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It Happened Tomorrow

Romance

It Happened Tomorrow

Jan 02 1945



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

HOST

2ND ANNCR

OPERATOR, female

1ST WOMAN

2ND WOMAN


LARRY STEVENS

POP BENSON

SYLVIA

JOE

FRANK

HOAG (3 lines)

WAITER (1 line)

GORDON

INSPECTOR

COPY BOY

UNCLE (2 lines)

1ST FELLOW

2ND FELLOW (1 line)

DRIVER (2 lines)

WOMAN (1 scream)

OFFICER (3 lines)

CHIEF (2 lines)




ANNOUNCER: Colgate Tooth Powder's THEATRE OF ROMANCE brings you Ralph Bellamy in the comedy "It Happened Tomorrow."


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG, OUT AT [X]--


ANNOUNCER: Tonight, and every Tuesday night, Colgate Tooth Powder brings you THE THEATRE OF ROMANCE, featuring each week your favorite stars and favorite stories and plays especially adapted for radio. And here is your host to tell you about tonight's presentation.


HOST: Good evening. Tonight we bring you, as a New Year's gift, one of the year's most unusual pictures: "It Happened Tomorrow," starring Ralph Bellamy, the story of a young reporter and a strange adventure. [X] The reporter, Larry Stevens, tells the story.


MUSIC: IN AND BEHIND LARRY, OUT AT [Y]


LARRY: (NARRATES) I'm afraid you'll find it hard to believe the following events. I myself have wondered about them for years, but I still find no explanation. If you think it over, life is full of things we can't explain. So I'm going to tell you what happened and let you judge for yourself. 


Near the end of the last century I had my first job as a newspaper reporter and my first girl. I'd just met Sylvia, and I was crazy about her. I was pretty sure that she liked me. She'd come to town to do a mind reading act at a local café with her uncle who definitely did not like me. He was Sylvia's legal guardian and she had to marry someone with a steady job and a bank account. On New Year's Eve, after everyone had gone, I was talking to Pop Benson about it. [Y]


(THOUGHTFUL) Pop Benson -- a small plump gray-haired man who was always looking at life and people with friendly curiosity. I told Pop my troubles. I said-- 


(TO POP) Gee, Pop, if I could only get a scoop. You know what I'd like to have if I could have anything in the world? I'd like to have tomorrow's newspaper. Then I could scoop every paper in the world. Just think of it, Pop! 


POP: (NOT SERIOUSLY) Sounds like a mighty fine idea, Larry, but I don't think you'd really be happy if it happened to ya.


LARRY: Pop, I'd give ten years of my life for tomorrow's newspaper.


POP: (GENTLE, GOOD-NATURED) Well, I wish I had the paper to give ya. Might teach ya a lesson. The only things that are worth having, Larry, are the things you work for and earn.


LARRY: Hey! Look at that clock. It's almost midnight. I've gotta go. I'm meeting Sylvia after the last show. See ya later, Pop. (LIGHTLY) If you come across a copy of tomorrow's paper, save it for me, will you?


POP: I'll sure do that, Larry. (CHUCKLES) You kind of like that young lady, don't you, son?


LARRY: (HIGHLY AMUSED, AFFIRMATIVE) Like her? Oh, Pop! Oh ho, Pop!


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SYLVIA: Well, we better say good night here, Larry. I don't want Uncle Walter to see you.


LARRY: D'ya think three weeks is long enough for a fella to be able to say he loves a girl? Er, academically speaking, of course.


SYLVIA: Oh. Well, academically speaking -- yes.


LARRY: Well, er, uh-- Would you think it might be all right for the fella to say so, even if the girl had an uncle that didn't like him? Academically speaking, of course.


SYLVIA: Well, of course, as long as we're speaking academically, I'd say: If the uncle happened to be the girl's guardian, she couldn't do anything about marrying the fellow until she was of age. That is, if the fellow was thinking of asking the girl to marry him.


LARRY: Oh, he is! Of course he is! (BEAT) When'll you be of age, Sylvia?


SYLVIA: (UNHAPPY) Oh, not for two years.


LARRY: (DISAPPOINTED) Two years.


SYLVIA: And, Larry, our booking'll be up Sunday and then we're going to Pittsburgh.


