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Brave New World

The CBS Radio Workshop 

Brave New World, Part 1

Jan 27 1956 



CAST:

VOICE

ALDOUS HUXLEY, our narrator

DIRECTOR, of Hatcheries and Conditioning

A group of STUDENTS, some with dialogue

LENINA

FANNY

HENRY

BERNARD MARX

HELMHOLTZ

JOHN

LINDA

ANNOUNCER

and crowds of BABIES, SAVAGES, ET CETERA



VOICE: Ladies and gentlemen, the distinguished author, Mr. Aldous Huxley.


HUXLEY: "Brave New World" is a fantastic parable about the dehumanization of human beings. In the negative utopia described in my story, man has been subordinated to his own inventions. Science, technology, social organization -- these things have ceased to serve man. They have become his masters. A quarter of a century has passed since the book was published. In that time, our world has taken so many steps in the wrong direction that if I were writing today I would date my story not six hundred years in the future, but at the most two hundred. The price of liberty and even of common humanity is eternal vigilance.


MUSIC: BRIEF INTRODUCTION ... FUTURISTIC


VOICE: CBS Radio, a division of the Columbia Broadcasting System and its two hundred seventeen affiliated stations, present the premiere broadcast of THE CBS RADIO WORKSHOP, radio's distinguished series dedicated to man's imagination -- the theater of the mind.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION


VOICE: Tonight, Part One of two half-hour programs devoted to one of the world's most shocking and famous novels, Aldous Huxley's terrifying forecast of the future, "Brave New World." We are proud to have Mr. Huxley as narrator for these broadcasts. Original music is composed and conducted by Bernard Herrmann.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG, OUT BEHIND HUXLEY--


SOUND: LAB BACKGROUND ... HISSING AND GURGLING


HUXLEY: This is Aldous Huxley and these are the sounds of the brave new world, of test tube and decanter, of hissing injectors and gurgling blood substitute. The year is A.F. Six Thirty-Two, six hundred and thirty-two years After Ford. We are inside the London Hatchery and Conditioning Center and this is the fertilizing room, an enormous laboratory where the temperature is never allowed to fall below ninety-eight-point-six. And here comes the Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning in person, bringing with him a group of young students.


DIRECTOR: Tomorrow, you'll be settling down to serious work. Today I just want to give you a general idea of things. These are the incubators and here is the week's supply of ova, kept at blood heat. Er, come along, boys.


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR ... THEIR STEPS THROUGH THE LAB


DIRECTOR: Now here we immerse the eggs into a warm bouillon containing free-swimming spermatozoa. Immersion continues until the eggs are all fertilized. Ah! and over here-- Here is where we bottle the Alphas and Betas. In short, gentlemen, the perfect process for manufacturing healthy babies. Are there any questions? 


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR


STUDENT: Uh, sir, will you explain the Bokanovsky process? 


DIRECTOR: I'm glad you asked that. Students, take this down.


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR AND TAKE OUT NOTEBOOKS


DIRECTOR: Bokanovsky's process. Where in olden times, one egg made one embryo which made one baby, today we've improved on all that. Now the egg will bud -- will divide -- from eight to ninety-six buds, and every bud will grow into a perfectly formed embryo, and every embryo into a mature baby -- making ninety-six human beings grow where only one grew before. Progress!


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR AGREEMENT


STUDENT: But, uh, what advantage is it, sir? Uh, I mean, uh--


DIRECTOR: Oh, my good boy, can't you see? Where in olden times nature allowed us only to have twins or perhaps triplets or so, today we can create scores -- yes, scores! -- of identical individuals. We can manufacture men and women in uniform batches. Think of it! An entire factory staffed with the product of one single egg -- ninety-six identical individuals working ninety-six identical machines. At last, society really knows where it stands. 


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR ADMIRINGLY ("It's marvelous.")


DIRECTOR: (REVERENTLY) Remember, it was Our Ford who gave us the concept of the assembly line when he was on earth many centuries ago.


SOUND: A FEW STUDENTS QUIETLY MURMUR A REVERENT OATH TO THEMSELVES: "OUR FORD."


DIRECTOR: And now, boys, we will go up to the Bottling Room where we shall see how we create each class of society -- Alphas, Betas, Deltas, et cetera. Come with me.


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR ... THEIR STEPS THROUGH THE LAB TO LENINA


DIRECTOR: (GREETING) Well, Lenina!


LENINA: (PLEASANTLY SURPRISED) Oh, Director!


DIRECTOR: (CHUCKLES) Charming, charming. 


SOUND: DIRECTOR QUICKLY PATS LENINA AFFECTIONATELY ON HER REAR SIX TIMES


DIRECTOR: Ah-- What are you injecting into our embryos today, my dear? Typhoid antitoxins?


LENINA: Yes, sir. 


DIRECTOR: Are you, uh, busy this afternoon?


LENINA: Oh, not after five, sir.


DIRECTOR: Good! Suppose we get together then -- on the roof? 


LENINA: That would be fine. 


DIRECTOR: I've admired you for some time, Lenina. I'm looking forward to a closer acquaintance.


LENINA: Thank you, sir.


DIRECTOR: (UP, TO STUDENTS) And now, boys, we're off to the Bottling Room!


SOUND: STUDENTS' STEPS EXIT THE LAB 


FANNY: (INHALES, IMPRESSED) You are a lucky girl! The Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning!


LENINA: Oh, hello, Fanny.


FANNY: Oh, you can trust the Director to be the perfect gentleman. I saw him pat you. 


LENINA: He wants me.


FANNY: You see? That shows what he stands for -- the strictest conventionality. And it's about time you started belonging to someone else, my dear.


LENINA: But I like Henry Foster. We've only been with each other four months.


FANNY: Four months?! Well, what would the District World Controller say? You know how he disapproves of anything intense or long-drawn. And it isn't as though there were anything painful or disagreeable about being with one or two other men besides Henry. After all, everyone belongs to everyone else. 


LENINA: You're quite right, Fanny. As usual.


FANNY: Good girl! 


LENINA: Fanny? Do you know Bernard Marx?


FANNY: (INHALES, SCANDALIZED) Bernard [Marx? You don't mean to say--?]


LENINA: Well, why not? Bernard's an Alpha-Plus. Besides, he asked me to go to New Mexico, to the Savage Reservation with him.


FANNY: But his reputation?! They say he doesn't like Obstacle Golf. 


LENINA: (DISMISSIVE) Oh, "they say," "they say."


FANNY: And that he spends most of his time by himself alone. They say somebody made a mistake when he was still in the bottle -- thought he was a Gamma and put alcohol into his blood substitute. That's why he's so stunted. 


LENINA: Oh, what nonsense.


FANNY: Well, very well, Lenina. It's your life, my dear. But I think you're heading for trouble.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: BOTTLING ROOM BACKGROUND


DIRECTOR: And here we have the Bottling Room. Little embryos, carefully bottled, being rocked gently to and fro as they did in olden days when carried by their mothers.


SOUND: STUDENTS GASP AND MURMUR 


DIRECTOR: (MILD ADMONISHMENT) Now, boys, you must learn to distinguish between smut and science. I'm going to use that word again. As scientists of tomorrow, you must learn to cope with it. (POINTEDLY) Mother!


