble all of the children and ordered me to stand before them on a stool.


BROCKLEHURST: Pupils, observe this child. Be on your guard against her. Shun her example and avoid her company. And you, the teachers, watch her well. Punish her body to save the soul, for already the Evil One has found in her a willing servant. She will remain on this stool for twelve hours. Return to your classes.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) If we who were children at Lowood did not flourish, at least we survived. True, we had nothing to cling to save each other, for the very anguish that was Lowood bound us together still more closely. Life was bearable. I know, because I was there for ten years. Shortly after my twentieth birthday, Mr. Brocklehurst sent for me.


BROCKLEHURST: This is a solemn moment, Eyre. Little did I imagine that the unregenerate child I received into this institution would, in ten short years, become one of its teachers.


JANE: A teacher, sir?


BROCKLEHURST: The trustees have seen fit to bestow that honor upon you.


JANE: But I cannot accept the offer, sir.


BROCKLEHURST: Why not, pray?


JANE: I do not wish to stay at Lowood.


BROCKLEHURST: This is unheard of! The ingratitude.


JANE: I have had ten years of harshness and drudgery, sir. For that I have no gratitude.


BROCKLEHURST: Willful and stiff-necked as ever. I see we have been sadly deceived in you. And where do you intend to go?


JANE: Out into the world, sir. I have never seen it.


BROCKLEHURST: You know how the world treats young paupers, friendless and without connections?


JANE: I intend to find a position as a governess. I have advertised in a newspaper.


BROCKLEHURST: (IRONIC) Doubtless you have been overwhelmed with demands for your services.


JANE: No, sir.


BROCKLEHURST: This is ridiculous! You have no talents, your appearance is insignificant. I warn you, Eyre, if you persist in this folly, this haven will never again be open to you.


JANE: (BEAT, FIRMLY) I am leaving Lowood, sir.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) My advertisement brought me a solitary answer. A letter signed by a Mrs. Fairfax that bore the crest of - Thornfield Hall. I was a whole day in reaching the estate. At the nearest village, a coachman met me and for two hours we rode through the desolate moorlands. And then, in the shadows of evening, it loomed before me, ancient and huge beyond anything I had 'visioned. It's great tower stretched into the darkness and its massive stone walls butted out into the misty gloom like the ramparts of a fortress. I had arrived at Thornfield Hall.


MRS. FAIRFAX: You are Miss Eyre, my dear?


JANE: Yes, madam.


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES


MRS. FAIRFAX: I'm Mrs. Fairfax. There's a nice, cozy fire burning inside. Come and warm yourself, child.


JANE: Thank you.


MRS. FAIRFAX: I'm so glad you've come, Miss Eyre. Living here with no company but the servants, it's none too cheerful, I tell you. Only the postman and the butcher to have a word with since this hard weather has set in.


JANE: Shall I have the pleasure of seeing Miss Fairfax tonight?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Miss Fairfax? 


JANE: Yes.


MRS. FAIRFAX: Oh. You mean Miss Adele.


JANE: Is it not your daughter to whom I shall be governess?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Oh, gracious, no. Adele is French.


JANE: Oh?


MRS. FAIRFAX: You will see her in the morning. She's Mr. Edward's ward. His niece.


JANE: Mr. Edward?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Mr. Edward Rochester. The owner of Thornfield. I'm only the housekeeper.


JANE: Well, will he wish to see me this evening?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Oh, he's not here. He's very seldom at Thornfield. And then his visits are always sudden and unexpected - and brief.


JANE: It's such a beautiful home, Mrs. Fairfax. Why, it's hard to understand why Mr. Rochester would choose to-- Well, remain away.


MRS. FAIRFAX: It is strange, but then, Miss Eyre, Mr. Rochester is a strange man in many ways. Now let me show you to your room.


JANE: Thank you.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) I spent all the next day with Adele, a beautiful and charming child. Like myself, she, too, was an orphan, and she won me over so quickly. That night, as I was making her ready for bed, she showed me one of her dolls.


ADELE: This is Mimi, mademoiselle.


JANE: Oh, and such a beautiful dress she has, Adele.


ADELE: Mama had a dress like that.


JANE: Did she?


ADELE: This is a dancing dress, mademoiselle.


JANE: Oh?


ADELE: Mama was a beautiful dancer. I also can dance. Do you wish me to dance for you?


JANE: Now, Adele? You mean this very minute?


ADELE: Now you speak like Monsieur Rochester. For him it is never the right moment.


JANE: Oh. Does that make you sad, Adele?


ADELE: Sometimes, mademoiselle. I love dancing.


JANE: I should like it, too.


ADELE: A great many gentlemen and ladies came to see Mama dance.


JANE: And where was that?


ADELE: In Paree. 


JANE: Uh huh?


ADELE: But when Mama had to go to Heaven, then Monsieur Rochester came and brought me here.


JANE: Oh, I see.


ADELE: Mademoiselle?


JANE: Yes?


ADELE: Do you like Monsieur Rochester?


JANE: I have not met him yet.


ADELE: That big huge chair downstairs?


JANE: Yes?


ADELE: That is his chair. He sits in it and stares into the fire -- and frowns.


JANE: Oh, but I'm sure he's very kind to you.


ADELE: Oh, sometimes he brings me beautiful presents.


JANE: (CHUCKLES WARMLY)


ADELE: But when he is angry, that's terrible!


JANE: (WORRIED) Oh.


ADELE: But do not be concerned, mademoiselle. Tonight in my prayers, I shall pray to God to make him be polite to you --- so you will stay with me forever.


JANE: Oh, thank you, Adele. Thank you, dear.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE, IN AGREEMENT WITH NARRATION--


JANE: (NARRATES) Later that week, quite early in the evening, I went for a walk alone. It was cold and huge clouds of mist clung to the ground. It was like walking through a dream -- with the road ahead inviting and invisible. There must have been a turn in the road, for I saw nothing and heard nothing until it was upon me. And then, out of nowhere, there was a fearful clatter of hoofs. And a man frantically shouting, and then both horse and rider crashed to the ground.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, HORSE'S HOOFBEATS IN AGREEMENT WITH NARRATION ... HORSE AND RIDER CRASH TO GROUND ... HORSE NEIGHS


JANE: (HORRIFIED) Oh!


ROCHESTER: (SURLY) What the devil do you mean by that?!


JANE: I'm so sorry, sir. I must have frightened your horse. Can I do anything?


ROCHESTER: Apologies won't mend my ankle. Stand out of the way.


JANE: But you're hurt.


ROCHESTER: I told you to stand aside.


JANE: Well, I can't until I see if you're fit to ride.


ROCHESTER: Where are you from?


JANE: From Mr. Rochester's house just below.


ROCHESTER: Do you know Mr. Rochester?


JANE: No, sir. I've never met him.


ROCHESTER: You're not a servant at the hall.


JANE: I'm the new governess.


ROCHESTER: The new governess.


JANE: Yes.


ROCHESTER: Well, if you're satisfied now that I have no bones broken, hand me my whip and get on out of my way!


JANE: Here you are, sir.