LARRY: Pittsburgh?! Might as well be the North Pole!


SYLVIA: Oh, I know. Larry, if we could only convince Uncle Walter that you're a good reporter before we go, then maybe he'd see things more our way.


LARRY: Well, I'll see if I can think of something before tomorrow night. Good night, darling.


SYLVIA: Good night, darling.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN INCREASINGLY EERIE IN BG


LARRY: (NARRATES) I walked Sylvia to her corner and then I started home. (SOUND: LARRY'S FOOTSTEPS ON SIDEWALK) It was late. There were no people on the streets. A fog hung low, misting the buildings, changing the familiar shapes into diffused, frightening shadows. I began to walk faster. And then suddenly-- (SOUND: LARRY'S FOOTSTEPS OUT WITH--)


MUSIC: ODD ACCENT ... THEN GENTLY OTHERWORLDLY IN BG


LARRY: (UNEASY) Someone call me?


POP: (APPROACHES) Yes, Larry. I did.


LARRY: (RELIEVED) Oh! It's you, Pop. You gave me a scare. What are you doing out so late?


POP: I was looking for you, Larry. I wanted to give you - this newspaper.


LARRY: The Evening News? I read it already, Pop. But thanks.


SOUND: TOWN CLOCK CHIMES MIDNIGHT ... MURMUR OF CROWD, IN BG


POP: Happy New Year, Larry.


LARRY: Happy New Year, Pop.


POP: Good night. Don't - lose that paper. (MOVING OFF) Good night. 


SOUND: CLOCK AND CROWD FADE OUT


MUSIC: CONTINUES BEHIND LARRY--


LARRY: (NARRATES) He was gone as quickly as he'd come. He just disappeared in the fog, leaving me with that newspaper in my hand. I put it in my coat pocket and I didn't even think of it again until the next morning. I dropped into Hoag's Diner for my breakfast and a guy I knew that happened to be out of a job asked for it.


SOUND: DINER BACKGROUND


JOE: Hey, Larry -- let me see your paper a minute, will ya? I wanna take a look at the want ads.


LARRY: Okay, Joe. It's last night's, though.


JOE: Mm, that's all right.


FRANK: (APPROACHES) Mornin', Larry. What'll it be this morning? Ham and eggs?


LARRY: (LIGHTLY) No, it's a new year. I think I'll eat bacon and eggs this year, Frank.


FRANK: Right you are.


JOE: Say, Larry, this isn't last night's paper. It's today's.


LARRY: No, Joe. Today's Evening News hasn't gone to press yet.


SOUND: DISH SERVED


FRANK: Here's your eggs, Larry.


JOE: Say, Frank, you got an ad in the paper for a waiter. Who do I talk to about the job?


FRANK: We don't need a waiter. We got a waiter. This is Hoag's Lunch Wagon, not the Ritz.


JOE: Well, then why have ya got an ad in the paper for a waiter?


LARRY: Let me see that ad. (BEAT, PUZZLED) That's what it says, Frank. (READS) "Wanted: Waiter, Hoag's Lunch Wagon."


FRANK: Well, it's a misprint. I'm tellin' ya, we've got a waiter.


SOUND: CRASH! OF DISHES


HOAG: (FURIOUS) Get out, you butterfingers! That's the last dishes you'll break here! You call yourself a waiter?! You're a hog carrier! You're fired!


WAITER: Fired?! I quit!


SOUND: WAITER'S BRISK STEPS TO DOOR WHICH SLAMS SHUT AS HE EXITS


HOAG: (YELLS AFTER HIM) And don't come back! (TO FRANK) Frank, take a dollar from the till and put an ad in the paper right away for a waiter!


MUSIC: SNEAKS IN ... UNEASY, IN BG


JOE: A waiter?


LARRY: An ad for a waiter?


HOAG: We gotta have another man right away. Put it in the Evening News.


LARRY: Joe? Joe, gimme that paper. I gotta get out of here. Give me that paper!


MUSIC: UP, FOR A TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND LARRY--


LARRY: (NARRATES) Suddenly I'd realized what Pop Benson had given me. By some miracle, last night he'd put into my hands tomorrow's newspaper. Here was my chance at fame and fortune. I went back to the office and spread the paper out and studied it. Then I went in to see the boss.