SOUND: ONLY A FEW STUDENTS GASP, COUGH IN EMBARRASSMENT, AND MURMUR 


DIRECTOR: There. That's better. As a matter of fact, there is an area in our world where humans are still viviparous -- still give birth to their children -- the Savage Reservation in New Mexico. I, uh, visited there once myself many years ago. Dreadful, filthy place. Naturally, civilization has improved on all that. (RESUMES TOUR) Ah! It is here we control the embryos' growth -- each batch carefully regulated to produce the exact class of citizen we desire. And here is our Mr. Henry Foster, in charge of bottling. Oh, Henry? 


HENRY: Yes, sir? 


DIRECTOR: Please explain the process to the students.


HENRY: Oh, delighted, sir.


DIRECTOR: By the way, Henry, before you begin -- I made a date with Lenina Crowne this afternoon.


HENRY: Oh, really? I'm delighted, sir. I'm sure you'll enjoy belonging to her.


DIRECTOR: Good. Very pneumatic girl. Now please proceed. 


HENRY: This way, gentlemen. 


SOUND: STUDENTS' STEPS THROUGH THE ROOM 


HENRY: Here, we advance the process. One by one, the eggs are transferred from their test tubes into these larger decanters and moved along to the labelers -- carefully labeled as to heredity, date of fertilization, sex, name, serial number. Gentlemen, there are eighty-eight cubic feet of card index in this room.


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR ("Amazing.") ... MORE STEPS THROUGH THE ROOM


HENRY: Now, here is where we actually predestine and condition. Nothing is so unstabilizing to society as unhappy people. We avoid all that by preconditioning our embryos.


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR ... MORE STEPS THROUGH THE ROOM


HENRY: And now we are entering the Heat Conditioning Room -- hot tunnels alternating with cool tunnels. Exposure to cold is accompanied by exposure to X-rays. By the time these babies are decanted, they have a perfect horror of cold. Thus they are perfectly prepared to emigrate to the tropics to be miners and acetate silk spinners and steel workers.


DIRECTOR: (SENTENTIOUS) And that-- That is the secret of happiness and virtue -- liking what you have got to do. All conditioning aims at that -- making people like their unescapable social destiny. (SEES THE TIME) Oh, ten to three, boys. Time to visit the nurseries.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


HUXLEY: And so the director continued on his tour. Meanwhile, in his rooms high above the city, Bernard Marx nervously paced the floor.


BERNARD: I'm taking Lenina Crowne to New Mexico with me, Helmholtz -- to the Savage Reservation.


HELMHOLTZ: Well it's about time.


BERNARD: What you mean by that? 


HELMHOLTZ: I'll be frank, Bernard. There's been a lot of talk about your behavior at the College of Emotional Engineering. Of course, I've been defending you, but--


BERNARD: (ANNOYED) And I'm supposed to be grateful? Because you're a successful feelies writer? Because you're tall, well-built, have all the girls you want?


HELMHOLTZ: (WITH A CHUCKLE) Oh, Bernard. Now you know how I feel. (MORE SERIOUS) I want to write. I mean seriously, not slogans or feelies. I - I want to write something important.


BERNARD: (SYMPATHETIC) Oh.


HELMHOLTZ: Lately I've been cutting out my committees -- and my girls. The director called me in just the other day.


BERNARD: Are you in trouble, too? 


HELMHOLTZ: There's a poem I wrote -- too emotional, he said.


BERNARD: Hm.


HELMHOLTZ: He gave me the lecture about being an Alpha-Plus, about remembering to behave "even as a little infant."


BERNARD: I know. I tried to explain to Lenina, but she doesn't understand. Or won't understand. All those other men she belongs to -- Henry Foster, Benito Hoover -- they treat her like - like a side of beef; it's disgusting. 


HELMHOLTZ: It's socially proper. We share and we share alike, remember? 


BERNARD: But I want her for myself, alone.


HELMHOLTZ: Bernard, you're my closest friend. Now, you listen to me. You can't win this way. Follow the rules, play the game, be happy.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


HUXLEY: The nursery was on the fifth floor. The sign over the door said, "Neo-Pavlovian Conditioning Room." It was a large bare room, very bright and sunny. Half a dozen nurses, trousered and jacketed in the regulation white viscose-linen uniform, were engaged in setting out bowls of roses in a long row across the floor. The nurses stiffen to attention as the Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning came in, followed by his students.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, STUDENTS STEPS ENTER ROOM ... NURSES' STEPS IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


DIRECTOR: (TO NURSES) Set out the books!


HUXLEY: In silence, the nurses obeyed his command. Between the rose bowls, the books were duly set out.


DIRECTOR: Now bring in the children!


HUXLEY: They hurried out of the room and returned in a moment, each pushing a kind of tall dumbwaiter, laden on all its four wire-knitted shelves with eight-month-old babies, all exactly alike -- a Bokanovsky group -- and all, since their caste was Delta, dressed in khaki diapers.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, FADE IN THE MURMURING AND GOO-GOOING OF BABIES ... CONTINUES IN BG


DIRECTOR: Put them down on the floor!


SOUND: BABIES PLACED ON FLOOR


DIRECTOR: Now turn them so they can see the flowers and books!


SOUND: BABIES TURNED ... BABIES FALL SILENT


HUXLEY: Turned, the babies at once fell silent, then began to crawl towards those clusters of sleek colors, those shapes so gay and brilliant. 


SOUND: BABIES CRAWL, SQUEAL, GURGLE, AND TWITTER ... THEN IN BG


HUXLEY: From the ranks of the babies came little squeals of excitement, gurgles, and twitterings of pleasure. The swiftest crawlers were already at their goal. Small hands reached out uncertainly -- touched, grasped -- unpetaling the roses, trampling the illuminated pages of the books.


DIRECTOR: Watch carefully, students! (TO NURSES) All right, nurses! Pull the lever!


SOUND: VIOLENT EXPLOSION! BABIES PANIC, SCREAM, WAIL! SHRILL SIREN! 


DIRECTOR: And now we proceed to rub in the lesson with a mild electric shock!


SOUND: CRACKLE! OF ELECTRICITY ... BABIES CONTINUE TO SCREAM IN TERROR


DIRECTOR: That's enough! 


SOUND: ELECTRICITY STOPS ... BABIES CONTINUE TO HOWL


DIRECTOR: (PAUSE) All right, take them away, nurses!


SOUND: NURSES' STEPS AS THEY WHEEL THE WEEPING BABIES AWAY


DIRECTOR: (TO STUDENTS) Observe! Henceforth, books and flowers will be associated in their minds with loud unpleasant noises and electric shock -- and, after two hundred repetitions of the same or a similar lesson, will be wedded forever. What man has joined, nature is powerless to put asunder. They'll be safe from books and botany all their lives.


STUDENT: But, sir, since these are lower-caste children anyway and will never read, why bother to condition them against flowers?


DIRECTOR: Simple economics. If Gammas, Deltas, or even Epsilons like flowers and nature, soon you'd see them wasting their time visiting the countryside. And of what economic use is that? (LIGHTLY) A love of nature keeps no factories busy.


SOUND: A FEW STUDENTS CHUCKLE


DIRECTOR: It was decided to abolish it, at least among the lower classes. Er, any further questions? 


STUDENT: Uh, sir, would you tell us about sleep teaching?


