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Attar of Roses

Empire Builders

Attar of Roses

Dec 23 1930





CAST:

ANNOUNCER, Ted Pearson

THE OLD TIMER, folksy, chuckles a lot

VIRGINIA MONAHAN, friendly

STEPHEN BURROUGHS, curmudgeon

NURSE, dry

DOCTOR

ANN, adorable ten-year-old

MISS GRAY, Ann's nurse; warm

LOCAL ANNCR (1 line)




ANNOUNCER: The Great Northern Railway presents EMPIRE BUILDERS!


MUSIC: THEME ... LIKE A TRAIN LEAVING THE STATION, THIS STARTS OFF WITH A LURCHING RHYTHM AND SLOWLY PICKS UP SPEED UNTIL IT HITS A FAST, EXHILARATING TEMPO


SOUND: IMPRESSION OF TRAIN APPROACHING FROM DISTANCE AND ROARING PAST ... WHISTLE, BELL, ENGINE, ET CETERA


MUSIC: GENTLE INTRODUCTION ... THEN IN BG--


ANNOUNCER: Tonight and every night, the Empire Builder starts a happy trainload of people off on one of the most pleasant travel experiences in America, the transcontinental ride from Chicago to the Pacific Northwest via Great Northern. First, a comfortable night's sleep while your modern Pullman is being whisked smoothly up the Mississippi River Valley to the Twin Cities. Then a day spent -- for the most part, no doubt -- in a luxurious observation lounge car listening to the radio, reading, or watching first the charming lake region of Minnesota and then the wide sweep of Dakota's plains flit past the car windows. 


Another night without a jolt or a jar as the Empire Builder glides smoothly, swiftly along on the straight stretches of steel rails and then --- the day of days for scenic wonders. First, the famous sixty-mile ride along the southern border of Glacier Park and across the Continental Divide at the lowest pass in the northern U. S. A. Rockies. Then fascinating hours of turbulent mountain streams, placid lakes, far-flung forests, high mountain peaks. You reach Spokane that evening, and the coast cities the next morning, after a thrilling ride through the electrified Cascade Tunnel, the longest in the Western world. What a trip!


If you're planning a trip to California this winter, go this way -- via Great Northern.


MUSIC: UP, TO FILL A PAUSE ... THEN OUT


SOUND: OBSERVATION CAR BACKGROUND ... WE HEAR OCCASIONAL BELLS AND WHISTLES AT VARIOUS CROSSINGS


OLD TIMER: Oh, I beg your pardon, ma'am, but I believe this must be your book. Found it layin' in the armchair over there by the radio.


VIRGINIA: Oh, why - why, thank you. Yes, I was reading it just a little while ago. Thank you so much.


OLD TIMER: (CHUCKLES) Well, now, maybe you won't be so pleased soon as you see the shape it's in. You see, I didn't notice it bein' there and I sort of, uh-- Well-- Well, I sat on it.


VIRGINIA: (CHUCKLES) Well, I hope it didn't hurt you.


OLD TIMER: (LAUGHS) No. No, it didn't hurt me. But I don't think it did the book any good. (CHUCKLES) 


VIRGINIA: Oh, well, it was dull reading anyhow. And I just can't keep my nose in a book with all this marvelous scenery flying by the windows.


OLD TIMER: Say, it is beautiful, isn't it?


VIRGINIA: Yes. And this road that follows the railway along here -- isn't it magnificent?


OLD TIMER: Yes, it sure is. You know, that's the Columbia River Highway. It follows along the river for miles and miles. 


VIRGINIA: Oh, yes, I've heard of it so many times. Look how it winds along the hillside up there. Oh, but excuse me. Uh, I'm Virginia Monahan, escaped from New York.


OLD TIMER: (CHUCKLES) Well, now, I'm mighty glad to know you. And they call me the Old Timer.


VIRGINIA: So glad to know you. My, what a magnificent view of the Columbia River.


OLD TIMER: I tell ya, there's nothin' to compare with it. 'Long here between Spokane and Portland, the Empire Builder follows the Columbia for more'n a hundred miles.


VIRGINIA: Really? And such scenery! You know, I haven't been able to speak except in exclamation points for days!