MUSIC: OUT


LARRY: Mr. Gordon? Who's covering the Melba concert at the Opera House this afternoon?


GORDON: Cover it? Since when are you the music critic?


LARRY: I've got a tip that there's gonna be a big story break there this afternoon. Some bandits are gonna hold up the box office. It's gonna happen at ten minutes past two. I can be back with the story by two-thirty. You can set up the headlines right now: "Bandits Steal Cash at Opera House While Melba Sings." I'll be back as soon as it's over.


SOUND: LARRY'S BRISK STEPS TO DOOR BEHIND--


GORDON: Stevens! Stevens, come back here!


SOUND: DOOR SHUTS AS LARRY EXITS


GORDON: Ah, that boy is crazy.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


INSPECTOR: Good afternoon, Mr. Gordon.


GORDON: Oh, hello, Inspector. Anything wrong?


INSPECTOR: Plenty. There's been a hold-up at the Opera House.


GORDON: Hold-up? (DOUBLE TAKE) A hold-up?! (EXPLODES) Hold the press! Copy boy! Copy!


COPY BOY: Yes, sir?


GORDON: Send Larry Stevens in right away! Is he here?


COPY BOY: Yes, he just came in, sir.


GORDON: (TO INSPECTOR) Stevens tipped me off this morning that this was gonna happen, but I didn't put much stock in it.


INSPECTOR: Oh, Stevens tipped you off, did he?


LARRY: (ENTERS, QUIETLY TRIUMPHANT) You want me, Mr. Gordon?


GORDON: Yes! Did you cover the Melba concert?


LARRY: Yes, sir.


GORDON: Have you written that story?


LARRY: Yes, sir. Here it is, sir.


COPY BOY: Shall I take it, sir?


GORDON: Yes! Have this set up in paragraphs! Break down page one! Make it a two-column spread! Come on! (MOVING OFF) We'll steer it through!


COPY BOY: (MOVING OFF) Yes, sir.


LARRY: Thank you, Mr. Gordon.


INSPECTOR: (CASUALLY) Say, uh, Mr. Stevens--? Mr. Gordon tells me that this morning you said this robbery was going to take place.


LARRY: (CLEARS THROAT SELF-CONSCIOUSLY, RELUCTANT) That's right. I did.


INSPECTOR: Ah, just how do you happen to know so much about it?


LARRY: Well, uh-- I had some information.


INSPECTOR: Uh huh. Maybe you don't realize it, but you're in a bad spot. Now, look, you better come clean. Where'd you get your information?


LARRY: Well, uh-- You won't believe me, but, uh-- I read it in the newspaper this morning.


INSPECTOR: (SKEPTICAL) Oh, you did? What newspaper?


LARRY: Today's Evening News.


INSPECTOR: Do you expect anyone to believe that?


LARRY: No. I - I find it very hard to believe myself. But it's true. You see, I wanted to marry Sylvia and her uncle said I should have security and a bank account and I said I wished I could see tomorrow's paper and Pop Benson got it for me-- If you'll just ask him--


INSPECTOR: All right, son, you had your chance. You better come down and think it over at headquarters.


LARRY: Aw, now, look--!


INSPECTOR: Come on, Stevens! 


LARRY: (TO HIMSELF) I am not a happy man. I am not a happy man.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


HOST: In just a moment, we'll bring you the second act of "It Happened Tomorrow," starring Ralph Bellamy. First--


MUSIC: FOR DREAMY JINGLE


SINGERS: Use Colgate Tooth Powder.

Keep smiling just right.

Use it each morning 

And use it at night.


Don't take a chance

With your romance --

Use Colgate Tooth Powder.


MUSIC: OUT


ANNOUNCER: Romance! What is romance? Why, romance is the gold currency in the pocketbook of love. It's the glory and the sparkle of love. But beware -- a little breath of trouble can dull the sparkle. So take care that this little breath of trouble -- unpleasing breath -- won't ruin your romance. Remember this: scientific tests have definitely proved that in seven cases out of ten, Colgate Tooth Powder instantly stops unpleasing breath that originates in the mouth. So the thing to do of course is brush your teeth night and morning and before every date with Colgate Tooth Powder. And as for cleaning your teeth, no dentifrice at any price will clean your teeth more quickly and thoroughly. Remember the name -- Colgate Tooth Powder, with the accent on "powder"!