DIRECTOR: I'm glad you asked that. The most ingenious development of all. Sleep teaching is given to all our children as they grow to maturity. A little voice murmurs slogans in their ear all the night long while they sleep. Of course, it's useless for teaching, but as a method for giving post-hypnotic suggestions, it is invaluable. It's what conditions our minds to love our future role in life. Now, boys, er, tell me some the lessons we've all learned through sleep teaching.


STUDENT: "A gram is better than a damn."


DIRECTOR: A good example! We have learned to take a gram of soma whenever we feel out of sorts. Euphoric, narcotic, pleasantly hallucinant. It transports our minds into a beautiful sleep filled with wonderful images. It gives a - a "soma-holiday," thus preventing unnecessary impulses such as anger, jealousy, envy, anxiety. Uh, next? 


STUDENT: Uh, "ending is better than mending."


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR AGREEMENT


DIRECTOR: Good! It's better to throw away something than to repair it. New clothing, new possessions keep our factories humming and make us happier. Next? 


STUDENT: (GENIAL) "I'm glad I'm not a Gamma!"


DIRECTOR: Ahhh, yes! We're all taught in our sleep to enjoy our own caste, whatever it may be. Gammas are taught to think, "I'm glad I'm not an Epsilon." Betas learn to be glad they're not Deltas or Gammas.


STUDENT: And glad they're not Alphas because we Alphas sometimes have to use our minds -- and that's very painful.


SOUND: STUDENTS LAUGH


DIRECTOR: That's very good! Very good indeed! Well, students, I think our tour is over for today. I'm sure most of you have dates with pneumatic young ladies; some, of course, will be wanting to get in a game of Obstacle Golf. But, uh, before we finish I'd like to add a few footnotes to the things you've seen today. Today, we have a controlled society, a happy society. We have stability. Ah, there was a time when these things did not exist.


STUDENT: Didn't people grow old and feeble in those days, sir?


DIRECTOR: Indeed they did. Old men in the bad old days used to renounce, retire, take to religion, spend their time reading, thinking-- (CAN YOU BELIEVE IT?) Thinking!


SOUND: STUDENTS GROAN UNHAPPILY


DIRECTOR: Now such is progress, at sixty we have the tastes and the powers of a seventeen-year-old. Why, the old men have no time, no leisure from pleasure, not a moment to sit down and think. They're much too busy scampering from feely to feely, from girl to pneumatic girl.


STUDENT: (MURMURS APPRECIATIVELY)


DIRECTOR: Fortunate boys, no pains have been spared to make your lives emotionally easy; to preserve you, as far as possible, from having emotions at all. (REVERENTLY) "Ford's in his flivver, all's well with the world."


STUDENTS: (SOLEMNLY, IN UNISON) "Ford's in his flivver, all's well with the world."


HUXLEY: And solemnly and devoutly they made the sign of the T -- and hurried off to join their fellow citizens at play.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


HUXLEY: In spite of Fanny's dire warnings, Lenina Crowne made a date that evening with the eccentric Mr. Marx -- partly to show Fanny her courage and partly because she was curious. 


SOUND: HUSHED WHOOSH! OF WINDS AND HELICOPTER ... IN BG


HUXLEY: When they were safely in their helicopter and climbing above the city, she turned to him.


LENINA: Shall we play Escalator Squash or go to the feelies?


BERNARD: Escalator Squash is a waste of time.


LENINA: But what else is time for? All right then, let's go to the feelies. You know, they're showing "Love on a Bearskin Rug" and everyone says it's terribly exciting! You can actually feel--


BERNARD: Lenina, please. Couldn't we just go for a walk and be alone together?


LENINA: (CLUELESS) But, Bernard, we'll be alone all night.


BERNARD: I - I meant alone - for talking.


LENINA: Talking? Well, what about? Oh, you're beginning to feel nasty, I can tell. Take a soma, Bernard.


BERNARD: (CURT) I'd rather be myself -- myself and nasty, not somebody else, however jolly.


LENINA: A gram in time saves nine.


BERNARD: Oh, for Ford's sake, be quiet. 


LENINA: Bernard--


BERNARD: Lenina, don't you ever want to be just you -- not enslaved by your own conditioning -- to be free?


LENINA: But I am free. I'm free to have the most wonderful time! Everybody's happy nowadays. 


BERNARD: But wouldn't you like to be free to be happy in your own way and not somebody else's?


LENINA: I simply don't understand you. (BEAT) Bernard, do you really like me? Everyone says I'm awfully pneumatic.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


HUXLEY: Eventually Bernard took Lenina to the Westminster Abbey Cabaret where Calvin Stopes and His Sixteen Sexophonists were playing. Also featured was London's finest Scent and Color organ and all the latest synthetic music. With the aid of four soma tablets, Bernard managed to spend a successful evening with the girl, and the next morning he agreed to apply at once for a permit to visit the Savage Reservation. He was quite nervous as he stood before the large desk of the Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning.


DIRECTOR: Oh, going to take Lenina Crowne, I see.


BERNARD: Yes, sir. 


DIRECTOR: Very pneumatic. 


BERNARD: (UNCOMFORTABLY) Ah, yes, sir.


DIRECTOR: New Mexico reservation-- How long ago was it? Let me see. Twenty, twenty-five years. Hmm. I must have been your age then. 


BERNARD: (PUZZLED) Sir?


DIRECTOR: I had the same idea as you. Wanted to have a look at the savages. Got a permit for New Mexico and went there for my summer holiday, with my girl of the moment. She was a Beta-Minus, I think. Oh, yes. She had yellow hair and was especially pneumatic. Well, it was terrible. We rode about on horses and all that and - and the last day of our stay, she got lost -- somewhere in those horrid mountains. Lost! We never did find her, poor girl. Must've fallen in some crevice. Yes, we searched for days, but no luck. Oh, miserable trip.


BERNARD: (SYMPATHETIC) You must have had a terrible shock.


DIRECTOR: What? Oh, don't imagine there was anything unethical about it; nothing emotional or long-drawn. It was all perfectly healthy and normal.


BERNARD: I'm sure it was, sir. 


DIRECTOR: What's that? Oh! (VERY PLEASANT) Mr. Marx, I should like to take this opportunity of saying I'm not at all pleased with the reports I've received of your behavior outside working hours. Alphas are so conditioned that they do not have to be infantile in their emotional behavior, but that is all the more reason for their making a special effort to conform. And so, Mr. Marx, I give you fair warning--


BERNARD: Er, yes, sir.


DIRECTOR: (CHEERFUL) If ever I again hear of any lapse from a proper standard of infantile decorum, I shall ask for your transference to a Sub-Center, preferably to Iceland. Good morning! 


MUSIC: TRANSITION


HUXLEY: The journey was quite uneventful. The Blue Pacific Rocket lost four minutes in a tornado over Texas, but was able to land at Santa Fe less than forty seconds behind schedule. Lenina and Bernard slept that night at Santa Fe and Lenina was very happy. 


LENINA: Imagine! Sixty Escalator Squash racket courts in the hotel! And Obstacle and Electro-magnetic Golf, too! Oh, Bernard, it's simply too lovely!


BERNARD: Er, there will be no Scent Organs, television, or even hot water once we get out on the reservation. 


LENINA: I can stand it; you'll see. (ADMIRING) Only, progress is lovely, isn't it? 