OLD TIMER: (CHUCKLES) Say, you just wait till you see the Willamette Valley. You know, it's one of the garden spots of the world.


VIRGINIA: Er, Willamette? How do you spell it?


OLD TIMER: W-I-L-L-A-M-E-T-T-E.


VIRGINIA: You may go to the head of the class.


OLD TIMER: (LAUGHS)


VIRGINIA: A French name, I suppose?


OLD TIMER: Well, French by adoption, but Indian by birth. The Indians named it Willamette and then--


VIRGINIA: (GASPS) Oh, did you see that auto skid? Oh, what a dangerous-looking curve!


OLD TIMER: That is a dangerous curve -- if you're drivin' along sixty or seventy miles an hour. Several bad accidents have happened there.


VIRGINIA: Oh, dear.


OLD TIMER: But there was one-- I don't know whether you'd call it a bad accident or not.


VIRGINIA: Mmm, now, that sounds intriguing. Tell me about it, Old Timer. Uh, if I may call you that.


OLD TIMER: (CHUCKLES) Why, sure. Everyone calls me that. Well, now, this is about a man named Stephen Burroughs, a bachelor -- sort of a fidgety type. Got more money than you could shake a stick at. Now, it was late at night and Stephen Burroughs was [in his car?] tearin' along like-- Well, like a wild Indian.


MUSIC: FOR A FAST DRIVE ... FADES A LITTLE FOR--


SOUND: TO ESTABLISH AUTO ENGINE, DRIVING FAST DOWN HIGHWAY 


MUSIC: UP, FOR A FAST DRIVE ... FADES A LITTLE FOR--


SOUND: BRIEFLY ... AS THE AUTO ENGINE ROARS PAST 


MUSIC: UP, FOR A FAST DRIVE ... FADES OUT BEHIND--


SOUND: AUTO ENGINE HITS A PEAK THEN CUTS OUT ABRUPTLY ... AUTO CRACKS UP AND ROLLS TO A STOP ... SILENCE PUNCTUATED BY CLATTER OF PARTS FALLING OFF AUTO


MUSIC: GENTLE BRIDGE


NURSE: Doctor?


DOCTOR: Yes, nurse?


NURSE: I believe he's coming to, at last.


BURROUGHS: (STIRS, MURMURS, WAKES, STARTLED) What the devil--?! Where am I?


DOCTOR: You're in the hospital, Mr. Burroughs. In Portland.


BURROUGHS: Portland? (GROANS)


NURSE: Here, here -- you must sit quiet.


BURROUGHS: (DISAGREEABLE) Hm? When I want your advice, young lady, I'll ask for it. Uh, doctor?


DOCTOR: Yes?


BURROUGHS: What time is it?


DOCTOR: Why, er-- Quarter past four.


BURROUGHS: Past four, huh? (REALIZES) Doctor -- what day is it?


DOCTOR: Friday.


BURROUGHS: Friday? Good lord! I've got an important meeting at four o'clock! I'm late! Here, nurse, help me up! (GROANS)


DOCTOR: Uh-uh-uh, not so fast, Mr. Burroughs.


BURROUGHS: Where are my clothes?! I'll attend that meeting, by gad, or know the reason why!


DOCTOR: Oh, it can't be done. I'm sorry.


BURROUGHS: I've got to go, man! Let me out of here! Nurse?!


DOCTOR: You say your meeting was Friday. Now, which Friday?


BURROUGHS: Why-- Why, Friday the seventeenth.


DOCTOR: Mmm. Too bad. This happens to be Friday the twenty-fourth.


BURROUGHS: Great Scott! Have I been here that long?


DOCTOR & NURSE: (A LOW, INDECIPHERABLE EXCHANGE OF WORDS ABOUT THE PATIENT'S CONDITION)


BURROUGHS: What happened, doctor?


DOCTOR: Well, you tried to straighten out Horseshoe Bend. Bad business.


BURROUGHS: Good business, doctor -- for you.


DOCTOR: No, I - I was talking from your point-of-view.


BURROUGHS: Well?


DOCTOR: Compound fracture of the leg. Left arm broken. Broken collarbone. And there was a slight concussion of the brain, but that's passed now.


BURROUGHS: Is that all?


