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Behind the Locked Door

The Mysterious Traveler

Behind the Locked Door

Nov 06 1951



CAST:

ANNOUNCER

THE MYSTERIOUS TRAVELER

MARTIN

CATHY

STEVENS, professor

SAM, Indian guide

CREATURE, who growls savagely

WOMAN, of the mountain




SOUND: TRAIN WHISTLE ... TRAIN RUMBLES DOWN TRACK ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: The Mutual Broadcasting System presents "The Mysterious Traveler," written, produced, and directed by Robert A. Arthur and David Kogan, and starring two of radio's foremost personalities, Lyle Sudrow and Robert Donnelly, in "Behind the Locked Door."


MUSIC: BRIEF EERIE TAG


SOUND: TRAIN CONTINUES IN BG


TRAVELER: This is the Mysterious Traveler, inviting you to join me on another journey into the realm of the strange and the terrifying. I hope you will enjoy the trip, that it will thrill you a little and chill you a little. So settle back, get a good grip on your nerves, and be comfortable -- if you can -- as I bring you the strange and chilling story so many of you have asked to hear again. I call it: "Behind the Locked Door."


SOUND: TRAIN NOISE OUT WITH--


MUSIC: INTRODUCTION ... THEN BEHIND TRAVELER--


TRAVELER: Our story begins in the beautiful mountain region of Lake Mead, Arizona. A convertible car is speeding along a deserted road, which winds through the mountains. The car slows down; turns into a dirt road. A few minutes later it comes to a stop before a small mountain lodge. Cathy Evans, an attractive girl in her early twenties, gets out of the car, runs up the steps of the lodge to the front door. She knocks impatiently, looking about anxiously. 


SOUND: PASTORAL BACKGROUND (BIRDS CHIRP, ET CETERA) ... KNOCKS ON DOOR, NO ANSWER, KNOCKS AGAIN ... BEAT ... DOOR CREAKS OPENS


MARTIN: (MISERABLE, DISTRAUGHT) Yes?


CATHY: (WORRIED) Martin! 


MARTIN: Cathy!


CATHY: I thought I'd find you here. 


MARTIN: (NERVOUS EXHALATION)


CATHY: Aren't you going to ask me in?


MARTIN: Go away, Cathy. 

 

CATHY: Martin, what's wrong with you?


MARTIN: Go away. Go away!


CATHY: Not until I find out what this is all about. 


MARTIN: (NERVOUS EXHALATION)


CATHY: Well, let me in. 


SOUND: CATHY'S STEPS ON WOODEN FLOOR


CATHY: Are you alone?


MARTIN: Alone? (BEAT, UNCONVINCING) Yes.


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES (PASTORAL BACKGROUND OUT)


CATHY: Darling, look at yourself! You haven't shaved in days and-- Martin, those deep gashes on your neck and face! How did you get them?


MARTIN: It doesn't matter.


CATHY: Darling, you must've lost a great deal of blood! And you're feverish!


MARTIN: Yes, I know. 


CATHY: Is it true about Professor Stevens?


MARTIN: Yes.


CATHY: Why did you leave town so suddenly last night? The authorities are looking for you.


MARTIN: Wha--? (WITH DREAD) Do they know I'm here?


CATHY: No. How could they? It was intuition that brought me here. 


MARTIN: They mustn't find me.


CATHY: Martin, nothing makes sense. You return from an expedition last night -- alone, unexpected. You stay in town one hour and then vanish, not even phoning me! 


MARTIN: It's - it's best that way, believe me, Cathy! 


CATHY: You've got to tell me everything that's happened.


MARTIN: I can't, Cathy! I can't!


CATHY: I'm your fiancée! I've got a right to know!


MARTIN: Cathy, go away. Please!


CATHY: I won't go away until you tell me what's happened. 


MARTIN: (BEAT, SLOWLY) If I do, then will you go?


CATHY: (BEAT) Yes.


MARTIN: (RELUCTANT EXHALATION, THEN SLOWLY) I - I don't know where to begin. I suppose if you can say it had a beginning, it was that day, a little over two weeks ago, in Professor Stevens' office--


MUSIC: TRANSITION TO FLASHBACK


STEVENS: Come in, Martin, come in! Have a seat.