MUSIC: TRANSITION


HUXLEY: They took a rocket ship into the interior and from there they traveled on horseback. And all Bernard could think about was Iceland and how cold and barren it would be. The director's warning had made him even quieter and more sullen than usual. And then, that evening, they reached their destination. Before them was the village of Malpais, situated on a mesa; adobe hovels growing out of the stony ground, dust and squalor, and the smell of wood smoke.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, FADE IN NOCTURNAL BACKGROUND ... WIND AND CRICKETS, ET CETERA


LENINA: What an awful place. I don't like it. Who's that man coming toward us? 


BERNARD: He's to be our guide.


LENINA: I'm frightened, Bernard.


BERNARD: Quiet.


LENINA: We shouldn't have come.


JOHN: Oh, good morrow. You're civilized, aren't you? You come from outside? From the Other Place?


BERNARD: My name is Bernard Marx. This is Lenina Crowne.


LENINA: (MURMURED GREETING) Hmm.


JOHN: My name is John. Come with me.


SOUND: THEIR FOOTSTEPS TO HUT, IN BG--


LENINA: He speaks English. That's strange.


BERNARD: Probably trained as a guide. 


LENINA: Where is he leading us?


BERNARD: To that hut, I believe. There seems to be some sort of activity over there.


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, FADE IN CROWD OF SAVAGES CHANTING AND BEATING DRUMS ... THEN IN BG


LENINA: (ASTONISHED) Orgy-porgy! Why, it's like our lower-caste community sing. Only, look! Now they're beating themselves with whips! Oh, no! Bernard!


BERNARD: It's got something to do with their religion. What a wonderful intensity of feeling it must generate. I often think one may have missed something in not having passions like that.


LENINA: Nonsense! Bernard, what's wrong with that man? 


BERNARD: Where? Oh. Well, he's just old, that's all.


LENINA: Old? But - but we don't look like that when we're old! He's so - wrinkled. So-- Oh, it's horrible!


BERNARD: That's because we age all at once. We stay seventeen until we're sixty or so, and then--


LENINA: And then we die and they burn our bodies and recover our phosphorus for the good of the World State, just as it should be. But this-- (BIG GASP!) 


BERNARD: What is it?


LENINA: (HORRIFIED) That - that woman! Oh, Bernard, no! Take me away, take me away!


BERNARD: She's only nursing her baby, Lenina. That's her child; she's the mother.


LENINA: Bernard, how can you be so vulgar? (NAUSEATED) I - I think I'll be sick. Please, Bernard, anywhere! Anywhere! 


JOHN: Is something wrong?


BERNARD: I think we'd better take Lenina inside.


JOHN: Over here. Follow me.


SOUND: THEIR FOOTSTEPS TO JOHN'S NEARBY HOME ... CROWD NOISE STARTS TO FADE


LENINA: (HIGHLY DISTRESSED) My soma! I'm out of soma! Bernard--?


BERNARD: I'm sorry, Lenina. I didn't bring any. 


LENINA: (UNHAPPY) Ohhhh--


JOHN: Here. Inside. This is my home.


SOUND: CROWD NOISE AND DRUMS OUT AS THEIR FOOTSTEPS ENTER JOHN'S HOME


JOHN: This is my home. You are welcome to remain here.


LINDA: (OFF) John? John?


JOHN: Yes, mother?


LENINA: (STARTLED) Mother? (GASPS)


JOHN: These are people from the outside, mother. They have come to see the reservation.


LINDA: (APPROACHES, EXCITED) From the Other Place? You're from the Other Place! 


LENINA: (NERVOUS) Don't come near me! 


LINDA: But don't you see? I'm from there, too. I'm civilized! I don't belong here. It - it's all a terrible mistake.


JOHN: (TO BERNARD AND LENINA, AN INTRODUCTION) This is my mother, Linda. 


BERNARD: (TO LINDA) Uh, were you born here? 


LINDA: No! No, I tell you. I was decanted like normal people. Oh, thank Ford someone has come. At last, thank Ford.


LENINA: Bernard! Bernard, please, keep her away. 


BERNARD: Could you tell us about yourself, please? 


LINDA: (INCREASINGLY TEARFUL) Well, I came here twenty-five years ago with a man. His name was Thomas. We went riding together -- on - on horses! There was a terrible storm. I got lost -- lost in this horrible place. It was the last day of our stay. He left me -- here -- alone!


BERNARD: Lenina?


LENINA: Yes?


BERNARD: You will be interested to know that our Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning is named Thomas and that he came here twenty-five years ago.


LENINA: No. Oh, no, no.


BERNARD: And that--


LENINA: It can't be! 


BERNARD: But it is. He told me so himself. (CHUCKLES, THEN LAUGHS) What a discovery! This boy-- This boy is our director's son! (LAUGHS) Our director is a father! (LAUGHS) 


LENINA: Oh, it's too horrible!


JOHN: (CONFUSED) Mother, what is he saying? 


BERNARD: (CHUCKLES, TO HIMSELF) Iceland. Iceland, indeed.


LENINA: Bernard, stop it!


BERNARD: (TO HIMSELF) Well, we'll see who tells who where to go now. (BEAT, PLEASANTLY) Er, John? 


JOHN: Yes, sir?


BERNARD: How would you and your mother like to return to civilization?


LINDA: (EXCITED, RAMBLING) Do you mean it? Oh, please, do you? Listen, they're crazy here. I was a Beta-Minus. I always worked in the Fertilizing Room; I was a good worker. But how can I tell them? They don't understand. (WITH DISGUST) They mend things. They don't know what a helicopter is. Or - or - or soma! They have babies -- like dogs! Oh, it's too revolting. (RELIEVED) Oh, thank Ford. If it hadn't been for my son -- for John-- What a comfort he has been to me.


LENINA: (OFFENDED) Your son! How can you--? You, a Beta-Minus!


LINDA: I know, I know! But he's been a comfort to me just the same. If only I'd had soma! (TO BERNARD) Oh, do you mean it? Will you take us back to civilization?


BERNARD: Of course. We'll leave tomorrow. (CHUCKLES) You and your son -- back to civilization.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


HUXLEY: And Bernard was as good as his word. That very night, he and John and his mother and Lenina took the Blue Pacific Rocket to London. For Lenina, it was a happy trip since she had taken four somas the minute they got back to the hotel. For John, it was a voyage of discovery. Poor Linda, his mother, could only weep for joy. But for Bernard it was a moment of triumph, triumph such as he had never known before.


MUSIC: CURTAIN


VOICE: "Brave New World," Part One, by Aldous Huxley -- a startling, shocking account of what can happen to our civilization six hundred years in the future -- and more importantly a warning to all of us against the destruction of moral standards, family life, and the soul of man. Join us next week when we will continue with Part Two of Aldous Huxley's terrifying forecast of the future, of what could become the brave new world -- presented on THE CBS RADIO WORKSHOP.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG, UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: THE CBS RADIO WORKSHOP is produced and directed by William Froug. "Brave New World" was adapted for radio by Mr. Froug. Featured in the cast were Joseph Kearns, Bill Idelson, Gloria Henry, Charlotte Lawrence, Byron Kane, Sam Edwards, Jack Kruschen, Vic Perrin, and Lurene Tuttle. Original music composed and conducted by Bernard Herrmann. This is the CBS Radio Network.