ROCHESTER: (WITH EFFORT, AS HE MOUNTS THE HORSE) Thank you. Now, if you'll kindly stand clear for a moment.


JANE: Yes, sir.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, HORSE IS MOUNTED ... THEN GALLOPS AWAY


MUSIC: BRIEF BRIDGE


MRS. FAIRFAX: (LOW, URGENT) Jane? Jane?


JANE: Yes, Mrs. Fairfax?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Quickly, dear. He's been asking to see the new governess.


JANE: Who?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Mr. Rochester, of course. Rode in on us without warning, and in such vile humor.


JANE: (BEAT, WITH DREAD) Where is he?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Inside, before the fire. In his chair.


JANE: Thank you.


SOUND: JANE'S FOOTSTEPS TO DOOR WHICH OPENS AND CLOSES 


ROCHESTER: (BEAT) Well, Miss Eyre, have you no tongue?


JANE: (TAKEN ABACK) I - I was waiting, sir, until I was spoken to.


ROCHESTER: Come here. Next time, when you see a man on a horse, don't run out into the middle of the road until he has passed.


JANE: I assure you, sir, it was not deliberate.


ROCHESTER: Sit down, Miss Eyre. (BEAT) Where're you from?


JANE: Lowood institution, sir.


ROCHESTER: What is that?


JANE: A charity school. I was there for ten years.


ROCHESTER: Ten years! You must be tenacious of life. No wonder you have rather the look of another world about you. When you came on me in the mist, I found myself thinking of fairy tales. (CHUCKLES) I had half a mind to demand whether you'd bewitched my horse. Indeed, I'm not sure yet. Who are your parents?


JANE: I have none, sir.


ROCHESTER: Your home?


JANE: I have no home, sir.


ROCHESTER: Who recommended you to come here?


JANE: Well, Mrs. Fairfax answered my advertisement.


ROCHESTER: Huh. And you rushed here just in time to throw me off my horse. Do you play the piano?


JANE: A little.


ROCHESTER: Of course. That is the established answer. Go into the drawing room. I mean, if you please. Go on. Take a candle, leave the door open, and play a tune.


JANE: (MOVING TO PIANO) What do you wish me to play?


ROCHESTER: Anything. Anything you wish.


MUSIC: AFTER A BEAT, JANE PLAYS A FAMILIAR PIANO PIECE, NOT TOO WELL ... AFTER A FEW BARS, OUT BEHIND--


ROCHESTER: Enough! Enough! You play "a little," I see, like any other English girl. Perhaps rather better than some, but not well. Good night, Miss Eyre.


JANE: (MYSTIFIED) Good night, sir.


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE


JANE: (NARRATES) What sort of man was this master of Thornfield -- so proud and so cynical, so unmannered? Instinctively, I felt that his harsh mood had its source in some cruel cross of fate. I was soon to learn that this indeed was true. After he said good night, I went to my room.


MUSIC: IN AND UNDER ... OUT AT [X]


JANE: (NARRATES) I had scarcely fallen to sleep when I heard it.


BERTHA: (DISTANT, ECHOING MANIACAL LAUGHTER ... CONTINUES IN BG)


JANE: (NARRATES) Like a voice in a nightmare -- a wild insane laughter; a woman's laughter -- that seemed to come from somewhere in the tower of Thornfield Hall. I opened my door and, at the end of the long hall in front of the stone steps leading to the tower, I saw Mrs. Fairfax. She was talking to someone. [X]


MRS. FAIRFAX: (OFF, STERN) But I tell you, you must be more careful. I've told you time and time again. It can be heard all over the house. (BEAT) I know. I see. Good night. (BEAT, SEES JANE, MILDLY SURPRISED) Oh.


SOUND: MRS. FAIRFAX'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH 


MRS. FAIRFAX: (CLOSER, FRIENDLY) Jane, did I disturb you, my dear?


JANE: There's nothing wrong?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Wrong? Oh, dear, no. I was just talking to Grace Poole. She's a person we have to do the sewing.


JANE: Oh.


MRS. FAIRFAX: She does excellent work. (LOW, CONFIDENTIAL) But she's a little peculiar.


JANE: Oh, I see.


MRS. FAIRFAX: Well, how did you get on with Mr. Rochester, my dear?


JANE: (BEAT) Tell me. Is he always so changeful and abrupt?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Well, he has his moods. But then, allowances should be made.


JANE: Why for him more than anyone else?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Partly because that's his nature and - partly because he has painful thoughts.


JANE: Mrs. Fairfax, I don't mean to be curious, but--?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Family troubles, Jane. I think that's why he so seldom comes to Thornfield. It has unpleasant associations for him. Good night, my dear.


JANE: Good night.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


ROCHESTER: Sit down, Miss Eyre. Tell me. You've been here now-- How long is it?


JANE: Eight days, sir.


ROCHESTER: Eight days, yes. You puzzle me a great deal, Miss Eyre. From the way you stare at me, it's apparent I also am something of a puzzle to you. Examine me, Miss Eyre. Do you find me handsome?


JANE: (BEAT) No, sir.


ROCHESTER: Indeed?


JANE: Oh, I - I beg your pardon. I'm too blunt.


ROCHESTER: No, don't turn away. What does my face tell you? Am I a fool?


JANE: Oh, no, sir. 


ROCHESTER: Is it the face of a kindly man?


JANE: (BEAT) Hardly that, sir.


ROCHESTER: No, I'm not a kindly man, though I did once have a sort of tenderness of heart. You doubt that?


JANE: Please, Mr. Rochester--


ROCHESTER: I have been knocked about by fortune, Miss Eyre. She has kneaded me with her knuckles till now I flatter myself I am as hard and tough as an India rubber ball with, perhaps, one small, sensitive point in the middle of the lump. Does that leave hope for me?


JANE: Hope of what, sir?


ROCHESTER: Of my transformation, from India rubber back to flesh. (NO RESPONSE) You are silent, Miss Eyre. (BEAT) Keep your silence then, and listen. What I want you to know is this. I do not wish to treat you as an inferior, but I've battled through a varied experience with many men of many nations; I've roamed over half the globe, while you've spent your whole life with one set of people in one house. Don't you agree that gives me the right to be a little masterful?


JANE: You pay me thirty pounds a year for receiving your orders. Do as you please, sir.


ROCHESTER: (AMUSED) Well, thirty pounds? I'd quite forgotten that. Well, on that mercenary ground, won't you agree to let me bully you a little?


JANE: No, sir. Only on the ground that you inquired of my feelings as your equal.


ROCHESTER: Good! And you'll not think me insolent?


JANE: (MOVING OFF) I should never mistake informality for insolence, sir.


ROCHESTER: Now where are you going?


JANE: Well, it's time for Adele's lesson.


ROCHESTER: Oh, you're afraid of me. You want to escape me. You look at me and you hesitate to smile; even to speak. Admit it! You're afraid.


JANE: I am bewildered, sir. I am certainly not afraid.


ADELE: (OFF) Mademoiselle! Mademoiselle! It's time for my lesson!


JANE: There, you see? I'm not a liar, sir.


ROCHESTER: Hm.


JANE: (CALLS) I'm here, Adele!