SOUND: DOOR CLOSES


MARTIN: Thank you, Professor. 


STEVENS: Martin, how would you like to go exploring with me for, say, ten days -- two weeks at the outside?


MARTIN: Exploring? Where?


STEVENS: The Vermilion Cliffs along the Colorado River. I found some wonderful Aztec pieces there last summer. One large cave I stumbled on proved to be a veritable treasure trove. 


MARTIN: Yes. Yes, I've seen those Aztec pieces in the university museum.


STEVENS: Well, the Vermilion Cliffs still remain largely unexplored. I'm sure that we could turn up many more objects of interest. 


MARTIN: Well, it certainly sounds intriguing. The only reason I hesitate, Professor, is because of Cathy. 


STEVENS: (LIGHTLY) Oh, I'm sure she'd give you a two-week leave of absence. 


MARTIN: (CHUCKLES) Yes, I suppose so. How many of us would go?


STEVENS: Well, it would just be you, myself, and an Indian guide. And three burros. I find that the fewer there are on an expedition, the better.


MARTIN: Mm hm. When would we leave?


STEVENS: Well, what about the day after tomorrow?


MARTIN: (BEAT) All right, Professor, I'm with ya!


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: LIGHT WIND BLOWS, IN BG ... CLIP-CLOP OF BURROS' HOOVES ON ROCK CLIFF ... THEN IN BG


MARTIN: So these are the Vermilion Cliffs, Professor?


STEVENS: Ah, yes -- an awe-inspiring sight, aren't they?


MARTIN: They're as breathtaking as the Grand Canyon itself. I had no idea they towered so high.


STEVENS: Yes, they make you realize just how insignificant man really is. 


MARTIN: Yeah.


STEVENS: You know, this region is so desolate, Martin, that it's all but unexplored. That's why I'm drawn to it time and time again.


MARTIN: Yes, I can understand that. It represents the "challenge of the unknown." 


STEVENS: (CHUCKLES) Careful, Martin, you'll get the exploring bug.


MARTIN: Oh, I've already been bitten, Professor.


STEVENS: Well, if you're going to be an explorer and an archaeologist, I'll have to start teaching you the fundamentals of the profession. (CALLS) Sam! This seems like a good spot! We'll camp here for the night! 


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: LIGHT WIND BLOWS, IN BG 


MARTIN: Whew! Mm! It certainly is hot, Professor. Exploring isn't as easy as I thought.


STEVENS: (NONCOMMITTAL GRUNT)


MARTIN: (BEAT) All right, Professor, what is it? For twenty minutes now you've been sitting on that rock, staring at that cliff.


STEVENS: (THOUGHTFUL EXHALATION) Note the boulders strewn over the face of that cliff. 


MARTIN: What about it?


STEVENS: That's a very peculiar landslide -- if you carefully study the formation of it.


MARTIN: What's peculiar about it?


STEVENS: Many of the rocks look as though they'd been placed there by human hands. 


MARTIN: But why? And by whom?


STEVENS: Well, one of the ancient Aztec forms of punishment was to seal a person in a cave by means of a landslide or just piling heavy rocks in front of the mouth of the cave.


MARTIN: Hmm. That landslide there must be hundreds of tons of rock there. 


STEVENS: Yes. Well, fortunately, we're prepared for it. 


MARTIN: Is that why you brought the dynamite along?


STEVENS: Yes. (CHUCKLES) Probably all we'll find will be a skeleton. In that case, it'll have been a waste of dynamite. However, we'll chance it. (CALLS) Oh, Sam? 


SAM: (OFF) What you want?


STEVENS: Get the case of dynamite, Sam. I'm going to blast that landslide.


SOUND: SAM'S FOOTSTEPS APPROACH


SAM: (COMING CLOSER) Professor, better leave it same way it be. 


STEVENS: Why? 


SAM: Evil spirit sleep in cave. Better not wake him up. 