___________________________________________________


The CBS Radio Workshop 

Brave New World, Part 2

Feb 03 1956



CAST:

VOICE

ALDOUS HUXLEY, our narrator

DIRECTOR, of Hatcheries and Conditioning

A group of STUDENTS

CONTROLLER

BERNARD MARX

LINDA

JOHN

FANNY

LENINA

NURSE

ALPHA

HELMHOLTZ

ANNOUNCER

and crowds of CHILDREN, WORKERS, ET CETERA



VOICE: Ladies and gentlemen, the distinguished author Mr. Aldous Huxley.


HUXLEY: "Brave New World" is a study of the future as it may be unless we are extremely careful. It depicts a society in which man has replaced nature by science, morality by drugs, individuality by total conformity. It is a hideous prospect, yet we seem determined to follow this path of self-destruction. But "Brave New World" need not be our future. The choice, after all, is always in our own hands.


MUSIC: BRIEF INTRODUCTION ... FUTURISTIC


VOICE: CBS Radio, a division of the Columbia Broadcasting System and its two hundred seventeen affiliated stations, present THE CBS RADIO WORKSHOP, radio's distinguished series dedicated to man's imagination -- the theater of the mind.


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION


VOICE: Tonight, Part Two of two half-hour programs devoted to one of the world's most shocking and famous novels, Aldous Huxley's terrifying forecast of the future, "Brave New World." And we are proud to once again have Mr. Huxley as our narrator. Original music is composed and conducted by Bernard Herrmann.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND HUXLEY--


HUXLEY: This is Aldous Huxley. In the garden outside the London Hatchery and Conditioning Center, it was playtime. Naked in the warm June sunshine, six or seven hundred little boys and girls were running with shrill yells over the lawns or playing games or squatting silently in twos and threes among the flowering shrubs. And strolling across the smooth turf came the Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning, followed eagerly by a group of new students.


SOUND: PLAYTIME BACKGROUND ... MURMUR OF BOYS AND GIRLS


DIRECTOR: And here we have playtime for our little tots. Notice the games all carefully constructed to use as many mechanical devices as possible. In olden times, children used to play simple games using only a ball and a bat. Ha! Madness! Nothing was added to increase consumption. Then came Our Ford. He taught us the principle of mass production in the assembly line many centuries ago and changed all that. 


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR "OUR FORD" TO THEMSELVES


CONTROLLER: Good morning, Director! 


DIRECTOR: Sir! What an unexpected pleasure! (AN INTRODUCTION) Boys, this is the Resident Controller for Western Europe. This is his fordship Mustapha Mond. Boys!


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR GREETINGS ("Good morning, sir!")


DIRECTOR: I was just showing the students the children, sir. 


CONTROLLER: Lovely children; busy as bees at their unrestricted play.


DIRECTOR: Controller, if you have the time, I wonder if you might tell the students something about the bad old days. 


CONTROLLER: I might. Where are you taking them? 


DIRECTOR: To the Hatchery and Conditioning Center to see the manufacturing of the babies.


CONTROLLER: Very well, I'll walk along with you. 


DIRECTOR: (PLEASED) Ah.


SOUND: CHILDREN FADE OUT DURING FOLLOWING ... REPLACED BY SIMPLE OUTDOORS BACKGROUND (BIRDS TWITTER, ET CETERA)


CONTROLLER: (TO STUDENTS) Yes, in the old days children lived in a place called "home" -- a rabbit hole with suffocating intimacies. Maniacally, the mother--


SOUND: STUDENTS GASP


CONTROLLER: Uh, please don't be shocked at that word. The mother brooded over her children. Her children. Our Ford, or Our Freud -- as for some inscrutable reason he chose to call himself whenever he spoke of psychological matters -- our Freud was the first to reveal the appalling dangers of family life.


SOUND: STUDENTS WHISPER UNHAPPILY AMONG THEMSELVES


CONTROLLER: Unpleasant as they may seem, students, these are facts. People used to be viviparous -- gave birth to their children. What were the consequences? A world dominated by mothers and fathers was a world full of every kind of perversion from sadism to chastity. There were also husbands, wives, and lovers.


DIRECTOR: (SENTENTIOUS) Now everyone belongs to everyone else. Thank Ford for progress!


SOUND: STUDENTS SAY, "THANK FORD."


CONTROLLER: Actually, we still preserve a few outmoded ethics of pre-stable societies in our savage reservations. Did you ever visit a reservation, Director? 


DIRECTOR: Yes, I once went to look at the savages in New Mexico. Oh, that must've been

twenty-five years ago. Mothers, fathers, marriage -- oh, very repulsive.


SOUND: STUDENTS MURMUR 


CONTROLLER: Yes. Well, here we are. I'll say goodbye.


DIRECTOR: Goodbye, Controller, and thank you.


SOUND: STUDENTS SAY, "THANK YOU, SIR!"


CONTROLLER: You're welcome!


DIRECTOR: And now, boys, if you'll follow me inside the hatchery.


SOUND: STUDENTS' STEPS TO DOOR, WHICH OPENS, THEN INTO HATCHERY ... HATCHERY BACKGROUND


DIRECTOR: And here we are! A hive of activity! Alphas superintending; Betas doing the skilled work; Gammas, in green, busy at routine jobs; and Deltas, in khaki, incapable of doing anything except sweeping the floor. Every member of society perfectly content to belong to his predestined caste, except for a few criminal exceptions. Which reminds me! One of those criminal exceptions is meeting us here at eleven. An Alpha-Plus, no less -- Mr. Bernard Marx.


STUDENT: What has he done, sir?


DIRECTOR: What has he done?! He refuses to participate in mechanical sports; he is lax; he--


SOUND: DOOR OPENS


DIRECTOR: Oh! Here he comes now.


SOUND: BERNARD'S STEPS APPROACH


BERNARD: (A LITTLE SMUG) Good morning, Director.


DIRECTOR: (LIKE A CAT WITH A MOUSE) Missssster Marx! You and Lenina Crowne returned from the Savage Reservation last night, I understand.


BERNARD: Yes, sir. We visited some of the places you told me about last week, Director. In fact, we--


DIRECTOR: Silence!


SOUND: CLAPS HANDS FOR ATTENTION


DIRECTOR: (TO ALL PRESENT) Your attention, please! Everyone step this way!


SOUND: EVERYONE PRESENT -- FROM ALPHAS DOWN -- STEPS TO THE DIRECTOR ... WE HEAR LITTLE GASPS AND MURMURS OF SHOCK AND DISAPPROVAL DURING THE DIRECTOR'S NEXT SPEECH--


DIRECTOR: (TO ALL) If I have interrupted your labors, it is because a painful duty constrains me. This man who stands before you -- this Alpha-Plus, the highest level of society -- has grossly betrayed the trust imposed in him by his heretical views on sports and soma. By his scandalous refusal to be promiscuous, he has proved himself an enemy of society -- a subverter, ladies and gentlemen, of all Order and Stability, a conspirator against Civilization itself! For this reason, I am ordering his immediate transference to a Sub-Center of the lowest order. In Iceland, he will have small opportunity to lead others astray by his unfordly example. Bernard Marx, can you show any reason why I should not now execute the judgment passed upon you?


BERNARD: Yes, I can.


SOUND: GASPS FROM SHOCKED CROWD


DIRECTOR: (SHOCKED, SLOWLY) What did you say?


BERNARD: You told me you visited the Savage Reservation twenty-five years ago, Director, with a young Beta-Minus, I believe. You told me she was lost during a storm and that you returned without her. (POINTEDLY) I thought perhaps you'd like to see her again. (CALLS) Linda?!