ADELE: (RUNS IN, EXCITED) Look at me, mademoiselle. You, too, monsieur. See? It is the ballet dress you brought me.


ROCHESTER: (UNINTERESTED, GLOOMY) Is it?


ADELE: Do I not look beautiful, monsieur? See?


ROCHESTER: Go upstairs.


ADELE: But, monsieur--


ROCHESTER: I said, go upstairs.


JANE: Come, Adele. Come with me, dear.


ROCHESTER: Miss Eyre, I'm not finished talking with you.


JANE: (GENTLY, TO ADELE) Go to the nursery. 


ADELE: (HURT) Yes, mademoiselle.


JANE: I'll come up in just a moment.


ADELE: (MOVING OFF) Yes.


ROCHESTER: (BEAT) Why are you looking at me like that, Miss Eyre?


JANE: I don't care what your past misfortunes were, you have no right to revenge yourself upon that child.


ROCHESTER: (BEAT, INDIFFERENTLY APOLOGETIC) You're quite right, of course. I was only thinking of myself, my own private memories and feelings. Miss Eyre, I am a battleground where nature and circumstance tear at each other's throat. Nature intends me to be a good man. Circumstance decrees otherwise. You may leave now.


JANE: Thank you.


ROCHESTER: I - I hope you'll be happy here at Thornfield.


JANE: I hope so, sir. (BEAT) I - I think so.


ROCHESTER: (BEAT) I'm glad.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG--


JANE: (NARRATES) Three nights later, I was again awakened by that awful laughter and a noise in the hall like padding of running feet. 


BERTHA: (DISTANT, ECHOING MANIACAL LAUGHTER ... FADES OUT BEHIND--)


JANE: (NARRATES) [I threw a robe over me,] I lit a candle and opened my door. I could see no one in the hall, but, faintly, I heard a sort of crackling noise that seemed to come from his room; Mr. Rochester's. As I drew near his door, I saw it was partly opened. Just a crack, but through it came a strange light and then suddenly I could see it. Smoke and fire! (CALLS, URGENTLY) Mr. Rochester! Mr. Rochester!


MUSIC: UP BRIEFLY, FOR A FIRE ... THEN IN BG


SOUND: CRASH! AND THUMP-THUMP-THUMPS! OF FIRE BEATEN OUT


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


JANE: (COUGHS)


ROCHESTER: (COUGHS) It's out, Miss Eyre! The fire's out! Please open the window.


JANE: (COUGHS) Yes, sir. (COUGHS) 


SOUND: WINDOW OPENED BEHIND--


ROCHESTER: Look, the fire seems to have been only at my bed -- the bed curtains and the sheets.


JANE: I'll get Mrs. Fairfax.


ROCHESTER: What the devil do you want to call her for?! Let her sleep.


JANE: Someone started that fire, sir. I - I heard footsteps.


ROCHESTER: Stay here!


JANE: Why? Where are you going?


ROCHESTER: I won't be long. (MOVING OFF) Stay here and be as quiet as you can.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) He took a candle and walked quickly down the hall. The window of his room looked out upon the tower and, through the vents in the winding staircase, I could see now and then a flicker of the candle as it mounted higher and higher. There was something in the tower that had to do with the fire. The light [from the candle] seemed to cling to the top of the tower and then I don't know how long later, it glimmered its way down again. There were footsteps in the hall and Mr. Rochester returned to his room. He closed the door and looked at me.


ROCHESTER: You came out of your room. You saw the fire and awakened me. Had you seen anything else?


JANE: No.


ROCHESTER: Did you hear anything?


JANE: Yes. A kind of laugh.


ROCHESTER: A kind of laugh. You've heard it before?


JANE: Yes, once. There's a strange woman living here -- Grace Poole.


ROCHESTER: Grace Poole, yes, Grace Poole. Well, I can see now what must be done. Meanwhile, say nothing about this to anyone and be sure--


JANE: Adele! 


ROCHESTER: Adele? [You need not be alarmed about Adele.] I looked in the nursery just now. Adele is all right.


JANE: Oh, thank heaven.


ROCHESTER: She's asleep. (DARK AMUSEMENT) Hm. Next to her head on the pillow, her dancing slippers. 


JANE: Oh.


ROCHESTER: Trying to console herself from my unkindness to her. The child has dancing in her blood and coquetry in the very marrow of her bones. She's shown you her doll, Miss Eyre?


JANE: Her dancing doll with the dress like her mother's?


ROCHESTER: Her mother was a dancer in the ballet of the Paris Opera. Adele is the image of her.


JANE: But she's dead. Adele's mother is dead.


ROCHESTER: That is what we tell her. The truth is not quite so touching.


JANE: (SORROWFUL) Oh. She has so little to love. I shall try to make up for it.


ROCHESTER: Are you always drawn to the loveless and unfriended?


JANE: When it's deserved, sir.


ROCHESTER: Would you say that my life deserved saving?


JANE: I should be distressed if harm came to you, sir.


ROCHESTER: (AMUSED) Oh, you should be distressed? Ho. What a puny sort of sentiment is that. (BEAT) You saved my life tonight, Miss Eyre. I knew you'd do me good in some way, at some time.


JANE: If I did, I'm very glad.


ROCHESTER: Good night, Jane.


JANE: Good night, sir.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: In a few minutes, Mr. DeMille presents Loretta Young and Orson Welles in Act Two of "Jane Eyre." And now here's our Hollywood reporter, Libby Collins. Anything new, Libby?


LIBBY: Why, Mr. Kennedy, I had a real thrill the other day. I met Irene Dunne. We had quite a conversation, too. It was on that all-important subject of feminine charm.


ANNOUNCER: Well, you certainly were talking to an authority, Libby. Irene Dunne is, above everything else, feminine and gracious. What are some of the things that impressed you most about her?


LIBBY: Well, her voice, for one thing. It's low and soft, delightful to listen to. You know, Irene Dunne started her career as a singer. Another subject of importance we discussed was clothes. Irene was wearing a beautifully tailored suit. She says she feels best in suits and almost always wears them. That's another rule for attractiveness, she thinks -- wearing the kind of clothes that become you. Makes a woman feel good when she has on a dress that's right for her. And when a woman feels at her best, why, she's most likely to be poised and charming.


ANNOUNCER: That makes good sense, Libby. And wouldn't that same argument apply to beauty care, too? If a woman knows, for instance, that her skin is looking fresh and smooth-- Well--


LIBBY: (CHUCKLES) Why, she feels good, of course. Don't think we didn't discuss that all-important subject of complexion care, Mr. Kennedy. Irene said, "Of course, you know, Libby, that I've used Lux Toilet Soap for years for my complexion -- and my bath, too. We've found here in Hollywood that Lux Soap is a real beauty soap, kind to delicate skin. And, Mr. Kennedy, you should feel particularly interested when you hear the one real extravagance Irene Dunne allows herself.


ANNOUNCER: And what's that, Libby?


LIBBY: Well, she loves fine perfumes; often blends her own. So when she told me she especially enjoyed the fragrance of Lux Soap, I thought that proved again what a really luxurious soap it is.