MUSIC: FOR DREAMY JINGLE--


SINGERS: Don't take a chance

With your romance --

Use Colgate Tooth Powder.


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG--


HOST: Now for the second act of "It Happened Tomorrow," starring Ralph Bellamy as Larry Stevens. We pick up the story a few hours later, Larry sitting despondently in jail after being cross-examined by the police. As he sits there, he hears a voice outside and he runs to the small barred window and peers down at the street. He can barely see the shadowy figure through the fog.


MUSIC: CHANGES TO GENTLY OTHERWORLDLY, IN BG


POP: Larry?


LARRY: Pop! Pop Benson!


POP: It wasn't worth ten years of your life, was it, Larry?


LARRY: [The police have been] looking all over for you. Where have you been?


POP: Just taking a vacation, my boy.


LARRY: I'm going half crazy! Did I meet you last night or did I dream it? Did you give me a newspaper?


POP: Didn't do you any good, did it, Larry?


LARRY: I'm in a jam, Pop. Nobody believes me. I can't get out of here!


POP: Oh, you'll get out any minute now. It says here you told the police where to pick up the bandits.


LARRY: Don't tell me that's tomorrow's Evening News.


POP: That's right. I brought it for you, Larry.


LARRY: What does it say about the hold-up?


POP: It says here they made an arrest in the morning at the Union Bank. That'd be at ten o'clock tomorrow morning. The police were waiting at the bank when the bandits got there. You wrote this story, Larry. You've got your byline again. Here, let me poke the paper through the bars. (SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER) Good night, Larry.


LARRY: Pop! Pop Benson! Don't go! I've got to talk to you.


POP: You don't need me now, Larry. All you have to do is tell the police where to make the arrest and they'll let you go. (MOVING OFF) Good night, Larry.


LARRY: Pop! Pop! Pop Benson! Wait!


MUSIC: UP, FOR ACCENT AND OUT


SOUND: CELL DOOR UNLOCKS AND OPENS


INSPECTOR: You hollerin' for me, Larry?


LARRY: Oh, no, I was just, er-- Oh! Wait a minute! Sure, I was hollerin' for ya, Inspector. I'm gonna tell ya where you can get those bandits!


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SYLVIA: Uncle Walter, please be reasonable--!


UNCLE: I am being reasonable! You're not going to marry this - this - this cub reporter, Sylvia! This - this cub--! What do you think you'll live on?!


LARRY: Why, I make twenty-two dollars and seventy-five cents a week.


UNCLE: No, no! Absolutely, positively, irrevocably - (TAKES A BREATH) - unconditionally no. He has to have a raise and a bank account before he'll ever have my consent to marry you.


LARRY: All right, sir. I'll get the raise. And I'll get the bank account.


MUSIC: UNHAPPY ... IN AND BEHIND LARRY--


LARRY: (NARRATES) I went home and spent the rest of the night walking and thinking. I thought I could promote the raise, but the bank account had me stumped. I did promote the raise, thanks to Pop.


MUSIC: OUT


LARRY: Mr. Gordon?! Mr. Gordon, I got a story! I got a scoop!


GORDON: Is that it in your hand?


LARRY: Yeah. It's all ready to go to press. But first-- First, I gotta have a raise.


GORDON: Is it a good story?


LARRY: You bet it is.


GORDON: All right. From now on you're making - twenty-five dollars a week.


LARRY: (RELIEVED) Aw, gee, thanks, Mr. Gordon.


GORDON: Now -- what's your story?


LARRY: The police just trapped those Opera House bandits at the Union Bank.


GORDON: What?


LARRY: I was there; it's an exclusive.


GORDON: Give it to me! (CALLS, MOVING OFF) Copy boy! Copy boy!


MUSIC: IN AND BEHIND LARRY--


LARRY: (NARRATES) Later in the afternoon, the fellas accidentally gave me the lead I was looking for. They told me how to get my bank account. I'd been bragging that I could find out anything I wanted to know.