MARTIN: (CHUCKLES) You really believe that?


STEVENS: Martin, I wouldn't laugh. Sam may be uneducated, but he senses things that you and I can't even begin to comprehend. 


MARTIN: Well, now, wait a minute. You mean you believe what he said about evil being asleep in that cave?


STEVENS: I wouldn't say that I believe it. But, nevertheless, I respect Sam's opinion. (BEAT, GENTLY) Sam? I still want to blast that landslide. 


SAM: (BEAT, RELUCTANT) I get dynamite.


MUSIC: TRANSITION


STEVENS: Keep your head down, Martin. When I set that dynamite off, there are going to be a great many rocks flying around. 


MARTIN: (SLIGHTLY OFF) Don't worry, Professor. I've got cover. 


STEVENS: (CALLS) Sam? You ready?


SAM: (OFF) Yes, Professor.


STEVENS: All right! Here goes!


SOUND: DETONATOR PLUNGER ... THEN LOUD, LENGTHY EXPLOSION AND FALLING ROCKS, WHICH CONTINUE IN BG


STEVENS: (CALLS) Keep your heads down!


SOUND: EXPLOSION AND FALLING ROCKS SLOWLY DIE DOWN


STEVENS: (CALLS) All right! It's safe now!


SOUND: THEIR FOOTSTEPS AS THEY APPROACH THE CAVE, IN BG


MARTIN: Professor, I think you did it. I can see a small opening. It looks like a mouth of a cave. 


STEVENS: Yes, it is. Sam, let me have one of the flashlights. Martin, you take the other. 


MARTIN: Uh huh.


STEVENS: I'll lead the way in.


MARTIN: Just as you say, Professor.


SOUND: THEIR FOOTSTEPS INTO CAVE, THEN IN BG ... ROCKS KICKED ABOUT .. SQUEAK OF RATS AND BATS, IN BG


STEVENS: The air doesn't seem too bad in here. (BEAT) Yes, it's all right.


MARTIN: Yeah, it-- What's that noise?


STEVENS: Just rats scurrying around.


MARTIN: (UNHAPPY) Oh.


STEVENS: Certainly a huge cavern. Look at that ceiling! Must be two hundred feet high! 


MARTIN: Look at the bats up there.


STEVENS: Yes, huge ones. (BEAT)

I have a feeling that this cavern and others extend for miles underground. 


MARTIN: Yeah, I-- Professor, look!


SOUND: THEIR FOOTSTEPS STOP


STEVENS: A skeleton. 


MARTIN: Yes. There's - there's another one over there. 


STEVENS: Yes. 


SOUND: FOOTSTEPS RESUME


STEVENS: Let's see what else there is-- 


SAM: Wagon train!


MARTIN: (DISBELIEF) What? 


SOUND: THEIR FOOTSTEPS STOP


STEVENS: Good Lord. Sam's right, it's a wagon train. 


MARTIN: A wagon train?


SOUND: THEIR FOOTSTEPS RESUME BEHIND--


STEVENS: Yes! Look, there are at least thirty or forty wagons in this cavern. Look! Skeletons of horses!


SAM: Yes. Here's a skeleton with an arrow beside it.


STEVENS: Let me see it.


SOUND: COUPLE OF STEPS, THEN STOP


STEVENS: (EXAMINES ARROW) Well. Appears to be a Navajo arrow. What do you think, Sam?


SAM: (BEAT, DEFINITE) Navajo.


MARTIN: Professor, this - this wagon train--? What's it all mean?


STEVENS: (CONSIDERS) Well-- Many years ago this wagon train was attacked by Indians. Wagon train retreated into this cavern, hoping to save themselves that way. 


MARTIN: And then the Indians caused the landslide, sealing them in?


STEVENS: Yes. 


MARTIN: Poor devils.


STEVENS: Look. Notice that old gun lying there. 


MARTIN: Yeah.


STEVENS: The flintlock seems to suggest that this wagon train must be at least a hundred years old. 


MARTIN: Probably headed for the California Gold Rush of Eighteen Forty-Eight. 