SOUND: DOOR OPENS ... GASPS FROM SHOCKED CROWD DURING FOLLOWING--


LINDA: (TO DIRECTOR) Thomas! Thomas! Oh, Thomas, it's me! Don't remember? Your Linda! Oh, I knew I'd recognize you, Thomas -- you look just the same; no one ages here. Thomas, look at me; I'm Linda. Remember? (TEARFUL) Hug me, hold me.


DIRECTOR: (INDIGNANT) What is the meaning of this? Who is this hag?! 


LINDA: Thomas! Oh, Thomas, it's Linda. Linda, your Beta-Minus. (CALLS) John, look, it's him! It's your father! 


JOHN: (WARMLY) Father! Father!


DIRECTOR: What's the meaning of this disgusting joke? Who is this savage, and this dreadful woman? Take them away!


LINDA: This isn't a joke! It's absolutely true! I'm his mother and you're the father!


SOUND: BIG GASP! FROM CROWD ... WHICH MURMURS EXCITEDLY AND STARTS TO LAUGH, IN BG


JOHN: (REASONABLE) Father, it's me, John. I'm your son.


BERNARD: (LAUGHS TRIUMPHANTLY) And now--! Now who is guilty of antisocial behavior, Director?!


DIRECTOR: (HORRIFIED) Oh, no. (MOVING OFF) No, no, no, no, no, noooooo!


SOUND: DIRECTOR'S RUNNING STEPS AWAY AS CROWD ROARS


MUSIC: TRANSITION


HUXLEY: A father as Director of Hatcheries; it was out of the question. The Controller asked for his resignation and all upper-caste London was wild to see the Savage and his mother. Bernard Marx became a hero and even Lenina Crowne had her share of reflected glory.


SOUND: LAB BACKGROUND


FANNY: Good morning, Lenina.


LENINA: Oh, good morning, Fanny. 


FANNY: Well, you certainly seem pleased with yourself.


LENINA: Yes, I am pleased. Bernard called up half an hour ago. He has to go to a party at the Controller's and he asked me if I'd take the Savage to the feelies this evening! 


FANNY: Oh, lucky girl. What's he like, Lenina? I've heard he's terribly good looking.


LENINA: Oh, he is. But so very odd.


FANNY: In what way?


LENINA: Well, the day Bernard and I left the reservation, the Savage came into my room; I'd taken a soma, so I didn't notice him until suddenly I awakened and there he was bending over me.


FANNY: What happened? 


LENINA: Well, naturally, I assumed something was going to happen, but instead of that, he just ran out of the room! 


FANNY: Well, how odd. What a terribly ungentlemanly thing to do. Doesn't he like you?


LENINA: Oh, I'm sure he does, so I can't make it out. And please don't tell this to anyone, Fanny. It upsets me, because I like him. I mean, I really like him!


FANNY: (GASPS) Lenina! 


LENINA: I know it's immoral, but I just can't help myself. I do like him!


MUSIC: TRANSITION


HUXLEY: The days passed. Success went fizzily to Bernard's head. His diffidence turned to bumptiousness, his nonconformity was forgotten, and he became completely orthodox. The Resident World Controller appointed him official escort for the Savage and asked him to make regular reports on the young man's reactions to civilization. This Bernard did -- assiduously.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


BERNARD: (A REPORT) Today I sent the Savage to the feelies with Lenina Crowne. The feature was "Three Weeks in a Helicopter." Instead of holding the knobs on the chair arms thus enabling him to experience the sensations of the lovers on the screen, the Savage refused to participate. Lenina tells me he called the film "vulgar and indecent."


MUSIC: TRANSITION


BERNARD: (A REPORT) The Savage refuses to take soma and seems most distressed because the woman, Linda -- his M-O-T-H-E-R -- remains permanently on soma-holiday. In spite of her senility and the extreme repulsiveness of  her appearance, the Savage frequently goes to see her and appears much attached to her.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: DOOR SLAMS


BERNARD: (ANGRY) What do you mean you refuse to come down to dinner?


JOHN: (MISERABLE) Bernard, I'm sick. I've eaten civilization and I'm sick.


BERNARD: Do you realize that I've invited the most important people in London tonight? The Ford Chief Justice is here. The Arch-Community-Songster of Canterbury has flown in just to meet you.


JOHN: (BEAT, QUIETLY) You've changed, Bernard. You used to feel the way I do about things. I talked to Helmholtz Watson. He says you've changed, too.


BERNARD: (UNCONVINCING) I haven't. (PLEADS) Listen, if you don't come downstairs for my dinner party, I'll be the laughing stock of London. 


JOHN: (RESIGNED) I'll come. Just let me read this to you first. 


BERNARD: Hm?


SOUND: BOOK OPENED, PAGES FLIPPED


JOHN: One day many years ago I found this book in my mother's room. One of the Indians had found it in a cave. It must be hundreds of years old.


BERNARD: Hmm. It's called "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare." Oh, I've heard of him. We don't allow it. Smut.


JOHN: But he says all the things I feel about Lenina. Listen to this.


BERNARD: Hm?


JOHN: (READS) 

"Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,

That sees into the bottom of my grief?

O sweet my mother, cast me not away:

Delay this marriage for a month, a week--


BERNARD: (LAUGHS, MOCKINGLY) Marriage! (LAUGHS) Ford, no!


JOHN: Bernard--


BERNARD: (LAUGHS) Oh, marriage -- that's too good, really. (LAUGHS)


JOHN: Bernard, stop it.


BERNARD: And - and mother! (LAUGHS) "O sweet my mother"! (LAUGHS) Oh, it's positively vulgar.


JOHN: You stop it. 


BERNARD: Wait till I tell Helmholtz about this! (LAUGHS)


JOHN: Stop it or I'll hit you!


BERNARD: Oh, come now, where's your sense of humor?


JOHN: Bernard--


BERNARD: Can't you see how funny it is?


SOUND: SCUFFLE AS JOHN PUSHES BERNARD TO THE DOOR, IN BG


JOHN: Get out! (THREATENING) I said leave me alone.


BERNARD: (NERVOUS) I - I'm leaving, John, I'm leaving.


SOUND: DOOR OPENS AND SHUTS AS BERNARD EXITS


JOHN: (BEAT, QUIETLY INTENSE) "How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, / That has such people in it!"


MUSIC: TRANSITION


HUXLEY: The next morning, a pneumatic young girl, crisply clad in a Beta-Minus viscose-linen suit, stood outside the door of the Savage's apartment and somewhat nervously rang the buzzer.


SOUND: FUTURISTIC DOORBELL ... DOOR OPENS


JOHN: Wha--? Lenina?


LENINA: You don't seem very glad to see me John. 


JOHN: Not glad? Oh, if you only knew. 


LENINA: May I come in then?


SOUND: LENINA'S STEPS IN ... DOOR CLOSES


JOHN: May I kiss your hand, Lenina?


LENINA: My hand?!


JOHN: (LOVINGLY) Admired Lenina. Indeed, the top of admiration, worth what's dearest in the world. I wanted to do something first, to show I was worthy of you.


LENINA: What are you talking about?


JOHN: Lenina, tell me something! I'll do anything you tell me -- anything at all! I'd sweep the floor if you wanted!