1ST FELLOW: Say, Larry if that's true, you could have more money than you'd know what to do with.


LARRY: Yeah? How?


2ND FELLOW: By pickin' all five winners at the racetrack tomorrow.


MUSIC: IN AND BEHIND LARRY--


LARRY: (NARRATES) One more newspaper would do it -- just one more newspaper. I spent the rest of the day hunting for Pop Benson, but he was nowhere to be found. Finally, I went over to his house in Sacramento Street and sat down on the front steps, waiting. It was almost morning before he came home.


MUSIC: CHANGES TO GENTLY OTHERWORLDLY, IN BG


POP: (APPROACHES) You waiting for me, Larry?


LARRY: I sure have been waiting, Pop. I've been sitting here all night. Pop, will ya give me one more newspaper?


POP: No, Larry, I - I don't think I can give you another one.


LARRY: Oh, Pop, please -- you can't let me down. I'll never ask you for one again, I swear it. I've just got to know what's gonna happen tomorrow.


POP: (RELUCTANT) Well, all right, Larry, I'll give it to ya, but-- Won't do you any good.


LARRY: All I want to know is what horses'll win. Then I'll be rich and I can marry Sylvia and--


POP: (SADLY) Here it is. (SOUND: RUSTLE OF NEWSPAPER) But you better take a look at the front page first, Larry.


SOUND: LARRY UNFOLDS NEWSPAPER


LARRY: (BEAT, READS SLOWLY, WITH INCREASING DISMAY) "Larry Stevens, Evening News reporter, was -- shot to death -- in the lobby of the Saint George Hotel at six-twenty-five today just before the Evening News went to press." (QUIET HORROR) Pop? Pop! It couldn't be.


MUSIC: UP FOR AN ACCENT AND OUT


POP: I told you you wouldn't want to see it, Larry. Good night.


LARRY: Pop? Pop!


POP: (MOVING OFF) Good night, Larry.


MUSIC: IN AND BEHIND LARRY--


LARRY: (NARRATES) I stood there, cold to the very marrow of my bones, my heart pounding. The next hours that passed were like a crazy nightmare. I went to see Sylvia and her uncle. I pleaded and threatened and made promises until at last he consented to let us get married. We were married at noon. I had the justice that married us draw up my will, and then we went to the racetrack and I picked the winners. I won sixty thousand dollars for Sylvia. But that didn't do me any good either because we were held up driving back to town and the whole amount was stolen. I wandered into the News office a little after six, determined I wouldn't be at the Saint George Hotel at six-twenty-five -- yet somehow sure I would be. And there--


MUSIC: UP FOR AN ACCENT AND OUT


1ST FELLOW: Oh, there you are, Larry. Say, did you hear about Pop Benson?


LARRY: No, what about him?


1ST FELLOW: The old man's dead.


LARRY: (BEAT, STUNNED) Dead?


1ST FELLOW: Yeah, they found him a little while ago at home. They figure he died about three nights ago -- New Year's Eve.


LARRY: (BEAT, HUSHED) Dead? Three nights ago?


1ST FELLOW: He was a great guy. Remember how he liked to play jokes on people?


LARRY: (DISBELIEF) Pop Benson -- dead.


SOUND: DOOR OPENS


GORDON: Stevens! Look at that clock! Ten past six! How long do you expect to hold down your job?!


LARRY: (DARK AMUSEMENT) Not very long, Mr. Gordon, if that's the right time.


GORDON: Well, I'll give ya another chance. I got an assignment for you. I got a tip that something big is gonna break at the--


LARRY: (RESIGNED) I know. At the Saint George Hotel.


GORDON: Oh, you know everything, don't you? All right, get in a cab and get over there right away.


LARRY: Oh, no, you don't! I'm not going near that place. Send someone else on that assignment or cover it yourself. I'm not going near the Saint George Hotel!


MUSIC: IN AND BEHIND LARRY--


LARRY: (NARRATES) I ran out and got in the carriage. I told the driver to go anywhere as long as he went away from the Saint George Hotel. I was in a cold sweat as we drove along. Suddenly, he pulled to a stop and I looked out the window and--


DRIVER: Here you are. Saint George Hotel, sir.


LARRY: I told you to go away from the Saint George Hotel!