STEVENS: Yes. Well, we'll come back tomorrow and search this wagon train thoroughly. I'm sure we'll find many things of great interest. 


MUSIC: BRIEF TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND MARTIN--


MARTIN: (NARRATES) The next morning, after an early breakfast, Sam and I followed Professor Stevens back into the cavern. We spent the morning investigating the trunks and boxes we found on the wagons and, among the moldy clothing and a hundred and one household articles, we found faded letters and newspapers which showed the wagon train had crossed the Mississippi in the summer of Eighteen Forty-Nine, headed west for California and gold. We finished rummaging among the effects of the wagons and the professor suggested we explore the caverns. We followed him from one cavern to another, each varying in size. Now and then the professor would stop to mark our trail, for the caverns were honeycombed with countless passageways.


SOUND: THEIR FOOTSTEPS, IN BG ... SQUEAK OF RATS AND BATS, IN BG


MARTIN: How far do you think we've come, Professor?


STEVENS: (CONSIDERS) I should say we're about a mile from the wagon train. 


MARTIN: Oh, yeah?


STEVENS: We'll go back in a few more minutes.


SAM: (TENSE) We go back now! This place evil!


STEVENS: (REASSURING) Now, Sam, if there are ghosts here, they're only the ghosts of the people of the wagon train; they wouldn't harm us.


SAM: I tell you, evil. Feel it! All around! We go back!


STEVENS: We'll go just a little further, then turn back. 


SOUND: QUIET GURGLE OF RIVER WATER, IN BG


MARTIN: Professor, wait a minute!


STEVENS: What is it, Martin?


MARTIN: I think I hear running water.


STEVENS: (BEAT) Yes, you're right. Come along! 


SOUND: THEIR BRISK FOOTSTEPS FILL A PAUSE, THEN IN BG ... RIVER WATER GROWS LOUDER, IN BG


MARTIN: We seem to be getting closer!


STEVENS: Yes, yes.


SAM: (WORRIED) Evil -- all around us.


STEVENS: Can't be much further.


MARTIN: Well, there it is! 


SOUND: RIVER WATER LOUDEST ... COUPLE MORE STEPS, THEN STOP BEHIND--


MARTIN: Yes, it's a small river! Huh! Look how swiftly it's flowing.


STEVENS: Yes. This probably flows for miles underground and empties into the Colorado River. 


MARTIN: (OFF) Say, Professor, here, along the bank! There's a tremendous pile of fish bones!


STEVENS: (BEAT) Yes, so there is. 


MARTIN: (CLOSER) Look! There are even more on the other side of the river! 


STEVENS: (THOUGHTFUL) Hmm.


MARTIN: What do these huge piles of fish bones mean?


STEVENS: (SLOWLY) It's very strange. 


MARTIN: Well, how do you account for it?


STEVENS: I'm afraid that, at the moment, I can't. Sam? Have you any ideas about it?


SAM: (TENSE) Evil! All around us! The feeling is strong! 


MARTIN: Professor, he's trembling.


STEVENS: (SOOTHING) Sam, there's nothing to be afraid of. Look, I'll shine my flashlight around -- see?


SAM: (WARY) We - being watched. 


MARTIN: Watched? What are you talking about?


SAM: (DECISIVE) Won't stay here! I go!


SOUND: SAM'S RUNNING FOOTSTEPS AWAY 


STEVENS: (CALLS) Sam, come back! You haven't even got a flashlight! Sam! (TO MARTIN) Come on, Martin, we've got to catch him!


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: RUNNING FOOTSTEPS ... THEN IN BG


STEVENS: (CALLS) Sam, wait for us! 


MARTIN: I can still hear his footsteps.


STEVENS: We've got to catch him. He'll hurt himself; a serious injury running in the dark like that. (CALLS) Sam! Wait for us!


SAM: (OFF, TERRIFIED SCREAMS AS HE FIGHTS OFF A CREATURE ... THEN IN BG)


MARTIN: Professor, it's Sam screaming.


STEVENS: This way! The fool's probably broken his leg.


MARTIN: No, no, it sounds more like a fight!