DOCTOR: Oh, some minor cuts and bruises.


BURROUGHS: Well, I'll be dam-- Oh, excuse me. How long am I in for, doctor?


DOCTOR: Two months. Er, maybe longer.


BURROUGHS: You won't keep me in here two months -- not if I know it! (TO NURSE) Here, you! (NO RESPONSE) Young woman?!


NURSE: (DRY) Oh, were you speaking to me?


BURROUGHS: I was. Telephone John Tyler, my secretary, Broadway Six-Oh-Four-Oh. Tell him to come out here immediately!


NURSE: Yes, sir.


BURROUGHS: (ANGRILY IMPATIENT) Move, woman, move! (WITH EFFORT) Do I have to get out of this sickbed and call him myself?! (GROANS)


DOCTOR: Now, Mr. Burroughs, Mr. Burroughs--


BURROUGHS: (EXHALES AS HE PASSES OUT)


NURSE: (SIMPLY) Doctor, he's fainted.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


BURROUGHS: (CURMUDGEONLY) Well, what did you bring me up here for, nurse?


NURSE: This is the sun room. You can wheel your chair around and look out in every direction. The convalescents like to come here.


BURROUGHS: Well, I don't. It took me a month to get used to that room downstairs and now-- Take me back down!


NURSE: I'm sorry. I can't.


BURROUGHS: You can't? What do you mean?


NURSE: The doctor's orders.


BURROUGHS: You're taking orders from me, young woman!


NURSE: Not in the hospital.


BURROUGHS: You take me back to my room, I tell you! 


NURSE: Just a minute, Mr. Burroughs. Here, your right arm, please. Steady. (BEAT) There.


BURROUGHS: Eh, that damn needle again! What was that for?


NURSE: To keep you quiet. I'll be back for you later.


BURROUGHS: Well, I won't stay here. I'll get up and get out myself.


NURSE: (MOVING OFF) I'll be back later.


BURROUGHS: (MUTTERS, TO HIMSELF AS HE DOZES OFF) Yeah, well-- I won't go to sleep. I tell you - I won't. You hear me?


MUSIC: BRIDGE


ANN: (WAILS TEARFULLY, OFF)


BURROUGHS: (STARTLED AWAKE) Now, what the devil--?! (REALIZES, TO HIMSELF) Oh. Been asleep. Must have been dreaming.


ANN: (WAILS TEARFULLY AGAIN)


BURROUGHS: (TO HIMSELF) Well, I wasn't dreaming that time! Must have been that kid over there. No one else here.


ANN: (WAILS FORLORNLY IN PAIN)


BURROUGHS: (ANNOYED) Oh, what's the matter? (CALLS) Where is somebody?! (TO HIMSELF) Oh, let me see if I can wheel my chair over there.


ANN: (HER WAILING GROWS CLOSER)


BURROUGHS: (FLUSTERED, TO ANN, STAMMERS) Now-now-now, what - what's the matter?


ANN: [?] on my hip. [It's tight! ?] (WAILS FORLORNLY IN PAIN)


BURROUGHS: Oh, it's hell to suffer like that. Where's the nurse? Where's anybody? (CALLS) Here! Nurse, nurse! (RELIEVED, TO ANN) Oh. Oh, here's your nurse. (TO NURSE) Well, hurry up, woman! Hurry up!


MISS GRAY: (APPROACHES) Yes, I'm coming. (ON MIKE) Here, Ann, take this. (BEAT) This will ease the pain. 


ANN: (HER WAILING SUBSIDES)


MISS GRAY: Let go of the man's hand, Ann.


BURROUGHS: (MELLOWER NOW) Oh, that's all right. 


MISS GRAY: You see, if she can hold someone's hand, she seems to be able to stand it better, the pain.


BURROUGHS: Is she like this often?


MISS GRAY: No, not so often any more. But it's bad while it lasts. (BEAT) There, she's better now. Come, Ann.


ANN: Thank you, mister.


BURROUGHS: That - that's all right.


ANN: (MOVING OFF) Goodbye.


BURROUGHS: Goodbye. (BEAT, TO HIMSELF, SLOWLY) Gosh. What a sad little smile.