ANNOUNCER: Yes, Libby, and it's a luxury everyone can enjoy at a tiny price. Thanks for bringing us these hints on charm from such a lovely authority. Now, to any of you ladies who haven't yet tried the Beauty Soap of the Stars, here's a suggestion. Why not get some fine white Lux Toilet Soap tomorrow? We pause now for station identification. This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.


MUSIC: LUX SIGNATURE FILLS PAUSE


HOST: Act Two of "Jane Eyre," starring Loretta Young as Jane and Orson Welles as Edward Rochester.


MUSIC: FOR A BRIEF INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) There was no sleep for me the balance of that night. The insane laughter, the fire, the story of poor little Adele -- each was a fragment of a tormenting and frightening puzzle. But most bewildering of all was the master of Thornfield Hall, this brooding melancholy man, bitter and unpredictable as the winds that raced across the neighboring moors. And, like the winds, searching and longing endlessly. I was up early the next morning, but not early enough. Mr. Rochester was gone. At breakfast, Mrs. Fairfax told me where.


MRS. FAIRFAX: He said something about Millcote. Perhaps he is bound there, perhaps not.


JANE: Millcote?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Lady Ingram's estate. The other end of the county. She has a daughter. Blanche Ingram and Mr. Rochester are old friends.


JANE: (QUIETLY DISMAYED) Oh.


MRS. FAIRFAX: Jane, you heard what happened last night?


JANE: Yes, I was awake.


MRS. FAIRFAX: It's just terrible; we might all have been burnt in our beds.


JANE: Did - did Mr. Rochester tell you how the fire started?


MRS. FAIRFAX: He said he was reading in bed and fell asleep. The wind blew the candle onto the bed curtain.


JANE: Oh, I see. If you'll excuse me, Mrs. Fairfax, I'll go up to Adele.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) But Adele was still sleeping. As I left her room, my eyes turned toward the tower staircase. Almost against my will, I walked to the ancient stone steps and started to climb. Halfway up, a great door barred the way. But it was open and I slipped past. At the top of the stairs was another door, but before I reached it there came a sudden screaming and snarling -- half-human and half-animal -- and a thudding sound, as if a beast were tearing at the bars of its cage. I wheeled on the stairs and started to descend, but the door behind me swung open and a voice rooted me to where I stood.


[SOUND: IN AGREEMENT WITH ABOVE, BERTHA'S SCREAMING, SNARLING AND THUDDING ... THEN OUT BEFORE DOOR OPENS]


GRACE: (SHARPLY) What are you doing here?


JANE: (GASPS, SCARED) Who are you?


GRACE: They've told you who I am. Grace Poole. (SAVAGELY) Never come up here! Never!


JANE: But why? What is there? What are you hiding?


GRACE: No one is allowed up here! Do you understand? No one. Now go down. Go down!


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) And so, to me, the mystery of the tower continued unsolved. Edward Rochester remained away and the winter weeks dragged by. I found a measure of contentment in Adele's apparent fondness of me. And - and then, early in spring, he returned. But he did not come alone. He descended suddenly upon us with a dozen guests, among them Lady Ingram and her daughter, Blanche.


SOUND: MURMUR OF BOISTEROUS PARTY GUESTS ... CUT OFF SHARPLY BY DOOR CLOSING 


ROCHESTER: Jane? (NO ANSWER) Jane, I've been home for hours. Not a word out of you. Why?


JANE: You've been with your guests. I have no wish to disturb you.


ROCHESTER: What have you been doing while I've been away?


JANE: Teaching Adele.


ROCHESTER: Yes, and getting a good deal paler than you were. What's the matter?


JANE: Nothing.


ROCHESTER: You're depressed. What about?


JANE: No, I'm not depressed, sir.


ROCHESTER: So much depressed that a few words more and there'll be tears in your eyes. (CHUCKLES) They're already there -- shining and swimming. Jane? Jane, you must tell me. What is it?


MRS. FAIRFAX: (APPROACHES) Mr. Rochester?


ROCHESTER: (SURLY) Now what the devil?


MRS. FAIRFAX: There's a gentleman to see you, sir.


ROCHESTER: Oh? Well, who is he?


MRS. FAIRFAX: A Mr. Mason, sir. Mr. Mason of Spanish Town, Jamaica.


ROCHESTER: (SHOCKED; INTENSE WHISPER) Mason! Spanish Town? (UP) Take him to my study, Mrs. Fairfax.


MRS. FAIRFAX: (MOVING OFF) Yes, sir.


ROCHESTER: (BEAT, QUIETLY UNNERVED) Jane? Jane, I wish I were on a quiet island with only you; and trouble and danger and hideous recollection far away.


JANE: Can I help you, sir?


ROCHESTER: If help is needed, I'll seek it at your hands, I promise you that. (BEAT) Jane?


JANE: Yes?


ROCHESTER: If all the people gathered in that other room came and spat on me, what would you do?


JANE: I'd turn them away, if I could.


ROCHESTER: Or if I were to go to them and they turned away and left me alone, what then? Would you go with them?


JANE: Oh, no, no, I'd stay with you, sir.


ROCHESTER: To comfort me?


JANE: As well as I could.


ROCHESTER: (BEAT) Thank you, Jane.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]


JANE: (NARRATES) I was to learn a little more of Mr. Mason later that night. It was long past midnight. The whole house was sleeping when it happened again. That awful screaming in the tower.


BERTHA: (LENGTHY BLOODCURDLING SCREAM)


JANE: (NARRATES) Aroused and frightened, the guests flocked to Mr. Rochester, but he had a convenient explanation ready for them. It was one of the servants, he said. A servant having a bad dream. [X]


SOUND: MURMUR OF PARTY GUESTS ... OUT BEHIND--


ROCHESTER: Well, that's all it was -- a bad dream. Now, since these halls are inclined to draught, I suggest you all return to your rooms. Lady Ingram, you set the good example.


BLANCHE: (LIGHTLY) But I'm quite disappointed in you, Edward. I was so looking forward to seeing you shoot a robber, weren't you, Mother?


LADY INGRAM: Less of your levity, Blanche, and get back to bed. Goodness, it's almost morning.


BLANCHE: (CHUCKLES) Good night, Edward, and good morning.


ROCHESTER: Sweet dreams, my courageous Blanche. There'll be no more disturbances, I promise you.


SOUND: MURMUR OF GUESTS RETURNING TO THEIR ROOMS, DOORS CLOSING OFF, ET CETERA ... THEN ROCHESTER'S FOOTSTEPS TO JANE'S DOOR ... HE KNOCKS


ROCHESTER: (LOW, INTENSE) Jane? Jane? Are you awake?


SOUND: JANE'S DOOR OPENS


JANE: Yes.


ROCHESTER: Come with me, quickly.


JANE: We're going up there? The tower?


ROCHESTER: Yes. You don't turn sick at the sight of blood, do you?


JANE: I've never been tried, but I don't think so.


ROCHESTER: Give me your hand. It won't do to risk a faint. (BEAT, SATISFIED) Hm, it's warm and steady. (CAREFULLY) Jane, what you see may shock and frighten and confuse you. I beg you not to seek an explanation. Only try to trust me. Can you do that?