STEVENS: Fight? Who could he possibly be fighting with?


MARTIN: I don't know.


SAM: (OFF, SCREAMING STOPS)


SOUND: RUNNING FOOTSTEPS SLOW TO A BRISK WALK, IN BG


MARTIN: He stopped. 


STEVENS: (CALLS) Sam, where are you? (TO MARTIN) Keep shining the flashlight around. 


MARTIN: Yeah.


STEVENS: It can't be much further. (CALLS) Sam! 


MARTIN: There he is!


STEVENS: Yes. 


SOUND: FOOTSTEPS FILL PAUSE, THEN SLOW TO A STOP ... MARTIN AND STEVENS ARE OUT OF BREATH


MARTIN: He's just - just sitting against a boulder, his head down. 


STEVENS: Yes. (TO SAM) Sam? (TO MARTIN) Give me a hand with him.


MARTIN: Right.


STEVENS: (HUSHED AWE) Good Lord! 


MARTIN: (GASPS IN QUIET HORROR) His face-- Neck--


STEVENS: Yes.


MARTIN: Who could have done this to him?


STEVENS: I - I-- I don't know.


MARTIN: But there must be an explanation. There has to be.


STEVENS: (SLOWLY) Martin? I have a theory. But it - it's so incredible, I can't bring myself to voice it. 


MARTIN: Well, tell me.


STEVENS: Martin, you'll think I'm insane.


MARTIN: Tell me!


STEVENS: What if the people of the wagon train -- or rather their descendants -- are alive -- here -- in these huge caverns? 


MARTIN: Well, that's impossible.


STEVENS: Why? Picture what happened the day the hundred and fifty people or so were sealed into this mountain by the Indians. What would have been the first thing they'd have done? 


MARTIN: Try to dig their way out.


STEVENS: Exactly. They start digging and find that a hundred-ton boulder's blocking the entrance and they have no dynamite. They're forced to give up. 


MARTIN: Yes?


STEVENS: They spend days looking for another way out; fail to find one. The day comes when all their food is gone. Starvation sets in.


MARTIN: All right, all right. Then that would mean they would all die. 


STEVENS: Not necessarily. The strongest of them stumble along in the darkness and find the underground river. They catch an abundance of fish and are able to survive. 


MARTIN: (REALIZES) The huge fishbone piles along the river! 


STEVENS: Right. The river was an everlasting supply of food. They continued to live by the river in the dark. Some probably went insane; died. Others adjusted themselves to their new environment. 


MARTIN: Professor, you - you think those handful of survivors had descendants who are alive today -- inside this mountain? 


STEVENS: Yes, Martin. And it was one of them who clawed Sam to death. 


MARTIN: What can those descendants be like -- being born and - and living in darkness?


STEVENS: I can only guess. I should imagine they'd be blind or near to it. But their other senses would be remarkably developed. 


MARTIN: Their physical appearance?


STEVENS: (BEAT) I don't know.


MARTIN: It's all like a nightmare -- a nightmare you can't awaken from. What - what's to prevent them from attacking us


STEVENS: Well, our flashlights, for one thing. I'm sure light frightens them, just as fire frightens animals. Fortunately, I have a revolver. 


MARTIN: Well, we'd better move on. (BEAT) Wait a minute. What about Sam?


STEVENS: There's nothing we can do for him now. Come along, Martin. We must find the trail I marked, so that we can get out of here. 


MUSIC: TRANSITION


SOUND: THEIR SLUGGISH WALKING FOOTSTEPS, THEN IN BG ... GURGLE OF RIVER WATER FADES IN, IN BG

 

MARTIN: (EXHALES WEARILY) Seems we've been searching days for the markings you left. 


STEVENS: (ALSO WEARY) Yes. Actually, it's been ten hours. (BEAT) Listen!


MARTIN: What? (REALIZES) The river! 


STEVENS: Yes. Come along.


SOUND: THEIR HURRIED FOOTSTEPS TO RIVER, WHICH GROWS LOUDER, IN BG


STEVENS: Once we reach the river, we'll be able to pick up the trail I marked.