MUSIC: BRIDGE


NURSE: Well, here we are, Mr. Burroughs -- up on the roof this morning.


BURROUGHS: Well, fine.


NURSE: (DRY) I see we won't need a hypo today.


BURROUGHS: Oh, er, nurse-- That little girl here. The one named, er, Ann; isn't that it?


NURSE: Yes?


BURROUGHS: What's the matter with her?


NURSE: Hip trouble.


BURROUGHS: Is she any better?


NURSE: I don't know.


BURROUGHS: Well, find out, then!


NURSE: All right. Why, there she is now.


BURROUGHS: Here, why don't you wheel her chair over here? This is a nice sunny spot.


NURSE: Surely. (BEAT) Oh, there -- she saw me wave. She's going to wheel herself over.


BURROUGHS: Well, I won't need you. I'll look out for her for a while.


NURSE: (MOVING OFF) Very well.


BURROUGHS: (UNCERTAINLY, TO ANN) How - how are you today, Ann?


ANN: I'm a lot better, thank you.


BURROUGHS: Tell me about yourself. Er, what's your name?


ANN: (PROUDLY) Beatrice Ann Highland. I like my name.


BURROUGHS: Mm hm. That's a nice name. How long have you been in the hospital, Ann?


ANN: All my life.


BURROUGHS: (TAKEN ABACK) What? All your life in a hospital? Where are your parents?


ANN: (MATTER-OF-FACT) They're dead. They were both killed when I was hurt, long time ago, when I was only two years old.


BURROUGHS: And how old are you now?


ANN: Ten.


BURROUGHS: Ten. Have you no other home? No relatives?


ANN: I have Aunt Mary.


BURROUGHS: Who's Aunt Mary?


ANN: She is my great-aunt. But I just call her Aunt Mary. She owns this hospital.


BURROUGHS: You don't mean Mary Woodruff, the superintendent?


ANN: Yes.


BURROUGHS: And she's your aunt, eh?


ANN: No. She's my great-aunt. I just call her "Aunt."


BURROUGHS: Oh ho, I see. And you have no other home than the four bare walls of a hospital.


ANN: Mm, but up here, there aren't any walls. Just a lot of space [?] -- sky and trees and flowers. I like trees and flowers. Especially roses. I can see them everywhere I look.


BURROUGHS: Of course. Portland is the Rose City.


ANN: Yes. I'm glad. A lady gave me some roses once -- little teeny ones. Cecile Brunners she called them. Hm, I didn't forget the name. They were so pretty. I've still got 'em -- all pressed out in a book. It's a picture book. I look at my roses every day.


BURROUGHS: You shall have some fresh ones tomorrow.


ANN: Oh? Will they pink? I like pink ones best.


BURROUGHS: Yes, yes, they'll be pink. Tell me, Ann -- what's the matter with your hip?


ANN: Somethin' happened to it. It won't "function" Aunt Mary says.


BURROUGHS: Well, can't it be cured?


ANN: The doctors say maybe, when I get older. Hmm, they're nice to me.


BURROUGHS: And your aunt--?


ANN: (CORRECTS HIM) My great-aunt!


BURROUGHS: Oh, yes, yes -- your great-aunt. She's nice, too?


ANN: Yes. She gives me a home here.


BURROUGHS: I see. You live in a hospital all your life. Never go anywhere. Never see anything.


ANN: But I do see things. There is my river, waaaay down there. It runs right through Portland and divides it into the east side and the west side. Uh, that's geography.


BURROUGHS: Hmm, very interesting.


ANN: Sam Simpson wrote a poem about my river. (SIMPLY) I just call it my river. It really isn't.


BURROUGHS: (AMUSED) I see.


ANN: A nurse told me about the poem.


BURROUGHS: Tell me about it.


ANN: "Beautiful Willamette" -- that's its name. I know the first verse by heart.


BURROUGHS: How does it go?


ANN: (RECITES) "From the Cascade's frozen gorges,

Leaping like a child at play,

Winding, widening through the valley,

Bright Willamette glides away."


BURROUGHS: Hmm, it's nice. Very, very nice.


ANN: I like this part the best. "Onward ever, / Lovely river, / Softly calling to the sea." What's a sea?