DRIVER: Oh, is that what you said, sir? Must have misunderstood you.


LARRY: (NARRATES) I looked around in desperation. Then I suddenly saw a man go up the stairs of the lobby and I recognized him as the man who had held us up and stolen our sixty thousand dollars! I forgot about the story, I forgot that I was to die in the Saint George Hotel at six-twenty-five, I forgot everything except that there was my man and there was my chance to get my sixty thousand dollars! (SOUND: LARRY'S RUNNING FOOTSTEPS, IN BG) I let out one yell and lit out after him! (CALLS) Stop! Thief! Stop!


SOUND: CROWD BUZZES IN REACTION ... CHANGES TO A BRIEF CHASE SCENE AS MEMBERS OF THE CROWD RUN INTO THE HOTEL WITH LARRY, STEPS UP STAIRS, ET CETERA ... IN AGREEMENT WITH THE FOLLOWING--


LARRY: (NARRATES) I chased him into the lobby. Others joined me, but we outdistanced them. Up five flights of stairs. Out on the roof. Then -- my blood suddenly chilled. 


SOUND: FOOTSTEPS OUT ... A FEW CROWD MEMBERS' EXCITED VOICES HEARD, IN BG


LARRY: (NARRATES) I caught a glimpse of the town clock -- and the hands were at six-twenty-five. I saw the man turn -- and raise his gun.


SOUND: GUNSHOT!


WOMAN: (SCREAMS)


MUSIC: IN AND BEHIND LARRY--


LARRY: (NARRATES) Then a mighty, silent darkness closed in around me.


MUSIC: UP FOR AN ACCENT AND OUT


OFFICER: Hey, chief, I got him! I shot him! Right through the heart!


CHIEF: Okay, Roberts. Any identification on him?


OFFICER: Yeah. Here's his wallet. It says, uh, "Larry Stevens, Evening News." I better phone his paper right away.


CHIEF: Hey, wait a minute. What's the matter with this other guy over here?


OFFICER: Oh, the one that was chasin' this Stevens? (CHUCKLES) He's all right. He just fainted, chief.


MUSIC: IN AND BEHIND LARRY--


LARRY: (CHUCKLES, NARRATES) That's exactly what had happened to me. The cops had come up behind me, had seen the man raise his arm to shoot, and they'd shot first. I'd seen the clock at six-twenty-five, the man raising the gun, (CHUCKLES) -- and I passed out cold. Of course, it was my wallet they found on the thief and that's how the story got in the papers. The wallet was empty, but I didn't care. I walked into the newspaper office a little while later so happy and so relieved I was practically crying. (FADES OUT)


GORDON: (FADES IN, UNCHARACTERISTICALLY MOURNFUL) Larry Stevens -- the best reporter I ever had. I'll never replace him. Never.


LARRY: You won't have to, Mr. Gordon.


GORDON: What? (DOUBLE TAKE, PLEASED) Stevens! Stevens, are ya alive, boy?


LARRY: Yes, sir, of course I'm alive.


GORDON: (FURIOUS) What do you mean being alive and spoiling a good story?! The papers are already out! "Evening News Reporter Dies Heroically at Scene of Duty"!


LARRY: I can give ya a better one.


GORDON: Yeah? What?


LARRY: "Evening News Reporter Returns from the Dead"!


GORDON: (PLEASED) Hey, I'll take that, Stevens, I'll take that! Oh, and, Stevens, there's a check for five hundred dollars in the office. I was gonna set up a little monument for ya, but I think I'll give it to you for a honeymoon [gift] instead. I understand you got married today.


LARRY: Aw, golly, thank you, Mr. Gordon! Thank you! Uh, I'll see that the first edition is called Gordon Stevens.


MUSIC: GENTLE AND ROMANTIC ... IN AND IN BG--


LARRY: (NARRATES) So it all turned out all right after all: I was five hundred dollars richer, and I had a better sense of values, and I had Sylvia. And once I'd found her that night and heard her say--


SYLVIA: Oh, Larry-- Darling, you're so wonderful and I'm so proud of you. Larry, I love you so much.


LARRY: (NARRATES) Once I'd heard Sylvia say that, I knew it didn't matter what happened tomorrow. I knew that whatever happened would be good because she'd be beside me.