MARTIN: We're getting closer. 


STEVENS: Yes.


MARTIN: There it is. 


SOUND: RIVER WATER LOUDEST ... FOOTSTEPS STOP


STEVENS: Here we are. Look, Martin, there's my marking on the passageway. We've found the trail. 


MARTIN: Yes.


STEVENS: Martin, it's two A.M. We'd better rest for a few hours. We're both too exhausted to go on right now. Let's one of us stand guard while the other sleeps.


MARTIN: All right. I'll - I'll sit up the first hour. 


STEVENS: Thank you, Martin. Keep your flashlight on.


MARTIN: Don't worry. I will.


MUSIC: TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND MARTIN--


MARTIN: (NARRATES) In a matter of minutes the professor fell asleep. I sat on guard, flashing my light slowly around the huge cavern. I looked at my watch and the seconds seemed like minutes and the minutes like hours. My eyes grew heavy and I finally dozed off. 


MUSIC: UP AND OUT


SOUND: GURGLE OF RIVER WATER, IN BG


MARTIN: (NARRATES) Suddenly I awakened in the darkness to hear the professor screaming.


STEVENS: (TERRIFIED) Martin! Help me! Turn on the flashlight! (YELLS, GRUNTS, MOANS, ET CETERA, IN BG)


MARTIN: (NARRATES) Frightened, frantically I fumbled in the darkness, but I couldn't find it. Then suddenly there were shots. 


SOUND: SIX REVOLVER SHOTS!


MARTIN: (NARRATES) [In the light] of the gun, I could see the professor struggling with a huge dark figure. 


STEVENS: (FALLS SILENT ... THEN MOANS BEHIND--) 


MARTIN: (NARRATES) Then suddenly all was quiet, except for the professor's moans.


STEVENS: (MOANS) 


MARTIN: (NARRATES) As I crawled toward him in the darkness my hand struck the flashlight. I turned it on and there was the professor.


STEVENS: (WEAKLY) Martin, I think I'm wounded.


MARTIN: You're - you're bleeding badly. Let me staunch your wounds.


STEVENS: (DYING) Too late. Leave at once. At once.


MARTIN: But what about you? (NO ANSWER) Professor? (NO ANSWER) Professor?! 


MUSIC: ACCENT ... THEN BEHIND MARTIN, WITH MINOR ACCENTS AT [X]--


MARTIN: (NARRATES) I felt his heart, but there was no beat. I staggered to my feet; shined my flashlight around until I found the professor's markings. I stumbled wearily along the marked passageway, trying not to remember my last glimpse of the professor's face. I hadn't gone more than a hundred yards when suddenly my flashlight flickered [X] -- and went out. (EXHALES) As I stood alone -- in the darkness, rats scampering past -- I fought to keep from screaming. [X] The darkness seemed to become heavier and more oppressive with each passing moment and I had the feeling something was silently approaching. I backed up against the passage wall and waited, my eyes straining in the darkness, and then suddenly I was leaped upon by a wild fury. 


CREATURE: (SAVAGE GROWLING, THEN IN BG)


MARTIN: (NARRATES) I threw my arms up [?] my face and neck. Again and again, the [?] savage [?] and I could feel the blood streaming down my face and neck.


CREATURE: (GROWLING MOVES SLIGHTLY OFF AS CREATURE BATTLES WITH WOMAN ... THEN BEHIND MARTIN--)


MARTIN: (NARRATES) And then suddenly the deathly clawing ceased -- as my attacker turned to ward off something in the dark. As I sank to my knees, I was dimly aware of a fierce fight taking place, and then consciousness left me. 


MUSIC: ACCENT FOR TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND MARTIN--


SOUND: GURGLE OF RIVER WATER, IN BG


MARTIN: (NARRATES, SLOWLY) Later -- how much later I have no way of knowing -- I became aware of a heavy, calloused hand washing my face and neck with water. I winced in pain as the water flowed into the deep cuts, and then suddenly I remembered all. And, remembering all, became aware of the calloused hand washing my face. And the presence of someone beside me in the darkness.