BURROUGHS: A sea? Well, in this case, it's an ocean. The Pacific Ocean. It's that way. You see, the Willamette River flows into the Columbia, and the Columbia flows into the Pacific Ocean. That's geography, too.


ANN: Is the Columbia River more beautiful than my river?


BURROUGHS: No, not more beautiful. Only bigger. The Columbia is one of the largest rivers in the United States.


ANN: Is the Pacific Ocean awful big?


BURROUGHS: Ohhhhh, yes. 'Most as big as the sky. Would you like to see the ocean?


ANN: Oh, yes. But it's too far away. It's a hundred miles.


BURROUGHS: That's not so far, Ann. One can get there in a few hours.


ANN: On the train?


BURROUGHS: Yes. Or by automobile.


ANN: I never saw a train.


BURROUGHS: You never saw a train?


ANN: But I heard one!


BURROUGHS: Way up here?


ANN: Mm hm! I hear the Empire Builder on the radio every Monday night!


BURROUGHS: Oh.


ANN: It sounded so - so-- (LONGINGLY) Oh, I'd like to ride on that train.


BURROUGHS: Stranger things than that have happened, Ann. Tell me, what else do you see up here besides your river "softly calling to the sea"?


ANN: The mountain peaks all covered with snow. They reach way up into the sky.


BURROUGHS: And how many peaks can you see from here?


ANN: Let's see. There's Mount Hood.


BURROUGHS: Mm hm.


ANN: I like Mount Hood the best -- it's so jaggedy. And over there is Mount St. Helens.


BURROUGHS: Right.


ANN: And right behind it is Mount Rainier, and I can see the top of Mount Adams, too. Why, it's waaaay over there. See?


BURROUGHS: Who told you all these things, Ann?


ANN: Miss Gray.


BURROUGHS: And who is Miss Gray?


ANN: She's my nurse.


BURROUGHS: Oh. And what else did Miss Gray tell you?


ANN: She told me all about those beautiful houses on the hills right back of us, and what's inside 'em, and everything. Mmm, I'd like to see the inside of a house.


BURROUGHS: Have you never seen the inside of a house, Ann?


ANN: No. 


BURROUGHS: Have you never been away from the hospital?


ANN: (NO) Mm mm. Only, sometimes I make believe! I sail away on a little white cloud and go over the top of the hills and - and see what's on the other side.


BURROUGHS: And what do you find on the other side?


ANN: Sometimes I see an enchanted castle with a little princess at the window. She wants to get out into the sunshine, but can't because she's under the spell of a wicked fairy.


BURROUGHS: Well!


ANN: And sometimes I see a dreadful, great big giant a-lookin' around for someone to devour.


BURROUGHS: (LAUGHS) But aren't you afraid [?] terrifying vision?


ANN: Oh, no. I'm not afraid. He can't get to the top of the hill. He's chained.


BURROUGHS: I see.


ANN: And he doesn't know what's on the other side either. I guess he'd like to, just like me.


BURROUGHS: Some day, Ann, you may see the other side. Who knows?


ANN: Oh, Mister-- Mister--? What's your name?


BURROUGHS: Why, it's Burroughs. But you just call me Uncle Stephen.


ANN: (PLEASED) Uncle Stephen. (CHUCKLES)


BURROUGHS: That's it. (SEES MISS GRAY) Oh. Oh, here's your nurse, Ann.


ANN: (HAPPILY, TO MISS GRAY) Oh, Miss Gray, Mister, uh-- Uncle Stephen's gonna show me the inside of a house some day, maybe.


MISS GRAY: Oh, isn't that splendid? But come now, it's time for your nap.


BURROUGHS: Goodbye, Ann.


ANN: Goodbye, Uncle Stephen.


BURROUGHS: (CHUCKLES WARMLY)


MUSIC: BRIDGE


ANN: Oh, Miss Gray, do you think Uncle Stephen will come up on the roof today?


MISS GRAY: I suppose so.


ANN: I missed him so, yesterday.


MISS GRAY: Well, he sent you your roses, didn't he?


ANN: Yes. He sends them every day. I love my roses.


MISS GRAY: And they're always Cecile Brunners?


ANN: (YES) Mm hm. I like them the best. Isn't Uncle Stephen wonderful, Miss Gray?