JANE: I can do that, yes.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) In the tower room, bloody and unconscious on a bed, lay a man. Across from him was a door -- a door secured with a heavy chain. From beyond it came a horrible sobbing and scratching. And now and then the voice of Grace Poole. But I had neither time to think nor to become frightened.


BERTHA: (EERIE SOBBING, OFF ... CONTINUES IN BG)


SOUND: SCRATCHING AT LOCKED DOOR, IN BG


ROCHESTER: Jane, I must get Dr. Rivers. That means leaving you alone here with this gentleman. If you will sponge the blood as I do now, please.


JANE: Yes.


ROCHESTER: If he regains consciousness, don't you speak to him on any account. Is that clear, Jane?


JANE: Yes, yes.


ROCHESTER: Whatever happens, do not move from here, or open that door.


JANE: No.


ROCHESTER: (MOVING OFF) I'll be back as quickly as I can.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


ROCHESTER: There's the patient, doctor. Jane, you are all right?


JANE: Yes, I'm all right. He's regained consciousness.


ROCHESTER: You have twenty minutes, doctor, for dressing the wound and getting the patient out of here.


DOCTOR: So you told me.


MASON: (HOARSELY) Wait a minute--


ROCHESTER: (REASONABLY) Now, Mason--


MASON: I - I'm done for, Edward.


ROCHESTER: That's nonsense. You've lost a little blood, that's all.


MASON: She sank her teeth into me like a tigress.


ROCHESTER: Stop.


DOCTOR: It will be better if you don't talk and let me get to work.


MASON: She said she'd drain my heart's blood--


ROCHESTER: Be silent, Mason, forget it! Jane?


JANE: Yes, sir?


ROCHESTER: Go downstairs quietly, unbolt the side-passage door. You'll find Dr. Rivers' carriage there. See that the driver's ready to leave the moment we come down.


JANE: Yes, sir, yes. 


SOUND: JANE HURRIES TO DOOR WHICH OPENS AND SHUTS AS SHE EXITS


ROCHESTER: Can I help you, doctor?


DOCTOR: No. This will be painful, Mason; it can't be helped.


MASON: (GASPS IN PAIN)


ROCHESTER: (STERN) I told you not to come here, Mason.


MASON: I thought I could have done some good.


ROCHESTER: You thought! You thought.


DOCTOR: Lie still, please!


ROCHESTER: I've tried so long to avoid exposure. I shall make very certain it doesn't come now. Dr. Rivers will take you to his home. You'll remain there until you're quite well, Mason.


MASON: Edward?


ROCHESTER: Yes?


MASON: Let her be taken care of.


ROCHESTER: I will.


MASON: Please let her be treated as tenderly as may be.


ROCHESTER: I do my best! And have done it. And will do it. Yet would to God there were an end to all this.


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE ... THEN DR. RIVERS' HORSE AND CARRIAGE TROTS AWAY


ROCHESTER: Well, they're gone, Jane [-- Mason and Dr. Rivers].


JANE: Yes, and it's daylight again.


ROCHESTER: I promised I'd turn to you for help; I didn't know it'd be so soon.


JANE: I was thankful I was here.


ROCHESTER: We could walk for a moment in the garden, Jane. It's so fresh and clean there.


JANE: Mr. Rochester, will Grace Poole live here still?


ROCHESTER: Grace Poole? Yes, Grace Poole will stay. Don't ask for explanations. Just believe me when I tell you there are good reasons for it. (BEAT) You're my friend, Jane, aren't you?


JANE: I like to serve you -- in everything that's right.


ROCHESTER: And if I asked you to do something you thought was wrong, what then? (LIGHTLY) But I know the answer. Very quietly you'd say, "Oh, no, sir, that's impossible."


JANE: Would I?


ROCHESTER: (BRISKLY) Jane, imagine you're a young man -- thoughtless, spoiled since childhood. Imagine yourself in a far-off land. Conceive that you there commit a capital error, one that cuts you off from all the possibility of human joys and then suddenly -- imagine that fate offers you the chance of regeneration and true happiness. Are you justified in overleaping the obstacles of mere custom? Tell me, Jane. Are you justified?


JANE: But how can I answer that? Every conscience must come to its own decision.


ROCHESTER: But if it can't come to a decision-- If you're afraid that you may bring shame to what you most cherish -- or destroy what you most desire to protect-- Oh, Jane, don't you curse me for plaguing you like this?


JANE: No, I don't curse you.


ROCHESTER: Give me your assurance on that; your hand. (BEAT, CHUCKLES) Your fingers are cold. They were warmer last night. Jane, will you watch with me again another night?


JANE: Whenever I can be useful.


ROCHESTER: For instance, the night before I'm married, will you sit with me then?


JANE: Are you going to be married, sir?


ROCHESTER: Sometime. Why not?


BLANCHE: (OFF, TO ADELE) But what makes you think he's in the stable?


ROCHESTER: (GROANS)


ADELE: (OFF, TO BLANCHE) Monsieur Rochester often rides before breakfast.


BLANCHE: (OFF) Oh, what a place to be looking for him.


JANE: (TO ROCHESTER) That's Adele.


ROCHESTER: (IRONIC) And the delectable Miss Ingram. (CALLS) Blanche!


BLANCHE: (OFF) Edward! Edward, is that you?


ADELE: (OFF, PLEASED) Uncle Edward!


BLANCHE: (OFF) What do you mean by running off like this so early?


ROCHESTER: (LOW) Excuse me, Jane. (UP, TO BLANCHE, LIGHTLY) And what do you mean by rising so early?


BLANCHE: (OFF) A correct host entertains his guests.


ROCHESTER: My dear Blanche, when will you learn? I never was correct, and never shall be. (MOVING OFF) Come along.


MUSIC: BLANCHE PLAYS PIANO EXPERTLY ... A FANCY BRISK PIECE THAT SERVES AS A BRIDGE ... THEN SHE STOPS ABRUPTLY


ROCHESTER: Well! Hm! Why do you stop, Blanche? Or don't you know the rest of it?


BLANCHE: (WITH DISTASTE) Edward! Does that person wish to see you?


ROCHESTER: Person? Person? (SEES JANE) Oh! Come in, Miss Eyre.


JANE: Oh, I'm sorry, sir. I did not know you were occupied.


ROCHESTER: I'm sure Miss Ingram will excuse me for a moment.


BLANCHE: Oh, certainly. But don't forget, Edward, you promised to show me the estate. (FADES AS JANE AND ROCHESTER MOVE OFF)


ROCHESTER: Oh, I shall. Don't leave. (BEAT, LOW) Well, Jane?


JANE: I overheard some of the guests after luncheon. They mentioned that you were leaving with them in the morning and I wish to ask for a reference, sir.


ROCHESTER: Reference? What the deuce do you want a reference for?


JANE: To get a new place.


ROCHESTER: Oh.


JANE: You as much as told me that you were going to be married.


ROCHESTER: Well?


JANE: In which case, Adele would likely go off somewhere to school.


ROCHESTER: I see. Adele must go off to school and you must go to the devil, is that it?