MUSIC: UP FOR AN ACCENT AND OUT


SOUND: GURGLE OF RIVER WATER UP, IN BG


MARTIN: (SCARED, WEAK, TO WOMAN) Who - who are you? (NARRATES) For a moment the hand hesitated, then resumed washing my neck. (BEAT, TO WOMAN) Well, can't you speak? Say something! 


WOMAN: (A SERIES OF GRUNTS) 


MARTIN: (NARRATES) A noise came from its throat that was more that of an animal's than a human being. (BEAT, HALTINGLY, TO WOMAN) If - if I could only see you. Do you have a name? 


WOMAN: (HALF-MOANING) Na-a-a-ame?


MARTIN: (NARRATES) It spoke. It seemed to repeat the word "name," though I couldn't be sure. Faint from the loss of blood, I closed my eyes, and fell asleep. 


MUSIC: ACCENT FOR TRANSITION ... THEN BEHIND MARTIN--


MARTIN: (NARRATES) When I awoke, my face and neck felt stiff and painful. It seemed to sense I was awake, for, as I opened my eyes and stared into the darkness, it came to my side. 


SOUND: GURGLE OF RIVER WATER, IN BG


MARTIN: (TO WOMAN) Can't - can't you understand anything at all? (NO ANSWER) Don't my words make any sense to you? (NO ANSWER) Why did you save my life? (NO ANSWER, NARRATES) My hand brushed against its hand. And I could feel the sharp claw-like fingers on it. I reached out in the darkness. As I touched its face, it bit my hand. (GRUNTS IN PAIN, NARRATES) I tried to get to my feet, but it placed a strong hand on my shoulder and held me down. At that moment, I realized that not only was it my savior, but my jailer as well. 


MUSIC: ACCENT FOR TRANSITION ... THEN IN BG, IN AGREEMENT WITH FOLLOWING--


MARTIN: (NARRATES) I lost all track of time. Now and then, it would leave me, and I would cautiously get to my feet to steal off, but no sooner had I taken more than a few steps, then it would be there at my side, forcing me to return to the bank of the river. I spent my every waking moment trying to think of a way to escape. And then, when my despair was greatest, an idea came to me. The professor had said that the underground river I lay beside emptied into the Colorado River. Though the odds were a hundred to one against my surviving, I knew it was the only possible way of escape. Slowly I crawled the few remaining feet to the edge of the river and, leaning over, started to wash my face. I could sense that it was watching me. 


SOUND: DURING ABOVE, GURGLE OF RIVER WATER FADES IN, CONTINUES IN BG


MARTIN: (NARRATES) I leaned forward a few inches more and fell into the river. 


SOUND: SPLASH! AS MARTIN FALLS INTO RIVER


MARTIN: (NARRATES) As I came up for air in the swift-flowing water I heard a splash beside me. 


SOUND: SPLASH! AS WOMAN FALLS INTO RIVER


MARTIN: (NARRATES) A moment later, I felt its arms around me. The current swept us along with breathtaking speed and, as we clung to each other, I discovered that it couldn't swim! For what seemed hours the river swept us along in the darkness and I felt myself losing consciousness as I attempted to keep the two of us above water. 


SOUND: WATER OUT WITH--


MUSIC: UP, TO CONCLUDE THE FLASHBACK, AND OUT


MARTIN: (GASPS, TEARFUL, HALF-CRAZY, TO CATHY) When - when I regained consciousness, Cathy, - (EXHALES) - we were both lying on a sandbar in the Colorado River and the sun was beating down on us. 


CATHY: (SYMPATHETIC) Darling, you're delirious from your wound. You need a doctor. 


MARTIN: (CHUCKLES WEAKLY) I wish-- I wish it were simple as all that. 


CATHY: Oh, you're feverish. You need care.


MARTIN: No. Go away, Cathy, go away. 


CATHY: How can I? Leaving you alone like this? 


MARTIN: (SAVAGE, HYSTERICAL) Don't you understand?! I'm not alone! (BEAT) She's here! 


CATHY: (BEAT, CONFUSED) She's here? 