SYLVIA: I love you very much, Larry. I'll love you forever.


LARRY: (NARRATES) You see? That's all you ever really need to know - about tomorrow.


MUSIC: UP, FOR A HEARTWARMING CURTAIN


SOUND: APPLAUSE


MUSIC: FOR DREAMY JINGLE


SINGERS: Use Colgate Tooth Powder.

Keep smiling just right.

Use it each morning 

And use it at night.


To help you rate

With every date

Use Colgate Tooth Powder.


MUSIC: OUT


ANNOUNCER: Young lady, why did he act that way when you showed him the snapshots of you at the beach? Why did he take them over to the window? I wonder was it a little breath of trouble that made him move away? It's too bad if you should let that little breath of trouble -- I mean unpleasing breath -- ruin your romance. I'll tell you what. Brush your teeth, night and morning and before every date, with Colgate Tooth Powder. Scientific tests prove that Colgate Tooth Powder, in seven cases out of ten, instantly stops unpleasing breath that originates in the mouth. So use Colgate Tooth Powder for all it's worth. Money can't buy a dentifrice that will clean your teeth better than Colgate Tooth Powder. Remember the name -- Colgate Tooth Powder, with the accent on "powder"!


MUSIC: FOR DREAMY JINGLE--


SINGERS: Don't take a chance

With your romance --

Use Colgate Tooth Powder.


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG--


HOST: Ralph Bellamy, who starred in tonight's play, will soon be seen in "Guest in the House," a Hunt Stromberg Production. Next week, it's our pleasure to bring you Somerset Maugham's dramatic masterpiece of love and intrigue, "The Letter," featuring Judith Evelyn. Until next Tuesday, when Colgate Tooth Powder's THEATRE OF ROMANCE will bring you "The Letter," this is your host saying goodnight and wishing you love, happiness, and romance. 


ANNOUNCER: "It Happened Tomorrow" is a United Artists release whose current dramatic production is "Tomorrow the World." In tonight's production, Pop Benson was played by Edgar Stehli, Gordon by Frank Readick, and Joan Allison appeared as Sylvia. The adaptation was made especially for this program by Jean Holloway. The music was composed and conducted by Ben Ludlow and the entire production was directed by Marx Loeb.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


2ND ANNCR: Latest reports from doctors on the Fourteen-Day Palmolive Plan!


OPERATOR: Louisville reports better complexions for seventy-one percent. Philadelphia reports better complexions for eighty-six percent.


2ND ANNCR: In city after city, doctors tested the Fourteen-Day Palmolive Plan on all types of skin. And two out of three of all women tested got better complexions in fourteen days.


1ST WOMAN: What is this Fourteen-Day Palmolive Plan?


2ND ANNCR: Wash your face three times a day with Palmolive Soap. Then, each time, take sixty seconds more to massage Palmolive's lovely soft lather onto your skin as you would a cream. Then rinse! This cleansing massage with Palmolive's lather brings your skin its full beautifying effect.


2ND WOMAN: See what Palmolive can do for your skin in fourteen days. Remember, doctors prove Palmolive's beauty results.


SOUND: TRANSITIONAL PAUSE


ANNOUNCER: Ladies, it's no sacrifice, no hardship, to save waste kitchen fat. In fact, it's one of the few war contributions that gives you a profit. Your butcher will pay you two red ration points and four cents for every pound of waste kitchen fat. With drastic new rationing regulations, now more than ever, you'll need the extra points. And, ladies, if you could only see how your waste kitchen fat is used in making vital war supplies, you'd double your efforts to save every drop. You'd skim the soup. You'd scrape the drippings from the roasting pan. You'd save the suet from the chops. You'd strain off every precious bit of bacon grease. Today's grim war news makes fat salvage even more necessary. General Eisenhower is calling for more of everything it takes to defeat a clever and desperate enemy. You can help in your kitchen. So "Fill a tin / And turn it in." And then fill up another.


MUSIC: THEME ... THEN IN BG, UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: Say, Judy Canova is coming back. Yes, folks, that wacky lovable scatterbrain will be back on the air with all her old gang next Saturday night over another network. See your local paper for the station. This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.


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