JANE: I hope not, sir.


ROCHESTER: (CHUCKLES) When the time comes for you to get a new situation, I'll get one for you, do you hear?


JANE: Very well. I - I may not see you again before you leave. (BEAT, FORMAL) Goodbye, Mr. Rochester.


ROCHESTER: (EQUALLY FORMAL) Goodbye, Miss Eyre. (LOW, INFORMAL, TONGUE-IN-CHEEK DISAPPROVAL) Jane, is that all? Seems so dry and stingy. Won't you do more than say goodbye? (BEAT, INHALES, A LITTLE MOCKINGLY) Oh, your hand? You'll shake my hand. (BEAT, WARMLY) Goodbye, Jane.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


ROCHESTER: There now, you've seen it all, Blanche -- the fields, the forests, and now the garden.


BLANCHE: Such a beautiful place, your Thornfield.


ROCHESTER: Mmm, as a dungeon, it serves its purpose.


BLANCHE: Dungeon? It's a paradise! A haven.


ROCHESTER: Oh, yes?


BLANCHE: A haven of peace and love.


ROCHESTER: Who's talking of love? Distraction is what a man needs. Distraction to keep him from peering too closely into the mysteries of his heart.


BLANCHE: I sometimes wonder if you have a heart, Edward.


ROCHESTER: Have I ever said anything to make you believe that I have?


BLANCHE: Edward, are you never serious?


ROCHESTER: Never more than at this moment, except perhaps when I'm eating my dinner.


BLANCHE: Really! You can be so revoltingly coarse at times.


ROCHESTER: Can I ever be anything else?


BLANCHE: Would I have come to Thornfield if I thought you couldn't?


ROCHESTER: Well, now we have something to consider. First, Mr. Rochester is revoltingly coarse -- and as ugly as sin.


BLANCHE: Edward, I never said--


ROCHESTER: Secondly, he's extremely careful never to talk of love or marriage. However -- and this is the third point -- the Ingrams are somewhat impoverished, whereas the revolting Mr. Rochester has an assured income of eight thousand pounds a year. Now, in view of all this, what attitude shall Miss Blanche be expected to take? From what I know of the world, I'd surmise she'd ignore the coarseness, et cetera, until such time as Mr. Rochester is safely hooked.


BLANCHE: How dare you!


ROCHESTER: Now, now, no horseplay.


BLANCHE: I've never been so insulted in all my life!


ROCHESTER: Blanche, I've just paid you the enormous compliment of being completely honest.


BLANCHE: You're a boor and a cur! Leave me at once!


MUSIC: BRIDGE


ROCHESTER: Well, they've gone, Jane. My guests have all gone. We're alone again.


JANE: I will be leaving, too, sir.


ROCHESTER: Soon to forget me.


JANE: (EMOTIONAL) Oh, I'll never forget you; you know that. (QUIETLY) I - I see the necessity of going.


ROCHESTER: Mm?


JANE: It's like looking on the necessity of - death.


ROCHESTER: Where do you see that necessity?


JANE: In your bride.


ROCHESTER: (QUICKLY) In my bride? Bride? I have no bride.


JANE: But you will have.


ROCHESTER: (INSISTS) Oh, yes, I will. I will.


JANE: (INCREASINGLY TEARFUL) So you - you think I could stay here to become nothing to you? Do you think because I'm poor and obscure and plain that I'm soulless and heartless? Well, I have as much heart and soul and-- Fully as much as you have! And if God had gifted me with wealth and beauty, I shouldn't have made it as difficult for you to leave me-- (SOBS) --as it is for me now to leave you. (BEAT, QUICKLY) There. I've spoken my heart. Now, let me go! (WEEPS, IN BG)


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... ROMANTIC ... IN BG


ROCHESTER: Jane, Jane-- Jane, you strange, you almost unearthly thing. You that I love as my own flesh.


JANE: Oh, don't mock me.


ROCHESTER: Oh, I have no love for Blanche. It's you I want. Answer me, Jane, quickly.


JANE: (ASTONISHED EXCLAMATION, STOPS WEEPING)


ROCHESTER: Say, "Edward, I'll marry you." Say it.


JANE: Let me look at you.


ROCHESTER: Say it, Jane. Say, "Edward, I'll marry you."


JANE: (BEAT, PASSIONATE) Edward, I'll marry you!


ROCHESTER: (WHISPERS) God forgive me.


JANE: Edward?


ROCHESTER: (WHISPERS) God forgive me.


MUSIC: UP, FOR CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: After a brief intermission, Mr. DeMille presents Orson Welles and Loretta Young in Act Three of "Jane Eyre." And now -- the lady next door has just come into Mrs. Brown's kitchen.


LADY: Hello! Mary? I won't stay a minute. I just cut some roses from the garden and I thought you'd like to have some.


MARY: Oh, how gorgeous. Thanks ever so much. Sit down; I'll be with you as soon as I finish scraping out this roasting pan.


LADY: Mary! You're not throwing that grease away, are you?


MARY: Why, there's only a spoonful or two of old black grease here. It's hardly worth the trouble of saving.


LADY: Trouble?! Why, Mary, that's vital war material. That little bit of fat could make enough vaccine for dozens of soldiers. Or sulphur ointment for wounded men's burns.


MARY: But I thought there was plenty of fat now. It's been taken off the ration list.


LADY: Darling, that doesn't make the need one tiny bit less urgent. You see, those fresh new fats are needed for food and the government doesn't want to take food fat unless it becomes absolutely necessary. The point is, that to make medicines and war supplies, used fats are just as good. So it's up to you and me and every other woman to keep those used fats coming in. Mary, at the ration board meeting yesterday, they said the need was terribly serious.


ANNOUNCER: And that's a fact. Now -- on the eve of invasion -- the need for war supplies and medicines is the greatest our country has ever faced. Think of it. By turning in your used cooking fats, you actually help to make more parachutes, synthetic rubber, and life-saving medicines such as insulin, tannic acid, and heart stimulants. Every drop you scrape from your frying pan or skim from soup is precious.


MARY: I didn't realize that when I throw away even a little used fat, I may be depriving our men of some vital thing they need. I'll save every scrap after this.


ANNOUNCER: Yes, and turn it in quickly to your butcher. He pays four cents and two red ration points for every pound. Save fats in any kind of tin can. Never use glass-- [?] [Turn] fat in quickly. Here's a chance for you to make a real and valuable contribution to the war effort. (BEAT) And now, our producer, Mr. DeMille.


HOST: You'll meet our stars informally after the play. But now the curtain rises on the third act of "Jane Eyre," starring Orson Welles and Loretta Young.


MUSIC: FOR AN INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG--


JANE: (NARRATES) All my doubts, and all the grim shadows that hung over Thornfield Hall, were shattered and gone. I loved, and I was loved. Spring had come to the Earth and spring had come into my heart. Two weeks later, Edward and I were in the little church in the village, my hand in his, as now it would be forever. The minister had started the marriage ceremony.


MINISTER: Be assured that if any persons are joined together otherwise than as the word of God allows, then are they not joined by God. 