MARTIN: Yes! (WEEPS QUIETLY, SEEMINGLY CRAZY) Didn't I tell you? Turned out to be a she


CATHY: (SHOCKED) You're out of your mind. You don't know what you're saying. 


MARTIN: (QUIETLY DISTRAUGHT) When I first saw her -- that first time, lying unconscious on that sandbar -- my first instinct was to leave her there, but how could I? She had saved my life in the cavern and then jumped into the river when she thought I was drowning, even though she couldn't swim herself.


CATHY: (FIRMLY) Martin, I want you to get a grip on yourself. 


MARTIN: Just as I was dependent on her in the dark, she's dependent on me in the light. She's blind. She can't speak yet. She--


SOUND: SMACK! AS CATHY SLAPS MARTIN IN THE FACE


CATHY: Stop talking like that.


MARTIN: (CHUCKLES QUIETLY) You can't believe it's true, can you, Cathy? (EXHALES) Neither could I, at first. 


CATHY: What are you staring at? 


MARTIN: Huh?


CATHY: Is there anyone in that bedroom? 


MARTIN: (WHIMPERS WEAKLY) 


CATHY: Well, I'll soon find out. 


SOUND: CATHY'S BRISK FOOTSTEPS TO DOOR ... KNOB TURNED, LOCKED DOOR RATTLES


CATHY: Why is the door locked?


MARTIN: (BEAT) She's in there! 


SOUND: CATHY'S FOOTSTEPS RETURN TO MARTIN


CATHY: Martin, you're sick. You don't know what you're saying. 


MARTIN: (CHUCKLES QUIETLY, CRAZILY) 


CATHY: I'll prove to you there's no one in that room. It's just your imagination. Give me the key to the door. 


MARTIN: Cathy, Cathy, go away.


CATHY: (INSISTS) Give it to me! 


SOUND: KEYS HANDED OVER


CATHY: Thank you.


SOUND: CATHY'S STEPS TO DOOR ... KEY IN LOCK ... DOOR UNLOCKS BEHIND--


CATHY: Perhaps when you see the room is empty you'll be willing to return to town for medical treatment. 


SOUND: DOOR OPENS


CATHY: (BEAT) There! (BEAT) I told you! (BEAT, THEN A LENGTHY BLOODCURDLING SCREAM)


MUSIC: CURTAIN


SOUND: TRAIN WHISTLE ... TRAIN RUMBLES DOWN TRACK ... SEGUE TO TRAIN INTERIOR


TRAVELER: This is the Mysterious Traveler again. Did you enjoy our trip? What's that, madam? You want a description of what Cathy saw when she opened that bedroom door? Well, you might ask Cathy. The only trouble is, the poor girl gets hysterical when you question her about the occupant of that bedroom. I suggest you write a letter to the Museum of Horrors for a full description. They consider the Woman of the Mountain as their star exhibit, because when she-- Oh, you have to get off here; I'm sorry. I'm sure we'll meet again. I take this same train every week at this same time. 


SOUND: LONG BLAST OF TRAIN WHISTLE ... THEN FADES OUT WITH--


MUSIC: IN AND BEHIND ANNOUNCER, OUT AT [X]


ANNOUNCER: You have just heard "The Mysterious Traveler." You may now enjoy other exciting adventures of the Mysterious Traveler in the current issue of The Mysterious Traveler Magazine. In our cast: Lyle Sudrow, Ann Shephard, and Robert Donnelly, with Maurice Tarplin in the title role. Phil Tonken speaking. This program came to you from New York. [X]


Mutual's ace commentator Cecil Brown, currently on a three-month's fact finding tour of the world, heads for the Orient on the last lap of his history-making trip. In these last weeks, Mr. Brown will bring you on-the-scene reports from such tinderbox areas as India, Hong Kong, Hawaii, Japan, and Honolulu. You won't want to miss any of the eyewitness accounts by this able commentator of the latest happenings in these headline-making spots of the world. Be sure to listen to the news reports of Cecil Brown over most of these stations. This is the Mutual Broadcasting System.


MUSIC: EERIE ORGAN ... UNTIL END

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