LENINA: But we've got vacuum cleaners here; it isn't necessary. 


JOHN: (PATIENTLY) No, of course it isn't necessary. But some kinds of baseness are nobly undergone. I - I'd like to undergo something noble -- just to show you how much I love you, Lenina.


LENINA: (A LITTLE GASP) Do you mean it, John? 


JOHN: (SLOWLY) Yes, but I hadn't meant to say it; not until I-- Listen. Lenina, on the reservation, people get married-- 


LENINA: Get what?!


JOHN: For always. They make a promise to live together for always.


LENINA: What a disgusting idea. (BEAT) Answer me this question, John. Do you really like me or don't you? 


JOHN: (BEAT, DEEPLY FELT) I love you - more than anything in the world.


LENINA: Well then, why on earth didn't you say so? Come here to me, John. Hug me.


JOHN: Oh, but, Lenina--


LENINA: (SINGS) "Hug me till you drug me, honey, / Kiss me till I'm in a coma--"


SOUND: SCUFFLE AS LENINA HUGS JOHN WHO RESISTS


JOHN: Lenina? What are you doing? No. No! Get away from me! Don't come near me!


LENINA: Hug me, honey!


JOHN: You - you strumpet!


LENINA: A gram is better than a damn!


JOHN: Get out!


LENINA: But don't you want me? 


JOHN: (EXPLODES) Get out of my sight--!


SOUND: JOHN SLAPS LENINA HARD


LENINA: (SHRIEKS) John!


JOHN: (QUIETLY) --before I kill you.


SOUND: LENINA'S HURRIED STEPS TO DOOR, WHICH OPENS BEHIND--


LENINA: Why, he's mad! He's gone mad!


SOUND: LENINA'S STEPS OUT ... DOOR SHUTS


JOHN: (BEAT, QUIET ANGER) "O thou weed, who art so lovely fair and smell'st so sweet that the sense aches at thee." (CURSING) Impudent strumpet, impudent strumpet, impudent strumpet!


SOUND: FUTURISTIC PHONE RINGS ... RECEIVER UP


JOHN: (INTO PHONE) Hello? -- Yes, this is Mr. Savage. -- Who's ill? -- Linda? My mother, dying? -- Yes. Yes, I'll come at once.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


NURSE: (CHEERFUL) Welcome to the Park Lane Hospital for the Dying. You've come to see someone in the Galloping Senility ward? 


JOHN: (SAD) Yes. My mother.


NURSE: (DISGUSTED) Oh, how vulgar.


JOHN: You know who I mean. Linda.


NURSE: (CHEERFUL AGAIN) Oh! Oh, yes! Room Forty-Three, Bed Sixteen. She'll be dying any minute now! This way, please.


SOUND: THEIR STEPS DOWN HALL, IN BG


JOHN: Is there - any hope--?


NURSE: Well, of course not! Or else she wouldn't have been sent here. Through these doors.


SOUND: HOSPITAL DOORS OPEN


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: BACKGROUND OF CHILDREN PLAYING, MURMURING


JOHN: What are these children doing here?


NURSE: Death conditioning, of course. It starts at eighteen months. Every tot spends two mornings a week in a hospital for the dying. All the best toys are kept here and they get chocolate ice cream on death days. They learn to take dying as a matter of course. This way.


SOUND: THEIR STEPS TO LINDA ... BACKGROUND OF CHILDREN FADES OUT


NURSE: Ah, here we are. Well, I must go. I've got my batch of children coming. (MOVING OFF, MERRILY) Time for their chocolate ice cream.


SOUND: NURSE EXITS ... JOHN'S STEPS SLOWLY TO LINDA


JOHN: Linda?


LINDA: (EXHALES)


JOHN: Linda, it's John. 


LINDA: (EXHALES)


JOHN: Your eyes are open, but you don't know me, do you? 


LINDA: (EXHALES)


JOHN: It's John, your son. Linda? 


LINDA: (EXHALES)


JOHN: Linda, don't you know me?


LINDA: (EXHALES, PAUSE, WEAKLY) "Hug me till you drug me, honey. Kiss me till I'm in a coma." (GASPS)


JOHN: Linda? (NO ANSWER) Linda?


LINDA: (FINAL BREATH)


JOHN: (TEARFUL) Mother? (BREAKS DOWN AND WEEPS)


MUSIC: MOURNFUL TRANSITION


HUXLEY: The menial staff of the Park Lane Hospital for the Dying consisted of one hundred and sixty-two Deltas, eighty-four redheaded female twins, and seventy-eight identical mongoloid male twins. At six, when their working day was over, the two groups assembled in the vestibule of the hospital and was served their daily soma ration. It was into this crowd that the Savage walked, so overcome with his grief and his remorse that he did not realize he was shouldering his way into the gathering throng.


SOUND: HUNGRY THRONG MURMURS ... CONTINUES IN BG


ALPHA: (TO THRONG) All right, here it is -- soma distribution! In good order, please! Oh, hurry up there! Stand in line for your soma! 


JOHN: (TO HIMSELF, IN DESPAIR) Linda. Linda died because of this.


ALPHA: (TO THRONG) Oh, now don't grab! There's enough for everybody! One gram for an evening's delight! Two for a trip to the gorgeous East! And four for a weekend in paradise!


JOHN: (TO HIMSELF, GRIM) "How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world that has such people in it!" (UP, TO THRONG) Stop! Stop!


ALPHA: (SURPRISED) Ford! It's the Savage!


JOHN: (TO THRONG) Listen, I beg you! Lend me your ears! Don't take that horrible stuff! It's poison!


ALPHA: (MILDLY ANNOYED) Mr. Savage, please! The people are waiting!


JOHN: (TO THRONG) You're slaves, all of you! Don't you want to be men?! Don't you want freedom?!


ALPHA: Freedom? Ford Almighty, call the police!


MUSIC: POLICE SIGNAL ... A SLIDE WHISTLE ... THRONG CONTINUES IN BG


HUXLEY: From somewhere behind the milling angry crowd, Bernard Marx saw the Savage. He and his friend Helmholtz Watson had been searching for John. Now they hurried forward.


BERNARD: Helmholtz, he's mad. They'll lynch him. Oh, Ford help us.


HELMHOLTZ: Ford help those who help themselves, Bernard. Come on!


BERNARD: Where are you going?! Come back!


HELMHOLTZ: (MOVING TO JOHN) It's a fight! A real fight! I've been waiting all my life for this! Men at last!


JOHN: (TO THRONG) I'll make you free whether you want to be or not! Give me those soma boxes!


SOUND: SOMA BOXES GRABBED 


ALPHA: Sir! Mr. Savage, no!


SOUND: WINDOW OPENED ... SOMA BOXES THROWN OUT, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


ALPHA: Stop it!


JOHN: Helmholtz! Join me?!


HELMHOLTZ: Yes!


JOHN: (WITH EFFORT, THROWING BOXES) Throw the poison pills away!


HELMHOLTZ: (WITH EFFORT, THROWING BOXES) By all means, throw them away!


ALPHA: Stop it!


JOHN: (TO THRONG) Freedom! Be a man and be free!


MUSIC: POLICE SIGNAL ... A SLIDE WHISTLE


ALPHA: (TO POLICE) Over here, officers! This way!


JOHN: (TO THRONG) Freedom! 


HELMHOLTZ: Throw them away!