MUSIC: FADES OUT


MINISTER: Therefore, Edward Rochester and you, Jane Eyre, if either of you know any impediment why you may not lawfully be joined in matrimony, you do now confess it. (BEAT) Edward Rochester, wilt thou have this woman to be thy wedded wife?


MASON: (OFF) Wait! I declare the existence of an impediment!


ROCHESTER: (BEAT, DIGNIFIED, TO MINISTER) Proceed with the ceremony.


MASON: (OFF) You cannot proceed! Mr. Rochester has a wife now living!


MINISTER: Who are you?


MASON: (OFF) My name is Mason. On the twentieth of October, Eighteen Twenty-Four, Edward Rochester was married to my sister, Bertha Mason, at St. Mary's Church, Spanish Town, Jamaica. The record of the marriage will be found in the register of that church.


MINISTER: Do you swear you're speaking the truth?


MASON: (OFF) I swear it. My sister is living now at Thornfield Hall. I have seen her there myself.


ROCHESTER: (DEFEATED; LOW, TO MINISTER) Parson, close your book. (UP, TO ALL) There'll be no wedding today. Instead, I invite you all to my house -- to meet Grace Poole's patient, my wife.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) It seemed without end, that journey back to Thornfield Hall. On the way, we stopped to get Dr. Rivers. Edward insisted that he come back with us. And that is all I remember of the ride back. If words were spoken, I did not hear them. And then at length I found myself with Grace Poole and the others, standing again in the tower room. There was a clanking and unlocking of chains, a door opening -- and the wife of Edward Rochester stood before him. Screaming, she flung herself upon him. Her clawing hands flashed around his throat. But she had no time to do him harm. Grace Poole and the doctor sprung upon her. And when they returned, the door was shut again and the chains fastened. Only then did Edward speak.


ROCHESTER: (BROKENLY) The woman you have seen - is my wife. Mad. The mad offspring of a mad family, to whom the church and law bind me forever without hope of divorce. This is what I wish to have; this young girl, who stands among you now -- so grave and quiet -- at the mouth of hell. Look at the difference, and then judge me.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


JANE: (WEEPS ... THEN SOBS QUIETLY IN BG ... EVENTUALLY OUT BEHIND--)


ROCHESTER: (OFF) They've gone, Jane. Jane, may I come in? (NO ANSWER, HE APPROACHES) Jane, I did not even know her. Jane, I was married at nineteen in Spanish Town to a bride already courted for me. But I married her, gross, groveling, mole-eyed blockhead that I was. Jane, hear me. I suffered all the agonies of a man bound to a wife at once intemperate and unchaste. I watched her excesses drive her at last into madness. Then I brought her back to England, to Thornfield. Jane, I did everything that God and humanity demanded. (BEAT) Then I fled from this place. My fixed desire was to find a woman I could love -- a contrast to the fury I'd left here; and what did I find? An actress in Vienna, a milliner in Naples, a countess in Warsaw. But back in England, I rode again inside of Thornfield. Someone was walking there in the mist. A strange elfinlike creature. Frightened my horse, and then came up and gravely offered me help -- and her hand. And then later that evening-- Jane, do you remember? Say you remember, Jane.


JANE: I remember.


ROCHESTER: You came into that room. How shy you were. And yet how readily you answered my surly questioning. Then you smiled at me. (BEAT) And in that moment, I knew I'd found you. (BEAT) Jane, can you forgive me?


JANE: I do forgive you.


ROCHESTER: And you can still love me?


JANE: I do love you with all my heart. I can say it now. (INHALES) Since it's for the last time.


ROCHESTER: (STUNNED) Jane-- (BEAT) You mean to go one way in the world? And let me go another? 


JANE: Oh, please--


ROCHESTER: Stay with me, Jane. We'd be hurting no one.


JANE: We should be hurting ourselves.


ROCHESTER: Would it be so wicked to be near me? Would it?


JANE: I'm leaving, Edward; I'm leaving. Surely you know that I must. (SOBS BEHIND--)


ROCHESTER: You will not be my comforter? My rescuer? Jane, my deep love, my frantic prayer -- are they nothing to you?


JANE: (MOVING OFF) Goodbye, Edward; goodbye and God bless you, keep you from harm and from wrong.


ROCHESTER: Jane?! (NO ANSWER) Jane! (NO ANSWER, WHISPERS) Jane--


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) Going nowhere, I had nowhere to go. Without references, I could find no employment. I soon intimately knew hunger and unsheltered nights. And at last, without hope or help, I turned like a beaten dog back to Lowood. Mr. Brocklehurst forgot his word never to open its doors to me again.


BROCKLEHURST: So you're back, Eyre. Penitent and humble, I suppose. Pleading for mercy and prepared as ever, I daresay, to return our favors with your accustomed deceit.


JANE: (QUIETLY DESPERATE) If there is a place for me here, I am ready to beg for it.


BROCKLEHURST: You would like to become a teacher, Eyre?


JANE: Yes, sir.


BROCKLEHURST: We need no teachers. We have need of a girl in the scullery. Do you want it or not?


JANE: I'll stay.


BROCKLEHURST: Get in the kitchen then.


JANE: Yes, sir; yes, sir.


BROCKLEHURST: Wait! Some months ago, I had repeated inquiries as to your whereabouts from a Mr. Edward Rochester. Obviously, I was unable to assist him.


JANE: I know no Edward Rochester.


BROCKLEHURST: I didn't ask you. Makes little difference if you do or not. In his last letter thanking me for my kindness, he said he was leaving England forever.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG--


ROCHESTER: (FILTER, INTENSE WHISPER) Jane--


JANE: (TOSSING IN HER SLEEP) Oh--


ROCHESTER: (FILTER, INTENSE WHISPER) Jane--!


JANE: (NARRATES) His voice. Night after night, I started to hear it.


ROCHESTER: (FILTER, INTENSE WHISPER) Jane--!


JANE: (NARRATES) I struggled to shut my ears from it, but I could not. It was like a soul in pain -- a wild, urgent cry -- more than I could bear. (DECISIVE) I would see him again -- speak with him again -- and, after that, I neither knew nor cared what happened to me. All I knew was that I must go! (INTENSE WHISPER) And go quickly!


MUSIC: UP, FOR TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) I reached the estate, but Thornfield Hall was no more. Fire had destroyed it all. I was staring at the pile of charred and blackened rubble when Mrs. Fairfax saw me. She came running from the gardener's cottage.


MRS. FAIRFAX: Oh, Jane! Jane! Oh, my poor, poor girl.


JANE: Mrs. Fairfax, what happened?


MRS. FAIRFAX: It was she who did it. She killed Grace Poole as she slept and set fire to Thornfield. Her laughing roused us. I ran to the nursery and carried Adele to the garden. As I stood there, I heard the laugh again. She was on the roof. Mr. Edward was just coming from the house. He said nothing, but turned and ran back into the flames. I saw him get to the roof and make his way toward her. She saw him, too. She ran to the edge and jumped. When we reached her, she was dead.


JANE: And Edward? Edward?!


MRS. FAIRFAX: As he was coming down, the great staircase fell. [He was badly hurt.]