MISS GRAY: Yes. He's nice.


ANN: I think he's awful nice.


BURROUGHS: Do you, Ann?


ANN: (EXCITED) Oh! Uncle Stephen! 


BURROUGHS: Good morning, Ann!


ANN: Good mornin'. Yesterday was just awful lonesome without ya.


BURROUGHS: Was it? Heh. Well, I - I was very busy yesterday. But I thought of you -- many times.


ANN: I'm so glad. See my pretty roses?


BURROUGHS: Do you still like them, Ann?


ANN: Mmm, I love 'em.


BURROUGHS: Well, you shall have them every day -- whether I'm here or not.


ANN: (APPREHENSIVE) Are you - going away?


BURROUGHS: I must. I'm well now. I came to say goodbye. 


ANN: Oh, but--


BURROUGHS: Oh, but I'll come back -- one of these days. You won't forget me, will you?


ANN: Never. Never!


BURROUGHS: (SLOWLY) Goodbye, Ann.


ANN: (SLOWLY, SADLY) Goodbye, Uncle Stephen.


BURROUGHS: (MOVING OFF) Goodbye, child.


MISS GRAY: Look, Ann. Mr. Burroughs is waving to you.


ANN: (AS SHE WAVES, QUIETLY) Goodbye. (TEARFUL, TO HERSELF) Oh, Uncle Stephen, Uncle Stephen-- Don't go away, don't go away-- (WEEPS)


MUSIC: LENGTHY BRIDGE ... TRAGIC ... THEN SEGUES TO A MEDLEY OF CHRISTMAS MELODIES THAT INCLUDES "THE FIRST NOEL," "SILENT NIGHT" AND "O COME ALL YE FAITHFUL" ... QUIET RINGING OF CHRISTMAS BELLS CONTINUES VERY GENTLY IN BG


MISS GRAY: Do you know what day this is, Ann?


ANN: (UNENTHUSIASTIC) No.


MISS GRAY: Why, honey, this is Christmas. And here we are up on the roof garden. Isn't the weather wonderful?


ANN: Oh, I'm so tired, Miss Gray.


MISS GRAY: Oh, look -- your roses have dropped to the floor. (BEAT) Here they are, Ann.


ANN: Thank you.


MISS GRAY: Why, Ann dear -- don't you love your roses any more?


ANN: Yes.


NURSE: Oh, Miss Gray?


MISS GRAY: Yes, Miss Barton?


NURSE: Here, this box just came, Miss Gray.


MISS GRAY: Oh, thank you. Why, Ann, it's beginning to seem like Christmas in spite of the warm sunshine. (READS) "Miss Beatrice Ann Highland--" (TO ANN) For you, Ann. Look, open your eyes. This great big box is for you.


ANN: (UNINTERESTED) Is it?


MISS GRAY: Shall I open it?


ANN: If you want to.


MISS GRAY: Oh, come, Ann -- aren't you interested in what Santa Claus brought you?


ANN: Yes, I suppose so.


SOUND: PACKAGE OPENED BEHIND--


MISS GRAY: I can't wait to see. (BEAT) Oh, Ann! It's pink, it's pink! See? It's a dress! (IMPRESSED) Oh, oh, oh! And how exquisite. And here are dainty pink stockings to match. And - and darling little white slippers. And -- oh, dear -- guess what? Pearls for your neck. And here's a handkerchief with tiny pink rosebuds embroidered in it. And even a purse. All for you, Ann!


ANN: Oh.


MISS GRAY: Aren't you thrilled, dear?


ANN: (CONCEDES) They're very pretty.


MISS GRAY: And here's a letter for you. Read it. (BEAT) Go on and read it, dear. Well, what are you staring at, child?


MUSIC: UP, AS STRINGS SNEAK IN ... SENTIMENTAL ... CONTINUES IN BG


ANN: (EXCITED) Look! Look, Miss Gray! 


MISS GRAY: (SURPRISED) Why--!


ANN: Uncle Stephen!


BURROUGHS: Ann!


ANN: Oh, it - it can't be true! I'm gonna pinch myself!


BURROUGHS: Yes. Yes, it is, Ann. I'm here. In the flesh.