ALPHA: (TO POLICE) Give them the soma spray!


SOUND: HISS! OF SOMA SPRAY ... CONTINUES IN BG


JOHN: (INCREASINGLY OVERCOME BY SOMA, SLOWLY) Free--! (COUGHS) Stand up as men! Win - your - freedom--


HELMHOLTZ: (ALSO OVERCOME, REALIZES) Soma--! Soma spray!


JOHN: Win--


HELMHOLTZ: John?


JOHN: --your--


HELMHOLTZ: John?


JOHN: --freedom--


ALPHA: (TO POLICE) Take them to the Resident Controller's office!


SOUND: HISS OUT ... HAPPY THRONG MURMUR RESUMES BEHIND--


ALPHA: (TO THRONG, SOOTHING) All right, all right, it's all over. We're all happy now. We're so happy, we all love each other, don't we? Oh, yes, we all love each other. Line up for your soma!


MUSIC: TRANSITION


CONTROLLER: So you don't much like civilization, Mr. Savage?

 

JOHN: No, I don't.


BERNARD: (GENTLE WARNING) John, you're talking to the Resident Controller. 


CONTROLLER: We don't need your comments, Mr. Marx.


JOHN: I think civilization is horrible. 


CONTROLLER: And yet people are happy. They get what they want and they never want what they can't get. They're well off, they're safe, they're never ill, they're not afraid of death. They're blissfully ignorant of passion and old age. They're plagued with no mother or father. They've got no wives or children to feel strongly about. They're so conditioned that they practically can't help behaving as they ought to behave. And you ask them to chuck this all away? For liberty? My good boy--


JOHN: All the same, it seems quite horrible to me.


CONTROLLER: Of course it does. Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And being contented has none of the glamor of a good fight against misfortune. Happiness is never grand. 


JOHN: They call this happiness? Working at an embryo assembly line, manufacturing babies? 


CONTROLLER: Science, my boy! Besides, they like it. Well, Mr. Marx, the time has come. You are being sent to an island.


BERNARD: To - to an island? Oh, please, sir, don't send me to Iceland. I promise I'll do what I should. I'll conform to the rules! 


CONTROLLER: One would think he was going to have his throat cut whereas if he had the smallest sense, he'd understand his punishment is really a reward. He'll be sent to an island where he'll meet the most interesting set of men and women in the world -- all the people who weren't satisfied with orthodoxy. Everyone, in a word, who's anyone.


JOHN: Then why didn't you go to an island yourself?


CONTROLLER: Because, finally, I prefer this. Sometimes I regret it. Happiness is a hard master -- particularly other people's happiness. (BEAT) Well, gentlemen, there are many islands available. Which climate do you choose, Mr. Watson? 


HELMHOLTZ: Well, I should like a thoroughly bad climate. I think I'd write better if I had to contend with difficulties.


CONTROLLER: How about the Falkland Islands? 


HELMHOLTZ: That would be fine.


CONTROLLER: Good. You may leave now. You, too, Mr. Marx.


JOHN: (SADLY) Goodbye, Helmholtz. Goodbye, Bernard.


HELMHOLTZ: Goodbye, John.


BERNARD: Goodbye, John.


SOUND: HELMHOLTZ AND BERNARD'S STEPS TO DOOR, WHICH OPENS AND SHUTS AS THEY EXIT


JOHN: (BEAT) One more question.


CONTROLLER: Of course.


JOHN: Where is God in this scheme of yours? 


CONTROLLER: It's a subject that has always had a great interest for me. 


SOUND: DRAWER OPENS ... BOOK REMOVED AND OPENED, PAGES FLIPPED, BEHIND--


CONTROLLER: You've never read this, of course -- the Holy Bible, New and Old Testaments. We've got quite a few revolting old books like that here.


JOHN: But if you know about God, why don't you tell the people? 


CONTROLLER: This book is old. It's about God hundreds of years ago. Not God now.


JOHN: But God doesn't change.


CONTROLLER: Men do, though. No, my friend, call it the fault of civilization. God isn't compatible with machinery and scientific medicine and universal happiness.


JOHN: But when you're alone it's natural to believe in God -- when you're quite alone in the night, thinking about death. 


CONTROLLER: But people are never alone now. We make them hate solitude and we arrange their lives so that it's almost impossible for them ever to have it. (BEAT) No solitude, no God. 


JOHN: Is that why there's no self-denial here? No God, no reason for it?


CONTROLLER: Of course. Industry and prosperity are only possible when there is no self-denial. If there were, the wheels would stop turning.


JOHN: But God's the reason for everything noble and fine and heroic. 


CONTROLLER: My dear young friend, civilization has absolutely no need for nobility or heroism. You're conditioned so that you can't help doing what you ought to do. And what you ought to do is, on the whole, so pleasant. So many of the natural impulses are allowed free play that there really aren't any temptations to resist. Anybody can be virtuous now. No temptations, no inconveniences.


JOHN: But I like the inconveniences. 


CONTROLLER: We don't. We prefer to do things comfortably.


JOHN: But I don't want comfort. I want God. I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness! I - want sin.


CONTROLLER: In fact, you're claiming the right to be unhappy.


JOHN: (CONCEDES) All right. I'm claiming the right to be unhappy.


CONTROLLER: Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent. The right to have cancer. The right to have too little to eat. The right to live in constant apprehension of what may happen tomorrow. The right to be tortured by unspeakable pains of every kind.


JOHN: (BEAT, DELIBERATELY) I claim them all.


CONTROLLER: (CHEERFUL) You're welcome.


MUSIC: SOBER TRANSITION


HUXLEY: Bernard and Helmholtz left for their islands, but the Savage was not allowed to go with them. The controller wished to continue the experiment. Three weeks later the Savage ran away. After some days of wandering he took refuge in an abandoned lighthouse, but his desire for solitude was not to be fulfilled. His hiding place was discovered. There were articles in the papers; sightseers came by the thousands. One Sunday, Lenina Crowne came for a picnic with three of her latest boyfriends. The day after her visit, two young reporters came to call, hoping for an exclusive interview. The door of the lighthouse was ajar. They pushed it open and walked into a shuttered twilight. Through an archway on the further side of the room, they could see the bottom of the staircase that led up to the higher floors. Just under the crown of the arch, dangled a pair of feet. They called. No one answered. They saw him. At last, the Savage had found solitude. He was alone, quite alone. 


MUSIC: SOMBER CURTAIN


VOICE: Thus concludes "Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley. We wish to thank Mr. Huxley for appearing on these broadcasts as our narrator. And, uh, we would also like to thank you, our listeners, for your enthusiastic response to this new series. This is William Conrad inviting you to join us again next week when we present George Stewart's dramatic account of one of nature's most terrifying phenomena, "Storm." The following week, listen as Dr. Frank C. Baxter interviews William Shakespeare -- presented on THE CBS RADIO WORKSHOP.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG, UNTIL END


ANNOUNCER: THE CBS RADIO WORKSHOP is produced and directed by William Froug. "Brave New World" was adapted for radio by Mr. Froug. Featured in the cast were Joseph Kearns, Herb Butterfield, Bill Idelson, Gloria Henry, Charlotte Lawrence, Parley Baer, Doris Singleton, Jack Kruschen, Vic Perrin, and Lurene Tuttle. Original music composed and conducted by Bernard Herrmann. 


America listens most to the CBS Radio Network.


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