JANE: (HORRIFIED) Oh--!


ROCHESTER: (OFF, SURLY) Mrs. Fairfax?


MRS. FAIRFAX: Yes, sir?


ROCHESTER: (OFF) What the devil are you doing? Adele is waiting for her supper.


MRS. FAIRFAX: I'm coming, sir.


ROCHESTER: (OFF) Is someone with you? (NO ANSWER) Who is it? (NO ANSWER, ANGRY) Who are you?!


JANE: (LOW, PUZZLED, TO MRS. FAIRFAX) His eyes?


[MRS. FAIRFAX: (LOW) He's - he's blind.]


JANE: (EMOTIONAL) Edward, I've come back. Oh, my beloved!


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... ROMANTIC ... IN BG


ROCHESTER: (WHISPERS IN DISBELIEF) Jane? 


JANE: (SOBS WITH HAPPINESS, CONTINUES BEHIND--)


ROCHESTER: (ENTRANCED) Her small, soft fingers. Her hair. Her little flower-soft face.


JANE: And her heart, beloved; her heart.


ROCHESTER: Jane. (BITTERLY) All you can feel now is pity. I won't have your pity!


JANE: No! Edward--


ROCHESTER: You can't spend your life on the ruins of a man! You're so young, so fresh.


JANE: (DESPERATELY) Oh, don't send me away. Please, Edward -- don't send me away.


ROCHESTER: You think I want to let you go?


JANE: No.


ROCHESTER: (LOVINGLY) Oh, my beloved.


MUSIC: UP, FOR TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND JANE--


JANE: (NARRATES) As the months went by, he came to see the heavens once more, to see first the glory of the sun, and then the mild splendor of the moon, and at last -- the evening star. And then one day when our first-born was put into his arms, he could see that the boy had his own eyes as they once were -- large, and brilliant, and black.


MUSIC: UP, FOR CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: That applause invites the return of the two artists who gave such distinguished performances tonight -- Loretta Young, whom we've presented many times before, and Orson Welles, who has made his first appearance in THE LUX RADIO THEATRE tonight. 


YOUNG: It's a pleasure to be back, Mr. DeMille. My, isn't the stage just crowded with producers tonight, hm?


HOST: Well, just-- ... Just two, Loretta. Orson and myself.


YOUNG: Well, that's what I say, and that's an awful lot of producers.


WELLES: Well, I'm not a producer or director this week, Loretta.


YOUNG: No?


WELLES: I have been doing everything C. B. says -- almost.


YOUNG: (CHUCKLES) ...


HOST: Well, I must tell you, Orson, that I have a son who thinks you are the greatest director in Hollywood.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


WELLES: Er, must be-- Must be terribly lonely for him at your house. ...


HOST: No, no. No, no. You have other admirers there, too. Now, I personally--


WELLES: Oh, this. This I've been waiting for. ...


HOST: I personally think Loretta Young is one of the loveliest stars in Hollywood. 


YOUNG: (LAUGHS)


SOUND: APPLAUSE


YOUNG: Is that what you were waiting for, Orson?


WELLES: Yeah. You took the words practically out of my mouth, C. B.


YOUNG: (LAUGHS) Thank you, kind sir. And now I don't want to hurt your feelings, Mr. DeMille, but I would like to say that I have used Lux Soap for years and I think it's a delightful complexion care.


HOST: Words like that are good for my morale, Loretta.


YOUNG: Oh?


HOST: Especially from you.


YOUNG: Thank you.


HOST: You know, Orson, I was going to say that I've always thought you were a fine actor, but, uh, I don't think I'm qualified to give an opinion on your directing. How long have you been in pictures?


WELLES: Since I was twenty-five. ...


HOST: Twenty-five, yes. I'm - I'm afraid I haven't been in the business long enough. ... 


WELLES: (CHUCKLES)


HOST: I didn't start until I was thirty-two. Of course, I was more or less the Orson Welles of Nineteen Thirteen. ...


YOUNG: (CHUCKLES) Well, you never can tell, Mr. DeMille. Orson may make it all even by becoming the Cecil B. DeMille of Nineteen Seventy, hm?


WELLES: I must remember to get some hair tonic. ...


HOST: Well, if - if my hair's standing on end this week, Orson, it's because Gary Cooper and I have the double opening of "The Story of Dr. Wassell" this week, both here and in New York.


WELLES: Well, you've made a picture before, C. B.


HOST: Yes, sixty or seventy, somewhere in there.


WELLES: Hm! Relax, son; it'll come out all right. ... Now, seriously, C. B., I've enjoyed working with you immensely. Have you got a script set for next week?


HOST: Yes, Orson, and I think it will be very good news for our audience -- because next Monday night, the play is Victor Herbert's great musical hit, "Naughty Marietta."


SOUND: AUDIENCE REACTS FAVORABLY


HOST: And our stars-- Well, at long last, we're presenting one of the most famous teams in motion picture history, Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy.


SOUND: CHEERS AND APPLAUSE


HOST: They starred together in the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture and next week we have them in this gay drama with those unforgettable songs by Victor Herbert.


YOUNG: Oh, I know it's going to be a wonderful evening, Mr. DeMille. Good night.


WELLES: Good night, sir.


HOST: Good night, good night. [?] to remember for a long time.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


MUSIC: LUX THEME ... THEN IN BG


HOST: Our sponsors, the makers of Lux Toilet Soap, join me in inviting you to be with us again next Monday night when THE LUX RADIO THEATRE presents Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy in "Naughty Marietta." This is Cecil B. DeMille saying good night to you from Hollywood.


SOUND: APPLAUSE


ANNOUNCER: Tonight, we salute the National Association of Retail Grocers, meeting in Chicago. They make this plea to consumers: buy only the foods you actually need, give ration stamps for every bit of rationed food you buy, pay no more than ceiling prices, and see that no edible food is wasted. Orson Welles appeared through the courtesy of the makers of Mobilgas. Loretta Young's next picture is the Paramount production "And Now Tomorrow." Our music was directed by Louis Silvers. 


SOUND: THREE CHIMES


2ND ANNCR: Three bells for three great shows -- same time, same station. Listen tomorrow night at Lux Time for George Burns and Gracie Allen. Listen Wednesday night for Frank Sinatra singing "Where or When." Jane Wyman will be Frank's guest. This time, Lux Time -- every Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.


ANNOUNCER: And this is your announcer, John M. Kennedy, reminding you to tune in again next Monday night to hear Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy in "Naughty Marietta." 


SOUND: APPLAUSE ... FADES OUT WITH--


MUSIC: THEME FADES OUT


2ND ANNCR: She tried New Easy-Mix Spry and he said--


MAN: Mmmm! What a cake! Your best ever!


2ND ANNCR: She tried New Easy-Mix Spry and she said--


1ST WOMAN: What a shortening! Almost mixes itself.


2ND ANNCR: You try New Easy-Mix Spry and you'll say--


2ND WOMAN: It's amazing. Spry gives me lighter cakes that stay fresh longer.


2ND ANNCR: Buy Spry at your grocer's in the same handy jar. 


ANNOUNCER: This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.


Comments