ANN: Oh, Uncle Stephen, I - I missed you so. I--


BURROUGHS: Didn't you get my roses? They were my daily message to you. I thought you'd understand that I hadn't forgotten you.


ANN: I wanted you, Uncle Stephen. (WEEPS)


BURROUGHS: Did you, dear? (BEAT, COMFORTS HER) There now. Stop crying. Stop crying and I'll - I'll show you your Christmas present.


ANN: (THROUGH TEARS) I saw it. I like my pretty dress and everything.


BURROUGHS: Oh, I'm glad you do. But that's not what I meant. Here, Ann. Take these field glasses and look waaay up there on the hill.


ANN: Oh, I can see [it so plain?].


BURROUGHS: Do you see that big white house -- way up near the top -- with the flag flying on it?


ANN: Oh - oh, now I see the flag.


BURROUGHS: (HESITANT) Do you - like that house, Ann?


ANN: It's like the enchanted castle where the little princess lives.


BURROUGHS: Well, that's your enchanted castle, Ann. I'm going to take you away from here this very afternoon -- to live in the inside of that house. And Miss Gray is coming along to take care of you. Will you like that, Ann?


ANN: Will you be there, Uncle Stephen?


BURROUGHS: Yes, indeed. Not even your dreadful, great big giant could keep me away.


ANN: Oh, it's too wonderful to be true. (APPREHENSIVE) Maybe - maybe when I wake up, I'll be in the hospital again.


BURROUGHS: Never you fear. When you wake up, Ann, you'll be in your own home way up on the hill.


ANN: (PLEASED) Oh!


BURROUGHS: And, when you're well, we'll travel all over the world and see what's on the other side of those hills.


ANN: In the Empire Builder?


BURROUGHS: Yes. On the Empire Builder.


ANN: Oh, Uncle Stephen!


BURROUGHS: Not - not "Uncle Stephen" any more, Ann. You're going to be my Christmas present to myself. Do you know what I've done? I've gone and adopted you for my very own.


ANN: (PLEASANTLY SURPRISED) Oh--


BURROUGHS: What's my name now, darling?


ANN: (PROUDLY) Daddy. My wonderful, wonderful daddy.


MUSIC: CURTAIN ... "SILENT NIGHT" ... THEN IN BG


ANNOUNCER: Well, Old Timer, that was a beautiful story you told us tonight.


OLD TIMER: Thank you, Ted. It's one of the best Christmas stories I ever run across. It seems to put people in a kind of a-- Well, you know, a kind of a "Christmassy" frame of mind.


ANNOUNCER: Hmm, it certainly does. By the way, are you going West for Christmas this year again?


OLD TIMER: Well, I don't know, Ted. I might. (CHUCKLES) And then again, I might not. You'll know better next week. Say, our time's gettin' short. You'd better tell 'em about tonight's play.


ANNOUNCER: Hm, that's right, Old Timer. Here goes. Harvey Hays, of course, was the Old Timer again in tonight's program. Betty White was Ann. Bob White played Stephen Burroughs. Bernardine Flynn was Miss Gray, the nurse. And Lucille Husting was Virginia, the girl to whom the Old Timer told the story. This is Ted--


OLD TIMER: (INTERRUPTS) Hey, Ted!


ANNOUNCER: Huh?


OLD TIMER: Just a minute! 


ANNOUNCER: Yes, Old Timer? What is it?


OLD TIMER: You forgot somethin'! 


ANNOUNCER: Oh, sure! I almost forgot. The Old Timer asked me -- for him, and for EMPIRE BUILDERS -- to wish you all a very merry Christmas.


CAST AND CREW: Merry Christmas!


MUSIC: UP, FOR A BRISK STANZA OF "JINGLE BELLS" ... FADES OUT FOR--


SOUND: TRAIN APPROACHES AND ROLLS PAST ... WHISTLE, BELL, ENGINE, ET CETERA ... TRAIN FADES INTO DISTANCE BEHIND--


ANNOUNCER: This is Ted Pearson speaking. The EMPIRE BUILDERS program has come to you from the Chicago studios of the National Broadcasting Company.


LOCAL ANNCR: And you are listening to Westinghouse KYW, the Chicago Herald and Examiner station.



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